Information about Trove user: cjbrill

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,864,572
2 annmanley 2,008,563
3 NeilHamilton 1,852,376
4 noelwoodhouse 1,459,945
5 maurielyn 1,368,221
...
43 wattlesong 406,866
44 Juniris 398,764
45 cmdevine 390,682
46 cjbrill 389,362
47 JanMcDonald 386,105
48 PenrithLibraryVolunteers 385,232

389,362 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2014 15,097
September 2014 16,446
August 2014 26,294
July 2014 3,715
June 2014 2,353
May 2014 1,557
April 2014 546
March 2014 958
February 2014 918
January 2014 1,736
December 2013 1,202
November 2013 698
October 2013 1,319
September 2013 3,520
August 2013 4,157
July 2013 3,630
June 2013 20,330
May 2013 16,199
April 2013 2,552
March 2013 3,105
February 2013 1,013
January 2013 862
December 2012 1,347
November 2012 390
October 2012 62
September 2012 2,394
August 2012 2,809
July 2012 19,124
June 2012 11,700
May 2012 2,356
April 2012 2,451
March 2012 753
February 2012 451
January 2012 704
December 2011 2,148
November 2011 1,544
October 2011 3,788
September 2011 868
August 2011 236
July 2011 1,986
June 2011 1,614
May 2011 493
April 2011 1,391
March 2011 21,150
February 2011 49,891
January 2011 47,659
December 2010 2,193
November 2010 3,543
October 2010 1,554
September 2010 3,683
August 2010 1,203
July 2010 4,168
June 2010 3,953
May 2010 3,190
April 2010 2,670
March 2010 1,237
February 2010 4,024
January 2010 4,143
December 2009 9,280
November 2009 7,304
October 2009 3,979
September 2009 3,512
August 2009 2,278
July 2009 1,180
June 2009 2,591
May 2009 1,913
April 2009 3,049
March 2009 812
February 2009 1,235
January 2009 493
December 2008 3,556
November 2008 6,113
October 2008 990

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
FEDERAL QUARANTINE STATION. THE PROPOSED SITE AT CLAREMONT. CIVIL SERVANTS AND PRIVATE PRACTICE. (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Friday 22 July 1910 page Article 2014-10-25 17:01 THE PROPOSED SITE AT CLARE
In the House of* Asembly yesterday
the House to call attention to what ho
vants doing private practice. Ho under-
ticularly in tho Lands Department,
wero allowed, to competo with others of
ed the Minister of Lands whothcr steps
the authority of the Governor-in-Coun
oil on the recommendation of the Pub-
desirable thing, ho (Mr. Earlo) thought.
chitects, or draughtsmen. If no. out-
side expert could bp ontninod in tho
Stuto"iñ any piofessioncl instance, the
sanctioned thro'igh tho head of the de-
Mr. Sadler: I suppose it ia because
of the small salaries paid. , '.,
Mr. Earlo: I don't think co. One
man-gets,£2S5 as á surveyor, and ho
is allowed private practice. If tho sal-
aries are nott sufficient they should bo
made so. lt.is contemptible and mean
to make'officers work, even at nicht,
and not ' pay them adequate salaries.
There aro grave complaints of this (sort
of thing going on. '
Proceeding,'Mr. Earlo said»,it appcar
edí.tftibe tho intention of the Federal
a^contract entered into by their prede-
cessors (tho previous Government), to
establish a quarantine station at' Trif
fitt'siRoint, which wns a very serious
thrng'for the people of Hobart and-the
suburb of Glenorchy. Tbo last Federal
Government, he was informed, 'had en-
tered into a contract with Mr.- Flex-
that point, which wns one of the most
beautiful residential areas' within rea-
sonable distance of the city-within
to the river extending into the bamo
for about a milo, and tho place was
largely resorted to by oxcursionists dur-
If a quarantine1 station were formed
tagions diseases. Members would real-
a quarantine station should bo fuither
Mr. Bakhap : Where is the present
quarantine station? /
Mr. Eaile: At Barnes Bay, Bruni
Mr. Bakhap : What is the area?
About 100 or 500 acres t i
Mr. Earle : And a very suitable place,
place, and on the joe side of tho city
Triffiitt's Point is on the windward sido
of our populous centres, from. which
during the greater part of the year tho
carry contagion. There aro many
things to bo considero-I in connection
with the matter. Flics carry contagion,
orchy, hard by; and'I know tb.e-.resi
Mr. Mulcahy. Are YOU speaking from
reliablo information ? '
Mr. Earle : Yes. No doubt there has
been a contract pieparcd, but whether
it is comp'etcd or no, I am not suie.
Mr Bakhap : It's a wonder the own-
er of tho lund says ho knows nothing
Mr. Earle- He will got his cheque,
Ho knows about it. It behoves this
any action, and then say wo knew no-
membeis interfeie?
Mr. Earle said they would ; but tho
Mr. Mulcahv- And peihaps the Fed
ei.il Government will snub us, and
tell us to minti our cm ii buaincss.
An Hon. Member It is our busi-
Mr. Earlo I am sure we v. ill not i e
is-try. (Laughter.1
An Hon. Member If the pul chase
has alieady been made negotiations will
Mi. Earle- Even if that is ¡¡o, the
pose. If purchased at nnvt'iing like a
reasonable price it may be cut un for
building allotments. "I suggest for-
Mr. Bakhap . Are there any Teasons
Mr. Mulcahv Yes, plenty of leasons.
Mr. Earle: The last .Fedeial Go-
vernment purchased the land fiom Air.
Flexrnoie, 1 believe. It is said that it
. MONT.
Hean) : As to Civil servants and pri-
vate practice, said there yvas only one
Government surveyor. Tlio other sur-
veyors did not como under the pro-
visions of tho Civil Service Act* they
only prepared surves's in the field when
grams, and tliis had boen proved to
Tho one qualified surveyor belonging
to the department was very i'onel of his
work. On Saturday afternoons ho
.sometimes surveyed lands required for
public purposes for tho Government
day aftornoons did private work, to
do which ho lind the consent of tho
Mr. Ogden said he considered thero
THE PROPOSED SITE AT
In the House of Assembly yesterday
the House to call attention to what he
vants doing private practice. He under-
ticularly in the Lands Department,
were allowed to compete with others of
ed the Minister of Lands whether steps
the authority of the Governor-in-Coun-
cil on the recommendation of the Pub-
desirable thing, he (Mr. Earle) thought.
chitects, or draughtsmen. If no out-
side expert could be obtained in the
State in any professional instance, the
sanctioned through the head of the de-
Mr. Sadler: I suppose it is because
of the small salaries paid.
Mr. Earle: I don't think so. One
man gets,£285 as a surveyor, and he
is allowed private practice. If the sal-
aries are not sufficient they should be
made so. lt is contemptible and mean
to make officers work, even at night,
and not pay them adequate salaries.
There are grave complaints of this sort
of thing going on.
Proceeding, Mr. Earle said it appear-
ed to be the intention of the Federal
a contract entered into by their prede-
cessors (the previous Government), to
establish a quarantine station at Trif-
fit's Point, which was a very serious
thing for the people of Hobart and the
suburb of Glenorchy. The last Federal
Government, he was informed, had en-
tered into a contract with Mr. Flex-
that point, which was one of the most
beautiful residential areas within rea-
sonable distance of the city - within
to the river extending into the same
for about a mile, and the place was
largely resorted to by excursionists dur-
If a quarantine station were formed
tagious diseases. Members would real-
a quarantine station should be further
Mr. Bakhap: Where is the present
quarantine station?
Mr. Earle: At Barnes Bay, Bruni
Mr. Bakhap: What is the area?
About 100 or 500 acres.
Mr. Earle: And a very suitable place,
place, and on the lee side of the city
Triffitt's Point is on the windward side
of our populous centres, from which
during the greater part of the year the
carry contagion. There are many
things to be considered in connection
with the matter. Flies carry contagion,
orchy, hard by; and I know the resi-
Mr. Mulcahy: Are you speaking from
reliable information?
Mr. Earle: Yes. No doubt there has
been a contract prepared, but whether
it is completed or no, I am not sure.
Mr Bakhap: It's a wonder the own-
er of the land says ho knows nothing
Mr. Earle: He will get his cheque,
He knows about it. It behoves this
any action, and then say we knew no-
members interfere?
Mr. Earle said they would; but the
Mr. Mulcahy: And perhaps the Fed-
eral Government will snub us, and
tell us to mind our own business.
An Hon. Member: It is our busi-
Mr. Earle: I am sure we will not re-
istry. (Laughter.)
An Hon. Member: If the purchase
has already been made negotiations will
Mr. Earle: Even if that is so, the
pose. If purchased at anything like a
reasonable price it may be cut up for
building allotments. I suggest for-
Mr. Bakhap: Are there any reasons
Mr. Mulcahy: Yes, plenty of reasons.
Mr. Earle: The last Federal Go-
vernment purchased the land from Mr.
Flexmore, I believe. It is said that it
CLAREMONT.
Hean): As to Civil servants and pri-
vate practice, said there was only one
Government surveyor. The other sur-
veyors did not come under the pro-
visions of tho Civil Service Act; they
only prepared surveys in the field when
grams, and this had been proved to
The one qualified surveyor belonging
to the department was very fond of his
work. On Saturday afternoons he
sometimes surveyed lands required for
public purposes for the Government
day afternoons did private work, to
do which he had the consent of the
Mr. Ogden said he considered there
CLAREMONT FOR QUARANTINE To the Editor of "The Mercury." (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Wednesday 21 September 1910 page Article 2014-10-25 16:44 CLAREMONT FßR QUARANTINE^
Sir.-If you turn back your files, you  
labour, therefore, a lot of population--
good water supply, etc , and, at the same
? September 20.
«V»
CLAREMONT FOR QUARANTINE
Sir. - If you turn back your files, you  
labour, therefore, a lot of population -
good water supply, etc., and, at the same
September 20.

COMMONWEALTH QUARANTINE STATION. RUMOURED ESTABLISHMENT AT CLAREMONT. DR. PURDY'S POSITIVE DENIAL. (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Friday 15 July 1910 page Article 2014-10-25 16:40 1 STATION." ,
STATION.
COMMONWEALTH QUARANTINE STATION. RUMOURED ESTABLISHMENT AT CLAREMONT. DR. PURDY'S POSITIVE DENIAL. (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Friday 15 July 1910 page Article 2014-10-25 16:39 A rntnour has gained currency dur-
ing the'last few days to the «fleet that
tlio. Commonwealth Government has
Glenorchy and the su rounding'districts,
as they considpr the presence of the
station within ' the municipality would
depreciate tho value of property. The
area, said to have been acquired1 is
known as Ashburton, and belong« to
Eiexmoro's estate. It consists of 300
rniiwnr on the oho hand 'and the Dar-
tivo about the sale having taken place;
the other hand, high Stnto officiais,
ler), the Minister for Land3 (Hon. A.
Hoan), and the Chief Health Officer
(Dr. Purdy) say they ¡mow nothing of
the purchase having been made. VT.
çâvo the statamont nn emphatic denial.
He said: "I hav© heard something
authorities, bat the Commonwealth lins
noither purchased it nor acquired it for
quarantine purposed." This is a very
tears of the people of tho district nt
rest. \
Tho Minister of Lands and tho Chief
Secretary both said thatthov had heard
that tho Commonwealth Government
was anxious to get the block, hut fur-
wealth want the land they can acquire I
all in the matter. The Government |
Phould the station be established
from oiersea. and ya tho district is
groinng rapidly, it is feared that a
great set-back will be giveji to it if tho
rumour proves correct, uand in the
locality is increasing ÍD value rapidly.
Tho Claremont station is practically on
b(?en bringing from £70 to £100 per
acre lately for icsidenttal purposes.
ties do not like tlîe present quarantine
landing cattle and other diawbacks,
for the purpose of obtaining a moro
Chief Commonwealth Health Offioer,
question : -
by the Commonwealth Governmont for
tion in this position«
-.
CLAREMONT. ""
A rumour has gained currency dur-
ing the last few days to the effect that
the Commonwealth Government has
Glenorchy and the surrounding districts,
as they consider the presence of the
station within the municipality would
depreciate the value of property. The
area, said to have been acquired is
known as Ashburton, and belongs to
Flexmore's estate. It consists of 300
railway on the one hand and the Der-
tive about the sale having taken place;
the other hand, high State officials,
ler), the Minister for Lands (Hon. A.
Hean), and the Chief Health Officer
(Dr. Purdy) say they know nothing of
the purchase having been made. Dr.
gave the statement an emphatic denial.
He said: "I have heard something
authorities, but the Commonwealth has
neither purchased it nor acquired it for
quarantine purposes." This is a very
fears of the people of the district at
rest.
Tho Minister of Lands and the Chief
Secretary both said that they had heard
that the Commonwealth Government
was anxious to get the block, but fur-
wealth want the land they can acquire
all in the matter. The Government
Should the station be established
from overseas, and as the district is
growing rapidly, it is feared that a
great set-back will be given to it if the
rumour proves correct. Land in the
locality is increasing in value rapidly.
The Claremont station is practically on
been bringing from £70 to £100 per
acre lately for residential purposes.
ties do not like the present quarantine
landing cattle and other drawbacks,
for the purpose of obtaining a more
Chief Commonwealth Health Officer,
question: -
by the Commonwealth Government for
tion in this position.

CLAREMONT.
Advertising (Advertising), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Tuesday 10 March 1914 page Advertising 2014-10-25 16:30 through tho large white gates at the
through the large white gates at the
Advertising (Advertising), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Tuesday 10 March 1914 page Advertising 2014-10-25 16:30 "Tho Premier Store" - BROA'NELLS - "The Stylo Leaders."
C^OME and inspect Hie beautiful
-' weaves, patterns, colours, and
shadings Fashion has designed for Uro
new season. They ure lovelier than
ever, mid big sales ure being' recoided
SPECIAL OFFER.-If desired, we
pul them asido lo be charged for at a
later dato.
our splendid rango of the neiv
TWEE'DS. The («neets ure decidedly
charming, and vulucs never belter!
Prices range lrom 1/ a yard for (ho
"Federal" Striped Tweeds lo 4,9 for
50-inch Imitation Harris Tweeds, tho
2/11. 39, mid 3/11 yard.
GREIYS, MOLES, and NAVYS in-
clude Chiffon Aimizoiis, 1Í9; Ama-
zonia ns, 2/; Venetians, Wliipeoids,
Taffetas, Cashmeres, Tantallon*. Ve
louis, Armures, Resudas, and Serges,
to be so verv fashionable this autumn.
Seiges to Pricslleys' specialities.
AT BROW NELLS.
"The Premier Store" - BROWNELLS - "The Style Leaders."
COME and inspect the beautiful
weaves, patterns, colours, and
shadings Fashion has designed for the
new season. They are lovelier than
ever, and big sales are being recorded
SPECIAL OFFER. - If desired, we
pul them aside to be charged for at a
later date.
our splendid range of the new
TWEE'DS. The effects are decidedly
charming, and values never better!
Prices range from 1/- a yard for the
"Federal" Striped Tweeds to 4/9 for
50-inch Imitation Harris Tweeds, the
2/11. 3/9, and 3/11 yard.
GREYS, MOLES, and NAVYS in-
clude Chiffon Amazons, 1/9; Ama-
zonians, 2/-; Venetians, Whipcords,
Taffetas, Cashmeres, Tantallons, Ve-
lours, Armures, Resudas, and Serges,
to be so very fashionable this autumn.
Seiges to Priestleys' specialities.
AT BROWNELLS.
Advertising (Advertising), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Tuesday 10 March 1914 page Advertising 2014-10-25 16:25 soine up to 1/6 per yaid.
CREAM FABRICS are« even still bel-
ter icpre-enled, nnd nothing will bo
more in good taste as Skirts to be« worn
with the Woollen Spoits Coals that aro
lo be so verv fashionable this autumn.
BLACK "FABRICS include all the
- WRITE FOR FREE PATTERNS.
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OP
HAKD AND SOFT PELT HATS.
ALSO À GRAND LOT OP KNITTED '
, AND
road rises the other slopo it passes'
through tho largo white gales at thor
lovel crossing, now shaded on both sides'
by tall thorn hedges. Near tho cross-
ing the now English Church, St..
George's, ia fast injuring completion,
and will ndd yet another nrehitectuiaí!
cliiirm to the locality. Claremont is theiii
passed on the left, and away to tho'
right, beyond tho railway station, tho'
solid sombre homestead of Ashbintom
stands np bare anti unadorned. Triffit'i
wealth Defence Forco as a remount dei
pot, nnd the old house is fitted up in
quarters for tho stuff. Here a laigo
tho pink of'condition, nie trained un-i
der tho able guidance- of Sergeant 01d-l
lunn mid his assistnnt'staff. A short»)
distance further on tho road passe*!
through a deep cutting, and just be-]
youd Clarcmont-lone branches away to'
tho left. It is along this lune that ii
situated tho township, if one might call
it such. A store, a school, and uuin-i
erous villas und cottages cluster closa
together, find nil round aro numerous
Tho naming of Mt. Faulkner and of
Faulkner's Cieek is ol' somo interest,
ns.it forms u link with the early days,
.not only of Tasmania, but of Victoria
nlso. Thero is no doubt but that iw
is called after' tho late Jolin Pascoe»
Fawkner, whoso name is always con-
nected _willivtho founding of Melbourne.,
Tile clifferehco in the spelling of tho
íiame is immaterial. Bouwick, in hi*
"Settlement of Port Phillip," commenta
on it tlitls:-"The difference of spelling,
his'name isnot a little curious, Iw
tho first notice' of the man in the Ho-j
bart Town-'Gnzelte/'May LU, 1814, tiwi
nanio is 'Falkner,' but tiiough once oH,
twice 'Faulkner' and 'Falkener,' it isi
usually 'Fawkner.'" Ho spoke of him-!
self as the original sottler of Port Fhil-i
lip, -as ho landed thero with Collina
in 1803^ with whom lie carno to Tas-i
mania, m oompany with his father. Ho '
was aged nbout 10 years, as ho was boral
on August 20. ,1702, and had a truly
remarkable colonial life. He was of al
somewhat wild and impulsivo naturo,,'
and wns always looked upon as tho con-|
Viicts' friend, and moro than anco goü
himself into trouble for sheltering es^l
enped prisoners. Fawkner had a farnil
near Triffit's Point, and it is said!
that the ojd hut j'ust insido the gatea
at Windermere was, inhabited by liinw
Air/ Knight does not vouch for thor;
accuracy of this, but has no reason .to
doubt it. Through somo trouble hot
was advertised for sale in the Hobart«
Town "Gnzotlc" on December 4, 1819v
ns follows:-"That most vnluablo farm,)
conveniently situated near tho new ioad|
leading to 'New Norfolk, in the district
of Glenorchy. It contains 93 acres o?,
land, five cleared, and been in cultiva
TIES, from 1/ lo 4/6.
some up to 1/6 per yard.
CREAM FABRICS are even still bet-
ter represented, and nothing will be
more in good taste as Skirts to be worn
with the Woollen Sports Coats that are
to be so verv fashionable this autumn.
BLACK FABRICS include all the
WRITE FOR FREE PATTERNS.
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF
HARD AND SOFT FELT HATS.
ALSO A GRAND LOT OP KNITTED
AND
road rises the other slope it passes
through tho large white gates at the
level crossing, now shaded on both sides
by tall thorn hedges. Near the cross-
ing the new English Church, St.
George's, is fast nearing completion,
and will add yet another architectural
charm to the locality. Claremont is then
passed on the left, and away to the
right, beyond the railway station, the
solid sombre homestead of Ashburton
stands up bare and unadorned. Triffit's
wealth Defence Force as a remount de-
pot, and the old house is fitted up in
quarters for the staff. Here a large
the pink of condition, are trained un-
der the able guidance of Sergeant Old-
ham and his assistant staff. A short
distance further on tho road passes
through a deep cutting, and just be-
yond Claremont-lane branches away to
the left. It is along this lane that is
situated the township, if one might call
it such. A store, a school, and num-
erous villas and cottages cluster close
together, and all round are numerous
The naming of Mt. Faulkner and of
Faulkner's Creek is of some interest,
as it forms a link with the early days,
not only of Tasmania, but of Victoria
also. There is no doubt but that it
is called after the late John Pascoe
Fawkner, whose name is always con-
nected with the founding of Melbourne.
The difference in the spelling of the
name is immaterial. Bonwick, in his
"Settlement of Port Phillip," comments
on it thus:- "The difference of spelling
his name is not a little curious. In
the first notice of the man in the Ho-
bart Town 'Gazette' May 21, 1814, the
name is 'Falkner,' but though once or
twice 'Faulkner' and 'Falkener,' it is
usually 'Fawkner.' " He spoke of him-
self as the original settler of Port Phil-
lip, as he landed there with Collins
in 1803, with whom he came to Tas-
mania, in company with his father. He
was aged about 10 years, as he was born
on August 20, 1792, and had a truly
remarkable colonial life. He was of a
somewhat wild and impulsive nature,
and was always looked upon as the con-
victs' friend, and more than once got
himself into trouble for sheltering es-
caped prisoners. Fawkner had a farm
near Triffit's Point, and it is said
that the old hut just inside the gates
at Windermere was inhabited by him.
Mr. Knight does not vouch for the
accuracy of this, but has no reason to
doubt it. Through some trouble he
was advertised for sale in the Hobart
Town "Gazette" on December 4, 1819,
as follows:- "That most valuable farm,
conveniently situated near the new road
leading to New Norfolk, in the district
of Glenorchy. It contains 93 acres of
land, five cleared, and been in cultiva-
TIES, from 1/- to 4/6.
CLAREMONT. ITS HISTORY AND TO-DAY. (By Our Travelling Correspondent.) (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Tuesday 10 March 1914 page Article 2014-10-25 15:56 CLAREMONT..  
CLAREMONT.
CLAREMONT. ITS HISTORY AND TO-DAY. (By Our Travelling Correspondent.) (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Tuesday 10 March 1914 page Article 2014-10-25 15:55 and slightly luithci noitli, the nigged
ndts ot tho Gunnel's Quoin flame in
tho pitliiic on the ca6lein side Claie
mont faces the east, and, whothei it
is at the lioui of dawn, 'and jocund
dn> stands tiptoe on the mistv moun-
tain top," oi in the midd.iv heal of tho
-uininei sun, oi, again, at eventide,
when Mount Fatilknei's slopes aie coi-
ned with daik shadows, mid one be-
holds Mount Diicclion's loiindcd Knoll
delitateh tinted Tilth the list, invs of
the setting sun, and in tho foiogrouiid
and slightly further north, the rugged
sides of the Gunner's Quoin frame in
the picture on the eastern side. Clare-
mont faces the east, and, whether it
is at the hour of dawn, "and jocund
day stands tiptoe on the misty moun-
tain top," or in the midday heat of the
summer sun, or, again, at eventide,
when Mount Faulkner's slopes are cov-
ered with dark shadows, and one be-
holds Mount Direction's rounded knoll
delicately tinted with the last rays of
the setting sun, and in the foreground
CLAREMONT. ITS HISTORY AND TO-DAY. (By Our Travelling Correspondent.) (Article), The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), Tuesday 10 March 1914 page Article 2014-10-25 15:50 (Bj Oin Tiavelhug Conespondent.)
north, tho main road crosses tho rail-'
way in a hollow, and as it rises tho hill-
tho left a pair of largo wrought-iron
rises, an a gentle hillside, the stately
trees mid the large, white plumes of
And that smooth slope, from which the
fowers,
theso estates, and from the water's edge
fiom th" lough, west winds, .mel be-
tween it uiiel the w ilei's "dge sun ound-
ell by oich.uds and holds, jppcni lui
dwellings, single 01 in social knots some
scattered o'ei the lei c1, and otheis
peí ched em the hillside On one's light
flows the mightv Dei went, now neal at
hand is the bioktn shoie line, culling
um aida and leinung somo sheltoiccl
lm 01, again, hidden foi a client dis
tunto horn new by some mounded
capclct and away lo the noilli, as fal
us Biidgcwiitei, ni in> miles nwav, its
palo blue wateis, crinkled on eithei hide
CLAREMONT. .
(By Our Travelling Correspondent.)
north, the main road crosses the rail-
way in a hollow, and as it rises the hill-
the left a pair of large wrought-iron
rises, on a gentle hillside, the stately
trees and the large, white plumes of
"And that smooth slope, from which the
flowers,
these estates, and from the water's edge
from the rough, west winds, and be-
tween it and the water's edge, surround-
ed by orchards and fields, appear fair
dwellings, single or in social knots: some
scattered o'er the level, and others
perched on the hillside. On one's right
flows the mighty Derwent, now near at
hand is the broken shore line, curving
inwards and forming some sheltered
bay, or, again, hidden for a short dis-
tance from view by some mounded
capelet and away to the north, as far
as Bridgewater, many miles away, its
pale blue waters, crinkled on either side
CLAREMONT..

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.