Information about Trove user: culroym

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,363,796
2 NeilHamilton 3,036,883
3 noelwoodhouse 2,840,968
4 annmanley 2,228,065
5 John.F.Hall 2,097,340
6 maurielyn 1,646,754
7 DonnaTelfer 1,603,113
8 C.Scheikowski 1,544,307
9 culroym 1,528,475
10 Rhonda.M 1,511,241
11 frankstonlibrary 1,491,934

1,528,475 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 10,271
February 2017 2,102
January 2017 6,818
December 2016 6,803
November 2016 16,027
October 2016 11,662
September 2016 16,028
August 2016 20,651
July 2016 26,498
June 2016 22,576
May 2016 20,584
April 2016 19,975
March 2016 28,084
February 2016 16,713
January 2016 17,677
December 2015 7,948
November 2015 17,827
October 2015 19,125
September 2015 12,112
August 2015 26,646
July 2015 39,181
June 2015 31,757
May 2015 8,907
April 2015 6,662
March 2015 14,061
February 2015 10,364
January 2015 13,553
December 2014 18,304
November 2014 17,639
October 2014 11,057
September 2014 27,107
August 2014 30,242
July 2014 7,095
June 2014 31,246
May 2014 21,489
April 2014 23,003
March 2014 19,369
February 2014 19,364
January 2014 20,178
December 2013 22,679
November 2013 20,249
October 2013 25,354
September 2013 24,440
August 2013 26,351
July 2013 21,272
June 2013 31,158
May 2013 29,612
April 2013 25,275
March 2013 23,814
February 2013 23,751
January 2013 10,940
December 2012 10,383
November 2012 5,120
October 2012 9,700
September 2012 7,518
August 2012 4,191
July 2012 3,586
June 2012 16,524
May 2012 21,287
April 2012 7,535
March 2012 18,690
February 2012 17,112
January 2012 20,383
December 2011 9,562
November 2011 14,315
October 2011 10,553
September 2011 13,269
August 2011 25,122
July 2011 6,121
June 2011 7,179
May 2011 16,708
April 2011 23,010
March 2011 30,786
February 2011 17,374
January 2011 14,869
December 2010 10,640
November 2010 17,860
October 2010 23,116
September 2010 17,342
August 2010 15,151
July 2010 15,727
June 2010 22,303
May 2010 14,807
April 2010 13,377
March 2010 13,402
February 2010 4,258
January 2010 3,760
December 2009 2,165
November 2009 2,753
October 2009 7,935
September 2009 1,917
August 2009 1,685
July 2009 7,149
June 2009 3,283
May 2009 377
April 2009 3,876
March 2009 10,656
February 2009 596
January 2009 169
December 2008 176
November 2008 114
October 2008 25
September 2008 734
August 2008 625

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,363,793
2 NeilHamilton 3,036,883
3 noelwoodhouse 2,840,968
4 annmanley 2,227,995
5 John.F.Hall 2,097,335
6 maurielyn 1,646,754
7 DonnaTelfer 1,603,111
8 C.Scheikowski 1,544,064
9 culroym 1,528,398
10 Rhonda.M 1,511,228
11 frankstonlibrary 1,491,935

1,528,398 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 10,270
February 2017 2,102
January 2017 6,818
December 2016 6,803
November 2016 16,027
October 2016 11,662
September 2016 16,028
August 2016 20,651
July 2016 26,498
June 2016 22,576
May 2016 20,524
April 2016 19,975
March 2016 28,068
February 2016 16,713
January 2016 17,677
December 2015 7,948
November 2015 17,827
October 2015 19,125
September 2015 12,112
August 2015 26,646
July 2015 39,181
June 2015 31,757
May 2015 8,907
April 2015 6,662
March 2015 14,061
February 2015 10,364
January 2015 13,553
December 2014 18,304
November 2014 17,639
October 2014 11,057
September 2014 27,107
August 2014 30,242
July 2014 7,095
June 2014 31,246
May 2014 21,489
April 2014 23,003
March 2014 19,369
February 2014 19,364
January 2014 20,178
December 2013 22,679
November 2013 20,249
October 2013 25,354
September 2013 24,440
August 2013 26,351
July 2013 21,272
June 2013 31,158
May 2013 29,612
April 2013 25,275
March 2013 23,814
February 2013 23,751
January 2013 10,940
December 2012 10,383
November 2012 5,120
October 2012 9,700
September 2012 7,518
August 2012 4,191
July 2012 3,586
June 2012 16,524
May 2012 21,287
April 2012 7,535
March 2012 18,690
February 2012 17,112
January 2012 20,383
December 2011 9,562
November 2011 14,315
October 2011 10,553
September 2011 13,269
August 2011 25,122
July 2011 6,121
June 2011 7,179
May 2011 16,708
April 2011 23,010
March 2011 30,786
February 2011 17,374
January 2011 14,869
December 2010 10,640
November 2010 17,860
October 2010 23,116
September 2010 17,342
August 2010 15,151
July 2010 15,727
June 2010 22,303
May 2010 14,807
April 2010 13,377
March 2010 13,402
February 2010 4,258
January 2010 3,760
December 2009 2,165
November 2009 2,753
October 2009 7,935
September 2009 1,917
August 2009 1,685
July 2009 7,149
June 2009 3,283
May 2009 377
April 2009 3,876
March 2009 10,656
February 2009 596
January 2009 169
December 2008 176
November 2008 114
October 2008 25
September 2008 734
August 2008 625

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 mickbrook 72,675
2 murds5 54,162
3 jaybee67 51,712
4 PhilThomas 20,779
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
163 MichelleKirwan 79
164 KenWillimott 78
165 morahan 78
166 culroym 77
167 dwcassidy 77
168 HollyH 77

77 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 1
May 2016 60
March 2016 16


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
George Bradshaw Founder of Famous Guide (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Monday 20 June 1927 [Issue No.17,018] page 5 2017-03-28 15:17 George Bradshaw I
As the following story wns tolil by
Bishop Crelgliton, It can be 'retold here
without offence (writes . a "Tlt-llits"
correspondent). Questioning a Bun-
"Can anyone tell mo what Is the hook
— Its numo begins with 'B' — which
everyone should fake with him and
There was a shout of "Tho Bible,'
"A Brndshaw!" and proceeded to
The history of the famous guldo
Is interesting. Its founder, George
Brndshaw, wns a Quaker, born' In
Manchester In 1801. By profession he
railroad maps. From tho latter— to
the engraving business of Brndshaw
Railway time-bills Into a form and
size suitable for tho waistcoat pocket.
The information thus prepared wns
put In a stiff cover and labelled
"Bradsliaw's Time . TnbleB and As
In 1839, was the little acorn from
overcome before Bradshaw beenme
established. Trains ran Irregularly,
alterations In times were made at odd
dates, and some rnllwny compnnlcs
refused to furnish Information or re
hoard of directors said that to put
their train -times Into a guide would
mnlto punctuality a sort of obligation,
a syndlcato secretly bought up such
a number of tho compnny's shares
that tho directors had to give way.
In 1841 the rnllwny authorities met
and agreed — making a belated recogni
guide— to assist it, and to mnko train
service alterations at the- beginning of
tho months only. Thus, In December,
1841, the first number of Brndshnw
wns Issued in the form in which It still
appears. Only one copy is In exist-
once now, and that is In the Bodleian
fins nothing earlier than February,
1842, and its copies luck the outside
Slxpenco was the price of the first
Bradshaw, and It wns a slim volume
of some 32 pages. Now Its pnges num
ber pver 1,100.
Tho "Continental Brndshnw" enmo
Into, helng In June, 1847, and wns so
prized that tho hotels secured their
copies with Chains, like tho old
"chained Bibles" In churches. It wns
work 1 connection with tho conti
nental edition that cuused the
died. Ono of his two sons, Mr.
Christopher Brndshaw, now 80, is still
a director of tho compnny that pub
following, not . published beforo, Is
authentic. An alfidnvlt had to bo
Owing to certnln circumstances the
place of "swearing" was at tho Hospice
St. Bernard, In Switzerland. No Blblo
wns available, and ns the matter was
urgent a . Brndshaw was used.
George Bradshaw
As the following story was told by
Bishop Creighton, It can be retold here
without offence (writes a "Tit-Bits"
correspondent). Questioning a Sun-
"Can anyone tell me what is the book
— its name begins with 'B' — which
everyone should take with him and
There was a shout of "The Bible,'
"A Bradshaw!" and proceeded to
The history of the famous guide
is interesting. Its founder, George
Bradshaw, was a Quaker, born in
Manchester in 1801. By profession he
railroad maps. From the latter—to
the engraving business of Bradshaw
Railway time-bills into a form and
size suitable for the waistcoat pocket.
The information thus prepared was
put in a stiff cover and labelled
"Bradshaw's Time Table and As-
in 1839, was the little acorn from
overcome before Bradshaw became
established. Trains ran irregularly,
alterations in times were made at odd
dates, and some railway companies
refused to furnish information or re-
board of directors said that to put
their train times into a guide would
make punctuality a sort of obligation,
a syndicate secretly bought up such
a number of the company's shares
that the directors had to give way.
In 1841 the railway authorities met
and agreed — making a belated recogni-
guide— to assist it, and to make train
service alterations at the beginning of
the months only. Thus, in December,
1841, the first number of Bradshaw
was issued in the form in which it still
appears. Only one copy is in exist-
ence now, and that is in the Bodleian
has nothing earlier than February,
1842, and its copies lack the outside
Sixpence was the price of the first
Bradshaw, and it was a slim volume
of some 32 pages. Now its pages num-
ber over 1,100.
The "Continental Bradshaw" came
into being in June, 1847, and was so
prized that the hotels secured their
copies with chains, like the old
"chained Bibles" in churches. It was
work in connection with the conti-
nental edition that caused the
died. One of his two sons, Mr.
Christopher Bradshaw, now 80, is still
a director of the company that pub-
following, not published before, is
authentic. An affidavit had to be
Owing to certain circumstances the
place of "swearing" was at the Hospice
St. Bernard, In Switzerland. No Bible
was available, and as the matter was
urgent a Bradshaw was used.
ON THE CORNER. (Article), Truth (Sydney, NSW : 1894 - 1954), Sunday 22 July 1894 [Issue No.210] page 2 2017-03-27 21:24 Fillia' circus and menagerie is showing in
Mascagci is said to have already made £20,000
out of 'CavalJtrii Rusticana.'
Addie Conyers is with Luscombe Eearelle's
So. 7 Variety Company in South Africa.
now ob the road to recovery,' save Adelaide
Pellard's Lillipntuni leave by the S.S.
The new piece st the Princes* Theatre,
London, is bv Tyreni Power, and is entitled
' The T«a.n.!l
Miss Kate Bishop is taking pupils in elscat-on.
Kone better qualified to incline budding talent in
he right direction.
Ktw York it TupOMible for three additions to
the language — *' mnsicemedy,' ** come drama,'
sad ' romadrsma.'
Huge Gorlitz ii managing for the Italian
actresa Elaoaora Dose in London. Why isn't
he maneginr for Amy Sherwin ?
William Terris and Hits Millwud, after finishing
up this season with Irrisg, go back on a three
In Montreal recently an actress who bad bean
slated by a local critic eama round to the front
?ne evening wh«B he was present asd slapped hie
Diary of hllf-a-wesk's provincial touring in
England : — Sunday, transportation ; If oad»v,
preparation; Monday aight, rtaliiatiou; Tues
day, proatratien.
Albert Norman ui Blanche Lawis are ttill np
n the wild weird North. Thursday Island waa
kt last place they were heard fron, and ' Cin
en ' was still the trusip card.
Touring in South Australia— Tho Fisk Jubilee
Eingen, Etacey and Kennedy Company, and the
bis little lot round in a four-hens ooaoh.
general manager for iiessrs. Williamson,
Garner, snd Musfrrove, is now stage-manager
lor George Alexander at the St. Jamas Tb.es.ne,
A friend met as oat-o'-work actor the other
day. ' Hew's things', old man,' said he. 'Oh
right as rain. So long w bananas are fourteen
starve.1'
Kenaedy-Deeriag Company free admission te
his show in New Zealand, becaase the company
had been plavwt; ' Hsu the Boatman ' without
Bermiuion.
Somebody suit ne a espy of a Melbourne
1 Standard ' in which ve sotice a colunu and a
are once more with Mr. Harry BickardV com
pany st tha Tivoli.
A fashion is growing in Loadonof finiiklng up
manufacturer whs recently get spliced at Isling
ton booked the whole of the Grand Thtatro for
On July 12th, at the Frineesa Theatre
LoBdea, a bessfit waa to fet given to tho aptly
oecasion aignslised his jubilee on the stage. Fifty
A New Zealand pressman recently saked a
theatrical agent what sort of s chonu he had it
his company. 'Oh,' replied the agent, 'It
wrote, ' The chorus will number 40 '.'
The Alhambra Music-hall is »t;ll open, and
the piogrammo consist* of a variety of items is
which Carltoa aad Sutton, J. S. Whitworth.
Harry Cowan, Lionel Lambert, the Faning Sis
ters, snd Milicent Wow toy chiffly shine.
ill-starred season.' Jennie was all right, bat
the attendance wasn't. Tho same paper elm
writes down aa a failure Leumaae'a venture with
English opera. lie opened with ' Fausl.'
hewicr Bichardaoa, dramatic editor ot tNew
husband of Hose CoghUn, at tha Midison
Square Theatre the other day. Tbscrltica would
aeem to be taking np n firm stand in the States,
Simonaen's Comic Opera Company was at
Albury on election sight. Jules Kimoneea and
Edith Moer* are the leading people. Bv
arraneement with Maider's Telegram Agency,
the resultB of tbt poHing were tead out iram the
Fillis' circus and menagerie is showing in
Mascagni is said to have already made £20,000
out of 'Cavalleria Rusticana.'
Addie Conyers is with Luscombe Searelle's
No. 7 Variety Company in South Africa.
now on the road to recovery,' save Adelaide
Pollard's Lilliputians leave by the S.S.
Africa.
The new piece at the Princess Theatre,
London, is by Tyrene Power, and is entitled
"The Texan."
Miss Kate Bishop is taking pupils in elocution.
None better qualified to incline budding talent in
the right direction.
New York is responsible for three additions to
the language —"musicomedy,' "comedrama,"
and "romadrama."
Huge Gorlitz is managing for the Italian
actrezz Eleonora Duse in London. Why isn't
he managing for Amy Sherwin ?
William Terris and Miss Millward, after finishing
up this season with Irving, go back on a three
In Montreal recently an actress who had been
slated by a local critic came round to the front
one evening when he was present and slapped his
Diary of half-a-week's provincial touring in
England : — Sunday, transportation ; Monday,
preparation; Monday night, realization; Tues-
day, prostration.
Albert Norman and Blanche Lewis are still up
in the wild weird North. Thursday Island was
the last place they were heard from, and ' Cin-
en ' was still the trump card.
Touring in South Australia— The Fisk Jubilee
Singers, Stacey and Kennedy Company, and the
his little lot round in a four-horse coach.
general manager for Messrs. Williamson,
Garner, and Musgrove, is now stage-manager
for George Alexander at the St. James Theatre,
A friend met an out-o'-work actor the other
day. ' How's things', old man,' said he. 'Oh
right as rain. So long as bananas are fourteen
starve."
Kennedy-Deering Company free admission to
his show in New Zealand, because the company
had been playing "Hans the Boatman ' without
permission.
Somebody sent us a copy of a Melbourne
'Standard' in which we notice a column and a
are once more with Mr. Harry Rickards' com-
pany at the Tivoli.
A fashion is growing in London finishing up
manufacturer who recently get spliced at Isling-
ton booked the whole of the Grand Theatre for
On July 12th, at the Princess Theatre
London, a benefit was to be given to the aptly
occasion signalised his jubilee on the stage. Fifty
A New Zealand pressman recently asked a
theatrical agent what sort of chorus he had at
his company. 'Oh,' replied the agent, 'it
wrote, ' The chorus will number 40 !"
The Alhambra Music-hall is still open, and
the programme consists of a variety of items in
which Carlton and Sutton, J. S. Whitworth.
Harry Cowan, Lionel Lambert, the Faning Sis-
ters, and Milicent Mowbray chiefly shine.
ill-starred season.' Jennie was all right, but
the attendance wasn't. The same paper also
writes down as a failure Leumane's venture with
English opera. He opened with ' Faust.'
Leander Ricardson, dramatic editor of New
husband of Rose Coghlan, at the Madison
Square Theatre the other day. The critics would
seem to be taking up s firm stand in the States,
Simonsen's Comic Opera Company was at
Albury on election night. Jules Simonsen and
Edith Moore are the leading people. By
arrangement with Mander's Telegram Agency,
the results of the polling were read out from the
A Cruel Joke. (Article), Snowy River Mail (Orbost, Vic. : 1911 - 1918), Friday 11 February 1916 [Issue No.1316] page 4 2017-03-27 20:50 maarkable mimetic powers.
had "liboll n il for t he prop 'ietor i:3.!
it:lo ullp Iris' -lind bto 'dlts n:teli;tei the•
tictket sy tl3-i. whih. h1 . lIeh' in -og ,
for `a lonu.' ltime.` Wlii'~edil ilil 1:-,i
come -:.aelintatisetd to free, ad:nli.ssn.'
iand reeled at the shocl 3whetf the jrivi
le e was withdrIwn.
. Nefer imiinil." .syrs the worthy les:oe.
Sralt tll they? ln3 tws at'1it show 1' I i:
'elii. 'Thoey will hfitto etl c ina tht."
Ile ia ' .'~ 1 .t '-w '!tl " tii 3:cepi3 ln.0 13
detp b:1..i Voice. ,O e wolnl. sttad o. n :1
threshold of1 1,? th03 ,tre. wath3 lg f0,:
lpatronsWho never e't'i" .11t. V1ry r' Tu.
frienid in utiless-the'- idtlemenr to inud-f
lhi stllC: l 'of.ett ll(ndr, t n!s of the relt3l:3
Itproei 'raitory ' to enterlhif the p:tiua ",
Thespis. But on
admission was granted, the
One night, business called him from
markable mimetic powers. Business
had been bad, for the proprietor had
made up his mind to discountenance the
ticket system which had been in vogue
for a long time. Whitechapel had be-
come acclimatised to free admission,
and reeled at the shock when the privi-
lege was withdrawn.
"Nefer mind," says the worthy lessee,
"vait till they knows vat a show I gifs
'em. They will haf to come in then."
He was a man with an exceptional
deep bass voice. He would stand on the
threshold of his theatre, waiting for
patrons who never came. Very rare,
indeed, would be allow a personal
friend in unless the gentleman denuded
himself of sundry coins of the realm
preparatory to entering the palace of
Thepsis. But on occasions when a free
admission was granted, the proprietor
his post for a short while. Dillon
watched his disappearance, and re-
A Cruel Joke. (Article), Warwick Examiner and Times (Qld. : 1867 - 1919), Saturday 27 March 1897 [Issue No.4110] page 2 2017-03-27 20:27 published by J. W. Arrowsmith,
published by J. W. Arrowsmith.
A Cruel Joke. (Article), The Snowy River Mail and Tambo and Croajingolong Gazette (Orbost, Vic. : 1890 - 1911), Saturday 29 October 1898 [Issue No.430] page 5 2017-03-27 20:23 holed each passer-by :
published by J, W. Arrowsmith.
holed each passer-by.
published by J. W. Arrowsmith.
A Cruel Joke. (Article), Snowy River Mail (Orbost, Vic. : 1911 - 1918), Friday 11 February 1916 [Issue No.1316] page 4 2017-03-27 20:02 II 1 V'trncl .oKt. ' t'
T ;ha.:t veteran actir,..loseph, A. Cave.
tells a goodts stoiy " +bit-:.- t0e 1hil.
Iiitrkalle ma u|etil po1 3 er s.. • wt3'tot'
L spi3'"t 1 ulit. o ti oc hasio st wh13 :3 f33! "
thie pa:y-hlo. with "" 'llt o0e," ore "'loti
two." 3as the 3case alighltt he.
Oine night. bulilen.s eqlled hinl fro.,
so.t etl ,.d ti till" 3the1 l ustl3' ' lit' -.ood :a t
the' doof" oft the: t'hitre, 'u d hut3-.
Slil 3il.3i passe. 0 'I 3' " 't " l
yes-, st lit.
P'I tw?it?t'0I!" ittftilt elsd tlott u to th 3
payt box." ' to' lit tiitis 'i tale 3t1ne3 3 a
1the guy10'?3.3 Ii ?:'i 'ra fea' 33i?:3"
3. W'1ole,1 ItoI of. folks ht il " p3i( ', -3
1n,; .-It" I wa-:i gcod h-ffhonui "hef're t:,
lesso .I ctil t'utd 0 ntl t 3lc° 3 1en 3 t0 33' v
a lo ?.? tt :lliet liot us.:t ' It i;ts 3 ie.l3
] f? rttubbddl 11 hll-I ands gleefully.
S".Va't did 1, tl:3 ' he Itre:tu-rked . n
i. +frierd,: "'I knew: ,1 ey vould uhtf t-.
approlcitto taletitt .i't a hotuse, my boy.
vat a' house ,
lBriunlng:t oier- with: 'leasure, Ih
slipped ronlild, ,to the; pay-box.
" -?taret:t'tlt? hiittgs in the pit 3 '
he qurIedtjo,0usly. "-.1
O"ne10o0 i hree 3-Said3 the eashiler.
Fret.. lr' itnd thr1 e. ".
"'?tlti iotldilid three Vy, It's full."
Ye3 bt't?li 13E0're 3ill your friends."
1 31i3il't kii ? ptons of 'em 1"
1 But 3 ou passed 'em all in I!"
. tvae"o. 'augutst surged over :hIt
propr'ietor's pertutrbed soul,
H-e g les ,:tl l'ight.-F1t'Om ".The Ift
;tad .\lvell'tur.- of Arthur Roberts,'
I pubhtwhed by JI. W. Arrowamith.
A Cruel Joke.
That veteran actor, Joseph A Cave,
tells a good story about the White-
chapel Garrick Theatre in the days
gone by. The company engaged in-
cluded Dillon, a man gifted with re-
maarkable mimetic powers.
Thespis. But on
admission was granted, the
would roll his stentorian voice down to
the pay-box, with "Path one," or "Path
two," as the case night be.
One night, business called him from
solved to fill the house. He stood at
the door of the theatre, and button-
holed each passer-by.
"Would you care to pass in and see
the show ?"
"Yes," was the quick retort.
"Path two!" thundered down to the
pay-box in the unmistakable tones a
the "guv'nor." In a very few minutes
a whole flock of folks had "pathed"
in. It was a good half-hour before the
lessee returned, and he went to have
a look at the house. It was nearly
full !
He rubbed his hands gleefully.
"Vat did I thay ?" he remarked to
a friend. "I knew they vould haf to
appreciate talent. Vat a house, my boy
vat a house !"
Brimming over with pleasure, he
skipped round to the pay-box.
" Vat are the takings in the pit ?"
he queried joyously.
"One pound three," said the cashier.
"Vat?"
"One pound three."
"Vun pound three ! Vy, it's full."
"Yes, but they're all your friends."
"I don't know von of 'em !"
"But you passed 'em all in !"
A wave of anguish surged over the
proprietor's perturbed soul.
He guessed right.—From "The Life
and Adventures of Arthur Roberts,"
published by J. W. Arrowsmith.
Fun. A Cruel Joke. (Article), Petersburg Times (SA : 1887 - 1919), Friday 10 February 1899 [Issue No.589] page 2 2017-03-27 19:12 and reeled alt the shock when the privi-
the door of the theatre, and button
and reeled at the shock when the privi-
the door of the theatre, and button-
A Cruel Joke. (Article), Gympie Times and Mary River Mining Gazette (Qld. : 1868 - 1919), Saturday 9 January 1897 [Issue No.3541] page 2 2017-03-27 19:09 tells a good story about the White
gone by. The company engaged in
cluded Dillon, a man gifted with re
made up Iris mind to discountenance the
for a long time. Whitechapel had be
come ' acclimatised to free admission,
and reeled at the shock when the privi
' yait till they knows vat a show I gifs
'em. They will haf to come iu then,'
deep bass .voice. He would stand on the
threshold 'of his theatre,, waiting for
indeed, would he allow . a personal
friend in unless the geutleiirau denuded
Thospis. But on occasions when a free
the pay-box, with ' Tatih oue,' or 'Path
watched -his disappearance, and, .re
the door of the theatre, aiid button
'Yes,' was the quick retort. .......
a look at the house.'. It' was nearly
lie rubbed his hauds gleefully.
' Vat did I thay V' he remarked to
a ifriend. ' I knew -they vould haf to
vat a house !*'
Brimming -over with pleasure, he
'Vat are the .-?raisings in the pit V'
'One pound three,' said the cashier.
' Ar:vt V'
' Yes, but they're ail your friends.'
'1 don't know von of 'em .!'
' But you passed 'em all' iu !''
A wave of anguish surged : over the.
'It's that tain Dillon !' he moaned.
He guessed right.— From ' The Life
and Adventures of Arthur Roberts,',
published by J, W. Arrowsuiitli, ,
tells a good story about the White-
gone by. The company engaged in-
cluded Dillon, a man gifted with re-
made up his mind to discountenance the
for a long time. Whitechapel had be-
come acclimatised to free admission,
and reeled at the shock when the privi-
' vait till they knows vat a show I gifs
'em. They will haf to come in then.'
deep bass voice. He would stand on the
threshold of his theatre, waiting for
indeed, would he allow a personal
friend in unless the gentleman denuded
Thespis. But on occasions when a free
the pay-box, with ' Path one,' or 'Path
watched his disappearance, and, re-
the door of the theatre, and button-
'Yes,' was the quick retort.
a look at the house. It was nearly
He rubbed his hands gleefully.
' Vat did I thay ?' he remarked to
a friend. ' I knew they vould haf to
vat a house !'
Brimming over with pleasure, he
' Vat are the takings in the pit ?'
' One pound three,' said the cashier.
' Vat ?'
' Yes, but they're all your friends.'
' I don't know von of 'em !'
' But you passed 'em all in !'
A wave of anguish surged over thw
' It's that tam Dillon !' he moaned.
He guessed right.— From "The Life
and Adventures of Arthur Roberts,"
published by J. W. Arrowsmith.
A Cruel Joke. (Article), The Snowy River Mail and Tambo and Croajingolong Gazette (Orbost, Vic. : 1890 - 1911), Saturday 29 October 1898 [Issue No.430] page 5 2017-03-27 18:56 'vait till they knows vat a show I gifs
"em. They will haf to come in then."
"Yes," was the quick retort.
"Path two!" thundered down to the
"One pound three," said the cashier.
He guessed right,— 'From "The Life
" vait till they knows vat a show I gifs
'em. They will haf to come in then."
" Yes," was the quick retort.
" Path two!" thundered down to the
" One pound three," said the cashier.
He guessed right,—From "The Life
A Cruel Joke. (Article), The Snowy River Mail and Tambo and Croajingolong Gazette (Orbost, Vic. : 1890 - 1911), Saturday 7 December 1901 [Issue No.592] page 4 2017-03-27 18:13 tells a good story about the Wlilte-
cliapel Garrlck Theatre In flic days
gone by. The company engaged In
cluded Dillon, a man gifted with re
hatl been had, for the proprietor hud
'made up lite uiiud to discountenance the
ticket system which hud been In vogue
for a long time. WliitoclKipel had tie-
and reeled at tile shock when the privi
" Nefer mind," says the worthy lesnee,
" valt till they knows, vat a show I glfs
'em. They will haf hi come In then."
lie was a man Willi an exceptionally
deep bans voice, lie would stand on the,
threshold of Ills theatre, waiting for
patrons wno never eaine. very rare,
Indeed, would he allow a persona!
friend In unless the gentleman denuded
Tliespls. But on occasions when a free
would roll hte stentorian volee down to
the pay-box, with " I 'nth one," or "Path
two," us the case might he.
Oqe nlght, business called him from
his pout for . a... short r . while.. , Dillon i
.watched his dlBiippodrance. ami re-
Bolved to fill the house, lie stood at
" Would you care to pass In nnd see
pay-box lu the unmistakable tones of
it whole flock of folks had " pathed"
.ill. It was a good half-hour before the
full ! '
He rubbed lite hauds gleefully.
" Vat did I tlmy ?" he remarked to
tt friend. " I knew they vould ltuf lo
appreciate talent. Vat a lioiiae, tuy boy,
vat a house !" ' ,
skipped round to the pay-lipx.
" Vat are the takings In the pit 7"
he queried Joyously.
" One pound three," said the cuahier.
" Vun pound" throe ! Vy, It's full."
. " Yes, but they'rq.iill your friends.".
" I don't know voii of 'em 1" ,
But' you passed "em all' In'!".''
A wave of anguish surged over tho
"It's that Utm Dillon!" he moaned. '
He gneseed right.— From " The Life
nnd Adventures of Arthur Roberts," ,
tells a good story about the White-
chapel Garrick Theatre in the days
gone by. The company engaged in-
cluded Dillon, a man gifted with re-
had been bad, for the proprietor had
made up his mind to discountenance the
ticket system which had been in vogue
for a long time. Whitechapel had be-
and reeled at the shock when the privi-
" Nefer mind," says the worthy lessee,
" valt till they knows, vat a show I gifs
'em. They will haf to come in then."
He was a man with an exceptionally
deep bass voice. He would stand on the
threshold of his theatre, waiting for
patrons who never came. Very rare,
indeed, would he allow a persona!
friend in unless the gentleman denuded
THespis. But on occasions when a free
would roll his stentorian voice down to
the pay-box, with " Path one," or "Path
two," as the case might he.
One night, business called him from
his post for a short while. Dillon
watched his disappearance, and re-
solved to fill the house. He stood at
" Would you care to pass in and see
pay-box in the unmistakable tones of
a whole flock of folks had " pathed"
in. It was a good half-hour before the
full !
He rubbed his hands gleefully.
" Vat did I thay ?" he remarked to
a friend. " I knew they vould haf to
appreciate talent. Vat a house, my boy,
vat a house !"
skipped round to the pay-box.
" Vat are the takings in the pit ?"
he queried joyously.
" One pound three," said the cushier.
" Vun pound" three ! Vy, It's full."
" Yes, but they're all your friends."
" I don't know von of 'em !"
" But you passed 'em all in !"
A wave of anguish surged over the
" It's that tam Dillon!" he moaned.
He guessed right.— From " The Life
and Adventures of Arthur Roberts,"
published by J. W. Arrowsmith.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. "Loch Ard Gorge"
    List
    Public

    39 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-11-15
    User data
  2. Cars of the 1920's and 1930's
    List
    Public

    Riley, 1926
    Reo

    22 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-02-01
    User data
  3. HISTORY OF AIR TRAVEL
    List
    Public

    Series in the Age newspaper

    3 items
    created by: public:culroym 2016-06-10
    User data
  4. Hugh A Borland
    List
    Public

    29 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-11-25
    User data
  5. IN SEARCH OF VICTORIA
    List
    Public

    Motoring Tour

    29 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-11-18
    User data
  6. Mining - Northern Queensland Articles by Hugh A Borland.
    List
    Public

    Printed in The Northern Herald Cairns, during 1939.

    40 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-12-10
    User data
  7. Moondye Joe
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-06-05
    User data
  8. MOONDYNE
    List
    Public

    CHAPTER VI

    2 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-06-05
    User data
  9. OUTLINE OF HISTORY
    List
    Public

    H G WELLS - The Romance of Mother Earth

    3 items
    created by: public:culroym 2016-01-22
    User data
  10. Pioneers and Explorers
    List
    Public

    25 articles appearing in the Longreach Leader 1937-38

    25 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-02-09
    User data
  11. Potosi
    List
    Public

    Potosi sailings (Orient R.M.S.)

    1 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-12-31
    User data
  12. The Bycroft Boys
    List
    Public

    Serial by Yarcoo

    11 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-09-29
    User data
  13. The Southern Cross
    List
    Public

    Chapter 1 19/09/1931

    6 items
    created by: public:culroym 2016-10-05
    User data
  14. Treasure Trove
    List
    Public

    Articles by Bernard Cronin

    10 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-02-09
    User data
  15. WHEEL NOTES By FORTIS
    List
    Public

    Motor cars and cycles and road conditions early days

    40 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-07-09
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.