Information about Trove user: cjbrill

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,110,534
2 NeilHamilton 2,152,428
3 annmanley 2,013,768
4 noelwoodhouse 1,745,711
5 maurielyn 1,409,302
...
46 cmdevine 419,242
47 JanMcDonald 409,709
48 Juniris 403,917
49 cjbrill 394,021
50 vjkingsr 384,366
51 graham.pearce 369,994

394,021 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

February 2015 404
January 2015 714
December 2014 193
November 2014 609
October 2014 17,836
September 2014 16,446
August 2014 26,294
July 2014 3,715
June 2014 2,353
May 2014 1,557
April 2014 546
March 2014 958
February 2014 918
January 2014 1,736
December 2013 1,202
November 2013 698
October 2013 1,319
September 2013 3,520
August 2013 4,157
July 2013 3,630
June 2013 20,330
May 2013 16,199
April 2013 2,552
March 2013 3,105
February 2013 1,013
January 2013 862
December 2012 1,347
November 2012 390
October 2012 62
September 2012 2,394
August 2012 2,809
July 2012 19,124
June 2012 11,700
May 2012 2,356
April 2012 2,451
March 2012 753
February 2012 451
January 2012 704
December 2011 2,148
November 2011 1,544
October 2011 3,788
September 2011 868
August 2011 236
July 2011 1,986
June 2011 1,614
May 2011 493
April 2011 1,391
March 2011 21,150
February 2011 49,891
January 2011 47,659
December 2010 2,193
November 2010 3,543
October 2010 1,554
September 2010 3,683
August 2010 1,203
July 2010 4,168
June 2010 3,953
May 2010 3,190
April 2010 2,670
March 2010 1,237
February 2010 4,024
January 2010 4,143
December 2009 9,280
November 2009 7,304
October 2009 3,979
September 2009 3,512
August 2009 2,278
July 2009 1,180
June 2009 2,591
May 2009 1,913
April 2009 3,049
March 2009 812
February 2009 1,235
January 2009 493
December 2008 3,556
November 2008 6,113
October 2008 990

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
HOBART TOWN GAZETTE. (Article), Hobart Town Gazette and Van Diemen’s Land Advertiser (Tas. : 1821 - 1825), Saturday 9 February 1822 page Article 2015-02-26 23:15 400 yards from the main land ; it is very thickly
not heard of her since.-The sawyers were all on
" The store-house has been got up ; and, I am
" The Pilot has established himself at the
" I beg to mention, that Mr. Kelly has cheer-
fully rendered every assistance in his power : his
rect; -and his services have been very useful and
" The person that was appointed acting store-
" The brig Sophia sails to-morrow morning for
." To His Honor  
" I have the honour to be, &c. &c
400 yards from the main land; it is very thickly
not heard of her since. - The sawyers were all on
"The store-house has been got up; and, I am
"The Pilot has established himself at the
"I beg to mention, that Mr. Kelly has cheer-
fully rendered every assistance in his power: his
rect; - and his services have been very useful and
"The person that was appointed acting store-
"The brig Sophia sails to-morrow morning for
."To His Honor  
"I have the honour to be, &c. &c.
COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE. LONDON, JUNE 4. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Tuesday 15 August 1854 page Article 2015-02-26 14:14 Tito thonl s l s In l Juno, without any
Tito thonl s l s In l June, without any
Shipping Intelligence. ARRIVALS. (Article), Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899), Saturday 30 September 1854 page Article 2015-02-26 14:13 .Lct ptenberg.--laanlue Juno, 481 toin. J. 0. ntlult,
malter, fur Blattvln; J. Crooke, aglsent. Ntopnanengerl;
oEP~aTUI?.
September 29.- Barque Juno, 481 tons, J. O. Kluin,
master, for Batavia; J. Crooke, agent. No passengers.
DEPARTURES.
NEW NORFOLK. (Article), The Hobart Town Courier (Tas. : 1827 - 1839), Saturday 15 January 1831 page Article 2015-02-26 12:02 of the harbour, and near the entrance into Hebe's in
on the spot. About 100 of this number are em
ment is generally of a very disagreeable and harrass
or the wind adverse so as to impede the pro
gress of the boats, this meal is sometimes delay
Macquarie Harbour grape. It was so named by Mr. Lempriere, late of the Commissariat at that station, who first brought it into notice as a desireable acqui
large digited leaf like the vine, grows with remark
with great effect as an antiscorbutic among the pri
seed ; but some beautiful specimens may be seen in  
the pleasure grounds of Mr. Moodie's villa, at Ho
pastures, is unknown ; but the smaller, or brush species (macropus elegans), and the Wallaby are common. That delicious animal, the wombat, (commonly known at that place by the name of badger, hence the little island of that name on the map was
numerous streams constantly flowing from the thick
of eel common in other parts of the island, is how
of the harbour, and near the entrance into Hebe's in-
on the spot. About 100 of this number are em-
ment is generally of a very disagreeable and harass-
or the wind adverse so as to impede the pro-
gress of the boats, this meal is sometimes delay-
Macquarie Harbour grape. It was so named by Mr. Lempriere, late of the Commissariat at that station, who first brought it into notice as a desireable acqui-
large digited leaf like the vine, grows with remark-
with great effect as an antiscorbutic among the pri-
seed; but some beautiful specimens may be seen in  
the pleasure grounds of Mr. Moodie's villa, at Ho-
pastures, is unknown; but the smaller, or brush species (macropus elegans), and the Wallaby are common. That delicious animal, the wombat, (commonly known at that place by the name of badger, hence the little island of that name on the map was
numerous streams constantly flowing from the thick-
of eel common in other parts of the island, is how-
Tasmanian News. (From the Hobart Town Courier.) (Article), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Tuesday 18 May 1830 page Article 2015-02-26 11:43 Amil. ' 24,.-Four men, namely John Taylor,
CTagmantón Mröj»»
(From the Hobart Town Courier.) '
APRIL 24,.-Four men, namely John Taylor,
Tasmanian News.
(From the Hobart Town Courier.)
Tasmanian News. (From the Hobart Town Courier.) (Article), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Tuesday 18 May 1830 page Article 2015-02-26 11:42 Wo would remind those people who are now earning
day. . .
Wo havo great ploasure in stating that in addition
We would remind those people who are now earning
day.
We have great pleasure in stating that in addition
Tasmanian News. (From the Hobart Town Courier.) (Article), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Tuesday 18 May 1830 page Article 2015-02-26 11:41 The following is the circumstonce to which we
a very quiot stato, owing in some measure to the
exertions of the Chaplain the Rov. XV. Schofiold,
who is indofatignblo to the discharge of his duties
Mr. S. in Oct. 20 in conjunción with another officer
of the settlement established n School for the Pri-
soners, whoso attendance however is quite optional
with themselves ; they are taught reading and writ-
ing hy Teachers selected from among themsloves,
under tho superintendence of the above mentioned
Gentleman, ono of whom has now loft tno sottlo
ment. The School is hold fonr times a week in the
is remarkably ordorly and their progress astonishing.
Thero aro some men upwards of 50 years of age
lourning their nlphahot. It is satisfactory to know
that sinco the first establishment of tho School not
one of tho' Scholars (amounting now to 58, exclusivo
of 12 Teachers) has boen brought up before the
Commander for any serious oflbneo. Some of their
copying books aro now in Town,
Tho School hours aro after the men hare done
Air. Dunn, the Banker, has received a lottor from
Mr. Schofield in which the substance of tho above
communication is repeatod. Mr. Schofiold expresses
a sanguine hopo of considerable improvement in the
situation of tho prisoners at this miserable place.
Wo have much satisfaction in finding that whatever
prisoners so conduct thomsolvos as to obtain Mr.
Sclnfield's recommendation to His Excellency for
mitigation of sontonce, such recommendation is in-
prisoners liberated at Sir. Schofield's requefct.
May 1.-The Bengal Merchant, Captain A. Du-
An Aborigine caiioiit in a man-thai1.-The
features of this case are rather novel. Tho Police
Magistrate of Oatlands district sent, out in the
co irse of last week, a patrolo of three constables to
oxauiine the country between Bettsholnio on the
Big Lagoon, and the land of Air. Adey, at the junc-
tion of the Little Swan Port River, and tho Eastern
Marsh Rivnlot. The object of tho patrole was to
look for stock ynids concealod in that unfrequented
stables when they wero at Mr.'Adey's hut, for they
,'hnd not been away half an hour before the «Abori
,graos onforsd tho htít, ofid oommoncoA robbing it.
and scatteriug thing about. By Mr. Adey'« orders
a man trap had boon placed in tho ontry of tho hut,
and sugar placod in it. The* sugar catching the
oyos of the cable tribo, one of thom thrust his hand
in to tako the sugar, who waa in an instant caught
and hold fast. Having no notion of any sort of
will do no harm unless in the hands of a man, tho
Aborigines must have thought the trap to have boen
som« living self-moving being; they scampered off
Six of tho Aborigines were seen to-day in the
The following is the circumstance to which we
a very quiet state, owing in some measure to the
exertions of the Chaplain the Rev. W. Schofield,
who is indefatigable to the discharge of his duties
Mr. S. in Oct. 20 in conjunction with another officer
of the settlement established a School for the Pri-
soners, whose attendance however is quite optional
with themselves; they are taught reading and writ-
ing by Teachers selected from among themselves,
under the superintendence of the above mentioned
Gentleman, one of whom has now left the settle-
ment. The School is held four times a week in the
is remarkably orderly and their progress astonishing.
There are some men upwards of 50 years of age
learning their alphabet. It is satisfactory to know
that since the first establishment of the School not
one of the Scholars (amounting now to 58, exclusive
of 12 Teachers) has been brought up before the
Commander for any serious offence. Some of their
copying books are now in Town.
The School hours are after the men have done
Mr. Dunn, the Banker, has received a letter from
Mr. Schofield in which the substance of the above
communication is repeated. Mr. Schofield expresses
a sanguine hope of considerable improvement in the
situation of the prisoners at this miserable place.
We have much satisfaction in finding that whatever
prisoners so conduct themselves as to obtain Mr.
Schofield's recommendation to His Excellency for
mitigation of sentence, such recommendation is in-
prisoners liberated at Mr. Schofield's request.
May 1. - The Bengal Merchant, Captain A. Du-
AN ABORIGINE CAUGHT IN A MAN-TRAP. - The
features of this case are rather novel. The Police
Magistrate of Oatlands district sent out in the
course of last week, a patrole of three constables to
examine the country between Bettsholme on the
Big Lagoon, and the land of Mr. Adey, at the junc-
tion of the Little Swan Port River, and the Eastern
Marsh Rivulet. The object of the patrole was to
look for stock yards concealed in that unfrequented
stables when they were at Mr. Adey's hut, for they
had not been away half an hour before the Abori-
gines entered the hut, and commenced robbing it.
and scattering things about. By Mr. Adey's orders
a man trap had been placed in the entry of the hut,
and sugar placed in it. The sugar catching the
eyes of the sable tribe, one of them thrust his hand
in to take the sugar, who was in an instant caught
and held fast. Having no notion of any sort of
will do no harm unless in the hands of a man, the
Aborigines must have thought the trap to have been
some living self-moving being; they scampered off
Six of the Aborigines were seen to-day in the
Tasmanian News. (From the Hobart Town Courier.) (Article), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Tuesday 18 May 1830 page Article 2015-02-26 11:29 - Macquarie Haubour.-Wo wore iavotired last
weok with the following account of a sohool for
Macquarie« Harbour. The same account was alco
forwarded to the Courier, in tho last number of that
Journal it appeared, noverthploss, wo considor die
'subject too important not to repeat it ; particularly
as wo have thereby the opportunity of oxprossing
of tho Rev. W. Schofied, the Wesleyan Missionary.
go who could elsewhere procure tho means of life.
Great praise is due to Mr. Lampiere ("who recently
returned hero from the chnrgo of tho Commissariat
we apprehend will experience aa irremodiablo loss
Wo nndorstand the health of tho prisoners is as
nsual, such as may bo expected ot nearly tho south
ermost extruniity "of the known world, and where in
a climato humid as such must bo, neither vegetables
nor fresh ment aro over tasted by any of the miser-
able beimrs suffering there tho very worst of exist-
ence. The scurvy of courso prevails there to n
most serious extent, Mr. Lampriere who wns at to
head of the Commissariat, and of course had tho
best facilities of obtaining food, is not himself freo
oflicor on his return from that placo should receive
waters produce no fish, and tho land almost refuses
The following is tho circumstonce to which wo
havo referred :
MACQUARIE HARBOUR. - We were favoured last
week with the following account of a school for
Macquarie Harbour. The same account was also
forwarded to the Courier, in the last number of that
Journal it appeared, nevertheless, we consider the
subject too important not to repeat it; particularly
as we have thereby the opportunity of expressing
of the Rev. W. Schofield, the Wesleyan Missionary.
go who could elsewhere procure the means of life.
Great praise is due to Mr. Lampiere (who recently
returned here from the charge of the Commissariat
we apprehend will experience an irremediable loss
We understand the health of the prisoners is as
usual, such as may be expected at nearly the south-
ermost extremity of the known world, and where in
a climate humid as such must be, neither vegetables
nor fresh meat are ever tasted by any of the miser-
able beings suffering there the very worst of exist-
ence. The scurvy of course prevails there to a
most serious extent, Mr. Lempriere who was at the
head of the Commissariat, and of course had the
best facilities of obtaining food, is not himself free
officer on his return from that place should receive
waters produce no fish, and the land almost refuses
The following is the circumstonce to which we
have referred:-
Tasmanian News. (From the Hobart Town Courier.) (Article), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Tuesday 18 May 1830 page Article 2015-02-26 11:22 to tho successful labours of the Rev. Mr. Schofipld
in his vocation at Maequarie-harbour, »'school has
who wore formerly wholly ignonmt even of tho al-
phabet, aro now capablo of reading tho new testa-
Tho prisoners at Mncqnarie-harbour aro ni prewnt
healthy and quiet. In tho school established for
the prisoners, who oro howovor, not obligod to at-
tend unless it is their own wish, tho scholars are
thomsolvos who also altond voluntarily, and the
wholo is under tho joint superintendence of the
chaplain ond another officer oí tho settlement, the
latter howovor has left tho station. This sohool was
established by those gontlemen in October, 1029,
scholars, amounting now to 53, inolusive of IS
toachors, has been brought up before the command-
ant for, any sorious offqnee. Amongst tho sobólo«
there aro mon abovo fifty years of age.
to the successful labours of the Rev. Mr. Schofield
in his vocation at Macquarie-harbour, a school has
who were formerly wholly ignorant even of the al-
phabet, are now capable of reading the new testa-
The prisoners at Macquarie-harbour are at present
healthy and quiet. In the school established for
the prisoners, who are, however, not obliged to at-
tend unless it is their own wish, the scholars are
themselves who also attend voluntarily, and the
whole is under the joint superintendence of the
chaplain and another officer of the settlement, the
latter however has left the station. This school was
established by those gentlemen in October, 1829,
scholars, amounting now to 53, inclusive of 12
teachers, has been brought up before the command-
ant for any serious offence. Amongst the scholars
there are men above fifty years of age.
Tasmanian News. (From the Hobart Town Courier.) (Article), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Tuesday 18 May 1830 page Article 2015-02-26 11:16 whose arm waa fast, dragged tho trap about a hun-
dred yards after bim. Ile must then have received
away on tho trap till they actually disentangled the
man, but at the losa of ono half of his arm. It is
very probable that tho Aboriginos will not soon for-
got tliis lesson, and that it will render them very
tables, stools, or boxes, may bite thom. Thoy had
been at Mr. Adoy's farm about a fortnight previous,
and threatened his mon, carting to thom iu brokon
English, " Wee'l have you." ,
Tho attention of tho patrolo on this oxenrsion
waa attracted by observing between Hettsholmo,
and near M'Gill's Marsh, a groat numbor of trees
newly barked. This part of tho Island is a great
rendezvous for tho natives, especially in the win-
ter, and tho bark so stripped, is most likely intended
for huts whenever thoy »hall again come round in
Sis of tho Aborigines' were soon to-day ia the
gully betweon Bowhill and the half moon sugar
loaf in ths parish of Exmouth. Thoy crossed
tho Ex-Rivulot, and went towards tho Table
Mountain, It is not very usual at this time of
the year for tho Aborigines to go, to the westward,
the greater portion of thom generally soeking tho
Eastern sea-coast, but thero aro few triboa, (vory
small in number) that koop prowling about the Big
River, Shannon tier, and tho Clydo, na far as tho
Quoin behind. Captain Wood's and tho Tuble Moun-
. The man's hand wa» loft m the trap, «nd is now
ia the possession of Mr. Adoy's servant.
It is understood that a man waa killel by a party
of nativos at Jorusalom last week. Black Tom is
a sheep in tho European way. Thoy now look out
for sheep flocks whorover thoy go.
whose arm waa fast, dragged the trap about a hun-
dred yards after him. He must then have received
away on the trap till they actually disentangled the
man, but at the loss of one half of his arm. It is
very probable that the Aborigines will not soon for-
get this lesson, and that it will render them very
tables, stools, or boxes, may bite them. They had
been at Mr. Adey's farm about a fortnight previous,
and threatened his men, carting to them in broken
English, " Wee'l have you."
The attention of the patrole on this excursion
was attracted by observing between Bettsholme,
and near M'Gill's Marsh, a great number of trees
newly barked. This part of the Island is a great
rendezvous for the natives, especially in the win-
ter, and the bark so stripped, is most likely intended
for huts whenever they shall again come round in
Six of tho Aborigines were seen to-day in the
gully between Bowhill and the half moon sugar
loaf in the parish of Exmouth. They crossed
the Ex-Rivulet, and went towards the Table
Mountain. It is not very usual at this time of
the year for the Aborigines to go to the westward,
the greater portion of them generally seeking the
Eastern sea-coast, but there are few tribes, (very
small in number) that keep prowling about the Big
River, Shannon tier, and the Clyde, as far as the
Quoin behind Captain Wood's and the Table Moun-
The man's hand was left in the trap, and is now
in the possession of Mr. Adey's servant.
It is understood that a man waa killed by a party
of natives at Jerusalem last week. Black Tom is
a sheep in the European way. They now look out
for sheep flocks wherever they go.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.