Information about Trove user: culroym

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,458,651
2 NeilHamilton 3,061,713
3 noelwoodhouse 2,922,410
4 annmanley 2,239,305
5 John.F.Hall 2,149,115
...
7 maurielyn 1,648,311
8 Rhonda.M 1,586,802
9 C.Scheikowski 1,584,160
10 culroym 1,579,904
11 frankstonlibrary 1,552,145
12 yelnod 1,476,242

1,579,904 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 14,547
April 2017 33,762
March 2017 13,391
February 2017 2,102
January 2017 6,818
December 2016 6,803
November 2016 16,027
October 2016 11,662
September 2016 16,028
August 2016 20,651
July 2016 26,498
June 2016 22,576
May 2016 20,584
April 2016 19,975
March 2016 28,084
February 2016 16,713
January 2016 17,677
December 2015 7,948
November 2015 17,827
October 2015 19,125
September 2015 12,112
August 2015 26,646
July 2015 39,181
June 2015 31,757
May 2015 8,907
April 2015 6,662
March 2015 14,061
February 2015 10,364
January 2015 13,553
December 2014 18,304
November 2014 17,639
October 2014 11,057
September 2014 27,107
August 2014 30,242
July 2014 7,095
June 2014 31,246
May 2014 21,489
April 2014 23,003
March 2014 19,369
February 2014 19,364
January 2014 20,178
December 2013 22,679
November 2013 20,249
October 2013 25,354
September 2013 24,440
August 2013 26,351
July 2013 21,272
June 2013 31,158
May 2013 29,612
April 2013 25,275
March 2013 23,814
February 2013 23,751
January 2013 10,940
December 2012 10,383
November 2012 5,120
October 2012 9,700
September 2012 7,518
August 2012 4,191
July 2012 3,586
June 2012 16,524
May 2012 21,287
April 2012 7,535
March 2012 18,690
February 2012 17,112
January 2012 20,383
December 2011 9,562
November 2011 14,315
October 2011 10,553
September 2011 13,269
August 2011 25,122
July 2011 6,121
June 2011 7,179
May 2011 16,708
April 2011 23,010
March 2011 30,786
February 2011 17,374
January 2011 14,869
December 2010 10,640
November 2010 17,860
October 2010 23,116
September 2010 17,342
August 2010 15,151
July 2010 15,727
June 2010 22,303
May 2010 14,807
April 2010 13,377
March 2010 13,402
February 2010 4,258
January 2010 3,760
December 2009 2,165
November 2009 2,753
October 2009 7,935
September 2009 1,917
August 2009 1,685
July 2009 7,149
June 2009 3,283
May 2009 377
April 2009 3,876
March 2009 10,656
February 2009 596
January 2009 169
December 2008 176
November 2008 114
October 2008 25
September 2008 734
August 2008 625

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,458,620
2 NeilHamilton 3,061,713
3 noelwoodhouse 2,922,410
4 annmanley 2,239,235
5 John.F.Hall 2,149,110
...
7 maurielyn 1,648,311
8 Rhonda.M 1,586,789
9 C.Scheikowski 1,583,902
10 culroym 1,579,777
11 frankstonlibrary 1,552,145
12 yelnod 1,476,196

1,579,777 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 14,497
April 2017 33,762
March 2017 13,390
February 2017 2,102
January 2017 6,818
December 2016 6,803
November 2016 16,027
October 2016 11,662
September 2016 16,028
August 2016 20,651
July 2016 26,498
June 2016 22,576
May 2016 20,524
April 2016 19,975
March 2016 28,068
February 2016 16,713
January 2016 17,677
December 2015 7,948
November 2015 17,827
October 2015 19,125
September 2015 12,112
August 2015 26,646
July 2015 39,181
June 2015 31,757
May 2015 8,907
April 2015 6,662
March 2015 14,061
February 2015 10,364
January 2015 13,553
December 2014 18,304
November 2014 17,639
October 2014 11,057
September 2014 27,107
August 2014 30,242
July 2014 7,095
June 2014 31,246
May 2014 21,489
April 2014 23,003
March 2014 19,369
February 2014 19,364
January 2014 20,178
December 2013 22,679
November 2013 20,249
October 2013 25,354
September 2013 24,440
August 2013 26,351
July 2013 21,272
June 2013 31,158
May 2013 29,612
April 2013 25,275
March 2013 23,814
February 2013 23,751
January 2013 10,940
December 2012 10,383
November 2012 5,120
October 2012 9,700
September 2012 7,518
August 2012 4,191
July 2012 3,586
June 2012 16,524
May 2012 21,287
April 2012 7,535
March 2012 18,690
February 2012 17,112
January 2012 20,383
December 2011 9,562
November 2011 14,315
October 2011 10,553
September 2011 13,269
August 2011 25,122
July 2011 6,121
June 2011 7,179
May 2011 16,708
April 2011 23,010
March 2011 30,786
February 2011 17,374
January 2011 14,869
December 2010 10,640
November 2010 17,860
October 2010 23,116
September 2010 17,342
August 2010 15,151
July 2010 15,727
June 2010 22,303
May 2010 14,807
April 2010 13,377
March 2010 13,402
February 2010 4,258
January 2010 3,760
December 2009 2,165
November 2009 2,753
October 2009 7,935
September 2009 1,917
August 2009 1,685
July 2009 7,149
June 2009 3,283
May 2009 377
April 2009 3,876
March 2009 10,656
February 2009 596
January 2009 169
December 2008 176
November 2008 114
October 2008 25
September 2008 734
August 2008 625

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 83,001
2 mickbrook 82,257
3 murds5 54,198
4 PhilThomas 24,218
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
126 Bede51 130
127 robynnnekb 129
128 haining 128
129 culroym 127
130 Natate 126
131 Nannymacg 123

127 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 50
March 2017 1
May 2016 60
March 2016 16


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
QUEEN VICTORIA. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Friday 3 February 1882 [Issue No.4559] page 2 2017-05-23 15:08 QTTEES VICTOBIA.
LOKDOH. February 1.— It is authori
tatively- announced that Her Majesty Queen
QUEEN VICTORIA.
LONDON. February 1.— It is authori-
tatively announced that Her Majesty Queen
QUEEN VICTORIA. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Friday 5 April 1889 [Issue No.82] page 2 2017-05-23 15:07 QUEEN VICTORIa
SBHer Majesty the Queen hLi
from Biarritz, in France, where
QUEEN VICTORIA
Her Majesty the Queen has returned
from Biarritz, in France, where she has
QUEEN VICTORIA. (Article), The Prahran Telegraph (Vic. : 1889 - 1930), Saturday 26 January 1901 [Issue No.916] page 3 2017-05-23 13:08 berlain). and Sir Henry Helfor
made tor a regency in the event of
-n the 25th of January, in St
George's Chapel. In 1848 thr
'^mented Princess Alice was born.
iiid Prinoe Alfred in the ensuing
fesr. On' the fiist of March, 1848,
On the let May, 18&1, was opened,
iu Hyde Park, the Great Exhibition,
?r Crystal Palace — the original ol
such world fairs, and largely due tc
-ipon her. In March, I8SI, ber mo
'.her, the Duchess of Kent, died, and
efore another New Yesr by the
irreparable loss of the Prince Con
?ort. It was on December 14 th
'ate gracious Queen. Other sore
trials were the deaths of thePrinoesi
\iice (of Hessf), of the Duke oi
Ubany, and of the Duke of Olarenoe
been reoent ones during thp past
No former monarch has so thor
*re held in trust for the people, and
tre the means eud not the end ol
tovernment. This enlightened policy
bas entitled her to the glorious dis
tinction of having been tbe most
?iver seen. .
Tbe Viotorian era will be remem
in all reepects. Perhaps no sixty
veara in the whole history of thv
world has produced snob changes
affecting all classes ia their domestic
life and pr&perity ae havo been pro
duoed by railways, by postal arrange
ments, end the rspid oommuniostiop
if intelligence of every sort of event
throughout tbe civilised world. Vic
tory has attended our stand&rda, but
there have: been terrible reverses.
The eventful yean of the Queen's
ife and her marriage have been
aumerous. , If we look back in tbe
her connections, we will ses how
been, ani 'how strongly it runs in
'he veins of the ruling families ot
Europe as this day'. It is well fot
the world that it is eo, for it is s
?trong. good strain ; and it gives a
«ood constitution and ability. II
the Prinoe Consort died a young
?nan, it was from an accidental
bufc, not because his health was
-utd, and no greater instance of its
?trong vitality exista than in the life
if the Queen herself, who has bean
ine of the strongest if women. A
toou souna constitution is ine loun
Idtion of everything that makes life
worth liviqg ; it is the keynote ol
prosperity and success. Tbe Queen
-wM much of the work she has
lone and of ths noble example she
-ave us, to -her good health, as does
tho present king. The untiring
energy of 'all the members of the
Boyal family would be impossible if
and see what the late Queen's grand
children anj descendants are accom
plishing there, and watch tbe cease
realise tbe unbounded blessing tbat
be inherits , from his maternal side
for tbe strong type of the Anglo
Saxon race which bas brought about
good, is nowhere more typically re
To come to the immediate evente
of the past .week, wben the news oi
the serious illness of the Queen wss
reoeived in Melbourne, it was as ii
a pall had -fallen over the city. The
hearts of aU were deeply stirred, and
tbe prayerwent forth that she might
the ^ natural sequenoe of life hai
tbe many year* of the aged queen'
she Jias goqp. She has had a wonder
ful run of good health, and aiokness
her io the minds of her loyal sub
jects. To the' last she manifested
that interest injief subjects at boms
and over sea tbat has ever charac
terised her beneficeat rugn. We
an^ all -in sorrow and sadness for the
gnat and good queen, and words
oannot express the lose which
Britain baa sustained. 8be was the
greateet queen, aye, the greatest
monarch, that evsr reigned, aad ' bet
perfect. The love of her subjects foi
ber has nsver been equalled, and
tbe grief whfch }s now felt for her
T ? ir ?
At thp Frahr^p Court qn Thurs
day, tbe Mayor/said: 'Before we
eommenpe proceedings, I desire, -.b
this Court, to i^x press our deepsst
sympathy And rjgret at the death
of our mpst gracious and nobis
Queen. l am at#v we ail /eel that
in losinjg ite nbliie woman, we have
lost one iKtjilllloved and esteemed
as we would our nptber. Not only
does tbe English -speaking race' re-
aogsiae and regret with us the gnat
loss »e have sustained, but in addi.
tion to that alllhp nations of Europe,
sad ia -AyMyiosSfnee, in every pari
dftbe'WotM,tbay feal with Ha tbat
me of the tigfcest eiiia -gra«desl
womenin-fcistMy haedeperied inm
amongst uv Wc regret-with them
that 'this' u tlie case, mil trart thai
hereon, who is io -follow in liar loot
steps as our Icing and sovereign—
we feel certiiin, fn fact. that Iron)
the noble exampje sbe bas always
shown to hitt and to the rest of hei
children and grand-ob ildren— that
he will emulate t^e good works she
has done, and as time goes on. when
he comes to iepvo (his world. Jie will
have the aame respect and devotion
Wd toying esteejn that' has jbeet
displayed or the oposMop of Ba
Majesty's death.' -
Thp remarks were received bj
those in court standing and suitaius2
?ilenoe. ? ? ; '»
The sorrow at |he news of ths
leath of our Gradous Qieen wai
very deep. I'bort wlio had fi«g-poles
Sew tbeir tlaga a half-mast.. Our
rarious shopkeepers, with one accord,
half shut their .shops, and there were
going away in tears. A great lumf
seemed toeettle in the heart of tht
people, -One fine o)d lady yas met
sompletoly broken down. Sna dwelt
upon file life-long reign of the Qut en.
Site recalled the Qutien as u trut
woman, whose natural insliuot wa«
io mat that it extended to. aU hei
subjects, both gnat ud tmaU,
' She had.' eaid the old lady, ' a
marvellous sympathy for all. and
now. alas,- the Quaes has gone.'
the gnat sorrow was tbe one topic
The people seemed looking for tbeii
Que.n. Eaoh bad sustained a per
loving personalty ? waa dwelt upon;
loss was felt by afi to'be irreparable
Such sorrow was .truly great, for it
hearts wae the -great and good
Queen Viotoria. '
of our Gracious Queen was re
secretary. orthe 8t; Kilda Cemetery,
ine for every yekr of tbe Queen's
Our new -Sovereign comes to ths
throne at 60. ripe in the experiences
of life, to reigq over tbe greatest
and most ' powerful Empire tht
world has seen. Neither Csoaar, nor
such as that whioh greets Edward
much better, be comes into hia in
heritance, wclcomid by the-plauditr
of a people who aro prepared in
advanoe to yield to bim unswerving
A oombined churches' memoria'
?ervice will be held at the St. Kilda
IWn Hall on 'Sunday afternoon
(to-morrow), at 3.80, as a tribute ot
mourning to tbe memory of ont
The signs of mourning througbou'
Ihe district an very numerous. All
tbe municipal flags en flying at
half-mast, and many of tbe private
sadness prevailing- At Pnhran, ths
front ot the Town Hall was draped
in black crape 'net, caught up in
bows. .The St. Kilda Town Hall was
also craped in btaok. The shops, too.
marta, were profusely festooned in
blask. Many private residences bore
the appearances of bouses in mourn
Prabran. the door was covered in
orape. Almost «jrery shop, neat and
small, bad its Windows half-barred
been entirely suspended. Tbe open,
have taken place on Wednesday,' the
Mayor of Prahran, Cr. Goocb, baring
issued invitations' to the lady citizens
to be present That function has
been postponed indefinitely. Pend
ing information from England, tbe
general mourning bas not been
Generally, however, black ties, blaok
adopted as tbe outward trappings of
inward sorrow. In all publio offices,
in publio institutions, the clerks are
fnllnarinw that nrocedure. Such
officials as the police, postmen, rail
by the Mayor ofPrahran, Cr. Goocb
to the Governor-General on Wedues.
day : — ' The mayor, councillors, and
citizens of Pnhran desire to convey
to the Boyal Family, through yuui
Excellenoy, their profound and sin.
beloved Queen.' The Governor
General haa replied in the following
words: — 'I beg; to thank your
Worship, coun(Hlprt, and citizen*
which t shall not. fail to transmit to
the members of the Boyal family at
the earliest opportunity — Hofetocn,
Governor-General.'
The Mayor 'of St. Kilda, Cr
Hughes, also despatched tbe follow
ing telegram '' to' the Governor
Qeneral: — ''Mayor, oouncillon.
citizens, St. Kilda. Ualbourne. Pro
found Borrow,'' deepest sympathy,
beloved Queen's ^ death.' TJp to
date no nply haa been reoeived. The
berlain), and Sir Henry Helfor
made for a regency in the event of
on the 25th of January, in St
George's Chapel. In 1843 the
lamented Princess Alice was born
and Prince Alfred in the ensuing
year. On the first of March, 1848,
On the 1st May, 1851, was opened,
in Hyde Park, the Great Exhibition,
or Crystal Palace — the original of
such world fairs, and largely due to
upon her. In March, 1851, her mo-
ther, the Duchess of Kent, died, and
before another New Year by the
irreparable loss of the Prince Con-
sort. It was on December 14th
late gracious Queen. Other sore
trials were the deaths of the Princess
Alice (of Hesse), of the Duke of
Albany, and of the Duke of Clarence
been recent ones during the past
No former monarch has so thor-
are held in trust for the people, and
are the means and not the end of
government. This enlightened policy
has entitled her to the glorious dis-
tinction of having been the most
ever seen.
The Victorian era will be remem-
in all respects. Perhaps no sixty
years in the whole history of the
world has produced such changes
affecting all classes in their domestic
life and prosperity as have been pro-
duced by railways, by postal arrange-
ments, end the rapid communication
of intelligence of every sort of event
throughout the civilised world. Vic-
tory has attended our standards, but
there have been terrible reverses.
The eventful years of the Queen's
life and her marriage have been
numerous. If we look back in the
her connections, we will see how
been, and how strongly it runs in
the veins of the ruling families of
Europe as this day. It is well for
the world that it is so, for it is a
strong. good strain ; and it gives a
good constitution and ability. If
the Prince Consort died a young
man, it was from an accidental
cause, not because his health was
bad, and no greater instance of its
strong vitality exists than in the life
of the Queen herself, who has been
one of the strongest of women. A
good sound constitution is the foun-
dation of everything that makes life
worth living ; it is the keynote of
prosperity and success. The Queen
owed much of the work she has
done and of the noble example she
gave us, to her good health, as does
the present king. The untiring
energy of all the members of the
Royal family would be impossible if
and see what the late Queen's grand-
children and descendants are accom-
plishing there, and watch the cease-
realise the unbounded blessing that
he inherits from his maternal side
for the strong type of the Anglo-
Saxon race which has brought about
good, is nowhere more typically re-
To come to the immediate events
of the past week, when the news of
the serious illness of the Queen was
received in Melbourne, it was as if
a pall had fallen over the city. The
hearts of all were deeply stirred, and
the prayer went forth that she might
the natural sequence of life has
the many years of the aged queen,
she has gone. She has had a wonder-
ful run of good health, and sickness
her in the minds of her loyal sub-
jects. To the last she manifested
that interest in her subjects at home
and over sea that has ever charac-
terised her beneficent reign. We
are all in sorrow and sadness for the
great and good queen, and words
cannot express the loss which
Britain has sustained. She was the
greatest queen, aye, the greatest
monarch, that ever reigned, and her
perfect. The love of her subjects for
her has never been equalled, and
the grief which is now felt for her
LOCAL MOURNING.
At the Prahran Court on Thurs-
day, the Mayor said: "Before we
commence proceedings, I desire, on
this Court, to express our deepest
sympathy and regret at the death
of our most gracious and noble
Queen. I am sure we all feel that
in losing that noble woman, we have
lost one we all loved and esteemed
as we would our mother. Not only
does the English speaking race re-
cognise and regret with us the great
loss we have sustained, but in addi-
tion to that all the nations of Europe,
and in every instance, in every part
of the world, they feel with us that
one of the highest and grandest
women in history has departed from
amongst us. We regret with them
that this is the case, and trust that
her son, who is to follow in her foot-
steps as our king and sovereign -
we feel certain, in fact, that from
the noble example she has always
shown to him and to the rest of her
children and grand-children— that
he will emulate the good works she
has done, and as time goes on, when
he comes to leave this world, he will
have the same respect and devotion
and loving esteem that has been
displayed on the occasion of Her
Majesty's death."
The remarks were received by
those in court standing and sustained
silence.
The sorrow at the news of the
death of our Gracious Queen was
very deep. Those who had flag-poles
flew their flags at half-mast. Our
various shopkeepers, with one accord
half shut their shops, and there were
going away in tears. A great lump
seemed to settle in the heart of the
people. One fine old lady was met
completely broken down. She dwelt
upon the life-long reign of the Queen.
She recalled the Queen as a true
woman, whose natural instinct was
so great that it extended to all her
subjects, both great and small.
"She had," said the old lady,"a
marvellous sympathy for all, and
now, alas, the Queen has gone."
the great sorrow was the one topic.
The people seemed looking for their
Queen. Each had sustained a per-
loving personalty was dwelt upon;
loss was felt by all to be irreparable.
Such sorrow was truly great, for it
hearts was the great and good
Queen Victoria.
of our Gracious Queen was re-
secretary of the St. Kilda Cemetery,
one for every year of the Queen's
Our new Sovereign comes to the
throne at 60, ripe, in the experiences
of life, to reign over the greatest
and most powerful Empire the
world has seen. Neither Caesar, nor
such as that which greets Edward
much better, he comes into his in-
heritance, welcomed by the plaudits
of a people who are prepared in
advance to yield to him unswerving
A combined churches' memorial
service will be held at the St. Kilda
Town Hall on Sunday afternoon
(to-morrow), at 3.30, as a tribute of
mourning to the memory of our
The signs of mourning throughout
the district an very numerous. All
the municipal flags are flying at
half-mast, and many of the private
sadness prevailing. At Prahran, the
front of the Town Hall was draped
in black crape net, caught up in
bows. The St. Kilda Town Hall was
also craped in black. The shops, too.
marts, were profusely festooned in
black. Many private residences bore
the appearances of houses in mourn-
Prahran, the door was covered in
crape. Almost every shop, neat and
small, had its Windows half-barred.
been entirely suspended. The open-
have taken place on Wednesday, the
Mayor of Prahran, Cr. Gooch, having
issued invitations to the lady citizens
to be present. That function has
been postponed indefinitely. Pend-
ing information from England, the
general mourning has not been
Generally, however, black ties, black
adopted as the outward trappings of
inward sorrow. In all public offices,
in public institutions, the clerks are
following that procedure. Such
officials as the police, postmen, rail-
by the Mayor of Prahran, Cr. Gooch
to the Governor-General on Wednes-
day : — "The mayor, councillors, and
citizens of Prahran desire to convey
to the Royal Family, through your
Excellency, their profound and sin-
beloved Queen." The Governor
General has replied in the following
words: — "I beg to thank your
Worship, councillors, and citizens
which I shall not fail to transmit to
the members of the Royal family at
the earliest opportunity — HOPETOUN,
Governor-General."
The Mayor of St. Kilda, Cr
Hughes, also despatched the follow-
ing telegram to the Governor
General: — "Mayor, councillors,
citizens, St. Kilda, Melbourne. Pro-
found sorrow, deepest sympathy,
beloved Queen's death." Up to
date no reply has been received. The
QUEEN VICTORIA. (Article), The Prahran Telegraph (Vic. : 1889 - 1930), Saturday 26 January 1901 [Issue No.916] page 3 2017-05-23 12:02 It was on the morning of the 24tli
if May, 1819, that, in the old Palact
?f Kensington, the little Princes*
first saw the light who was in aftei
years to be known as one of tht
greatest and best sovereigns wh-
bave sat on the throne of Great
Britain — Her MoBt Gracious Ma jest}
Queen Victoria. Ber parents wen
Q.K.H. Edward, Duke of Kent, and
the Princess Victoria Maria LouisB
it Saxe-Goburg. sister to Princi
linopold, and widow of the Prince ol
Leiniogen, the august couple having
been married iu tbe previous year,
first by the Lutheran rite, in Gei
many. and two months later by .tht
Archbishop of Oanterbuty, in th-
presence of the British Boya! Family.
The ceremony of baptism of thi
and. was performed with great pomp
the Boyal go'd fount being brought
the Archbishop of Canterbury, as
listed by the Bishop of London
officiating. The baby reoeived tht
names of 'Alexandrine Victoria,'
after tbe then Emperor of Bussis
and her mother. It wss at first in
to allow his name to occupy a secono
place, and so the little Princess re
ceived the name by which ehe hat
nince endeared herself to her people
though in her early childhood eht
was generally known as ' Princess
Drina.'
June, 1887, that tbe gate porter ol
Kensington Palace was aroused by »
Knocking whiob, like that in ' Mac
ieth,' was significant of a King's
leath. Archbishop Henley, thi
Marquis of Conyngham (Lord Cham
berlain). and Sir Henry Helfor.
vere there to announce that William
iV. — the Sailor King — was gathereo
co his fathers, and that upon hei
young head now devolved the Crowii
if $re*t Britain and Iifeland. It
must havo been a touching sight
wbA the weeping girl, half awake
ihocked by the sudden news, a young
{irl, small, slight and slender, bu-
dear.cut features, standing with
brought out by her mother to re
vive tbe emissaries' intelligence
But Queen Viotoria was never e
coward — her old Stewart blood, oi
receive tbe Premier, Lord Mel
bourne, to whose visit succeeded e
inoBt trying of all, came tbe young
Sovereign's first meeting with hei
It waa not in St. James' Palace
but in Kensington — in the very ssmi
roorn in which she bad been chris
tened— that Queen Victoria held hei
thst arrangements were publicly
made tor a regency in the event ol
'he King'a dying while she was in
Engtish royalty. Presently she eaid
earnestly, 'Mamma, I cannot aee
who ia to come after Uncle William,
unless it is myself.' She waa told
that io it waa. ' It is a very soletni
thing,' she said. ' Many a chili
the difficulty. Than ia spleadoot,
but there is responsibility.4' Then,
her band to her governess, she said
earnestly, ' I will be good.'
' And ehe hutapt her promise
Through all ber length of life ;
.And all her snbjectB b:ess her —
Good mother, Qaeenand wife.'
. On the 28th fane, 1838, the Queen
was crowned^ ruler. At day dawn a
SSIVO Of BfUlisry Jfiii# mo jlrwc?
epve notice of the approaphing func
the Park guns told tbat Her Majesty
had entered „)}» carriage, as the
Boyai Standard floated out over the
Palaee.
When the Queen asoended the
that- of how at the Sjate Ball thi
young prince cut open his tunio to
plaoe . next ' his heart the lowers
-ivento bim by bis' BoyAlipartner
aBd of boW ^e xext day-honored
him ly -deoliuring ier ptefannce:
flui f irtanate bridegroom was
ms Augustus gmmannrti'jswBj ion
of Ernest, Duke of Saxa-Cobtirg
Suallcld. At k apodal meeting of
the Pri«y Council on November -28rd
Her Majeaty announced her be
trothal. She read the'deelaration in
a clear sonorous sweet-toned voioe,
but her hands trembled so exces
sively that she waa soaroely able to
hold the papar ahc we* reading
truly it was a nervous moment, but
ss she told the Duchess of Glostei
afterwards, ebe fead lately done
something still inore nervous— pro-
posed to Prince Albert. On the | 6tb
January of tbe following year tbe in
tended marriage was aonaunced to
the assembled Parliament, tbe news
beinp received with tbe greatest en
to the Prince when he arrived aa a
the 10th, in theOhapel Boyal, at St.
James, apd sounds of cannon an
uounoed to London when the ring
was placed on the Queen's $nger.
On the Slot of November was born
child, Victoria, Prmoeea Boyal. The
Prince of Walei «as born on the 8th
of November cf the ensuing year.
1641, and was christened, with tbe
King of Pruxia for bis gvdfathvr,
It was on the morning of the 24th
of May, 1819, that, in the old Palace
of Kensington, the little Princess
first saw the light who was in after
years to be known as one of the
greatest and best sovereigns who
have sat on the throne of Great
Britain — Her Most Gracious Majesty
Queen Victoria. Her parents were
H.R.H. Edward, Duke of Kent, and
the Princess Victoria Maria Louise
of Saxe-Coburg, sister to Prince
Leopold, and widow of the Prince of
Leiningen, the august couple having
been married in the previous year,
first by the Lutheran rite, in Ger-
many. and two months later by the
Archbishop of Canterbury, in the
presence of the British Royal Family.
The ceremony of baptism of the
and was performed with great pomp
the Royal gold fount being brought
the Archbishop of Canterbury, as-
sisted by the Bishop of London
officiating. The baby received the
names of "Alexandrina Victoria,"
after the then Emperor of Russia
and her mother. It was at first in-
to allow his name to occupy a second
place, and so the little Princess re-
ceived the name by which she has
since endeared herself to her people
though in her early childhood she
was generally known as "Princess
Drina."
June, 1837, that the gate porter of
Kensington Palace was aroused by a
knocking which, like that in "Mac-
beth," was significant of a King's
death. Archbishop Henley, the
Marquis of Conyngham (Lord Cham-
were there to announce that William
IV. — the Sailor King — was gathered
to his fathers, and that upon her
young head now devolved the Crown
of Great Britain and Ireland. It
must have been a touching sight
when the weeping girl, half awake
shocked by the sudden news, a young
girl, small, slight and slender, but
clear-cut features, standing with
brought out by her mother to re-
ceive the emissaries' intelligence
But Queen Victoria was never a
coward — her old Stewart blood, of
receive the Premier, Lord Mel-
bourne, to whose visit succeeded a
most trying of all, came the young
Sovereign's first meeting with her
It was not in St. James' Palace
but in Kensington — in the very same
room in which she had been chris-
tened— that Queen Victoria held her
that arrangements were publicly
made tor a regency in the event of
the King's dying while she was in
English royalty. Presently she said
earnestly, "Mamma, I cannot see
who is to come after Uncle William,
unless it is myself." She was told
that so it was. "It is a very solemn
thing," she said. "Many a child
the difficulty. There is splendour,
but there is responsibility." Then,
her hand to her governess, she said
earnestly, "I will be good."
" And she has kept her promise
Through all her length of life ;
.And all her subjects bless her —
Good mother, Queen and wife."
. On the 28th June, 1838, the Queen
was crowned ruler. At day dawn a
salvo of artillery from the Tower
gave notice of the approaching func-
the Park guns told that Her Majesty
had entered her carriage, as the
Royal Standard floated out over the
Palace.
When the Queen ascended the
that of how at the State Ball the
young prince cut open his tunic to
place next his heart the flowers
given to him by his Royal partner
and of how she next day honored
him by declaring her preference.
The fortunate bridegroom was Fran-
cis Augustus Emmanuel, second son
of Ernest, Duke of Saxe-Coburg
Sualfeld. At a special meeting of
the Privy Council on November 23rd
Her Majesty announced her be-
trothal. She read the declaration in
a clear sonorous sweet-toned voice,
but her hands trembled so exces-
sively that she was scarcely able to
hold the paper she was reading
Truly it was a nervous moment, but
as she told the Duchess of Gloster
afterwards, she had lately done
something still more nervous— pro-
posed to Prince Albert. On the 16th
January of the following year the in-
tended marriage was announced to
the assembled Parliament, the news
being received with the greatest en-
to the Prince when he arrived as a
the 10th, in the Chapel Royal, at St.
James, and sounds of cannon an-
nounced to London when the ring
was placed on the Queen's finger.
On the 21st of November was born
child, Victoria, Princess Royal. The
Prince of Wales was born on the 8th
of November of the ensuing year.
1841, and was christened, with the
King of Prussia for his godfather,
QUEEN VICTORIA. (Article), The Prahran Telegraph (Vic. : 1889 - 1930), Saturday 26 January 1901 [Issue No.916] page 3 2017-05-23 11:36 SPECIALLY COMPILED KBOU AVrUE.vrlcj
fOVSOES. I
SPECIALLY COMPILED FROM AUTHENTIC
SOURCES.
QUEEN VICTORIA (Article), Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), Monday 5 August 1895 [Issue No.7727] page 3 2017-05-23 11:35 bas advised all her sons and sons-in-law to
•moke nothing but Frossard Gavour Cigars.
Mild and fragrant packets, 8 for Is. KZ211O
has advised all her sons and sons-in-law to
smoke nothing but Frossard Cavour Cigars.
Mild and fragrant packets, 8 for 1s. NZ211o
QUEEN VICTORIA (Article), Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), Thursday 1 August 1895 [Issue No.7724] page 3 2017-05-23 11:33 has advised all her SOBS and sons-in-law to
smoke nothing but Frossard Oavour Cigars.
Mild »BD fragrant packets, 8 for Is. NZ2UO
has advised all her sons and sons-in-law to
smoke nothing but Frossard Cavour Cigars.
Mild and fragrant packets, 8 for 1s. NZ211o
QUEEN VICTORIA. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 3 October 1903 [Issue No.1957] page 37 2017-05-23 11:32 Benson (one of the sons of the late Arch
the correspondence of the late Queen Vic
Benson (one of the sons of the late Arch-
the correspondence of the late Queen Vic-
QUEEN VICTORIA. (Article), The Armidale Express and New England General Advertiser (NSW : 1856 - 1861; 1863 - 1889; 1891 - 1954), Saturday 18 August 1866 page 4 2017-05-23 11:31 richest sovereigns iu Europe. The Duchess of
Kent, who had saved no inconsiderable suru, be
queathed property to her Majesty. The Prince Con
sort, who had been saving from the day of Lis mar
riage, died worth a very large amount, nil of which
it is believed lie willed to the Queen ; and a wealiliy
Queen cannot be accused of any very lavish expendi
is kept iu that establishment for the royal accounts,
und these are written by clerks specially appointed
tnoro and more valuable every year, though up to
" Vegetable Pills !'• exclaimed an old lady : " don't
in the stomach there's nothing like it j it can always
be relied on.''
richest sovereigns in Europe. The Duchess of
Kent, who had saved no inconsiderable sum, be-
queathed property to her Majesty. The Prince Con-
sort, who had been saving from the day of his mar-
riage, died worth a very large amount, all of which
it is believed he willed to the Queen ; and a wealthy
Queen cannot be accused of any very lavish expendi-
is kept in that establishment for the royal accounts,
and these are written by clerks specially appointed
more and more valuable every year, though up to
" Vegetable Pills !" exclaimed an old lady : " don't
in the stomach there's nothing like it ; it can always
be relied on."
QUEEN VICTORIA (Article), Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), Tuesday 30 July 1895 [Issue No.7722] page 3 2017-05-23 11:27 ; QUEEN VICTORIA
has advised, all her sons and sons-in-law to
•moke nothing bat Froisard O&vour Cigars.
Mild and fragrant packets, 8 for Is. NZ211O
a i
QUEEN VICTORIA
has advised, all her sons and sons-in-law to
smoke nothing but Frossard Cavour Cigars.
Mild and fragrant packets, 8 for 1s. NZ211O

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. "Loch Ard Gorge"
    List
    Public

    39 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-11-15
    User data
  2. Cars of the 1920's and 1930's
    List
    Public

    Riley, 1926
    Reo

    22 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-02-01
    User data
  3. HISTORY OF AIR TRAVEL
    List
    Public

    Series in the Age newspaper

    3 items
    created by: public:culroym 2016-06-10
    User data
  4. Hugh A Borland
    List
    Public

    29 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-11-25
    User data
  5. IN SEARCH OF VICTORIA
    List
    Public

    Motoring Tour

    29 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-11-18
    User data
  6. Mining - Northern Queensland Articles by Hugh A Borland.
    List
    Public

    Printed in The Northern Herald Cairns, during 1939.

    40 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-12-10
    User data
  7. Moondye Joe
    List
    Public

    1 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-06-05
    User data
  8. MOONDYNE
    List
    Public

    CHAPTER VI

    2 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-06-05
    User data
  9. Nelson P Whitelocke
    List
    Public

    Great-grand-son of Lieutenant William Lawson

    8 items
    created by: public:culroym 2017-05-18
    User data
  10. OUTLINE OF HISTORY
    List
    Public

    H G WELLS - The Romance of Mother Earth

    3 items
    created by: public:culroym 2016-01-22
    User data
  11. Pioneers and Explorers
    List
    Public

    25 articles appearing in the Longreach Leader 1937-38

    25 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-02-09
    User data
  12. Potosi
    List
    Public

    Potosi sailings (Orient R.M.S.)

    1 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-12-31
    User data
  13. The Bycroft Boys
    List
    Public

    Serial by Yarcoo

    11 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-09-29
    User data
  14. The Southern Cross
    List
    Public

    Chapter 1 19/09/1931

    6 items
    created by: public:culroym 2016-10-05
    User data
  15. Treasure Trove
    List
    Public

    Articles by Bernard Cronin

    10 items
    created by: public:culroym 2014-02-09
    User data
  16. WHEEL NOTES By FORTIS
    List
    Public

    Motor cars and cycles and road conditions early days

    40 items
    created by: public:culroym 2015-07-09
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.