Information about Trove user: cjbrill

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,878,403
2 annmanley 2,008,656
3 NeilHamilton 1,865,163
4 noelwoodhouse 1,472,380
5 maurielyn 1,373,055
...
43 wattlesong 409,212
44 Juniris 399,424
45 cmdevine 393,578
46 cjbrill 392,101
47 PenrithLibraryVolunteers 388,066
48 JanMcDonald 386,428

392,101 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

October 2014 17,836
September 2014 16,446
August 2014 26,294
July 2014 3,715
June 2014 2,353
May 2014 1,557
April 2014 546
March 2014 958
February 2014 918
January 2014 1,736
December 2013 1,202
November 2013 698
October 2013 1,319
September 2013 3,520
August 2013 4,157
July 2013 3,630
June 2013 20,330
May 2013 16,199
April 2013 2,552
March 2013 3,105
February 2013 1,013
January 2013 862
December 2012 1,347
November 2012 390
October 2012 62
September 2012 2,394
August 2012 2,809
July 2012 19,124
June 2012 11,700
May 2012 2,356
April 2012 2,451
March 2012 753
February 2012 451
January 2012 704
December 2011 2,148
November 2011 1,544
October 2011 3,788
September 2011 868
August 2011 236
July 2011 1,986
June 2011 1,614
May 2011 493
April 2011 1,391
March 2011 21,150
February 2011 49,891
January 2011 47,659
December 2010 2,193
November 2010 3,543
October 2010 1,554
September 2010 3,683
August 2010 1,203
July 2010 4,168
June 2010 3,953
May 2010 3,190
April 2010 2,670
March 2010 1,237
February 2010 4,024
January 2010 4,143
December 2009 9,280
November 2009 7,304
October 2009 3,979
September 2009 3,512
August 2009 2,278
July 2009 1,180
June 2009 2,591
May 2009 1,913
April 2009 3,049
March 2009 812
February 2009 1,235
January 2009 493
December 2008 3,556
November 2008 6,113
October 2008 990

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
No. 14. THE EGLESTON FLOCKS. (Article), Daily Telegraph (Launceston, Tas. : 1883 - 1928), Saturday 18 October 1890 page Article 2014-10-30 16:35 King .George III. to the father of the pre
King George III. to the father of the pre-
OLD TIME RACING.—No. 17. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Thursday 29 November 1894 page Article 2014-10-30 16:33 Beverley, upon the road which leads t)
wuuld have softened an anchorite. Just in
Beverley, upon the road which leads to
would have softened an anchorite. Just in
HOBART TOWN. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Thursday 8 December 1864 page Article 2014-10-30 16:24 the late Francis Allison, Esq —Stockwell, 2032
the late Francis Allison, Esq. - Stockwell, 2032
COMMISSIONERS' OFFICE. November 15. (Article), The Hobart Town Courier and Van Diemen’s Land Gazette (Tas. : 1839 - 1840), Friday 22 November 1839 page Article 2014-10-30 16:17 day any caveat or counter-claim must be entered :
applicant; claim dated April, 1838.-Bounded on the
rie River, on the south west by 49. chains along a loca-
day any caveat or counter-claim must be entered:-
applicant; claim dated April, 1838. - Bounded on the
rie River, on the south west by 49 chains along a loca-
COMMISSIONERS' OFFICE. 22nd October, 1844. (Article), The Courier (Hobart, Tas. : 1840 - 1859), Tuesday 29 October 1844 page Article 2014-10-30 16:14 1000 acres originally located to Francis Allison, th
applicant.-Bounded on tho south east by an1
commencing at nn old marked tree and stake
al the noith angle of the first-mentioned locatipn.oji
Ellenthoipe Hall and exteuding along a line of old
south weat by C4 chains 50 links north westerly
Francis Allison passiog a line of old marked trees,,
easterly in two bearings along a location lo John
Edward Con now occupied by or belonging to
1000 acres originally located to Francis Allison, the
applicant. - Bounded on tho south east by an1
commencing at an old marked tree and stake
al the noith angle of the first-mentioned location on
Ellenthorpe Hall and extending along a line of old
south west by C4 chains 50 links north westerly
Francis Allison passing a line of old marked trees,
easterly in two bearings along a location to John
Edward Cox now occupied by or belonging to
CLAIMS FOR GRANTS. (Article), Launceston Advertiser (Tas. : 1829 - 1846), Thursday 28 November 1839 page Article 2014-10-30 16:12 tally Robert Young, whoso heir-at-law sold to the an
pliiSSJ;-Cl?iln ^ APril. -838-
tally Robert Young, whose heir-at-law sold to the ap-
plicant. - Claim dated April 1838.
SHIP NEWS. ARRIVED. (Article), Launceston Advertiser (Tas. : 1829 - 1846), Monday 22 March 1830 page Article 2014-10-30 12:04 The cr-w and prisoners are much affected
The crew and prisoners are much affected
RATS—AND SOMETHING ABOUT THE 'SENTINEL' (To the Editor. NATIONAL ADVOCATE) (Article), National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 - 1954), Saturday 9 February 1907 page Article 2014-10-29 17:05 (To the Editor. National Advocate)
Sir,— A letter in your Monday's issue
mistake, It was a subsequent tenant
rats foi the benefit of the blackguards
meet with an / success, and I suppose
the rats we'/e released, if any were left,
after one or. two : failures to establish
deilt with fully in 'letters by your
Court Bench, Walter Cooper, Rich
Nemo Pickering, * Cyclops ' (Lewis
writer since also known as '^Boondi,'
etc, still flourishing on the press and
Robertson; John McElhone, W P
individual alluded to in the par. com1
cubs of the ''aristocracy' who stood at
[ street corners insulting femuh.'s pasi
ine- without a male escort were cnu»
mine was fraudulently sold to a Bath
^SQitinel was wained by a neigh-,
'hour and duly cautioned the 'pub-
hours of the publication of the warn
the proprietor of the Seulinel de
manding an apology and retraction I
and some hundreds in cash as a'
solatium for the ' damage ' done by
proprietor of the S mtintl was
t tvinn .tiUn li.tr
iX ii-i c* 11 YYIIU uiutucu law -n/u
actually paid twenty- five pounds to
someapochryphal fund which has never
lost his all — £ 1 500. A publican near
the railway station lost ^1200. A well
known produce merchant lost ^800,
Sentinel's warning was fully justified
to a successfnl candidate and paid
bill and published ib, pointing out
that two charges amounting to £'35,
no charge whatever for their services. 1
the money disgorged. I could men
tion cases out of number to the greut j
credit of the Sentinel, but I have .
600 to 2200. When Sir Hercules
a well-known sporting official were : —
' Whenever anything extra good ap--
copy.' I think I have now said all
that is necessary in defence ot the de
the allusion, advising the person indi
after the office of the Sentinel was re
moved from George-street -0 the
street, a paragraph ivas published to
this effect : — 1 Our late landlady is
rather careless in allowing her prop
erty lo be left to take care of itself, for
office boy, George, amoDg them.'
for damages. Next morning the pro
The unfortunate victim saw the wo
people would like tc make out.
(To the Editor, NATIONAL ADVOCATE)
Sir,- A letter in your Monday's issue
mistake. It was a subsequent tenant
rats for the benefit of the blackguards
meet with any success, and I suppose
the rats were released, if any were left,
after one or two failures to establish
dealt with fully in letters by your
Court Bench, Walter Cooper, Rich-
Nemo Pickering, 'Cyclops ' (Lewis
writer since also known as 'Boondi,'
etc. still flourishing on the press and
Robertson, John McElhone, W P
individual alluded to in the par. com-
cubs of the ''aristocracy" who stood at
street corners insulting females pass-
ing without a male escort were cau-
mine was fraudulently sold to a Bath-
Sentinel was warned by a neigh-
bour and duly cautioned the pub-
hours of the publication of the warn-
the proprietor of the Sentinel de-
manding an apology and retraction
and some hundreds in cash as a
solatium for the 'damage ' done by
proprietor of the Sentinel was
a man who dreaded law and

actually paid twenty-five pounds to
some apochryphal fund which has never
lost his all - £ 1,500. A publican near
the railway station lost £1,200. A well-
known produce merchant lost £800,
Sentinel's warning was fully justified.
to a successful candidate and paid
bill and published it, pointing out
that two charges amounting to £35,
no charge whatever for their services.
the money disgorged. I could men-
tion cases out of number to the great
credit of the Sentinel, but I have
600 to 2,200. When Sir Hercules
a well-known sporting official were: -
"Whenever anything extra good ap-
copy." I think I have now said all
that is necessary in defence of the de-
the allusion, advising the person indi-
after the office of the Sentinel was re-
moved from George-street to the
street, a paragraph was published to
this effect: - "Our late landlady is
rather careless in allowing her prop-
erty to be left to take care of itself, for
office boy, George, among them."
for damages. Next morning the pro-
The unfortunate victim saw the wo-
people would like to make out.
RATS—AND SOMETHING ABOUT THE 'SENTINEL' (To the Editor. NATIONAL ADVOCATE) (Article), National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 - 1954), Saturday 9 February 1907 page Article 2014-10-29 16:52 RATS— AND SOMETHING
ABOUT THE 'SENTINEL*
(To thelEditor. National Advocate)
the question of the gibe on ' that
famous literary production the Sen
writers 1 knew on the paper were
for six months, and afterwards A G
argued his case before ihe Privy
account of their positions. SirJJohn
Robertson; John McJMhone, YV p
this splendid array 'of talent left the
was hated and fearedbyafew amorous
the following morning 3 company of
all the married roues of the cify each
menting on the after-dark perform
urst syndicate for some ^4000. The
RATS - AND SOMETHING
ABOUT THE 'SENTINEL'
(To the Editor. National Advocate)
the question of the gibe on 'that
famous literary production the Sen-
writers I knew on the paper were
for six months, and afterwards A. G.
argued his case before the Privy
account of their positions. Sir John
Robertson; John McElhone, W P
this splendid array of talent left the
was hated and feared by a few amorous
the following morning a company of
all the married roues of the city each
menting on the after-dark perform-
urst syndicate for some £4000. The
"Give Mela Subject" VERSATILE REPORTERS. HOW A BAILIFF BEAT A DEBTOR. (Article), National Advocate (Bathurst, NSW : 1889 - 1954), Tuesday 16 January 1912 page Article 2014-10-29 16:43 mean by this ?' I never said this
'Give ifcSa Subjeel'
Grosvenor Bunster used to ?describe
to me the difficulty he ;had in pitching
But. when once found a'nd decided,
upon t'he writing' was never' a trouble
to him1. iBunster's name has fur
to trouble and out of it again by un
mitigated bluff. His 'real name was
press work as 'Grosvenor Bunster.'
One day, while employed on the'
'Melbourne Age,' he was sent down
to the House to .take — that is, to re
port — Gavan 'Duffy on some most
while en route to the House, 'he call
in such a state that foe lay down and
He got his note book out, and, know
take, 'he rapidly wrote out a speech
of what lie thought Duffy would, or
?his copy, he told mo he had some
misgivings on the matter, and there
'his_stujf into -'shorthand, and fortu
with a copy 'of the paper in his hand,
tho office' and addressed 'the gentle
man in charge, said: 'What do you
whole report is a vile concoction.'
Bunster was sent for, and ho came
correct copy of his shorthand ootes,
which he produced, and, greatly mys
tified Duffy, who then left, .and the
t'he facts leaked out, and Bunster got
a caution- that such a thing must
'Empire' the late John Byron got
down at the 'House and into the press
gallery, :but I decided that it would
not 'suit me, and I 'did not accent the ,
appointment. 'But that very day a J
similar case occurred on t'he 'Em- j
pire.' A boat race was to come off
that afternoon, between Punch and '
McGrath, and a reporter was sent to i
write up the race. Like Bunster, lie \
got drunk on the road. 'He sobered up j
as tne people were coming nome, ana i
from which he wrote out his- report.
Punch demanding .to know what the
siacked right off. A cable from Eng
land. 'announcing .the death of Judge
the brothers Harry and George Co'hen
rented the premises under tne School
of Arts als general storekeepers. I
business matters frequently. A no
income largely 'supplemented by pri
vate practice, from whicfh lie probably
all. the tradespeople in the town what
he called 'a turn.' That is, he or
dered goods right and left, 'but did
not pay for them until legal proceed
the tune of some .£2500, 'but turned
a deaf ear to all applications for pay
ment. So I was 'sent up to 'his resi
dence, some five miles 'to the south I
the summons on his' wife, a noted
Bathurst beauty, daughter of a pro
waJs that these great important
a cliair or bedstead m the place.
table was a sheet of 'bark with sap
No horse or vehicle was to bo seen,
so I read the case as: 'Prepare to
meet bailiffs!' I walked about
about 27 tons. It was t'he only pro
perty I could sec to seize in the event
entered for the Cohens, and, after a |
reasonable time, and no attempt lo '
settle the matter, exocution was is- 1
sued, and' I went up and seized, leav
ing' in possession my main, an ex
the sale,, and oh tho day appointed
comfortable circumstances'. I read
wished to do a good turn, to tho deb
tor, it would 'be to bid^' and make
the 'hay fetch something towards re
lieving: the man's troubles. The only
one would advance, and I was greet
ed with chaff and much : self-praiso
on their grcaS elevcraessj btyi I1 lad
and brought him .home. I reported
Judge granted a ca sa at once. The
amounted to about ,£30, and was paid
interested Burns's lines — 'The best
aft agley.' I forgot to say that
for whom I recovered the monoy.
mean by this ? I never said this
"'Give Me a Subjeet"
Grosvenor Bunster used to describe
to me the difficulty he had in pitching
But when once found and decided,
upon the writing was never a trouble
to him. Bunster's name has fur-
to trouble and out of it again by un-
mitigated bluff. His real name was
press work as "Grosvenor Bunster."
One day, while employed on the
"Melbourne Age," he was sent down
to the House to take - that is, to re-
port - Gavan Duffy on some most
while en route to the House, he call-
in such a state that he lay down and
He got his note book out, and, know-
take, he rapidly wrote out a speech
of what he thought Duffy would, or
his copy, he told me he had some
misgivings on the matter, and there-
his stuff into shorthand, and fortu-
with a copy of the paper in his hand,
the office and addressed the gentle-
man in charge, said: "What do you
whole report is a vile concoction."
Bunster was sent for, and he came
correct copy of his shorthand notes,
which he produced, and, greatly mys-
tified Duffy, who then left, and the
the facts leaked out, and Bunster got
a caution that such a thing must
"Empire" the late John Byron got
down at the House and into the press
gallery, but I decided that it would
not suit me, and I did not accept the
appointment. But that very day a
similar case occurred on the "Em-
pire." A boat race was to come off
that afternoon, between Punch and
McGrath, and a reporter was sent to
write up the race. Like Bunster, he
got drunk on the road. He sobered up
as the people were coming home, and
from which he wrote out his report.
Punch demanding to know what the
sacked right off. A cable from Eng-
land announcing the death of Judge
the brothers Harry and George Cohen
rented the premises under the School
of Arts as general storekeepers. I
business matters frequently. A no-
income largely supplemented by pri-
vate practice, from which he probably
all the tradespeople in the town what
he called "a turn." That is, he or-
dered goods right and left, but did
not pay for them until legal proceed-
the tune of some £2500, but turned
a deaf ear to all applications for pay-
ment. So I was sent up to his resi-
dence, some five miles to the south
the summons on his wife, a noted
Bathurst beauty, daughter of a pro-
was that these great important
a chair or bedstead in the place.
table was a sheet of bark with sap-
No horse or vehicle was to be seen,
so I read the case as: "Prepare to
meet bailiffs!" I walked about
about 27 tons. It was the only pro-
perty I could see to seize in the event
entered for the Cohens, and, after a
reasonable time, and no attempt to
settle the matter, execution was is-
sued, and I went up and seized, leav-
ing in possession my man, an ex-
the sale, and oh the day appointed
comfortable circumstances. I read
wished to do a good turn to the deb-
tor, it would be to bid, and make
the hay fetch something towards re-
lieving the man's troubles. The only
one would advance, and I was greet-
ed with chaff and much self-praise
on their great cleverness; nut I lad
and brought him home. I reported
Judge granted a case at once. The
amounted to about £30, and was paid
interested Burns's lines - "The best
aft agley." I forgot to say that
for whom I recovered the money.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.