Information about Trove user: gakerr

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,546,109
2 NeilHamilton 3,081,182
3 noelwoodhouse 3,021,095
4 annmanley 2,252,210
5 John.F.Hall 2,247,172
...
253 MaurieRose 143,504
254 Phil.Drew 142,617
255 snowgum 142,337
256 gakerr 142,278
257 Trisha 142,092
258 GlennD61 142,053

142,278 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2017 2,573
June 2017 3,944
May 2017 2,274
April 2017 2,835
March 2017 814
February 2017 868
January 2017 2,012
December 2016 685
November 2016 848
October 2016 3,681
September 2016 2,016
August 2016 1,543
July 2016 3,990
June 2016 3,406
May 2016 2,639
April 2016 3,454
March 2016 3,784
February 2016 788
January 2016 2,369
December 2015 3,116
November 2015 3,035
October 2015 3,795
September 2015 1,156
August 2015 1,393
July 2015 2,262
June 2015 3,480
May 2015 3,015
April 2015 2,394
March 2015 2,388
February 2015 2,324
January 2015 2,055
December 2014 4,358
November 2014 2,459
October 2014 1,444
September 2014 2,005
August 2014 2,608
July 2014 2,943
June 2014 2,846
May 2014 1,948
April 2014 3,292
March 2014 1,254
February 2014 1,092
January 2014 3,054
December 2013 1,881
November 2013 1,243
October 2013 3,496
September 2013 4,205
August 2013 2,581
July 2013 3,990
June 2013 2,814
May 2013 2,688
April 2013 1,307
March 2013 1,937
February 2013 1,285
January 2013 957
December 2012 763
November 2012 174
October 2012 1,120
September 2012 327
August 2012 461
July 2012 1,021
June 2012 1,362
May 2012 358
April 2012 504
March 2012 253
February 2012 153
January 2012 1,018
December 2011 620
November 2011 408
October 2011 598
September 2011 79
August 2011 21
July 2011 46
June 2011 66
May 2011 303

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,546,078
2 NeilHamilton 3,081,182
3 noelwoodhouse 3,021,095
4 annmanley 2,252,140
5 John.F.Hall 2,247,167
...
253 MaurieRose 143,087
254 Phil.Drew 142,617
255 snowgum 142,258
256 gakerr 142,248
257 Trisha 142,092
258 GlennD61 142,053

142,248 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2017 2,573
June 2017 3,944
May 2017 2,274
April 2017 2,835
March 2017 814
February 2017 852
January 2017 2,002
December 2016 685
November 2016 848
October 2016 3,681
September 2016 2,012
August 2016 1,543
July 2016 3,990
June 2016 3,406
May 2016 2,639
April 2016 3,454
March 2016 3,784
February 2016 788
January 2016 2,369
December 2015 3,116
November 2015 3,035
October 2015 3,795
September 2015 1,156
August 2015 1,393
July 2015 2,262
June 2015 3,480
May 2015 3,015
April 2015 2,394
March 2015 2,388
February 2015 2,324
January 2015 2,055
December 2014 4,358
November 2014 2,459
October 2014 1,444
September 2014 2,005
August 2014 2,608
July 2014 2,943
June 2014 2,846
May 2014 1,948
April 2014 3,292
March 2014 1,254
February 2014 1,092
January 2014 3,054
December 2013 1,881
November 2013 1,243
October 2013 3,496
September 2013 4,205
August 2013 2,581
July 2013 3,990
June 2013 2,814
May 2013 2,688
April 2013 1,307
March 2013 1,937
February 2013 1,285
January 2013 957
December 2012 763
November 2012 174
October 2012 1,120
September 2012 327
August 2012 461
July 2012 1,021
June 2012 1,362
May 2012 358
April 2012 504
March 2012 253
February 2012 153
January 2012 1,018
December 2011 620
November 2011 408
October 2011 598
September 2011 79
August 2011 21
July 2011 46
June 2011 66
May 2011 303

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 103,182
2 mickbrook 90,948
3 murds5 54,198
4 PhilThomas 33,372
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
438 catsman 30
439 cgelliott 30
440 French 30
441 gakerr 30
442 gyeoca 30
443 lpcurley 30

30 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

February 2017 16
January 2017 10
September 2016 4


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
A MODERN BAKERY. [?] WITHOUT HANDLING. [?] BREAD [?] FACTORY. (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Monday 13 April 1914 page 2 2017-07-22 20:00 turns per minute. The premises are tho
turns per minute. The premises are tho-
A MODERN BAKERY. [?] WITHOUT HANDLING. [?] BREAD [?] FACTORY. (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Monday 13 April 1914 page 2 2017-07-22 20:00 much has machinery entered into the busi
sown, right through the process of reap
making into bread it need never be actual
the bread are on this floor. First the dif
are continually moving and it is impos
hundred loaves of bread. After the vari
it can be brought to the proper tempera
more than an hour's hardI work. 'I'he
shute which conveys it to a dividing ma
chine on the lower floor. The dividing ma
placed on a belt through a molding ma
oven. There is alsoi a cake mixing ma
yard, an enclosed loading yard, and a com
modious new set of stables. On the up
chinery, there being an 8 h p supply from
the Electric Lighting Company. The busi
Mr Fred Board and the instillation
i.riilui.
There are few branches of produc-
much has machinery entered into the busi-
sown, right through the process of reap-
making into bread it need never be actual-
the bread are on this floor. First the dif-
of bread to be made is tipped into a mix-
are continually moving and it is impos-
hundred loaves of bread. After the vari-
it can be brought to the proper tempera-
ture, two powerful steel arms contained in
the mixer are selt in motion, and perform
more than an hour's hard work. 'I'he
shute which conveys it to a dividing ma-
chine on the lower floor. The dividing ma-
placed on a belt through a molding ma-
oven. There is also a cake mixing ma-
yard, an enclosed loading yard, and a com-
modious new set of stables. On the up-
electricity is also used for driving the ma-
chinery, there being an 8¼ h p supply from
the Electric Lighting Company. The busi-
of Lismore and district and also Graf-
Mr Fred Board and the installation

PROGRESSIVE BAKERY BUSINESS. (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Thursday 13 April 1911 page 4 2017-07-22 19:50 Mr. I. Wakely, of Magellan Street, whose
reputation as a baker of both; fancy goods
ami bread has been well knowp for inuny
years, Iuih found the business growing" at a
rate which hafl necessitated oxteiislvo. al
terations and Improvements 'in' the*i>ttint,
with 11. view to the mora expeditions bund
increased baking trade. sMr. Wakely decid
cnpacity of MOO loave.s In each batch. In
the market, he after duo consideration de
cided on Installing nn AUau's steel oven
of the hi tost design, at a costNof £200.
This has a- full capacity for bread, and
nl?o hoops a full supply of hot watur on
tap, mid in all wuys Is an improvement on
the old style of oven. The two ovens nro
/low In use when required nml enable the
proprietor to handle a large trade expedi
tiously. The whole of the tattings of the
bakery are of nn up-to-date elmructer, ami
nil things. j|r. Wakoly is to be congratu
lated on the. deserved Increase in his trade
out. An announcement regarding his busi
Mr. L. Wakely, of Magellan Street, whose
reputation as a baker of both fancy goods
and bread has been well knowp for inuny
years, has found the business growing at a
rate which has necessitated extensive al-
terations and Improvements in the plant,
with a view to the more expeditious hand-
increased baking trade. Mr. Wakely decid-
capacity of 300 loaves In each batch. In
the market, he after due consideration de-
cided on Installing an Allan's steel oven
of the latest design, at a cost of £200.
This has a full capacity for bread, and
also keeps a full supply of hot water on
tap, and in all ways Is an improvement on
the old style of oven. The two ovens are
now In use when required and enable the
proprietor to handle a large trade expedi-
tiously. The whole of the fittings of the
bakery are of an up-to-date character, and
all things. Mr. Wakely is to be congratu-
lated on the deserved increase in his trade
out. An announcement regarding his busi-
MACHINE BAKERY. (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Friday 19 June 1914 page 4 2017-07-22 19:41 management extends through our advertis
next frlday. afternoon tea being provided
management extends through our advertis-
next Frlday, afternoon tea being provided
DEATH OF BILLY BUCHAN. A NOTED ABORIGINAL. (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Tuesday 24 August 1915 page 8 2017-07-22 18:35 that Billy imparted to him. of the cus-
that Billy imparted to him, of the cus-
DEATH OF BILLY BUCHAN. A NOTED ABORIGINAL. (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Tuesday 24 August 1915 page 8 2017-07-22 18:16 he remained for many yours, and then
passed on to the service of the former's ,
writer was a member, wrote:- "He has
sketch of one who was as faithful as ,
"'Jacky, Jarky" the true friend of a well
also, saw the railway locomotive supersede
he remained for many years, and then
passed on to the service of the former's
writer was a member), wrote:- "He has
sketch of one who was as faithful as
"'Jacky, Jacky" the true friend of a well-
also saw the railway locomotive supersede
STATE PARLIAMENT. LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY. EARLY CLOSING ACT. (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Saturday 22 September 1917 page 4 2017-07-22 17:13 . ' ABORIGINES PROTECTION ACT. 7 =;.
: A Bill to amend the Aborigines Protection
Act to enable .the Government to separate 7.
oetofoons>:and quarter, -castes from full blood-7 ,:
:Gd-aud half -caste aborigihes was read tho first. :
time. Mr,..Fuliev explained that, this would '-' ' 1
mean 'a' saviiijr tOithe Government: who at, : 7v .
present; were r obliged to support people who
had no- right . to be lli the reserve. - ,r77 .v ; ;
ABORIGINES PROTECTION ACT.
A Bill to amend the Aborigines Protection
Act to enable the Government to separate
octoroons and quarter-castes from full blood-
ed and half-caste aborigihes was read the first
time. Mr. Fuller explained that this would
mean a saving to the Government, who at
present were obliged to support people who
had no right to be in the reserve.
The Sugar Industry. THE NEW REGULATIONS. (From the Brisbane "Courier.") (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Saturday 2 August 1902 page 6 2017-07-21 21:37 THE KKW REGULATIONS.
TUB Minister for Customs has prepared
tho sugar regulations, ainoug .whicu aro
tho following'.
UK HATE.
Rebate shall only bo allowed in respect
j of white-grown cane, and to the grower
' thereof. White-grown cane means cane
beon employed from and including the
preparation( of tho ground for planting,
cano at the mill for manufacture. The
expression "white labourer" in these re
gulations is used to the exclusion of oil
forms of coloured labour, whether abori
before tho 1st March, 1902, shall prevent
any cano grown being considered white
CONDITIONS OK CLAIM FOU ItKIIATK.
of white-grown cane, the following con
ditions are essential to be observed :-1.
Notico of intention to claim must have
been given to tho Collector of Customs for
the end of Fobruary, 11)02, and before tho
7th March, 1002; (li) us to all cane sub
produced on laud indicated in the notice,
and must have been delivered for manu
it was produced, JJ. The claim for rebato
month from the dato of delivery of the
land in respoct of which notico has boen
given of the intention to claim the róbate
before all tho cane produced thereon has
been duly delivered for manufacture, tho
claim for rebate shall thereby be im
mediately forfeited; but tho Minister roay
iu special cases extend the time limited for I
giving notico of the intention to claim in
respoct of cane planted beforo tho ond of
February, 1002, to any time not hitor than
fourteen days after the ¡"th March, 1002.
THU CLAIM KOlt KKIIATK. j
The claim for rebato shall ho made in
writing to the oíücer doing duty ut tho
mill whero tho cane was delivered, and in
tho following torin :-' To tho olKoer of
sugar-mill.-Pursuant to my notice of in
tention to claim, I horoby claim rebate of
exoiso duty in respect of white-grown cane
grown by me, and delivered at the above \
tho following particulars relating to same
ISSl'H Ol'ItKllATK NOTK.
On delivery of cane at tho mill an oificer
shall chock the weight thereof, and shall,
according to tho result, dolivor to tho
grower a rebato note in satisfaction of his
claim, and shall advise tho officer at the
rebato noto ; and oa making tho decsta
tion endorsed on tho rebate note, and on
delivering and discharging tho rebate note
nt such Custom-house, tho grower shall be
entitled to tho payment of the rebate at the
end of throe days after his receipt of the re
Tho rebato is intended to bo at the rate
of £2 for ovory ton of sugar given by the
cane, and theavorage sugar-giving contents
of sugarcane in tho following districts
shall be taken to bo the sugar-giving con
tents of each lot of cane delivered for man
ufacture into sugar in such districts respec
No. 1.-" Northern district," compris
ing all that port of Australia north of the
19th degree of south lattitudo.
No 2.-" Central distriot," comprising
and 2ürd dogrees of south latitude.
No ¡i.-" Central district," comprising
all that part of Australia betweon the 23rd
! and 26th degrees of south latitude.
No. 4.-Southern district," comprising
1 all that part of Australia south of the 2Gth
AVKKAfiKSUCiAU-filYINO CONTENTS Ol'
CANK.
cane produced in each district and the con
year commencing on the 1st June, 1002,
otherwise proclaimed uud determined by
in any year :
contents of caue, and rato of rebate per ton
No. 1, Northern district, 12.5¡por cent,
cont. 4s 6d ; No. 3 Central district, 10.83
ACCOUNT TO HE KBIT HY PRODUCER.
Every producer shall keep au account
cane, tho number of acres o £ cane harvested
! of cane sold to each person, the names of
IMIOIHVKKS RETl'llN.
livery producer shall, not later than the I
15th day of January in each year, furnish I
to the eolloetor a return veri tied by declar
ation, in or to effect of the form hereto :
ut'tu-m <i, statin.^ ail tho ¡Mi'i.oiiars with
respect to tho matter .«¿v-citied in the
ses'eral heads of such form, so far as re
lates to the 3'earondinsr on the 31st De- j
comber immediately preceding. !
Dr. Jenner's English Pilo Ointment enjoys as
THE NEW REGULATIONS.
THE Minister for Customs has prepared
the sugar regulations, among which are
the following.
REBATE.
Rebate shall only be allowed in respect
of white-grown cane, and to the grower
thereof. White-grown cane means cane
been employed from and including the
preparation of the ground for planting,
cane at the mill for manufacture. The
expression "white labourer" in these re-
gulations is used to the exclusion of all
forms of coloured labour, whether abori-
before the 1st March, 1902, shall prevent
any cane grown being considered white
CONDITIONS OK CLAIM FOR REBATE.
of white-grown cane, the following con-
ditions are essential to be observed :—1.
Notice of intention to claim must have
been given to the Collector of Customs for
the end of February, 1902, and before the
7th March, 1902; (b) as to all cane sub-
produced on land indicated in the notice,
and must have been delivered for manu-
it was produced, 2. The claim for rebate
month from the date of delivery of the
land in respect of which notice has boen
given of the intention to claim the rebate
before all the cane produced thereon has
been duly delivered for manufacture, the
claim for rebate shall thereby be im-
mediately forfeited; but the Minister may
in special cases extend the time limited for
giving notice of the intention to claim in
respect of cane planted before the end of
February, 1902, to any time not later than
fourteen days after the 7th March, 1902.
THE CLAIM FOR REBATE
The claim for rebate shall be made in
writing to the officer doing duty at the
mill where the cane was delivered, and in
the following form —' To the officer of
sugar-mill.—Pursuant to my notice of in-
tention to claim, I hereby claim rebate of
excise duty in respect of white-grown cane
grown by me, and delivered at the above
the following particulars relating to same
ISSUE OF REBATE NOTE.
On delivery of cane at the mill an officer
shall check the weight thereof, and shall,
according to the result, deliver to the
grower a rebate note in satisfaction of his
claim, and shall advise the officer at the
rebate note ; and on making the declara-
tion endorsed on the rebate note, and on
delivering and discharging the rebate note
at such Custom-house, the grower shall be
entitled to the payment of the rebate at the
end of three days after his receipt of the re-
The rebate is intended to be at the rate
of £2 for every ton of sugar given by the
cane, and the average sugar-giving contents
of sugarcane in the following districts
shall be taken to be the sugar-giving con-
tents of each lot of cane delivered for man-
ufacture into sugar in such districts respec-
No. 1.—" Northern district," compris-
ing all that part of Australia north of the
19th degree of south lattitude.
No 2.—" Central district," comprising
and 23rd degrees of south latitude.
No 3.—" Central district," comprising
all that part of Australia between the 23rd
and 26th degrees of south latitude.
No. 4.—Southern district," comprising
all that part of Australia south of the 26th
AVERAGE SUGAR-GIVING CONTENTS OF
CANE.
cane produced in each district and the con-
year commencing on the 1st June, 1902,
otherwise proclaimed and determined by
in any year :—
contents of cane, and rate of rebate per ton
No. 1, Northern district, 12.5 per cent,
cent. 4s 6d ; No. 3 Central district, 10.83
ACCOUNT TO bE KEPT BY PRODUCER.
Every producer shall keep aN account
cane, the number of acres of cane harvested
of cane sold to each person, the names of
PRODUCERS RETURN.
Every producer shall, not later than the
15th day of January in each year, furnish
to the collector a return verified by declar-
attached, stating all the ¡particulars with
respect to the matter specified in the
several heads of such form, so far as re
lates to the year ending on the 31st De-
cember immediately preceding.
Dr. Jenner's English Pile Ointment enjoys as
ABORIGINALS PROFESSOR TAYLOR AT KYOGLE SURVEY OF DISTRICT (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Saturday 20 September 1924 page 9 2017-07-21 21:05 J afcs is to be found possibly the best en
Here,is,a" .heap-and fairly uniform rainfar
ranging from 40 to 7o inches, combined with
a warm temperature .and-rich soils. These
the white settlers, which m,eans that the
dense .white - population. As a natural result
we.find that here .the population has-increased
remarkably. Indeed, it stands out in a, map of.
this very feature", of population-variation. It
13 thus the very antithesis of the arid regions
j decreasing. .
J We may commence our survey on the Upper
cattle station of Kyogle. Many Victorian far
mers were attracted to the region, and o£
lat,o years the large' holdings have been cut
getters, however, were the first pioneers, hunt
ing the red cedar. They would, range' the val
leys, and iu winter search for the leafless
the .eucalpyts. Or later, in spring, the' young
red-lcave3 would show out' even more plainly.
YENEER
white pine is relatively abundant. This' is
an Arancaria allied to the Norfolk Island
around the inner bark, and contains the hitter
much as the lioopB contain .the staves of a
barrel, hence the name "hoop.pin,e." One of
the' most interesting industries at Kyogle is
the veneer.factory. Here three-ply wood and
matchbox wood is obtained from th,e hoop
and will be new-to most readers'. A log of
wood, a,bout five feet long'and two feet dia
meter, is soaked for a day in boiling wat,er
length (five fe,et); of the log is gradually
"sharping" is 'pared off, which is five feet
wixl,3 ana some 30 feet long. This constitutes
the veneer, and iti i3 carried away frond the
enough to stand a-^outh walking freely upon
it as lie adjusts the' various laj^ers. This
local milk, and applied cold. -The ply-wood
is first' dried in some' ingenious drying rooms,
whose atmospber.e iecalls a burning westerly
hyraulic press, guillotined to .size, and > then
The Richmond Eiver at Kyogle flows in a
gully som,e 15 feet deep, which winds through
large alluvial lilats, sometimes one-or two
erops as oat's or barley. The latter are chiefly
the country is' rather
wet for grain?'?r One energetic lady" has" ob
tained «? successful crop of cotton, and the
general conditibns s,eem to me to resemble
slopes, and in the distance-some thiry miles
away-one can see Mount Lindsay (4200 feet)
on the Queensland border. The-tropical scrub
lias nearly all been cleared away, but tur
and'20 feet high) are common in the vicinity.
Every her.c and fhrere one sees an old stump
Ultimately this will grow into a giant tree j
State we have the' densest aboriginal popu
th,e ranges the full-blood population is stated
is only a mater of 30 years before the thou
sand full-bloods of our "State will have van
ished. At Stoney Gully is a reserve, wlier.e
(chiefly of th,e Minyung tribe) and about 15
children, who we're mostly three-quarter or
lialf-cast,e. Here I made a careful study of
and liead measurement; on hair, colour, and
intelligence'. In an earier article I have
described the results for the Kaonilroi tribe
on the Namoi Eiver. Those of the Kyogle
Here, however, I was able' to obtain from
Mr. Roger . Hill (a three-quarter caste) a most
ask, What is their value '? These old tales
tim.0 when our own remote ancestors were
not ;so very different from the Australian
(found; in certain isolated valleys in "Old
South Wales," racial types which still re
semble the' Australian aboriginal in many im
general evolved continuously, owing to th,e
stimulus of changing enviroment and .of racial
has remained st'agnant for a hundred thou
theyj were told tq^me :
"Ballugarh warring-": He (was) very cold.
"Yoogumbay W(aybc'r": (He had) No fire.
"Mirrugun' Ghillee": (there wer,e) Old
"Gaigum Ngabbum Djellclah". (W,o are)
(If will be noticed that many of our con
nective phrases are omitted, alid gestures,
etc., take their place.) Th,e story goes on,
in Mr. Hill's translation:
gorge. In' this gorge lives a tribe of giants,
and there' are .two nice youiig girls there too,
who are t'he daughters of the giants. Ballu
garh is too frighteiied to call to them'be
cause they belong to a hostile tribe. Ho is
up on the cliff, and'sees the two girls getting
into t'he pool. The girls wonder at this, and
spy the young man. He stands there shak
pick up a fir,estick and climb by a vine up
tlw cliffs of the gorge. The young man says,
' ' Make a' . fire here'.'' But the girls say,
"No; all the giants are climbing up be
up, and fall. one on top of the other. The
young women become his wiv,es.
? It may be objected that this story is
borrowed from our "Jack and. the Bean
of it belongs to the legendary lore ( com
mon to all peoples) upon which all 'f fairy
teles '' are' baaed.
Wales is to be found possibly the best en-
Here is a heavy and fairly uniform rainfall,
ranging from 40 to 70 inches, combined with
a warm temperature and rich soils. These
the white settlers, which means that the
dense white population. As a natural result
we find that here the population has increased
remarkably. Indeed, it stands out in a map of
this very feature of population variation. It
is thus the very antithesis of the arid regions
decreasing.
We may commence our survey on the Upper
cattle station of Kyogle. Many Victorian far-
mers were attracted to the region, and of
late years the large holdings have been cut
getters, however, were the first pioneers, hunt-
ing the red cedar. They would, range the val-
leys, and in winter search for the leafless
the eucalpyts. Or later, in spring, the young
red-leaves would show out even more plainly.
VENEER
white pine is relatively abundant. This is
an Araucaria allied to the Norfolk Island
around the inner bark, and contains the latter
much as the hoops contain the staves of a
barrel, hence the name "hoop pine." One of
the most interesting industries at Kyogle is
the veneer factory. Here three-ply wood and
matchbox wood is obtained from the hoop
and will be new to most readers. A log of
wood, about five feet long and two feet dia-
meter, is soaked for a day in boiling water
length (five feet) of the log is gradually
"shaving" is pared off, which is five feet
wide, and some 30 feet long. This constitutes
the veneer, and it is carried away from the
enough to stand a youth walking freely upon
it as he adjusts the various layers. This
local milk, and applied cold. The ply-wood
is first dried in some ingenious drying rooms,
whose atmospbere recalls a burning westerly
hyraulic press, guillotined to size, and then
The Richmond River at Kyogle flows in a
gully some 15 feet deep, which winds through
large alluvial flats, sometimes one or two
crops as oats or barley. The latter are chiefly
for use as fodder since the country is rather
wet for grain. One energetic lady has ob-
tained a successful crop of cotton, and the
general conditibns seem to me to resemble
slopes, and in the distance—some thiry miles
away—one can see Mount Lindsay (4200 feet)
on the Queensland border. The tropical scrub
has nearly all been cleared away, but tur-
and 20 feet high) are common in the vicinity.
Every here and threre one sees an old stump
Ultimately this will grow into a giant tree
State we have the densest aboriginal popu-
the ranges the full-blood population is stated
is only a mater of 30 years before the thou-
sand full-bloods of our State will have van-
ished. At Stoney Gully is a reserve, where
(chiefly of the Minyung tribe) and about 15
children, who were mostly three-quarter or
half-caste. Here I made a careful study of
and head measurement; on hair, colour, and
intelligence. In an earier article I have
described the results for the Kamilroi tribe
on the Namoi River. Those of the Kyogle
Here, however, I was able to obtain from
Mr. Roger Hill (a three-quarter caste) a most
ask, What is their value ? These old tales
time when our own remote ancestors were
not so very different from the Australian
(found, in certain isolated valleys in "Old
South Wales," racial types which still re-
semble the Australian aboriginal in many im-
general evolved continuously, owing to the
stimulus of changing enviroment and of racial
has remained stagnant for a hundred thou-
theyj were told to me :—
"Ballugarh warring": He (was) very cold.
"Yoogumbay Wayber": (He had) No fire.
"Mirrugun Ghillee": (there were) Old
"Gaigum Ngabbum Djellelah". (We are)
(It will be noticed that many of our con-
nective phrases are omitted, and gestures,
etc., take their place.) The story goes on,
in Mr. Hill's translation:—
gorge. In this gorge lives a tribe of giants,
and there are two nice young girls there too,
who are the daughters of the giants. Ballu-
garh is too frightened to call to them be-
cause they belong to a hostile tribe. He is
up on the cliff, and sees the two girls getting
into the pool. The girls wonder at this, and
spy the young man. He stands there shak-
pick up a firestick and climb by a vine up
the cliffs of the gorge. The young man says,
"Make a fire here.'' But the girls say,
"No; all the giants are climbing up be-
up, and fall one on top of the other. The
young women become his wives.
It may be objected that this story is
borrowed from our "Jack and the Bean
of it belongs to the legendary lore ( com-
mon to all peoples) upon which all "fairy
tales '' are based.
INQUIRY FOR INFORMATION ON "KING KAPEEN" (Article), Northern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954), Saturday 24 January 1948 page 5 2017-07-21 20:32 "KING KAPEEF
my old resident of the district
know anything of a regal iving that
VYolIongba';- once possessed?
me: "Mr. Jim O'Flynn, cf the
LiiolllUi tJ JLUUllUiy, XUUXXU
seme scrap metal which he pur
Kapeen, King of Wollcngbar.' He
is anxious to find out any particu
in 1888' and the last of the Wol-
/ir. William Henry Smith, of "Wol-
longbar House," wrote to me sayinv
be came from the Hon. Thos.
Sutcliffe Mort's station on the Dar
as .yet had no name. Mr. Smith
theifi "Wollongbar," which means
home. In due time the Govern
tribe and I often Visited him in his
Jralba, which abound in stories of
'ears. Dumaresque had sheep about
the ridge. H. O'B. (as he was cal
and shepherd. This v/as substan
O'Flynn? It seems strange thai;
"KING KAPEEN"
any old resident of the district
know anything of a regal King that
WolIongbar once possessed?
me: "Mr. Jim O'Flynn, of the
Lismore foundry, found amongst
some scrap metal which he pur-
Kapeen, King of Wollongbar.' He
is anxious to find out any particu-
in 1888 and the last of the Wol-
Mr. William Henry Smith, of "Wol-
longbar House," wrote to me saying
he came from the Hon. Thos.
Sutcliffe Mort's station on the Dar-
as yet had no name. Mr. Smith
them "Wollongbar," which means
home. In due time the Govern-
tribe and I often visited him in his
Uralba, which abound in stories of
years. Dumaresque had sheep about
the ridge. H. O'B. (as he was cal-
and shepherd. This was substan-
O'Flynn? It seems strange that

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.