Information about Trove user: goldie444

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,649,183
2 noelwoodhouse 3,156,978
3 NeilHamilton 3,136,761
4 John.F.Hall 2,375,974
5 annmanley 2,277,348
...
802 colinkil 40,100
803 Bellona1792 40,090
804 silverstar 40,089
805 goldie444 40,080
806 TheWorldsGreatestTroveCorrector 39,974
807 DesSeary 39,625

40,080 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2017 3,189
August 2017 3,993
July 2017 1,049
June 2017 251
May 2017 8
April 2017 111
March 2017 86
January 2017 1,376
December 2016 2,967
November 2016 5,520
October 2016 4,979
September 2016 1,639
August 2016 1,979
July 2016 2,647
June 2016 700
May 2016 1,397
April 2016 2,553
March 2016 277
February 2016 390
January 2016 480
December 2015 703
November 2015 2
October 2015 51
September 2015 589
August 2015 766
July 2015 924
June 2015 1,101
May 2015 90
August 2014 86
October 2013 12
May 2013 165

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,649,130
2 noelwoodhouse 3,156,978
3 NeilHamilton 3,136,761
4 John.F.Hall 2,375,969
5 annmanley 2,277,278
...
801 Bellona1792 40,090
802 silverstar 40,089
803 colinkil 40,086
804 goldie444 40,080
805 TheWorldsGreatestTroveCorrector 39,974
806 DesSeary 39,566

40,080 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2017 3,189
August 2017 3,993
July 2017 1,049
June 2017 251
May 2017 8
April 2017 111
March 2017 86
January 2017 1,376
December 2016 2,967
November 2016 5,520
October 2016 4,979
September 2016 1,639
August 2016 1,979
July 2016 2,647
June 2016 700
May 2016 1,397
April 2016 2,553
March 2016 277
February 2016 390
January 2016 480
December 2015 703
November 2015 2
October 2015 51
September 2015 589
August 2015 766
July 2015 924
June 2015 1,101
May 2015 90
August 2014 86
October 2013 12
May 2013 165

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
FOUND DROWNED. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Thursday 21 October 1886 [Issue No.9,756] page 2 2017-09-26 01:55 FOUND BROWNED.
Between eight and nine o'clock last evening thtr
dead body of John Iladdon, a cibdriver, who \va3
well known in the city, was found in a tank at tlm
rear of hia private residence, Baxter-street. Yes
tho day had several drinks. He appeared to ba in
if she wjiild go to a lute] in .M'Oae street to get
another drop of brandy for him. Mrs Iladdon,
who is a cripplo, at first suggested that he should
wait until one of their sous came lioin*,
but ultimately alio consented to go. She
was aboout from the house for about
ten minutes, aud on her return from the hotel she
noticed that her husband was not in fhe room
where she h.»d left him. Taking a lamp in her
h ind Airs Iladdon went out into the yard to look
for him, and was sLockod to find his body partly
in a corrugated iron tank about 4 feet G inches
high, near tho back door. She immediately
screamed out for ass-istniico, and attempted to
raise the unfortunate man's head out of tho w.iter.
A Mr OUrk and several neighbors cv.tie to her
as-istance, and carried the deceajodinto thehouse.
Dr Lyuch, l.)r Eadie's locum tatens at the Medical
attendance, aud for a considerable time
attempted to re.-toro animation, but with
out eucosj, as the man was evidently dead
when taken out of the tank. The mitter
was repoitel to tho police, who in turn gave in
formation to tho coroner, and an inquest will be
held on tho body to day. What was Haddon's
object in going to the tank can only, of course.be
a suicidal tendency, so that tlie cans is made »U
the mora mysterious, although tho fact that only
respected by all who knew him, and he wis a
general favorite amongst the cabmen. He wis a
native of the North of Irolaud, about 53 years of
age, aud came to the Bandigo go dfieHs
shortly after his arrival in tho colony in 18G1,
and has remained here over sinci. He leaves a
widow aud three children to mourn their lo=s. Vi e
understand that his life was injured in the Aus
FOUND DROWNED.
Between eight and nine o'clock last evening the
dead body of John Haddon, a cabdriver, who was
well known in the city, was found in a tank at the
rear of his private residence, Baxter-street. Yes-
the day had several drinks. He appeared to be in
if she would go to a hotel in M'Crae Street to get
another drop of brandy for him. Mrs Haddon,
who is a cripple, at first suggested that he should
wait until one of their sous came home,
but ultimately she consented to go. She
was absent from the house for about
ten minutes, and on her return from the hotel she
noticed that her husband was not in the room
where she had left him. Taking a lamp in her
hand Mrs Haddon went out into the yard to look
for him, and was shocked to find his body partly
in a corrugated iron tank about 4 feet 6 inches
high, near the back door. She immediately
screamed out for assistance, and attempted to
raise the unfortunate man's head out of the water.
A Mr Clark and several neighbors came to her
assistance, and carried the deceased into the house.
Dr Lyuch, Dr Eadie's locum tenens at the Medical
attendance, and for a considerable time
attempted to restore animation, but with-
out success, as the man was evidently dead
when taken out of the tank. The matter
was reportel to the police, who in turn gave in-
formation to the coroner, and an inquest will be
held on the body today. What was Haddon's
object in going to the tank can only, of course, be
a suicidal tendency, so that the case is made all
the more mysterious, although the fact that only
respected by all who knew him, and he was a
general favorite amongst the cabmen. He was a
native of the North of Ireland, about 53 years of
age, and came to the Bendigo goldfields
shortly after his arrival in the colony in 1861,
and has remained here over since. He leaves a
widow and three children to mourn their loss. We
understand that his life was insured in the Aus-
OBITUARY. (Article), The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Monday 7 June 1915 [Issue No.13,847] page 4 2017-09-25 17:03 ' OBITUARY.
The funeral of the laic Mr. Jete-
raiah MeanjvoT Mosquito Creek, took
j Cemetery, and was one of the lar
gest seen in the district for. some
highly respected resident of the dis
trict. He was a native of Glare.- Ire-
land, a colonist of tin years, and
leaves one sou and three daughters.
The Rev. Father HolToruau officiated
at the graveside, and the funeral ar
Messrs. Fizelle and Mulquocn.
Cook, of 21 Myrtle, Street, .took place
on Saturday to the Bendigo Ceme
n u mber ,o f sorrow ing relatives and
Lee, E. Hog, an and A. Gardner. Many-
also one from the officers and play
Mut queen.
OBITUARY.
The funeral of the late Mr. Jere-
raiah Meany of Mosquito Creek, took
Cemetery, and was one of the lar-
gest seen in the district for some-
highly respected resident of the dis-
trict. He was a native of Clare, Ire-
land, a colonist of 65 years, and
leaves one son and three daughters.
The Rev. Father Heffernan officiated
at the graveside, and the funeral ar-
Messrs. Fizelle and Mulqueen.
Cook, of 21 Myrtle, Street, took place
on Saturday to the Bendigo Ceme-
Lee, E. Hogan and A. Gardner. Many
also one from the officers and play-
Mulqueen.
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Saturday 5 June 1915 [Issue No.13,846] page 12 2017-09-25 16:39 Bridge street. TeIephone_ri5.
WEANY. — The friends of the late MR.
ATJL JEREMIAH MEANY are respectfully
dale Cemetery. The funeral will leave,
Day (Saturday), the Stli inst., «l two
Undertakers, Bridge street... Telephone
175. - '
Bridge street. TeIephone 175
MEANY. - The friends of the late MR.
JEREMIAH MEANY are respectfully
dale Cemetery. The funeral will leave
Day (Saturday), the 5th inst., at two
Undertakers, Bridge street. Telephone
175.
OBITUARY. LATE MR. W. F. M'NAMARA. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Friday 8 February 1918 [Issue No.19,496] page 5 2017-09-25 13:01 LATE MR. W. P. McNAMARA.
LATE MR. W. F. McNAMARA.
Senior-constable Woodhouse took charge
Family Notices (Family Notices), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Thursday 7 February 1918 [Issue No.19,495] page 1 2017-09-25 12:27 McNAMARA.—The Friends of the late Mr.
spector of Wheat CommirMou. Melbourne, for
merly of Axedalo. are ro>pretfully invited *o
Follow Iiis Remains to iho Axedalc Cemetery
This Day (Thursday). 7rh inM... on arrival of
11.20 irain from ('astlomaine. FIZKLLK aud
MULQU1CFN. Undertakers, Bridce-strect.
McNAMARA. - The Friends of the late Mr.
spector of Wheat Commission, Melbourne, for-
merly of Axedale, are respectfully invited to
Follow his Remains to the Axedale Cemetery
This Day (Thursday). 7th inst on arrival of
11.20 train from Castlemaine. FIZELLE and
MULQUEEN. Undertakers, Bridge-street.
OBITUARY. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Wednesday 6 February 1918 [Issue No.19,494] page 6 2017-09-25 12:19 W. T. McNamara, late chief inspector of
W. F. McNamara, late chief inspector of
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, OUR RIGHTS, AND OUR RESOURCES. SANDHURST, FRIDAY, OCT. 22, 1886 THE CITY COUNCIL AND THE GAS COMPANY. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Friday 22 October 1886 [Issue No.9,757] page 2 2017-09-24 12:19 Dkatk kkom Eukns —The deputy eoronar, Mr
Boll, hold a magisterial inquiry at the Bondigo
Hospital yesterd y en the body of Catherine
Backer, a married woman, who died in that
in Lily-street, deposul that »boul .eleven o'clock
on the night of fue.-day, the 12tli inst, he was in
bod when he was awakened by hearing t is mother
scrcaming. lie g <t up tnd on going into the room,
where his moth-r had been i oninp, lie found her
enveloped in 11 mes. Ho threw a bucio.ful of
water oyer her ana extinguished the Amies. Some
household remedies were app.ied in order t«
father came homo, liecker wished to take his
first. Ultimately she consented, ami was
conveyed to the hot-pi*.al about three o'clock njxt
doctors "to ask them to attend her, but t'oey were
not at homa. Frederick Backer, husband of the
deceased, corroborated tha eviier.ee of the last
witness, and st:t:d that his wife, who was about
47 years of age, was a na'ive of Hamburg,
Ueimahy. Dr J. D. Boyd, assistant ro'ideut
sargson at the hospital, deposed th it from the
tim-j tha deceased was brought to the institution
it was seen lliat the case was hopeless. She
gradually sank and died as previous1!* stated.
The ciusa of death was shock to ilie fyntem and
test'mony was returned.
Death from Burns - The deputy Coroner, Mr
Bell, hold a magisterial inquiry at the Bendigo
Hospital yesterday on the body of Catherine
Becker, a married woman, who died in that
in Lily-street, deposed that about eleven o'clock
on the night of Tuesday, the 12th inst, he was in
bed when he was awakened by hearing his mother
screaming. He got up and on going into the room,
where his mother had been ironing, he found her
enveloped in flames. He threw a bucketful of
water over her and extinguished the flames. Some
household remedies were appied in order to
father came home. Becker wished to take his
first. Ultimately she consented, and was
conveyed to the hospital about three o'clock next
doctors to ask them to attend her, but they were
not at home. Frederick Becker, husband of the
deceased, corroborated the evidence of the last
witness, and stated that his wife, who was about
47 years of age, was a native of Hamburg,
Germany. Dr J. D. Boyd, assistant resident
surgeon at the hospital, deposed that from the
time the deceased was brought to the institution
it was seen that the case was hopeless. She
gradually sank and died as previously stated.
The cause of death was shock to the system and
testimony was returned.
THE BENDIGO ADVERTISER (PUBLISHED DAILY.) PROGRESSION, AND RIGHTS, AND OUR RESOURCES. SANHURST, MONDAY, OCT. 18, 1886 (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Monday 18 October 1886 [Issue No.9,753] page 2 2017-09-24 11:49 Ths Djjff-MacNamap.a Assault Cass.—At tho
City IV.ice Court on Saturday, J raea Duff, tha
license of the lioyal i ak Hotel, Back Crock, sur
rendered. to his bail to answer a charge of having
unlawfully assaulted tine JVhu MacNamara, of
offence was alleged to have be?u commit ed. As
statel in our last issue, tlu jury at the inquest
which was hold on the body of the deceased, re
tur ed a verdict to the elfect tint the deceased
died from p'euriey and pneumonia accelurated hy
fracture of the riba, but that there was not suf
ficient ovidence to show how or by what means
tho injuries were received. I i conscqueneo of this,
So-geunt Fahey asked the bench to discharge the
ureiupd. and this was accordingly doue.
Ths DUFF - McNAMARA Assault Cass. - At the
City Police Court on Saturday, James Duff, the
licensee of the Royal Oak Hotel, Back Creek, sur-
rendered to his bail to answer a charge of having
unlawfully assaulted one John McNamara, of
offence was alleged to have been committed. As
stated in our last issue, the jury at the inquest
which was held on the body of the deceased, re-
turned a verdict to the effect that the deceased
died from pleuriey and pneumonia accelerated by
fracture of the ribs, but that there was not suf-
ficient evidence to show how or by what means
the injuries were received. In consequence of this,
Sergeant Fahey asked the bench to discharge the
accused and this was accordingly done.
THE ALLEGED MANSLAUGHTER CASE. AN OPEN VERDICT RETURNED. FOURTH DAY. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Saturday 16 October 1886 [Issue No.9,752] page 2 2017-09-24 11:32 Harry and Keating should be charged with
tako all tho circumstances, and the weight of
^vident'e into their consideration, With regard
to the deceased, M. M'Namara was a highly
respectable residont of Axe Creek, lint unfortu
nately he was of an excitablo nature, especially
that a person could hear a man falling at a dis
tance of 70 or SO yards. In his zeal, Mr. Jackson
had overstepped the bounds. The jury, how
but still there was not suflicicnt evi
dence to provo this conclusively. He
night he could not recognise the mau as
M'Namara, except by his voice and stature Yet
i'i answer to Mr Macobov, the witness stated
that ho could describe his beard, etc. No doubt,
consideration; tho man whom Mr Jackson says
lie met was the deceased, but he (the coroner)
did not believe hiiii when he said that he
could see whether thdre was blood on
the man's faee or not. Tho evidence
of Mr Jacktnan showed that the de
ceased was about the town on the day follow
ing tho alleged assault, and he did not then
011 the Wednesday evening, '23th Aug., tho day
after the alleged assault, lie said that he had a
pain in Ilia oidei but did not complain one word
aj;ainst Duff. The coroner then referred at con
ren.arked did not, to his mind, show any material
difference of opinion. There was 110 doubt
the causo of death was' pleurisy caused by
ribs had been fractured. For his p;irt he did
not think there was a tittlo of evidence against
Duff 011 that point. It the jury were of opinion
that there was snllicient evidence to prove that
Dufl or anybody else had caused the injury and
so shortened tho deceased's life by even live
minutes, that person would bn guilty of man
slaughter. If ho.vovcr they did not think that
there was sufficient evidence 011 this point they
inquiries into tho case if they choose to do so.
Tho jury retired, and after three-quarters of
the injuries be had received, but there was not
snllicient evidence to show how ho came by
tho verdict, and remarked that so far as thoso
proceedings were, concerned Mc Duff left the
placo without being in the slightest degree im
plicated in the death of tho deceased.
Barry and Keating should be charged with
fact he might say gross corrupt and deliberate
take all the circumstances, and the weight of
evidence into their consideration. With regard
to the deceased, Mr. M'Namara was a highly
respectable resident of Axe Creek, but unfortu-
nately he was of an excitable nature, especially
that a person could hear a man falling at a dis-
tance of 70 or 80 yards. In his zeal, Mr. Jackson
had overstepped the bounds. The jury, how-
but still there was not sufficient evi-
dence to prove this conclusively. He
night he could not recognise the man as
M'Namara, except by his voice and stature. Yet
in answer to Mr Macoboy, the witness stated
that he could describe his beard, etc. No doubt,
consideration, the man whom Mr Jackson says
he met was the deceased, but he (the coroner)
did not believe him when he said that he
could see whether there was blood on
the man's face or not. The evidence
of Mr Jackman showed that the de-
ceased was about the town on the day follow-
ing the alleged assault, and he did not then
on the Wednesday evening, 25th Aug., the day
after the alleged assault, he said that he had a
pain in his side, but did not complain one word
against Duff. The coroner then referred at con-
remarked did not, to his mind, show any material
difference of opinion. There was no doubt
the cause of death was pleurisy caused by
ribs had been fractured. For his part he did
not think there was a tittle of evidence against
Duff on that point. If the jury were of opinion
that there was sullicient evidence to prove that
Duff or anybody else had caused the injury and
so shortened the deceased's life by even five
minutes, that person would be guilty of man-
slaughter. If he however they did not think that
there was sufficient evidence on this point they
inquiries into the case if they choose to do so.
The jury retired, and after three-quarters of
the injuries he had received, but there was not
sullicient evidence to show how he came by
the verdict, and remarked that so far as those
proceedings were concerned Mr Duff left the
place without being in the slightest degree im-
plicated in the death of the deceased.
THE ALLEGED MANSLAUGHTER CASE. AN OPEN VERDICT RETURNED. FOURTH DAY. (Article), Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), Saturday 16 October 1886 [Issue No.9,752] page 2 2017-09-24 10:33 To the Jury—Witness hoard no groans. The
footbridge is boarded, and ho believed that the
noise he heard at a distance of GO or 70 p\cea
was through the man falling on tho timber.
Was perfectly sober \V;hcn 'ne went home: He
ouly had One glass of colonial wine during the
evening
| This concluded the evidence, and an adjourn
On resuming, Mr ilornbucklo remarked that
right to answer the arguments of Mr Maeoboy
with regard to the admission of the dying de
that position in 1S713 he had upheld the rule
at that inquiry which would have to be elimi
considered, however, that it -would only be fair
point raised by Mr Maeoboy in reference to the
from Taylor 0, 72, page 1 4 (i—" Though these
solemn sense of impending death aud concern
power of cross-examination—a power quito as
essential to tho eliciting of the truth as the
to his Maker feelings of auger or revenge or in
the case of mutual conflict, tho natural desire
of screening his own misconduot, may affect the
tho identity of persons aud to the omission of
his argumenton the case of the Queen v. Ashtou,
where a mail on his deathbed swore that
the accused had kuockcd him down and yet it
Ashton had never touched the man. lie might
remark that he had attended at the Polico
but on the suggestion of the clerk ho had
decided to withhold proceedings until this caso
j Mr. Macoboy interjected that although Mr.
Hornbucklc had done that, it did not prove
opinion which existed betweeu the two legal
gentlemen was. a very good reason why they
Mr. Macoboy, in reply to Mr. Hornbuekle,
qno'ed the following from Guruer'a Criminal
Law, page 149:—"Dying declarations are ad
charged with the death—Rex v Scaife ] M. aud
Hob. 551. For it is considered that when an
every hope in thin world is gone, then every
—R. v. Woodcock, 1 Leach 502, 1 Gill Ev. 2S0.
made by a person in a dying state are not admiss
apprehended that ho was in such a state of
evidence, that they wore made under u sense of
said that he must certainly stop the legal gentle
would not allow them. The jury had the evi
the case as it Btood; not from what they had
was to considor by what manner and means the
He regretted that tho inquiry had been held
a fellow creature of his life, thero was really no
accused party there; but Btili it would be more
it was theL: duty at an inquiry of this nature to
Augr.vt last 'he cip.ceaw.d and Duff had a
Police Court dispute over a paltry £3 15?.
for a debt, The deceased was well kuown
imougst them as a highly respectablo man,
hut unfortunately ho waa of a rather cxcitablc
liim, They had heard that the deceased went
Co Duffs hotel ill regard to this matter. Tho
iWeised was then apparently under tho in
llucncc of liquor. The evidence of Mr. Tat cr
»:»H ,'hn.ived tli.it J'C'irif* j'u(i, « lall :ibollfc 14
years ol age, was present at the first interview
of the lUth August. Young Duff had not, how
ever, been called. (Mr. iiornbueUle : lie has
been hero all tho time on supiena.) The evi
inside the house heard a noiso us
the deceased walked along the right - of
way at the side of tho hotel. It waa
quite within tho bottiuia of jwialhility that tho
deceased ulet With his injuries then through
•.t.hioh h.-td bomi , stacker! .in , tbo yii-fht
d* \vay alter the hotel iuui lieeil liiiriifc
down. The Coroner then referred to the testi
mony of Tattersall with regard to the proceed
ings which took place between tho deceased and
Dull' inside tho hotol, when deceased aooused
latter Was stated to havo told the dcUeasud to
of making uso of euoh insulting language. To
show that Dti(F Was not at all exulted, Tattersall
had also said that Dull'lit a cigar and commenced
smoking it as ho ordered M'iS'itiliara out of the
placc, If the jury believed the evidence (h
Tattcrsall, It was clour that the deceased did not
hotel. Tattcrsall's evidence lmd (jollti on first
rate until ho Was examined by yoiliijj ltonnessy,
who, on account of his HtiotViiif? something
about the case, had been discharged hitd
called as a witness that day. There was_ nO
evidence whatever that tho deceased got into
DufTs Hotel a second time during that night.
To his mijid he did not think that the deceased
no doubt the deceased gave Mr3. I'enton I'll to
mind for him that uight, and K'fc Fenton's
streot. Taking all the surroundings of the case
as to whether the injuria! which M'N.unara re
ceived that night were inflicted by i'.il?, or by
a dream on (ier part. or else she
To the Jury - Witness heard no groans. The
footbridge is boarded, and he believed that the
noise he heard at a distance of 60 or 70 paces
was through the man falling on the timber.
was perfectly sober when he went home. He
only had one glass of colonial wine during the
evening.
This concluded the evidence, and an adjourn-
On resuming, Mr Hornbuckle remarked that
right to answer the arguments of Mr Macoboy
with regard to the admission of the dying de-
that position in 1876 he had upheld the rule
at that inquiry which would have to be elimi-
considered, however, that it would only be fair
point raised by Mr Macoboy in reference to the
from Taylor 6, 72, page 1 4 6- "Though these
solemn sense of impending death and concern-
power of cross examination - a power quite as
essential to the eliciting of the truth as the
to his Maker feelings of anger or revenge or in
the case of mutual conflict, the natural desire
of screening his own misconduct, may affect the
the identity of persons and to the omission of
his argument on the case of the Queen v. Ashton,
where a man on his deathbed swore that
the accused had knocked him down and yet it
Ashton had never touched the man. He might
remark that he had attended at the Police
but on the suggestion of the clerk he had
decided to withhold proceedings until this case
Mr. Macoboy interjected that although Mr.
Hornbuckle had done that, it did not prove
opinion which existed between the two legal
gentlemen was a very good reason why they
Mr. Macoboy, in reply to Mr. Hornbuckle,
qnoted the following from Gurner's Criminal
Law, page 149:- "Dying declarations are ad-
charged with the death - Rex v Scaife M. and
Rob 551. For it is considered that when an
every hope in this world is gone, then every
- R. v. Woodcock, 1 Leach 502, 1 Gill Ev. 280.
made by a person in a dying state are not admiss-
apprehended that he was in such a state of
evidence, that they were made under a sense of
said that he must certainly stop the legal gentle-
would not allow them. The jury had the evi-
the case as it stood; not from what they had
was to consider by what manner and means the
He regretted that the inquiry had been held
a fellow creature of his life, there was really no
accused party there; but but it would be more
it was there duty at an inquiry of this nature to
August last the deceased and Duff had a
Police Court dispute over a paltry £3 15s
for a debt. The deceased was well known
amongst them as a highly respectable man,
but unfortunately he was of a rather excitable
him. They had heard that the deceased went
to Duff's hotel in regard to this matter. The
deceased was then apparently under the in-
fluence of liquor. The evidence of Mr. Tattersall
showed that young Duff, a lad about 14
years of age, was present at the first interview
of the 24th August. Young Duff had not, how-
ever, been called. (Mr. Hornbuckle: He has
been here all the time on supoena.) The evi-
inside the house heard a noise as
the deceased walked along the right of
way at the side of the hotel. It was
quite within the bounds of possibility that the
deceased met with his injuries then through
which had been stacked in the right
of way after the hotel had been burnt
down. The Coroner then referred to the testi-
mony of Tattersall with regard to the proceed-
ings which took place between the deceased and
Dull inside the hotel, when deceased accused
latter was stated to have told the deceased to
of making use of such insulting language. To
show that Duff was not at all excited, Tattersall
had also said that Dull lit a cigar and commenced
smoking it as he ordered M'Namara out of the
place. If the jury believed the evidence of
Tattersall, it was clear that the deceased did not
hotel. Tattersall's evidence had gone on first-
rate until he was examined by young Hennessy,
who, on account of his knowing something
about the case, had been discharged and
called as a witness that day. There was no
evidence whatever that the deceased got into
Duff's Hotel a second time during that night.
To his mind he did not think that the deceased
no doubt the deceased gave Mrs. Fenton £11 to
mind for him that night, and left Fenton's
Street. Taking all the surroundings of the case
as to whether the injuries which M'Namara re-
ceived that night were inflicted by Duff, or by
a dream on her part, or else she

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.