Information about Trove user: beetle

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,511,299
2 NeilHamilton 3,079,397
3 noelwoodhouse 2,978,290
4 annmanley 2,243,541
5 John.F.Hall 2,207,614
...
4581 LeeTAS 3,228
4582 qldpalaeo 3,228
4583 lja60 3,226
4584 beetle 3,222
4585 JenCWPearson 3,222
4586 fionakmcg 3,221

3,222 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2015 16
July 2015 7
June 2015 4
April 2015 1
December 2014 1
November 2014 11
June 2014 1
April 2014 80
March 2014 40
February 2014 169
January 2014 102
December 2013 3
November 2013 36
October 2013 41
June 2013 4
May 2013 5
December 2012 2
November 2012 1
July 2012 2
June 2012 6
March 2012 28
February 2012 209
January 2012 355
December 2011 89
November 2011 167
October 2011 54
September 2011 14
August 2011 86
July 2011 7
June 2011 324
May 2011 724
April 2011 102
March 2011 50
November 2010 26
October 2010 374
September 2010 81

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,511,268
2 NeilHamilton 3,079,397
3 noelwoodhouse 2,978,290
4 annmanley 2,243,471
5 John.F.Hall 2,207,609
...
4573 Julie73 3,231
4574 gibeor 3,229
4575 qldpalaeo 3,228
4576 beetle 3,222
4577 JenCWPearson 3,222
4578 vtlivelive 3,222

3,222 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2015 16
July 2015 7
June 2015 4
April 2015 1
December 2014 1
November 2014 11
June 2014 1
April 2014 80
March 2014 40
February 2014 169
January 2014 102
December 2013 3
November 2013 36
October 2013 41
June 2013 4
May 2013 5
December 2012 2
November 2012 1
July 2012 2
June 2012 6
March 2012 28
February 2012 209
January 2012 355
December 2011 89
November 2011 167
October 2011 54
September 2011 14
August 2011 86
July 2011 7
June 2011 324
May 2011 724
April 2011 102
March 2011 50
November 2010 26
October 2010 374
September 2010 81

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails
2017-06-27 15:42 Separate parts of work 219632371 into work 226610287
Different images
<separate><from suid='219632371'/><ids>244930450</ids><title>Eric Douglas in the Victorian Alps</title><author></author><published>2017-02-03 10:26:46</published></separate>

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Air Tractor or Airframe – (AAE) 1911-1914 - Boat Harbour, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay
    List
    Public

    The Airframe was sitting on the ice near Boat Harbour, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay when the BANZ Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) of 1929-1931 and Sir Douglas Mawson visited that site on 5th and 6th January 1931.
    This Airframe was rigged as an air tractor when the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911-1914 was based there at the huts (Mawsons Huts) and in 1913-1914 it was stripped of its engine and propeller to become just an airframe, and dragged to the edge of Boat Harbour.
    Sir Douglas Mawson had envisaged aeroplane flight in the Antarctic at the time of the AAE 1911-1914 when he was the leader. The aeroplane bought with the intention of being flown by the AAE was a Vickers REP designed 60HP Monoplane. However, unfortunately it incurred heavy damage in a test flight in Adelaide two months before the ship Aurora departed for the Antarctic. Nevertheless Mawson decided to still take the plane south and use it as an ‘Air Tractor’ as it made good publicity. However the plane was stripped of its wings and the metal sheathing from the fuselage, before it was taken to the Antarctic.
    At Cape Denison, Frank Bickerton of the AAE 1911-1914 expedition spent most of 1912 winter months converting it to a sledge. However use proved that it was not too successful in this role as it was slow, heavy and cumbersome.
    When Eric Douglas viewed and photographed the airframe, and even sat on it, in early January, 1931 it is clear from his notes that he thought that it had been an intact and flyable aircraft for he commented that “they could not fly it because it was too windy”. I suppose that he did not ask Sir Douglas Mawson about its history as he seems to have assumed that if it had been taken to Commonwealth Bay by the AAE then it could potentially fly?
    At some stage the airframe disappeared from its ice perch near Boat Harbour. It was there still in 1976, but had disappeared by 1981. It was a mystery? Did it sink, was it blown some distance and taken away on pack ice or did it did just get blown into the Boat Harbour?
    The Mawsons Huts Foundation and in particular Dr Chris Henderson of Hobart began a research study in about 2008 and part of this study was a careful analysis of all photographs of the airframe sitting in its last known position. This enabled transits to be drawn and a most likely current position to be pin-pointed if the airframe is in fact underneath the ice. There are also rivers under the ice at Cape Denison and so this fact complicates the scenario.
    The Mawsons Huts Foundation has carried out extensive scientifically aided and physical searches for the airframe in recent Antarctic summers. By chance in 2010 a carpenter working on the huts found some rusty pieces when skirting around Boat Harbour and they were identified as part of the airframe. They were “four connecting pieces, about 100 mm in size each, from the last section of the tail, which was cut off before the frame was abandoned”. (Dr Chris Henderson). However the bulk of the airframe has not been located.
    The Mawsons Huts party which went to clear the huts of ice and snow in the Summer of 2015 -2016 had to fly in by helicopter to Cape Denison from the ship l’Astrolabe hove-to some 20 nautical miles away, as what was the usual path to Cape Denison was blocked by the large and very lengthy iceberg B-9B grounded on the western edge of Commonwealth Bay and fast ice had built up inshore of the berg making access by sea impossible.
    However, in January, 2016 it was reported that the iceberg which had been bocking sea access to Mawson Huts had now broken up. So I imagine that the search for the airframe will continue.
    The Search for Mawsons Air Tractor by Dr Chris Henderson -
    http://www.chrishenderson.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/1-THE-SEARCH-FOR-MAWSONS-AIR-TRACTOR-I-2009-Part-1.pdf

    This was written by me in July 2016, so the situation regarding the Air Tractor or Airframe search needs to be brought up to date. I imagine that the search will continue in the Summer of 2017/2018. There is a cost of course.

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-25
    User data
  2. ALFRED THOMPSON - District Foreman, Running Inspector, District Inspector - Victorian Railways
    List
    Public

    Alfred Thompson was born 11th September 1836 at St Mary Redcliffe, Bristol, England and baptised on 23rd October 1836 at All Saints, Publow, Somerset. Son of Henry Thompson bap. 6th May, 1810 in Publow, Somerset, a Master Saddler, Harness Maker, Dealer and Chapman (Pedlar), and Ann Garland born 2nd October, 1805, Backwell, Somerset. Alfred appeared on the 1841 Census in the Redcliffe Hill area of Bristol with his parents Henry and Ann; and siblings Priscilla and Frederick.

    A Trade Card of Henry Thompson is in the online collection at the Fitzwilliam Museum at the University of Cambridge. It refers to Henry Thompson before he was a Master Saddler and Harness Maker (that is as a Saddler and Harness Maker) -

    Title:
    Trade card for Henry Thompson, Saddler and Harness Maker, Bristol

    Maker:
    Unknown; printmaker

    Category(s):
    print; trade card

    Name:
    trade card

    Date:
    circa 1830 — 1850

    School/Style:
    British

    Period:
    19th century

    Technique(s):
    engraving
    hand colouring

    Dimension(s):
    height, sheet, 90, mm
    width, sheet, 60, mm

    Acquisition:
    bequeathed; 1923; Perceval, Spencer George

    Inscription(s):
    inscription; plate centre; printed; H. THOMPSON, / Saddler, & Harness / MAKER / 5, Redcliff Hill, / Bristol.
    signature; plate lower centre; printed; Stewart Sc.

    Accession:
    Object Number: P.12842-R
    (Paintings, Drawings and Prints)
    (record id: 185498; input: 2011-09-20; modified: )

    Permanent
    Identifier:
    http://data.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/id/object/185498

    A number of records give Alfred's date of birth as being on 11th September, 1837 but these records are obviously incorrect for he was baptised in October, 1836 and I have a copy of that record. Even his Death record for 19th May, 1920 gives his age as 82 but he was actually 83.

    Alfred Thompson was a descendant of a quite innovative and adventurous Gloucestershire and Somerset family on his paternal side. Before his father Henry, there were two Thomas Thompsons - Thomas 1745 St Marys, Stanton Drew and his son Thomas 1779 Christchurch, Bristol and they both became Burgesses of Bristol - they were Copper Work's owners - they owned Mines and Mills and were hence also Copper Workers - in Somerset based in Publow and Pensford. The family had gradually left the region of the Forest of Dean (Dene) where their Thompson ancestors mined - Redbrook, Upper Redbrook, Newland and Colford/Coleford in Gloucestershire on to Bitton, Gloucestershire and then on to Somerset.

    A couple of generations back further John/Johannes Thompson 1687 of All Saints, Newland, Gloucestershire had married Anna (Anne) Coster 1687 also of All Saints, Newland on 15th June, 1709 in the Gloucester Cathedral in Gloucestershire - John's father John Thompson c1660 was of Redbrook and Anna's father was James/Jacobi Coster 1661 a son of the Copper entrepreneur John Coster c1613 of Whitecleeve, Newland, Gloucestershire. However James/Jacobi was a Potter and this probably set him apart from his high profile brother John born 1647 and John's sons Thomas 1684 - MP for Bristol, John 1694 and Robert c1697 who were all engaged in Copper mining and Brass smelting; and in Thomas's case in running slave trade ships.

    While in his turn Alfred Thompson was a bit different and became a District Foreman - Loco Branch (1882), Running Inspector - Loco Branch (1884) and District Inspector (1889) with the Victorian Railways. He was appointed to the Victorian Railways on 8/1860 (Pro Vic). This record also states that he was married but he did not marry (Fanny Shiels) till 1866. By the way the Victorian Railways absorbed some private companies between 1857 and 1860 - Geelong & Melbourne Railway Co. and the Mt Alexander & Murray River Railway Co. and some even later as in the case of the Melbourne & Hobsons Bay Railway Co. (Ref - a Trove researcher).

    Nevertheless in spite of the record showing a commencement date of August,1860, Alfred may have commenced work in the Victoria Railways sometime between 1858 and 1862 as other references point to a start by him both earlier and later than the August, 1860. Alfred's Death Certificate for 19th May, 1920, states that he was in the Colony of Victoria for 62 years.

    On 20th October, 1862 Alfred Thompson drove the first train engine from Melbourne to Bendigo (Sandhurst) at the opening of that line - from his own reported account. He had just turned 26.

    In about 1882 Alfred Thompson was the District Locomotive Foreman on the Gipps Land [Gippsland] and South Suburban lines which carried both passenger and goods trains. Railway accidents of varying magnitudes eg loss of life, serious injuries and damage to railway engines and carriages were a blight of the railway system being newly established in the state of Victoria; and this must have been distressing obviously for the victims and their families, for the Victorian Railway system chiefs, employees of the railways, railways users and the public in general.

    Regarding a head on train accident between two trains near Hawthorn Station in 1882 an 'Accident Inquiry' was set up in 1883 and Mr Alfred Thompson was mentioned in newspapers as having stated that (April 1883) with regard to arrangements made with him for the Box-hill (Boxhill) special on 2nd December (1882). 'He received the time tables on the afternoon of the 1st inst. and issued them to the driver of the special...He thought that the omission from the timetables of the special of any mention of meeting the ordinary train at Hawthorn, was an important omission, but, notwithstanding, he should have known that the trains were to meet there. He did not call the driver's attention specifically to the omission. Alfred Thompson, locomotive foreman of the south suburban lines stated that (May 1883) "It was his duty to send time tables to the last witness (George Smiles, the shop foreman at Sandridge) but he had only received six copies of the Box hill special time table and these were distributed at the stations along which the train was to run, and he had none left for Mr Smiles. All engines should be run from the one shed. As it was, he was responsible for engines running from the Sandridge shed, although he was generally stationed at the Prince's bridge shed." ' [The first railway line to be opened in Victoria was in September 1854 and it went from Flinders Street to Sandridge ie Port Melbourne].

    The Report of the Board of Inquiry of mid July, 1883 - clause no 7 - "...six copies of the special timetable ...were received by Alfred Thompson, the locomotive foreman....but no copies were sent to Sandridge. Having received them it was the duty of the locomotive foreman to forward one or more of these tables to Sandridge..." - clause no 12 - "...the driver...Kitchen, was appointed to run the special train by Alfred Thompson, the locomotive foreman...Kitchen had very little previous experience with suburban trains..."

    Details of the inquiry into the 'Hawthorn Railway Accident' can be found in the Parliamentary Paper (Victorian Parliament) 1883, second Session No 15 - http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/vufind/Record/46224.

    1883. VICTORIA.
    HAWTHORN RAILWAY ACCIDENT.

    Report – Clause 7 – “In this case six copies of the special time-table were sent from the Superintendent’s office as usual, and were received by Alfred Thompson, the locomotive foreman, about four or five o’clock in the afternoon of the 1st December, but no copies were sent to Sandridge. Having received them, it was the duty of the locomotive foreman to forward one or more of these tables to Sandridge. Thompson was examined twice, and we consider that he gave his evidence in a very unsatisfactory way. He first of all maintained that it was the duty of Mr Harrowen, the Locomotive Inspector, and not his own, to forward time-tables, but he afterwards contradicted himself, admitting that the duty appertained to him solely. Harrowen’s evidence is to the same effect. Thompson then made the excuse that enough copies were not furnished to him, but he admits having received six, and only accounts for five, so that, according to his own statement, he could have forwarded a copy”…

    Report – Clause 10 – “We must remark that, with Mr Harrowen’s sanction, Thompson is in the habit in some cases (of which he himself seems constituted sole judge), instead of himself delivering special time-tables to the drivers, to whom it is his duty to deliver them, of handing the tables to the coke man, to be by him given to the drivers coming for fuel”…

    Report – Clause 67 – “The evidence exposes a deficiency in organization, absence of effective supervision, and want of discipline which pervades the department, and we think that the cause of the accident lies here.”

    Alfred Thompson was cross – examined twice by the ‘Board Appointed To Inquire Into The Causes Of The Hawthorn Railway Accident (2nd December, 1882).
    In his concluding statement on 10th May, 1883 he said “There was none (time-tables) on the coke-shed that day. We only notify to those men actually running, and if we had had the others, no doubt they would have been posted. But there was a misunderstanding somehow or other at that time. Mr Harrowin told me on December 1st – the night before – that he was going to look after the engine – to couple on to some carriages from Box Hill to Camberwell and from Camberwell to Box Hill, and that he would attend to the Box Hill trains. I told him that I was going to the station on that day, and I thought he was gone, and that took off the responsibility partly, with my thinking he would (not)? look after this one train. There was only one train to look after – this train that would meet the special, because all the others had got their time-tables. These special time-tables are sent to the running foreman. It is the lighter’s duty to see that they issue to all the drivers. If I do not receive them, of course I cannot issue them. I have two offices at Prince’s Bridge – the engineering shed there and the south suburban running – the actual running of the engines. That is about 34 or 35 engines, and the great mistake is, not having all the engines under one shed; because if I get one lot of notices for one shed, I have to come down late at night and go and issue those notices to the south suburban men at Sandridge. Smiles books the engines for the running, but I am responsible for the running. They should all be housed in one shed, for one running foreman to have charge of them. If they are not in one place he should not be held responsible for them.”

    Trove newspapers show that by 1887 Alfred Thompson was both a Foreman and Running Inspector.

    It was reported in the Argus on 22nd October, 1887 that “Thompson, locomotive line inspector, left here (Traralgon) this evening for the purpose of inspecting the line from Maffra to Stratford.”

    On 22nd October, 1888 it was reported - 'that at about 11 o’clock in the morning of 20th October, the 8.45 express train from Warragul to Melbourne ran into the 8.5 milk train from the same place, while it was standing at the Narre Warren Station.The engine driver of the milk train was killed. At 12 o’clock a special train with the casualty van was on its way to the accident - the district traffic superintendent Mr O’Connor, the locomotive inspector, Mr A Thompson and a gang of men left Prince’s-bridge. The scene of the accident was reached in about an hour.’

    In May 1889, Alfred Thompson was on a Board of Inquiry into a railway accident on the Mornington and Crib Point lines.

    In 1889 the Railways Commission appointed three Railways chiefs to conduct a Board of Enquiry into an accident as Spencer Street Station - Mr Woodruff the Lines Branch Manager, Mr Keirwan the District Traffic Inspector and Mr Alfred Thompson the District Locomotive Inspector.

    'On 5th September, 1889 there was a serious accident at the Drouin railway station when the 2.10pm passenger train from Bairnsdale to Melbourne collided with the engine of a goods train - passengers were injured...All the arrangements of clearing the line were "most expeditiously" carried out by Mr Thompson, the locomotive inspector.'

    By January 1890 Alfred Thompson was the District Locomotive Inspector of the Eastern System of the Railways.

    On 3rd January, 1890 Alfred Thompson (under his hat) as the Locomotive Inspector of the South Suburban lines was appointed to a Board of Inquiry "to investigate" the accident on the Sandringham line on Boxing Day 1889.

    It was reported in papers in May 1890 that ' Mr Alfred Thompson the Inspector of Locomotives and Mr Cook the Inspector of Stations, accompanied by a Mr Daglish had visited the new engine shed now nearing completion at Warragul Station; and the coal staiths on the south side of the main line between Melbourne and Sale. In regard to the staiths, supplies can be given from either side of the lines running past them. Lamps will be placed at the eastern extremities on the higher and lower elevations, which when required will enable work to be carried out at night time and will throw light forward over the turn-table from which the engines will proceed into the adjacent shed. On the northern side of the staiths "a house" has been prepared to dry the sand to be used in the engines running on the line to prevent the skidding of the wheels when in motion...The engine shed is a brick building in the shape of a segment of a circle, capable of being enlarged to further encompass the turn-table reserve. A blind wall of galvanised iron has been put on the south-eastern end of the shed and it can be removed at any time...The roof is supported by strong iron girders, and is lined inside with red pine, except in the centre which is glass and "is covered without with slates"...Each engine pit is entered by massive doors from the connecting lines with the turn-table, and in the centre pillar of the building outside, a reflecting lamp of the Dempster patent type will be placed, which will throw a full light on the turn-table...'

    The Argus 13th January, 1891-
    A Goods train from Warragul to Melbourne - 'parted'. Alfred Thompson reported "I attribute the cause of the accident as Driver Pitt's breaking away from the rear portion of his train and it colliding with him..." A departmental inquiry was to be held immediately. It was reported in the papers on 12th January, 1891 that 'this accident (on 10th January) involved almost total destruction of a goods train...' News of the accident ' was telegraphed to Melbourne, and at 2.30 yesterday morning Mr More, traffic superintendent and Inspector Thompson set out from Prince's Bridge station with the casualty van. They reached the scene of the accident about daylight and remained there till all the work of clearing the road was completed' ...' the casualty train, with District Superintendent More and Inspector Thompson, arrived in Melbourne from the scene of the accident shortly before one o'clock this morning...' (Besides the engine) "...The train had consisted of 19 trucks and the guard's van... There were two breaks in the train...five of the trucks were smashed to pieces...Fortunately no one was injured' (12th January, 1891)

    ‘On 6th June, 1892 damage was done to rolling stock on the main Gippsland line at Warragul. When he arrived Inspector Thompson, of the locomotive department set one portion of his men repairing the permanent way and the other portion in assisting in removing the dilapidated carriage.’

    From the Advertiser of 9th August, 1893 - In the Speight (Mr Richard Speight, former Railways Commissioner) Libel action against the Age "Mr Alfred Thompson, the locomotive inspector, mentioned several instances where carriages were destroyed which could have been rebuilt..." In the Argus of 9th August, 1893 it reports on Mr Alfred Thompson who was called as a witness - he said that "he had been 31 years in the department."

    Alarming Railway Accident - Explosion of a Locomotive Boiler at Ringwood, Remarkable Escape of Driver and Fireman – The Argus, 22nd January, 1894, page 5 (Trove) -
    “…The stationmaster telegraphed news of the accident to Prince's-bridge station, and Mr. Alfred Thomson, inspector of the eastern section, left with an engine and casualty van at about 10 o'clock for the scene of the accident. It was found that though the framework of the engine had been forced out of position, and the boiler was of course destroyed, the wheels had not been damaged. All the gear having been disconnected, the engine was brought to Melbourne. No cause for the accident can be assigned so far as inquiries have gone. The engine is No. 297 of the R class. It was manufactured at the Phoenix Foundry, Ballarat, and has been running for 11 years, which is a comparatively short time in the life of an engine, as there are some on the lines now which have been running for 30 years. The boilers are subject to a complete overhaul every five years, when the tubes are drawn and replaced and any defective plates renewed. They are also sent into the shop every twelve months for careful inspection and overhaul. This engine was subjected to a thorough overhaul about four years ago, and underwent a general inspection only a few months since. The edges of the fractured plate reveal no cause for the accident so far as they have been examined, for they are from three eighths to half an inch thick. Steam and water are reported to have been at their proper standard at the time of the occurrence. An inquiry into the cause of the accident will be held..."

    Statement by the Driver, Mr John Shepherd visited at home in Richmond -
    "He states that he is utterly unable to account for the explosion. He was on the engine at the time it occurred, and so, he thinks, was the fireman, William Miles. He heard a terrific sound, and felt something strike him on the forehead, and at the same instant his eyes were filled with dust und steam and smoke. He groped his way on to the platform, where he found the fireman a few yards from the engine, but up to that moment he had not the least idea of what had happened, nor did he realise it till he was told, as he could see nothing for some time. A constable kindly took charge of him, and took him to the stationmaster's room, paying him every attention till the doctor came. The train that day was lighter than usual - only six carriages instead of seven, and they were not well filled. The steam was blowing off slightly at the usual standard of 130lb. to the square inch, and the indicator on the steam-gauge also showed the same pressure. That is the pressure to which the engines are warranted, and as soon as it goes above that amount the valve acts, and the extra steam escapes without any action on the part of the driver, the valve being mechanical in its operation. There was the proper quantity of water in the boiler. He had only driven the engine for three weeks, but has been a driver for 20 years.”

    The Age 26 January, 1894, page 4 [Google newspapers] - The Locomotive Explosion -
    'A board of experts was appointed to ascertain the cause of the explosion of a locomotive boiler that occurred at the Ringwood Railway Station. The evidence was heard at the Spencer Street Railway Station. Among those who gave evidence was Alfred Thompson - he was the Locomotive Inspector of the Eastern Section of the railways and stated "that he had examined the 297 R. The boiler showed no sign of want of water. The plugs were partly melted. He considered that the engine when repaired was in first class working order. He would not have hesitated in regulating 140 lb. pressure in the boiler on the account of general repairs done to it. There was he had found, a fracture in the inside of the plates. His opinion was that the explosion resulted from the inside of the plates being eaten away by corrosion from the use of bad water. The expansion and contraction of the plates in these circumstances would test the strength of the plate, and an explosion would likely take place." '

    The Argus of 6th April, 1894 -
    'At the request of the Minister of Railways a further investigation was made into the cause of the railway locomotive boiler explosion at Ringwood in early January, 1893 (sic 1894). The members of the Board convened to take further evidence "showed an undisguised desire to place responsibility of the accident upon the shoulders of some individual..." Two witness were called - Mr Stinton - Manager of the Newport Workshops (Witness 1) declared that it was Mr Thompson's duty to see that the locomotives under his charge were sent to the Newport shop in due time for a thorough overhaul", and Mr Thompson (Witness 2) "argued that he had no means of ascertaining the internal condition of the boilers, and that the casualty must be attributed to an incomplete system of supervision for the purpose of carrying out repairs..." 'The finding of the Supplementary Board reported in the paper on 13th April, 1894 - "Locomotive Inspector Thompson is blamable for the accident but it points out that there were mitigating circumstances, inasmuch as no instructions had been given in writing as to who should be responsible for boilers being thoroughly examined every five years." '

    On 27th February, 1895 a railway accident occurred on the Gippsland line. The next day a Departmental Inquiry was held at Bunyip and Alfred Thompson was on the Board of Inquiry.

    ‘The Argus reported on 27th February, 1896 that a special train was to start for Korumburra yesterday at 9.45 from Prince’s-bridge station. On board was His Excellency the Governor and Lady Brassey accompanied by the Earl of Shaftsbury, plus members of Parliament and officials…Mr Fitzgerald, the traffic manager (railways) and Mr Thompson, the locomotive superintendent, were also on board…the whistle sounded and the special train stood still. A small crowd gathered, but the locomotive “still jibbed” and was eventually taken away to the engine shed. A second engine was “harnessed up.” All went well until Dandenong was reached, when it was discovered that the “new iron horse” was deficient in staying power, so the engine was “cut loose” and a third locomotive “was impounded.” ‘

    The information that follows emerged because of a report by Milburn a Train Driver at a Coroner's Inquiry in May 1908 - on 26th February, 1896 there was apparently an 'Unrecorded Accident - Lord Brassey's Special' (the Governor's Special to Korumburra) - Reported in the Argus on 30th May, 1908 -
    At the Coronial Inquiry into a disaster at Sunshine in about May, 1908 the driving record of the driver Milburn was subject to scrutiny. Special reference was made that Milburn had run the train (Lord Brassey's Special) on 26th February, 1896 at excessive speed on the return trip from Korumburra and that he had not examined the engine No 100 properly before starting. In response - He (Milburn) stated "... (Re. Lord Brassey's Special) - The accident was never reported in any paper...At the inquest I was exonerated (Eleven people were injured). (Re. Lord Brassey's Special) - The superintendents (Mr O'Connor and Mr Thompson) advised me not to stop off duty - though I suffered pain for weeks afterwards - so that no one would get to know of the accident."

    When Alfred Thompson retired in December, 1897 newspaper reports said that he was a Victorian railway employee for over 37 years. At the complimentary Banquet and Presentation held on Alfred's behalf at the Freemason's Hall in Collins Street, Melbourne, over 200 of his fellow railway employees attended. Mr Woodroffe the Railways Chief Mechanical Engineer was in the Chair for the duration of the event. Speeches were made including by Mr Mathieson the Commissioner of the Railways and Mr Rennick the Engineer in Chief. Songs were sung and recitations made with the event proceeding for two hours.

    A Victorian Railways Report for the quarter ending March 1898 shows that Alfred Thompson commenced work on 8/1860 and retired on 6/2/1898. At the retirement date he was in the Locomotive Branch as a District Locomotive Inspector earning 500 pounds per annum. www.parliament.vic.gov.au/papers/govpub/VPARL1898No13.pdf

    Royal Commission before the Select Committee on Railway Spark Arresters – Minutes of Evidence VPARL1902No26P1-159-1
    http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/papers/govpub/VPARL1902No26P1-159.pdf
    Evidence by Alfred Thompson (former) district locomotive inspector on
    Thursday 4th October, 1900 (page 86)
    [Some points of interest selected by me].

    By the Chairman – What are you? I was District Locomotive Inspector of the Eastern system for four years. I am pensioned off now – I was in the Railway Department about 40 years. My duties as inspector were the supervision of the running of the engines, and overlooking the Loco. Department.
    Responses to questions on Spark Arresters –
    • Studied Spark Arresters - ‘Yes, those that were fitted on to engines in my district, the Eastern system. I was personally acquainted with Thornton’s, Allibon’s, and the Morris-Smith superheater and spark-extinguisher’...
    • Opinion on Thornton’s –
    • ‘It is not a perfect spark arrester, for the simple reason that the meshes allow sparks to go out – the sparks escape through the armour chain. In the trials that we had with wood it emitted sparks very badly – it did not allow large pieces to go through the mesh. Sparks got out, but they very nearly went out before they landed on the ground’...
    • Why isn’t it a perfect arrester? – ‘You cannot call it perfect unless the sparks are smothered in a wet atmosphere by spray’...
    • Forming a judgement on the arrester – ‘Yes’...
    • ‘No, we did not did not report it was an efficient spark arrester, but that it emitted a large amount of sparks, but not dangerous ones’
    • Any objections to the Thornton’s arrester? – ‘Not particularly. There was one objection, the chain armour wire wore very rapidly by friction of the exhaust, because there was a plate round the blast pipe – it was made of common steel wire, and it rusted and chafed through with the friction and got damaged...
    • No it would not last long. I do not think it would last a twelvemonth without necessary repairs – the holes chafed through which would have to be mended, but the “petticoat” as they called it was always on the move, and that chafed through and the dampness in the chimney corroded it.’
    • Contradiction in the evidence – If there was sufficient friction to make it wear, that would prevent it from rusting? 'In the spark-box it is always inclined to be damp and moist, and the steel wires would always get rusted, and the friction would break it through...’
    • What other arrester had you experience with? –
    ‘Allibon’s is a perfect spark arrester, but the objection was at the trials in New South Wales. Mr Thow said it destroyed the rolling-stock with the smoke – he said that with the balloon-shaped funnel the soot could not get away'...
    • Was the funnel higher than the ordinary funnel here? ‘They run with a high funnel because they have no overhead bridges at Deniliquin. Here you would need to have short funnels and I think that would be detrimental to it’
    • Experience with other spark arresters –
    ‘Morris-Smith’s superheater and water-heater. I think that it is the most perfect spark-arrester I ever saw, because it completely smothers them. It is a spark-extinguisher and an economizer in fuel because it has the superheater round the blast pipe, and the construction of the blast pipe is such that it is bound to put the sparks out’...
    • Liability of it to get out of order – ‘The superheater need to be made properly. They had a lot of trouble with them because they did not braze them, and the soft solder leaked and caused a lot of trouble; they brazed them at the latter end, and that overcame the difficulty, because when it was soft soldered the engine was always leaking, and it had to be laid up’...
    • Experience of any other arresters? –
    • ‘No. There were Tyrer’s and others, but I did not have experience with those’...
    • As Loco. Superintendent, did you have to deal with the coal supplied to the engines? –
    • ‘Yes. Coal is not screened as it used to be, but since they have used Victorian coal, which is of a soft nature, it comes out of the mine and through a skip screen; it then goes on the truck and on to the stage, and that makes a certain amount of slack.’
    • It is not screened on the stages now? – ‘ No, I do not think you would ever get that it is too expensive – in Mirl’s time they did not screen it, but where the coal is run down you top it. There are a great many more engines running now that in Mr Mirl’s time...We never used to screen it on the Eastern side even in Mirl’s time – we could always do with 10 per cent, or 15 per cent of Newcastle coal’...
    • By Mr Sangster. You say that Anderson’s is a better arrester than the departmental one, that Allibon’s is better still, and that Morris’s is the most perfect you ever saw? – ‘Yes...’
    • By Mr Williams. You state that there are three or four spark-arresters better than the one used by the Department – do you hold the opinion that they steam just as well and are also better spark-arresters? – ‘No’.

    Regarding Alfred Thompson's personal life -

    On 5th November, 1866 Alfred Thompson married Fanny Shiels at the Manor at Brunswick, Victoria - at the time of their marriage Albert and Fanny were living at 40 Little Lonsdale Street, Melbourne. Fanny was born 'at sea' in 1849 on the 'Agenoria' on the way to Australia with her Scottish parents William Shiels 7th March 1815 Markinch, Fife and Elizabeth Burrell/Birrell 26th March, 1818 Abbotshall, Fife and her siblings Isabella and William.

    On board the 'Agenoria' too was the sister of Elizabeth Burrell/Birrell - Margaret Birrell and her husband John Greig and their young family - including their daughter Agnes (Greig) Franks who later witnessed the Eureka Rebellion or Stockade in 1854, and wrote about it in text and poetry. Agnes's father had set up a tent city on the Ballarat goldfields in the vicinity of Bakery Hill, Sovereign Hill and Golden Point a bit before the Eureka stockade had gathered momentum.

    Alfred and Fanny Thompson had five children (in Melbourne) - William, Alfred, Henry (Harry), Elizabeth and Fanny. It was their son Henry (Harry) Thompson who won the first Maryborough Gift sprint race in 1891 (Sheffield Handicap of 130 yards).

    Alfred Thompson - 11/9/1836 Bristol, England to 19/5/1920 Middle Brighton, Victoria.

    Fanny (Shiels/Shields) Thompson - 1849 'at sea' on the 'Agenoria' to 15/7/1926 Middle Brighton, Victoria.

    {Thanks to Marsha Stringer of the Thompson site with Bitton on the net and her researchers; and the Forest of Dean site on the net and their researchers}

    [Also information from Trove digital newspapers online; and personal Family History research]

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    148 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-02-02
    User data
  3. ANTARCTIC MAPS - which were owned by Eric Douglas
    List
    Public

    ANTARCTIC MAPS/CHARTS

    THE LINCOLN ELLSWORTH RELIEF EXPEDITION 1935/36
    *Ross Sea to South Pole (black and white). With the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre.
    *Ellsworth Relief Expedition - Track of the RRS Discovery 2 - Melbourne - Dunedin - Bay Of Whales - Melbourne - via Ross Island & Balleny Islands. Property and Survey Branch, Department of Interior, Canberra. (black and white - 2 copies). With the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre.
    *Ellsworth Relief Expedition - Track of the RRS Discovery 2 - 70 S Bay of Whales - Ross Is - 70 S Property and Survey Branch, Department of Interior, Canberra. (black and white - 2 copies). With the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre.
    * Map or chart showing the paths of the RRS Discovery 2 and of Ellsworth and Hollick-Kenyon c1936. The paths were sketched in by Eric Douglas over a Banzare prepared map or slide.
    * Ross Sea to South Pole - Proposed Flight Paths for the RAAF Wapiti Seaplane - Lincoln Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935/36. This is likely to be an 'original'. The National Library of Australia - 'Original' Map Collection' experts are keen to view this map and I will take it to Canberra for that purpose (8th July, 2014).

    BANZARE 1929/31
    *Antarctica. AAE 1911-1914 & BA & NZ Expedition 1929-1931. Property and Survey Branch, Department of Interior, Canberra. (coloured). With the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre.
    *South Polar Region (map is split in half - black and white with some coloured shading - showing Australian Dependency). With the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre.
    * Royal Geographical Society - Banzare charts 1929 to 1931.
    * Map of the route of the Discovery on both voyages. Prepared by Mawson and published in the Geographical Journal, Aug 1932.

    THE ENDURANCE
    * The Voyage of the Endurance - The subsequent drift in the pack ice and the various relief attempts

    The Maps with the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre have just been catalogued by the Division and the details are online - 7th July, 2014.

    The maps not listed as being with the Australian Antarctic Division Data Centre are still held privately.

    Sally E Douglas

    18 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-11-05
    User data
  4. ANTARCTIC WEATHER and FLYING IN THE ANTARCTIC - BANZARE
    List
    Public

    ANTARCTIC FLIGHTS, WEATHER AND FLYING EXPERIENCES

    FLIGHTS

    From ‘Alfresco Flight’ – The RAAF Experience by David Wilson –1991 – chapter on Airmen and Explorers –
    “...The organization of the British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) gave him [Mawson] the opportunity to prove new techniques in Antarctic exploration. Among the equipment was ‘a light aeroplane for traversing pack-ice and for increasing the range of observation’. He would have preferred two aircraft but space on the Royal Research Discovery [S Y Discovery] precluded carrying more than one. The aircraft selected was a two seat De Havilland DH60G Moth, registered VH-ULD, which was to be the first Australian aircraft to see service over the Antarctic...

    ...Flying Officer S A C Campbell and Pilot Officer G E Douglas were seconded from the RAAF for duty with the expedition [transferred to the Seaplane division of the RAAF]...Both pilots ultimately joined other expedition members aboard the Nestor at Melbourne before voyaging to Cape Town to join the Discovery.The Discovery was Scott’s old ship...Douglas maintained the motor boat engine, a task which was to become one of his extra curricular duties for the duration of the voyage [2 voyages], as well as the Moth...”

    In ‘Moments of Terror’ – the story of Antarctic Aviation – 1994 – by David Burke – he states on page 13 –
    “...Pilots whose names belong to that early polar [ie Arctic and Antarctic] hall of fame [hypothetical] include Eielson, Crosson, Balchen, Hollick-Kenyon, Campbell, Murdoch, Douglas, Schirmacher, Wahr and Riiser-Larsen...”


    ERIC DOUGLAS' WRITINGS ON VOYAGE 1 AND 2 FLIGHTS, ANTARCTIC WEATHER AND FLYING IN THE ANTARCTIC


    VOYAGE 1 FLIGHTS

    BANZARE – Antarctic related flights in 1929 and 1930 (Voyage 1 of 2) where Eric was the Pilot or Pilot/Passenger (from Eric’s Flying Log Record No 2) -
    * On about 14th or 15th October 1929 after arriving in Cape Town Eric Douglas went out to the drome and piloted a Gipsy Moth for 35 minutes over Cape Town. Note: a personal flight.
    * 18/10/1929 - Eric went up in a Gipsy Moth with Mr Blake at Musenberg (Muizenberg), Cape Town, South Africa. Duration 30 minutes. Note: Is a personal flight
    * 31/12/1929 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell – Lat. 66.11 S and Long. 65.10 E – M/C (Machine) test and Engine test OK. (Eric was responsible for the ‘running’ of the Gipsy Moth). Observation Flight. 5000’ - 18 degrees F. Sea Level Temp. 32 degrees F. Apparent land to the south – 60M and apparent islands to the SW – 35M
    * 25/1/1930 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell. Test M/C and engine OK. Lat. 65.51 Long. 53.07
    * 25/1/1930 – took up Captain Hurley in VH-ULD. Aerial photography – Obliques and Cinema. Height 2000’. Another flight that day also with Captain Hurley as passenger in VH-ULD. Aerial photography – Proclamation Is. 2000’ - Temp. 20 degrees F. Sea level temp. 29 degrees.
    * 26/1/1930 - took up Captain Hurley VH-ULD. Obliques and Cinema. Photographed Enderby Land and the Antarctic Coast and Inland mountain range. Height 4000’ -Temp 15.5F. Sea level temp. 29 degrees.
    * 18/2/1930 – went up in VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell. Test M/C and Engine OK. Jeanne D’Arc, Kerguelen Island. Sea level temp 47 degrees F
    * 18/2/1930 – took up Mr Fletcher VH-ULD. Royal Sound, Kerguelen Island. Height 3500’. Visibility poor. [Mr Harold Fletcher wrote that they taxied down the main arm into a wind swept sea and bobbed about 'like a cork' waiting for a good opportunity to take off heading into the wind. "Doug gave her full throttle and she hit one or two waves and bounced in the air...Doug held her there and away we went..."].
    * 19/2/1930 – went up in VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell. Murray Is. Island Harbour. Observatory Bay. Photography Height 1500’. Visibility very good. Sea level temp 48 degrees F. M/C and Engine OK.

    SY DISCOVERY - Voyage 1 - Eric Douglas
    GIPSY MOTH VH-ULD (Other notes on flights and consumption of aviation petrol and oil)

    31-12-29 ~ Test flight. Lat 66 Long 66.
    Height 5000 feet. Land sighted about 80 miles to south. (apparent land) 1 hour.
    M/C and engine OK
    Petrol Shell Aviation 20 Galls.
    Oil Triple Shell 2 Galls

    2-1-30 ~ 8 Galls petrol & 1 quart oil.

    5-1-30 ~ Sir Douglas Mawson . F/O Campbell. Observation flight. 1.15 hr. Land definitely seen.

    25-1-30 ~ F/O Campbell and Self
    15 min. Test m/c and engine. OK

    25-1-30 ~ Self & Capt Hurley
    1.30. Aerial photos near Proclamation rock.

    25-1-30 ~ F/O Campbell & Sir Douglas
    1.00. Observation flight. Dropped flag.

    26-1-30 ~ Self & Capt Hurley
    1.00 Aerial photos. 4000 ft East of Proclamation rock.

    26-1-30 ~ F/O Campbell & Com Moyes
    1.00 Observation flight.

    25-1-30 ~ 12 Galls of petrol & 3 pts oil.
    (Eric Douglas) Total flying time in Antarctic 4hrs.

    Air Temp sea level 29 degrees F
    Air Temp 4200 feet 15 degrees F

    Sea level 29 F
    1000 26 F
    2000 23 F
    3000 20 F
    4000 15.5 F
    4200 15F

    Oil pressure 40 lbs
    Engine revs 1800
    Max revs 1980
    Stalling speed 48 m/hr

    Machine
    Adjusted Acleron controls for tension and droop.
    14-1-30 Repaired rips in Starb upper main plane (30).
    Trailing edge of two ribs repaired.
    26-1-30 Lower Starb wing tip dented (metal tube) when hoisting outboard.

    Engine
    GIPSY 85-100 HP.
    Covered oil pipes with asbestos string. Covered up air cooling vent in lower cowling. Overhauled impulse magneto. Changed compensating jet from 410 cc to 420 cc. Adjusted slow running and throttle. Greased valve and rockers. Engine. OK
    Engine starts OK when doped with a mixture of 2/3 petrol and 1/3 ether. Generally heated up for one hour by warm air, conveyed in canvas chute from boiler room. Temperature of engine raised from 28 F to 40 F or 45F. Doping then not necessary, also better for oil circulation.

    Improvements
    Oil temperature gauge necessary. Quick fastenings for float u/c. Tecalemit nipple for Acleron return bearing. (Crank arm under fuselage)

    Flying Carried Out At Kerguelen Is
    Air temp 40 degrees F to 50 degrees F. Heating or doping not necessary. Engine ran smoother here than in Antarctic. Oil press 36 lbs, steady. Full revs in air 1980.


    ANTARCTIC WEATHER

    On Board the S.Y. Discovery - left Cape Town Oct 19th 1929 -
    Notes Observed On The Weather -
    October 1929 -
    Winds variable until we reached the 40 th. Parallel of Latitude.
    Winds mainly from the North, North West and West, sometimes gale force and generally increasing at night time.
    We are now Nov 6th (1929) in the 48th Latitude and occasionally have snow, sleet and rain. Rain when the wind is from the north and sleet when it comes from the west.
    The Barometer is an accurate forecast of the weather in these latitudes.
    About one fine day per week and even then it is somewhat cloudy and always wind. The seas have been quite large at times, but no doubt they are moderate seas for this part of the World. The swell generally comes from the west and when the wind comes in from the north hard, a broken confused sea is set up, which makes it somewhat difficult to keep the ship from yawing.
    Mr Simmers (New Zealander) is the meteorologist on board and he is kept busy reading his instruments at definite times.
    When we were anchored off the Crozet Islands the wind came down the valleys form the snow capped mountains in terrific gusts which last for about a minute. These winds are cold. We were anchored on the east side, and of course the west winds meet the abrupt mountains on the west coast causing these winds to rise, they become colder and descend along the valleys with increased velocity. When out to sea these winds become steadier and warmer.
    Kerguelen Island (Nov 12th to Nov 24th 1929) -
    We were here for 12 days (south east end) and the winds were mostly from the S to W. The sky always had clouds, mainly stratus. Very unreliable weather. We never experienced high winds as we were there at the most settled part of the season, but the wind would spring up quickly and snow fall without much change in then barometer.
    December 1929 -
    Latitudes 60 to 67 South
    Longitudes 81 to 65 East
    The steadiest weather was experienced when we were well amongst the pack ice. Light south east winds prevailed, fairly clear sky, clouds forming over the water and generally blue sky over the ice. No very strong winds, no doubt due to us being a hundred miles or more from the Antarctic Continent.
    January 1930 -
    Latitudes 65 to 66 1/2 South
    Longitudes 65 to 40 East
    During this month we experienced three Blizzards. The first one was of short duration (12 hours) the wind reached 65 M/hr in the gusts, average velocity 45 M/hr. The wind came in from the north east, quickly increased in strength, then swung to east, then to south east, remaining in this quarter and increasing in strength until after the Barometer started to rise. The Barometer fell 1” during this blizzard. Thick driving snow for several hours. The other Blizzards were not so violent but of longer duration (three to four days).
    After these blizzards, at least one fine day prevails. Beautiful clear blue sky and light winds from South east. When we were in sight of the Antarctic Coast on these days the visibility was excellent, and objects that appeared a few miles away were actually double the distance that they appeared away (Verified by angles and sights).
    Air temp near the coast remained round about 30F. Lowest Air temp at sea level 20 F.
    Four or five hours before a blizzard starts, mountains etc inland take on a mirage and later on their outlines become hazy, then a few hours later the wind and snow starts to come on.
    Average Barometer reading 29.5”
    Once we had a blow with the barometer steady and it was not until an hour or so later that the barometer started to drop.
    February 1930 -
    We are steaming towards Kerguelen Is. The Air temp is rising about 1 F for every 100 miles we go north. We arrived at Kerguelen Is on Feb 8th after twelve days run from Enderby Land. The weather throughout this run was rather good. For the greater part of the trip a steady west wind prevailed with sky fairly free of clouds.

    FLYING IN THE ANTARCTIC

    Flying was carried out only on fine days, generally the first fine day after a blizzard. Sea conditions generally ideal, sometimes slight ocean swell on, which made it difficult getting off. Air conditions perfect, practically no bumps, although some were felt when flying over the Antarctic coast. Engine ran splendid, developed full power and oil pressure remained steady (38 to 40 lbs/sqin). Machine controls gave no trouble and the machine behaved quite normal in the air ie stalling and climbing speeds. Lowest air temperature experienced was 15 F at 4200 ft. With the usual winter flying clothes on and good woollen underwear the low temperature was hardly noticeable.
    Of course our flights were of short duration, generally about one hour, and it was midsummer.
    Engine
    The engine would start up when doped with a mixture of 2/3 petrol and 1/3 ether. But generally it was heated with warm air (conveyed through canvas flue from the boiler room) for about an hour previous to starting up. Temperature of engine raised to 45 F. Starting then quite easy and doping not necessary. (Crank case in air vent covered up. Oil pipes lagged with asbestos)
    Kerguelen Island
    From Feb 8th to March 2nd 1930
    Air temperature average 40 F. Much less snow about than when we were here in November last. Only the high inland mountains have snow on them, although several days before we left, light snow fell and the surrounding hills were covered lightly. Also the vegetation is much more profuse and green. No trees on this island and the main vegetation is thick moss like growth which practically covers all the small islands and in some places on the mainland. During this stay we only experienced two calm days and clear skys, otherwise very strong south to west winds prevailed. We had a full gale on three occasions, each one lasted for about 24 hours, average velocity 50 miles per hour and over 60 miles per hour in the gusts. Westerlie wind. Barometer fell nearly an inch before each blow, generally from 29.8” to 28.9”.
    Flying was carried out on these calm days, and on one occasion in a fresh north wind. Air moderately bumpy on this day, otherwise free of bumps. Flying mostly over water and sometimes inland near the mountains especially Mt Ross 6500 ft for taking aerial photos. Machine behaved well and engine ran splendid, much easier to start on with the air temp at 40 F, doping not necessary. Engine ran smoother here than when flying in the Antarctic. Air pressure 36 lbs/sqin.
    On the whole few days are suitable for flying. Winds arise quickly and clouds quickly form. Against this is the ideal water ways for a seaplane or flying boat, shelter from any wind, smooth seas and even when flying inland, forced landings could be carried out quite safely on any of the numerous lakes.
    We left Kerguelen Island on March 2nd 1930 and a course was set for Albany (Western Australia). At present March 23rd we have been three weeks out form Kerguelen Is and are now past Albany and in the Great Australian Bight, 850 miles from Adelaide (to where the course is now set).
    The weather during this time has been exceptionally fine and calm. For the first week out of Kerguelen Is fresh west winds were experienced, with the sky fairly clear of clouds. The latter two weeks the winds have been light and variable, the last four days the prevailing wind has been from the east southeast, clear skies every day.

    VOYAGE 2 FLIGHTS

    BANZARE – Antarctic related flights in 1930 and 1931 (Voyage 2 of 2) where Eric was the Pilot or Pilot/Passenger (from Eric’s Flying Log Record No 2) -
    * 7/1/1931 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell – Lat. 66.33 Long. 138.45 Test M/C & engine - OK. Adelie land. Sighted new coast extending westward.
    * 16/1/1931 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with Lt. Oom as passenger. Lat. 65.03 Long. 121.27 8000 ft observation flight. Air temp. 8000 ft 16 degrees F. Magnetic Var. 68 degrees West. Ice Plateau 80 miles to the South
    * 27/1/1931 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with Sir Douglas Mawson as passenger. Lat 65.07 Long 107.22 5000 ft - observation flight. Air temp. 5000 ft 12 degrees F. New coast sighted. M/C damaged coming aboard - Heavy swell
    * 6/2/1931 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with F/0 Campbell. Lat 64.47 Long 84.13 Test M/C & engine - OK. Pack ice tending westwards. Heavy Pack.
    * 10/2/1931 – went up in Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD with Lt. Oom as passenger. Lat 67.10 Long 74.24 1500 ft - observation flight. Air temp 10 degrees F. Numerous ice bergs. 40 miles of pack to the south, beyond open water.

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    29 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-01-09
    User data
  5. Arthur Max Stanton, FIRST MATE on BANZARE Voyage 2
    List
    Public

    Arthur Max Stanton (also known as AMax and Max) (1899-1963) was born in London. His father was a German Engineer and Inventor who migrated to England in the 1890’s. The family name was Schneider at the time. However, the family’s name was changed to Stanton soon after WWI, and a distant family member states that shortly after that Stanton migrated to Sydney. However New Zealand Immigration records show that an Arthur Max Stanton migrated from Liverpool to Dunedin, New Zealand in November, 1934 on the ship Port Campbell. His occupation was given as Master Mariner. Besides although known widely as Arthur, to his family and friends he was known as AMax. On BANZARE he was known as Max. Anyway in 1944 he was living in Neutral Bay, New South Wales and in 1946 he visited Melbourne, Victoria.

    Stanton joined the BANZARE Antarctic Voyage 2 in 1930-1931 as the Ship’s Chief Officer, replacing Kenneth Norman MacKenzie who had been promoted to the Master for Voyage 2 in lieu of Captain John King Davis who had decided not to participate in Voyage 2. Sir Douglas Mawson was the organizer and leader of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931. Even though he was appointed as the Chief Officer Max Stanton actually had a Master’s Certificate in Seamanship and Navigation.

    From Armed Forces Censuses - Arthur Max Stanton fought in WWI and his Medal Card is at the National Archives of the UK (all information is online).

    The story of the Southern Cross shipwreck in 1932 was something like this – In late October, Max Stanton was the Master of the Southern Cross which struck a reef close to shore at Anietyum Island in the New Hebrides. The ship was a wreck and chaos prevailed. For a time all were reported as missing. It was learnt later that month that Stanton and his crew and passengers went through quite an ordeal. After all being accounted for and saved from drowning, Captain Stanton and the deck officers and an Anietyum boy set out for Vila, New Hebrides in a whaleboat borrowed from one of the Islands two traders. It was heavy going and eventually they landed on a beach at Tanna Island and from there a Frenchman arranged for a launch to take them on to Lenukel nearby for Medical treatment. Then they left Tanna Island by launch for Vila still 125 miles away. In Vila Captain Stanton chartered a local schooner to return to Anietyum Island to pick up his crew and salvage stores. It was said that ‘details of the wreck of the Southern Cross ...make a dramatic story’. The Southern Cross struck a reef, at 3.30 am in pouring rain. There were eight Europeans and 15 Solomon Islanders on board. Only four of the eight whites could swim. It was dark and black. All the deck cargo was swept overboard...one lifeboat was launched but it was smashed. The other could not be launched. An officer swam ashore with a line of about 150 yards in the ... surf over coral... But the coral cut the line and it came away in his hands. One male passenger tried to get ashore along a second line taken in by another officer but it broke too. It was said that captain dived into the water in his pyjamas and dressing gown to rescue the man. This man tried to clutch the captain and the captain responded and knocked the man out and managed to get him ashore. The captain and three officers were in the water for three hours...

    In October, 1933 Arthur Max Stanton sailed with a crew of 12 old public school boys in search of 12,000,000 pounds of treasure reportedly buried at the Cocos Islands in 1824.
    In October, 1946 Max Stanton visited Melbourne and he “pins his faith to good old fashioned methods of locating treasure. He stated that on his retirement he will search for gold of the Incas and plate from Lima Cathedral which he believed buried at Cocos...”

    From the Courier Mail of 18th October, 1952 - in 1952, Stanton commanded a 2,500 ton tanker across the North Pacific. Also it said that he was intending to sail from Brisbane to Rabaul, Papua New Guinea in a 45ft Yacht. The article also said that he began his sea life in sail and was apprenticed with a British overseas shipping line. Moreover, it said that Stanton commanded Navy Corvettes in WWII. As well as that he has commanded 2,500 ton, 3,000 ton and 9,000 ton merchant ships and was the Staff Captain of a 16,000 ton transport troop ship from Marseilles to Saigon. It was in about 1952 that he retired from sea duty.

    Sally Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-23
    User data
  6. BACK to NHILL CELEBRATIONS - RAAF participation in 1929
    List
    Public

    "Back to Nhill Celebrations in 1929"


    At the start of March 1929, Eric Douglas had been instructing student Pilots of the RAAF at Point Cooke (Cook) and Laverton, having qualified as an A1 Flying Instructor in June 1928. He had already passed his A Flying Course at the No 1 Flying Training School at RAAF Point Cooke in December, 1927- having initially learnt to fly in Avro 504K’s – A3-8, A3-9, A3-10, A3-12, A3-29, A3-40, A3-45, A3-48 and A3-52; DH9’s - A6-1 and A6-22; SE5A’s – A2-4, A2-12, A2-16, A2-31 and A2-36; DH9A’s – A1-11 and A1-24. He had come first in flying and third in theory.
    Early in that same month, Eric had carried out solo engine and m/c (machine) tests on DH9A’s – A1-16 and A1-28 as well as instructing RAAF student Pilots. He had earlier also carried out an engine test on A1-16 accompanied by Sergeant Curtain – since 1927 Eric had been a Sergeant Pilot. With AC1 Charters as his student they had practiced forced landings in Avro 504K A3-41 and with LAC Holdsworth as his student in A3-41 they had practiced aerobatics.

    Next was the flight on 18th March,1929 at 0815 from Point Cooke, to Ararat and then Nhill, with LAC Brier as his passenger in DH60 Cirrus Moth A7-6 for the purpose of joining the ‘Back to Nhill Celebrations’. The flight took 2-15 hours from Point Cooke to Ararat and at 1200 they flew from Ararat to Nhill, a flight of 1-15 hours. On that same day Eric flew solo at 1430 at Nhill in A7-6 in the formation and aerobatics for 45 minutes and at 1540 he flew solo in A7-6 in aerobatics for 30 minutes.
    On 19th March, 1929 at 1100 Eric flew solo in A7-6 at Nhill in the formation and aerobatics for 30 minutes. At 1400 accompanied by LAC Brier, Eric flew from Nhill to Ararat in A7-6 (time taken 1-30). At 1615 they left Ararat for Point Cooke (time taken 1-45).
    The next day 20th March, 1929 Eric went up with Flight Lieutenant Charles Eaton m/c testing the Warrigal 1 at Point Cooke.

    There is a gap here with no flying by Eric. This probably means that he was seconded to Head Office to assist with technical matters.

    On 17th April, 1929 Eric left on the search for the ‘Kookaburra’ G-AUKA a Westland Widgeon monoplane lost in the outback with Flight Lieutenant Keith Anderson and his mechanic ‘Bobbie’ or ‘Bobby’ (Henry Smith) Hitchcock, who were searching for their old comrade Sir Charles Kingsford Smith.
    Eric left RAAF Point Cooke at 0845 on 17th with LAC Smith as his passenger, for an engine test and then to join the No 1 Squadron at RAAF Laverton. At 1235 on that same day they left Laverton with the first stop being Mildura, arriving there 4-30 later. Eric was flying DH9A A1-20. This of course is an aviation story that made headlines in 1929. Flight Lieutenant Eaton was in charge of the RAAF search party of 10, all of whom flew in DH9A’s to the outback.
    My father Eric had said more than once over the years that these aircraft were given to the RAAF by England (RAF) as ‘training aircraft’ for around Point Cooke and Laverton. Moreover, that it was never intended that they would undertake such a flight as north across Australia to the area of Wave Hill Station and the Tanami Desert in the Northern Territory. The Tanami Desert was where the ‘Kookaburra’ was located, being first sighted by Captain Lester Brain of Qantas.
    ”... Later that evening (21st April, 1929) when we were with Flight Lt. Eaton and Cpl. Sullivan and enjoying a good meal prepared by the two Telegraph Officers (Mr Woodruff was the main Officer) and assisting in the celebration of Mr Woodruff's birthday, we learned by the telegraph that Mr Brain had located Lt. Anderson's aeroplane at a spot he estimated to be about 80 miles south west of Newcastle Waters. It appeared that Mr Brain had flown about fifty miles to the west of Newcastle Waters into the desert when he saw signs of smoke on the south western horizon about sixty miles away. When about twenty miles from the smoke he saw a large dark brown patch of burnt ground and when close to the patch he located the "Kookaburra". He reported that he saw one man lying near the plane but there was no sign of his companion...” (Eric’s unpublished story of 1958).

    (Eric Douglas Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-10-29
    User data
  7. BANZ Antarctic - Voyage or Cruise 1 - short log by Eric Douglas
    List
    Public

    BANZARE 1st Cruise - With the SY Discovery 1929 -1930 - by Eric Douglas


    Expedition first mooted by Australian National Research Council - Sir Douglas Mawson was invited to take command. SY Discovery made available by British Government.

    Name of Expedition - B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. British Australian, New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition. Organization - Organization carried out mainly by Sir Douglas Mawson during the years 1928 &1929. Sir D Mawson, Commander & Leader of Expedition. Ships Company - Captain J.K. Davis, Captain & Master of S.Y. Discovery. Ships Officers & Crew selected in England by Capt J.K. Davis. Mainly drawn from the British Mercantile. Scientific Staff - Australians selected by Discovery Committee. Capt Hurley & Mr Marr joined ship in England. Prof Johnson & Mr Fletcher - Biologists Dr Ingram - Medical Officer & Bacteriologist Commander Moyes R.A.N. - Surveying Officer Mr Howard - Chemist F/Lt Campbell & F/O Douglas R.A.A.F. - Seaplane operations Mr Simmers - Meteorologist - nominated by New Zealand Government Mr Falla - Ornithologist - nominated by New Zealand Government Object of Expedition - 1/ Continuation of Sir D Mawson’s Australasian Antarctic Expedition of 1912 - 1914. Embracing :- 2/ Oceanographical survey of waters south of Australia and South Africa and Antarctic coast 3/ Examination of Sub-Antarctic Islands 4/ Delineation of this sector of Antarctic coastline 5/ Study of Whaling possibilities 6/ Meteorological data, magnetic & cosmic ray survey. Note: Wintering on Antarctic continent never contemplated. Description of Ship - 3 masted Barkquentine. Tonnage approx 1900 tons Length 175 ft Breadth 34ft Draught 18ft Engines Steam triple expanding 400 H.P. Normal speed 5 1/2 Knots. Owned by Falkland Is Government & loaned to British Government for 2 years. Ship first used by the late Capt Scott in years 1900 - 1904. Built specially for Polar work & capable of withstanding enormous pressure when beset in ice. Entirely constructed of wood except engine room. Hull built of three layers of different wood. Sides approx 2ft 6in bottom 3ft. Bows solid for 10ft. Cross beams 10in by 10in oak 7ft apart and three beams in a layer from the keel. Start of Expedition - Ship departed England early in August 1929 & arrived Cape Town S Africa early in October 1929. Scientific party travelled by passenger steamer (TSS Nestor) from Australia to Cape Town. Ship departed Cape Town 19th Oct 1929 & arrived off Possession Is Crozet Group Nov 2nd. Scientific Party ashore for one day. Foreshore thick with Sea Elephants. First view of Penguins. Departed Nov 4th for Kerguelen Is 700 miles away. First snow & becoming colder. Warm clothes issued out. Ship averaging 140 miles per day. Saturday 9th Nov 1929 - Sighted Kerguelen but driven northward by South gale. Eventually arrived off Royal Sound 12th Nov. Steamed 20 miles up winding Fiord to old Whaling station Jeanne D'Arc. Coal left here by a ship going south. Cardiff briquettes 500 tons. This Island belongs to France. Controlled by Governor of Madagascar. Size 80 miles by 40 miles. Wonderfully pretty, inland lakes and Glaciers. Mainland overrun with rabbits, seals scarce, penguins on Islands. Departed 24th Nov 1929 - Ship low in water with heavy cargo of coal. Heading for Heard Is (British). Early on morning of 26th Nov sighted Heard Is. Wonderful sight, rugged coast with huge glaciers running into the sea. Highest peak approx 7000ft. Island about 20 miles long & six across. Scientific party ashore, meaning to stay two days, weather bad. Ship puts to sea to weather out gale. Barometer down to 28.4in. Camped on a peninsular. Studied sea elephant, penguins, skua gulls etc. Shot my first sea leopard, savage creature. Ship arrives back and Party get aboard on 3rd Dec. Heading S.E. - Becoming colder each day, roughly 10 degrees F for every 100 miles south. Dec 7th 1929 - Sighted first ice berg. First honour to Capt Hurley. Dec 9th 1929 - Met first pack ice. Old pack, very broken. More ice bergs of increasing size. 1/4 mile long 150ft out of water, deep blue colour in crevasses. More birds in vicinity. Dec 12th 1929 - Pack more consolidated, ships progress slower. Whales sporting in pack ice pools. Navigating ship by water sky and ice blink. Sun setting about 11PM. Beautiful sunsets especially in calm of evening. Echo soundings. Winds S.E. Dec 17th 1929 - Moth seaplane unpacked & commenced to assemble m/c. Dec 20th 1929 - Heavy going in pack only making 40 miles per day south. Dec 24th to 26th 1929 - Held fast in pack. Waiting for ice to break up. Dec 29th 1929 - On the 80th meridian of east Longitude and near Antarctic Circle (66 1/2 South). Air Temp down to 28 degrees F. Dec 31st 1929 - Carried out first reconnaissance flight. Great assistance to ship. Sighted apparent land 80 miles to south over unbroken pack. Impossible for ship to get through. Jan 2nd 1930 - Ship steaming to westward Jan 4th 1930 - Nunataks (Rocky peaks) sighted from mast head 30 miles east of Kemp's reported land. Jan 5th 1930 - More flying carried out, surveying coastline. Jan 7th 1930 - Aeroplane damaged by ice falling from masts, spars & rigging. Jan 11th 1930 - First sight of killer whales. Land 20 miles away. Jan 13th 1930 - Steaming along coast of Enderby land. Antarctic continent showing up clearly, visibility wonderful. Jan 14th 1930 - Met Norwegian research ship "Norvegia" Capt Riiser Larsen. She was equipped with two seaplanes. Jan 18th to 22nd 1930 - Driven off coast by S.E. blizzard. Unfortunate at this time. Jan 24th 1930 - Off a huge rock we named Proclamation rock. Seaplane flown securing splendid photos. Landing party raises British flag on land and Sir Douglas proclaims this land for the British Empire. MacRobertson Land - East of this rock he named MacRobertson land. Coal reserve becoming low. Jan 27th 1930 - Ship headed away for Kerguelen Is. Last view of Antarctic coast. Mountain peaks showing up clear. Hours of darkness, running through ice berg infested area. Ship making good progress under sail & steam. Feb 7th 1930 - The distant snow covered peaks of Kerguelen Is showing up. Gale coming on from North west but ship makes Royal Sound safely. Feb 8th 1930 - Ship moored to jetty at Jeanne D'Arc. Overhaul of engines & boilers. Coaling ship in readiness to sweep south again towards Queen Mary land on way home. Happy days spent ashore exploring inland parts of this wonderful Island. Aeroplane assembled & floats. More snow around, especially on high ground. Fierce winds from west. Feb 21st 1930 - Farewell to Jeanne D'Arc. Ship steams round 40 miles to Observatory Bay. Visits to Christmas Harbour and Murray Is (Capt Cook anchored here in 1771 on Xmas day) March 2nd 1930 - Departed from Kerguelen Is. Winter too far advanced to go south so course shaped for Albany W. Australia. Mar 23rd 1930 - Getting into warmer regions. Change into better clothes. Longing for a feed of fresh food. Tinned foods are not satisfying over a long period. Eggs still appear on Menu but only in form of curried eggs etc. Meet P&O S.S. Cathay in Bight, fresh food & papers dropped & picked up by us. Very welcome. April 1st 1930 - Arrived at Port Adelaide. Unloaded scientific specimens. Departed Adelaide April 3rd & arrived Port Melbourne 8th April. Finish of 1st Cruise.

    Word processed and loaded onto Trove by Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-09
    User data
  8. BANZ Antarctic - Voyage or Cruise 2 - short log by Eric Douglas
    List
    Public

    BANZARE 2nd Cruise - With the SY Discovery 1930 - 1931 - F/O Eric Douglas

    Winter of 1930 - Ship docked and refitted out at Harbour docks Williamstown Melbourne. Nov 1st 1930 - Ship departed Williamstown for Hobart, Tasmania where she duly arrived on Nov 5th. Nov 6th to 22nd 1930 - All stores restowed in their correct groups in the ship's holds. More coal taken on board than 1st Cruise. Fresh food:- eggs 20,000, fruit and live stock 19 sheep. 1000 tons of loading on board (Slight change in personnel) Nov 22nd 1930 - Departed Hobart and slowly steamed outside into ocean swell. Ship rather low in water. Heading for Macquarie Island 900 miles S.E. Dec 1st 1930 - At 1PM this island could be faintly seen and at 4PM the north end showed up clearly. Hills very green, highest past of Island 1500ft. 20 miles long & 3 miles wide. Sea-Elephants & Penguins - Party ashore at 6AM 2nd Dec. Tents erected on shore. Walked along shore to the Nuggets, fine sight, thousands of Royal penguins. Huge rookeries inland. penguins continually coming & going from the sea. Penguins amused us with their surfing. 4th Dec 1930 - All on board & ship steaming down the coast to "Lusitania" Bay. Visit to King Penguin rookerie. 5th Dec 1930 - South of Macquarie Is looking for Bishop & Clarke rocks. Rocks located & photographed. Several growlers or small bergs in sight. Foggy weather. 6th Dec 1930 - Heading south for the head of the Ross Sea where we have to meet the Sir James Clarke Ross (20,000 tons) to pick up 100 tons of coal she has taken down for us. 8th Dec 1930 - Numerous bergs in sight, rough seas had died away. Air temp 29 F. Sheep killed & carcasses hung in rigging. 15th Dec 1930 - Factory ship sighted, loose pack in vicinity. Sight whale chasers. Alongside this ship and coaling commenced. First sight of a modern factory ship in operation, rather gruesome sight, awful stench, blood & bones continually being emptied overboard (Norwegian & English Companies) Whaling Operations - Whales Blue - Normally 100ft long - 100 tons weight Finner - Normally 100ft long - not so heavy Hump back - Normally 50ft long Blue whale yields 90 - 100 barrels of oil. Six barrels to 1 ton and 1 ton of oil - 25.0.0 So whale worth 300 - 400 pounds or even more when in fine condition. Factory ship treats 24 whales per day or over 7000 pounds per 24 hours. (200,000 pounds per month - "Kosmos" - World Record 48 Whales in 24 hours). Ships this particular season expect to earn over 3/4 of a million pounds (six months work). Men work in shifts - 12 hours. Over 300 all told on ship. Chasers - Each ship has from 7 - 9 chasers working. Chasers are powerful small vessels 90 - 100 ft long. 2000 H.P. 15 Knots. Contain a muzzle loading swivelling gun for throwing explosive headed harpoon. Captain or Gunner - Earns 6.10 for every blue or finner whale. Earns 3.10 for a hump whale. Probably earns up to 2000 pounds in seasons work. Ships Complement - Gunner, mate, 2 engineers, 2 firemen, 1 cook & 4 seamen. One man on look out duty. Gunner & mate get little sleep, probably 2 hours per day when whales are numerous. Earns his money. Whale chasing is exciting work. Norwegians expert at killing whales. Terrific strength of whales, known to have towed chasers at 15 Knots for 10 hours. 17th Dec 1930 - Heading for Balleny Is. Much fog & mist. Ship to visit Commonwealth Bay (Adelie land) Queen Mary land & then to chart MacRobertson land etc. 19th Dec 1930 - Large ice bergs in sight, occasionally pushing through heavy pack (25ft thick). Seaplane - m/c shifted on to skid deck & assembling operations commenced. 3PM Ship steaming with wind coming astern, smoke blowing ahead in mist & visibility very bad. 4PM Ship nearly ran into big berg. No hope of seeing Balleny Islands, heavy pack surrounding them. Weather worse than previous year. Xmas Day - In wireless communication with Australia. Xmas dinner excellent. Presents given to all members. Directional wireless picks up signals from "Kosmos". 29th Dec 1930 - Alongside "Kosmos" (22000 tons) & taking in 50 tons of coal. Normally Discovery only holds enough coal for 50 days steaming in Antarctic waters. Cardiff Briquettes - Coal in bunkers used by Discovery. Special steaming coal, made up by special process in Cardiff England. Blocks about 11in square by 9in deep. Weigh 25 lbs, roughly 90 to a ton, easy to stow & handle. Used in previous voyages. 30th Dec 1930 - Making in for Commonwealth Bay - 90 miles away. 31st Dec 1930 - Blizzard coming on from South east. Ist Jan 1931 - Ship in perilous position, surrounded by bergs & heavy tumbling pack, terrific wind - 70 m.p.hr. Spray freezing on decks, all hands helping to set sail and keeping steam up. Ship labours in pack. Ship takes shelter behind berg. Wonderful sight, driving snow and pack. 3rd Jan 1931 - Blizzard now abating. Ship making in to coast. High plateau showing up. No mountain peaks in sight. 4th Jan 1931 - Beautiful day. Party goes ashore, visit to old huts. 6th Jan 1931 - Union Jack hoisted and Proclamation read by Sir Douglas. Use skis and crampons. Small sledges used for transporting ice to motor boat. Cases of old food & fuel collected. Kennedy carries out magnetic dip readings. South magnetic pole has moved 100 miles N West ie nearer to Cape Denison. 8th Jan 1931 - I have touch of snow blindness, very painful. Fine weather continues. 11th Jan 1931 - 200 miles west of Cape Denison, winds very light. 15th & 16th Jan 1931 - Seaplane flown. Land sighted 70 miles south. 16th to 30th Jan 1931 - Dirty weather, constant snow and mist. Ship hove to waiting for chance to get south. Magnetic Compass nearly useless. Var 68 degrees W. Termination ice tongue disappeared since 1919 (50 miles by 20 miles) No chance of getting to Queen Mary land. Heavy pack keeping us 60 miles out. 6th Feb 1931 - More whaling ships in sight. Norwegians told us there are 40 Factory ships and 250 Chasers spread round the Antarctic coast. Sun setting at 10PM. 7th Feb 1931 - In same locality as our furtherest east of last cruise (180 East Long - 40 East Long) 10th Feb 1931 - Motor boat & crew had lucky escape from being towed into heavy pack. Painter cut just in time. 11th Feb 1931 - Land sighted again. Seaplane flies over coast and drops the British flag. Lower temperatures 20F. 13th Feb 1931 - Flag hoisted on MacRobertson land. Fine coastline. Rocky out crops, mountains inland. 15th Feb 1931 - Killer whales pass ship. Another blizzard comes on. 18th Feb 1931 - Party ashore for scientific work. High rocky capes. Ship running short of coal, so we must head north now before bad weather comes on. 19th Feb 1931 - Last view of Antarctic coast (Lat 67 S Long 61 E). 10.30PM Auroral display (Aurora Australis) Moving and radiating bands of light, pinkish in colour. Top Yards - Lower & upper top gallant yards crossed to mast. All gear on deck not wanted stowed below. Ship making fair progress north. Winds NE to NW. 1st March 1931 - Lat 57 S. Winds south west. More auroral displays. 2nd March 1931 - Gale comes on from N.W. Ship headed away before it. 3rd March 1931 - Wind round now to WSW, blowing with terrific force (70 m/h). Huge seas everywhere, ship going fine but needs careful handling. Wonderful sight. Ship under bare poles making 8 Knots. 4th March 1931 - Wind & sea abating. 6th March 1931 - 1880 miles from Melbourne. More birds in vicinity of ship. Albatrosses, Cape Hens, Petrels & Nellies. Ship under sail alone, conserving coal for last part of passage. Plenty of work for all in trimming yards. 14th March 1931 - 700 miles from Hobart our proposed port. Engines going again. 18th March 1931 - South coast of Tasmania in sight, can smell the timber on the land. Lovely view after the weeks of endless ice & snow. 19th March 1931 - Ship steamed up D'Entrecasteaux channel to Hobart, arriving at 3.30PM. Given great welcome by the Navy. Especially Rear Admiral Evans. Left Hobart on 22nd March and arrived Melbourne on 26th 147 days out. Hobart to Hobart - Length of second cruise 10,557 miles. Ship returns to England via Cape Town. Two Cruises - Approx 22,000 miles.

    Word processed and loaded onto Trove by Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-09
    User data
  9. BANZARE - Gipsy Moth Seaplane VH-ULD
    List
    Public

    FROM LOG OF (GILBERT) ERIC DOUGLAS

    First Flight in the Antarctic by Gipsy Moth Seaplane VH-ULD -
    Tuesday 31st Dec. 1929 -
    Magnetic Variation 40 West. A beautiful morning, clear sky and a light SE wind. We started to get the machine on her floats, warm the engine and the oil. In the meantime the others were busy running a station. By 2PM we had things OK and we then lowered the machine into the water. Stu and I stopping aboard. By exercising care this manoeuvre is fairly easy. We took the sling off and then I started up the engine. She started up quite easy. After taxying about the locality for ten minutes we headed into the wind and gave her full throttle. After a run of about 200 yards she rose easily and climbed well. We flew around the ship for a while testing the machines rigging, engine and instruments. The rigging was perfect, the engine OK and instruments OK. We felt quite pleased with things. We then climbed at 1700 revs (Engine capable of 2000) to 5000 ft. noting air temperatures every 500 ft, at 5000 ft the air temperature was 18 F but it did not feel so cold. At this height we had a great view of the ice pack. To the south this pack extended for 30 or 40 miles unbroken, then we could see open water which appeared to be about 10 miles across, beyond this again appeared the distant shape of land but it is hard to say definitely. This apparent land extended towards the SW, from the SW to W there was a haze. To the SE and E fairly hazy with some small water ways. To the west the water extended as far as we could see. To the North and North east, very broken thin pack ice, and clouds to the NE. We flew south from the ship at this height for eight miles, but as we were getting over heavy ice we turned. After an hours flight we landed, taxied up to the ship and reported what we saw. The m/c (machine) was then hoisted aboard and the ship started steaming slowly to the west along the ice front. 10PM. No wind, beautiful sky to the west, rainbow effect, certainly one of the best days yet for weather. I only hope we get another good day tomorrow. Wonderful calm air for flying, no signs of bumps or wind gusts. Noon position LAT 66 11 LONG 65 10. Distance run 45 miles. Log kept at the time of the voyage.

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection).

    The official position of the SY Discovery was Latitude 66 10 or 66 10 30 S and Longitude 65 10 E and it is thought that the land sighted was Mac-Robertson Land (named by Sir Douglas Mawson on that 1st of 2 voyages). Ref: The Winning of Australian Antarctica - Grenfell Price - Angus and Robertson - First published in 1962.

    Gipsy Moth Seaplane - note that this was 'Alfresco' or open cockpit or open air flying. Moreover, it was a de Havilland Gipsy Moth manufactured in Britain and provided with a civilian call sign. As to who paid for the aeroplane I am unsure but it was flown by the two RAAF pilots who had been seconded to BANZARE. (The Gipsy Moth was likely paid for out of the BANZARE 'budget' which was funded by the Governments of Britain, Australia and New Zealand and by private Benefactors and companies. The Government of South Africa also provided 'support' when the Discovery was in Cape Town, South Africa).

    ERIC DOUGLAS INTERVIEWED BY JOHN THOMPSON OF THE ABC IN 1963, IN MELBOURNE -

    " ...John Thompson: Was it a seaplane, or could you take off from the ice? Eric Douglas: No. Yes we had the skis in the float, but we envisaged that where possible we would work off the water, because Sir Douglas felt that it would be most unusual for us to get a smooth strip of ice, or if we did get it, it might break up when we were in the air. So we thought the safest was to do it off the float. Well, it so happened that on the 31st December, 1929, we made our first flight. Mind you, we had tried several days before this to make a flight, we had the aeroplane ready, but either the wind came up, or the visibility dropped with snow, blowing snow and fog, or we had insufficient water. We always had something. It was hard to just get what we wanted. Well, anyhow, on this particular afternoon, we started the engine, lowered the aeroplane overboard, Stuart Campbell and I went off for two reasons, one was to test the aeroplane and see how it flew in that type of region, and the other was to make it an ice recco flight so we could help to guide the ship through. But to our amazement when we climbed up to about five thousand feet there to the south-west we could see black peaks, sticking up.

    John Thompson: What excitement ! Eric Douglas: And we almost jumped out of the aeroplane. It was absolutely terrific. Later on Sir Douglas called them the Douglas Islands after Admiral Douglas, and then the Norwegians later on they contested this and said that they didn‟t exist. Of course I badly judged the distance. I said that these black peaks were 45 to 50 miles away, but as a matter fact, from what I know now, they were close to a hundred. But I didn‟t quite appreciate the visibility in the Antarctic when the day was clear, in that there‟s no dust, and what you could normally estimate at, say fifty miles, we found later on we always had to double it. I‟m convinced now that the peaks that I was looking at were actually on the Antarctic coast, and they were part of what is now MacRobertson Land. They were just west of where the Station Mawson is now. And I think I and Campbell were looking at mountain peaks some distance inland from the Antarctic coast. John Thompson: Great big black things? Eric Douglas: Just shaped like a saw tooth, jet black, no sign of any snow or ice, and standing startling clear from the frozen sea. This was probably the first time that human eyes had seen land in that part.

    John Thompson: How did you find the aeroplane behaved ? Quite well in this cold sir? Eric Douglas: Yes, extraordinarily well. We had to make very few modifications. Of course it only had an engine of 110 horse power.

    John Thompson: And a little light old-fashioned aeroplane with a rotary engine, I suppose? Eric Douglas: No, it was a Gipsy Moth. But when we had to put aboard some emergency gear and photographic equipment it was a little underpowered, not so much when you got into it sir, but getting off, and of course one of the things you had to do down there was to get off as soon as possible to avoid any floating ice in the water pool ..."

    (From an ABC recording in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection and backed up by written papers held at the Australian Academy of Science in Canberra).

    More on de Havilland Gipsy Moth DH 60G – VH-ULD -

    De Havilland Gipsy Moth DH 60G was the aeroplane flown on the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931, under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson.
    On both voyages which made up the expedition the Gipsy Moth was flown by the two RAAF pilots – Stuart Campbell and Eric Douglas.
    In 1929-1930 their ranks were Flying Officer Stuart Campbell and Pilot Officer Eric Douglas and in 1930-1931 they were Flight Lieutenant Stuart Campbell and Flying Officer Eric Douglas. For the purposes of BANZARE Stuart Campbell and Eric Douglas were seconded to the ‘Seaplane Division’ of the RAAF.
    The two RAAF pilots flew together on BANZARE or one of the pilots flew taking up a BANZARE passenger - for example Sir Douglas Mawson, or Frank Hurley who was the official Photographer and Cinematographer. Reconnaissance for the ship’s passage and aerial photography for photographs, whole glass plate negatives, films, and maps and charting purposes were to the forefront.
    The plane was not in fact a seaplane but a moth with floats and skis, the skis were kept inside the floats. The plane was purchased in England from the de Havilland Company and crated on the steam yacht Discovery from London. The Discovery left London on 1st August 1929, for Cape Town. The ship went via Cardiff to stock up with Cardiff briquettes.
    BANZARE started officially in Cape Town, South Africa on 19th October, 1929. It was here that Sir Douglas Mawson boarded the Discovery, although he had earlier been in England. Boarding here too were the RAAF pilots and the ‘Scientific party’ from Australia and New Zealand. It appears that both Frank Hurley and James Marr had boarded the Discovery in London.
    On seeing the Discovery at Cape Town on 14th October 1929, Eric Douglas noted “...Our machine (Gipsy Moth) is packed on the deck in cases…”
    In a letter to his mother Bessie (Elizabeth) from Kerguelen on 17th November, 1929 Eric wrote “…They are leaving one of the lifeboats ashore to make more room for our machine…I know Sir Douglas does not expect us to do much flying. I would like to do plenty of it but conditions are so hard, as this ship is too small for handling a machine properly. Anyhow we will do what we can…”
    On the way south in 1929 on Voyage 1 the plane was unboxed from its crates and assembled by RAAF pilots Campbell and Douglas on the deck of the ship. On the return journey it was the reverse process with the plane being disassembled and stored back in the crates to make way for the lifeboat or whaleboat. It was the same sort of process for Voyage 2.
    The Gipsy Moth was painted a bright lemon yellow by the pilots. Eric Douglas used to say that as far as he was concerned bright yellow and bright orange were the colours which stood out best in the Antarctic.
    The RAAF pilots were continuously concerned for the stowage safety of the Gipsy Moth, especially after it had been assembled. This is one example of what occurred - Voyage 1 – Eric Douglas’ log of 6th January, 1930 “Stu and I were woken at 4.30AM and told that a blizzard had started. When we came on deck, it was blowing hard and the air thick with driving snow and the sea starting to make. It was blowing too hard to take the machine off its floats, so we set to and lashed her securely down as best we could... 10PM Much easier now and our machine is safe from serious damage, although when the temperature rises ice will fall from the masts and rigging on to our planes...” and 7th January, 1930 “... Pieces of ice two or three feet long, by six inches wide and one inch thick are coming off the masts and rigging, and although we have the planes covered with bags, so hard do they hit that there are numerous rips and holes in the fabric of the upper wings. So we will have quite a job repairing the same...” Eric Douglas had made light of the damage. Because of the damage sustained in this episode alone the moth had to be disassembled for repairs and then reassembled. It took ten days of repair work by the pilots with some help from others.

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    251 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  10. BANZARE - Polar Medal awards in 1934
    List
    Public

    British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition
    (BANZARE) 1929-1931

    The Expedition Commander

    Sir Douglas Mawson – Commanding the Expedition, Navigation Officers and crew of the Discovery – 1929-1931. Born in England. From Adelaide. Mawson was a Mining Engineer, Geologist and University Lecturer and Professor. There are a number of Antarctic features and landmarks named for Sir Douglas Mawson, including Mawson Coast and the Australian Antarctic Station of Mawson. However, none of these namings were by Sir Douglas Mawson. Nickname the Dux. I had the privilege of meeting Lady Mawson in the early 1970's.

    The Ship’s Company

    Captain John King Davis chose the Ship's Company before BANZARE Voyage 1 - he was basically interested in men from the Merchant Navy as he felt that their skills and experiences would be more appropriate for Antarctic conditions. Although Arthur J Williams the Wireless Officer was with the Royal Navy and Lieutenant William Robinson Colbeck was from the RNR.

    Captain John King Davis – Master of the Discovery and second in Command 1929-1930. Born at Kew, Surrey, England. Started life at sea as a cabin boy or steward boy, working his way from Cape Town to London. Davis Bay on the Wilkes Coast and Davis Peninsula in Queen Mary Land were named for Captain Davis for the AAE 1911-1914, and Cape Davis in Kemp Land for BANZARE Voyage 1. There is also the Australian Antarctic Station of Davis. Nickname Gloomy.

    Kenneth Norman MacKenzie – First Mate 1929-1930 and Master of the Discovery, and second in Command 1930-1931. Mackenzie Bay on the Amery Ice Shelf is named for Captain MacKenzie. From Scotland. He fought on the Western Front in WW1 and was captured twice and gassed. He took over year to recuperate in hospital and he never recovered to have good health. Prior to BANZARE Kenneth was with the Ellerman City Line. Called Mac by those onboard the Discovery.

    Arthur Max Stanton – First mate 1930-1931. Born in London, England. He went to sea at an early age. He was apprenticed with a British overseas shipping line. Stanton Group - a small group of rocky islands off Falla Bluff, Mac.Robertson Land have been named for Stanton. In 1932 he was the Master of a vessel called the Southern Cross which was shipwrecked in the New Hebrides. He dived overboard in his pyjamas and dressing gown to save a male passenger. In 1933 he sailed with a group of 12 men on a yacht looking for treasure which had supposedly been buried in the Cocos Islands in 1824. Stanton commanded merchant ships of 2,500, 3,000 and 9.000 tons. In 1952 he was intending to sail from Brisbane to Rabaul in a 45ft yacht. Friends of Mawson say online that AMax as he was called by his family and close friends, died in Hong Kong in 1963. Other sites online indicate that he died in 1973. Called Max by those onboard the Discovery.

    Lieutenant William Robinson Colbeck RN Reserve – Special Navigating Officer and Second Mate 1929-1931. Colbeck Archipelago made up of numerous rocky islands, in Mac.Robertson Land is for William Colbeck. William became a Captain RNR. A son of the legendary William Colbeck of the Antarctic. William Robinson Colbeck shows up in the UK Navy List in 1939. W R Colbeck was a 'Cape Horner'.

    John Bonus Child – Third Mate 1929-1931. He came from the P & O Steam Navigation Company. Child Rocks in the Robinson Group have been named for him. John Bonus Child was a temporary Lieutenant Commander in 1941 - UK Navy List of the early 1940's

    Wilfred James Griggs – Chief Engineer 1929-1931. From the Winning of Australia by Grenfell Price in 1962, see page 186 - Griggs Point was for Wilfred Griggs. This name has not featured on Australian Maps since about 1962. He came from the P & O Steam Navigation Company

    Bernard Frank Welch – Second Engineer 1929-1931. Welch Island and Welch Rocks off the Mawson Coast of Mac.Robertson Land have been named for Bernard Welch.

    Arthur J Williams – Petty Officer, Signalling Division RN, Wireless Officer 1929-1931. He was on loan from the British Admiralty. Point Williams off the Lars Christensen Coast has been named for Arthur Williams.

    Scientific and Technical Staff

    Professor (Thomas) Harvey Johnston – Chief Biologist 1929-1931. Born In Balmain, New South Wales. From Adelaide at the time of BANZARE. He was also a Zoologist, Botanist and Parasitologist. Johnston Peak in Enderby land is for Harvey Johnston.

    Harold Oswald Fletcher – Assistant Biologist 1929-1931. He was also a Zoologist and Palaeontologist. Cape Fletcher in Mac.Robertson Land is for Harold Fletcher. From Sydney. Nickname Cherub.

    Robert Alexander Falla – Ornithologist 1929-1931. On BANZARE he was also the specialist in Taxidermy. Falla Bluff in Mac.Robertson Land is for Robert Falla. From New Zealand. Nickname Birdie.

    Ritchie Gibson Simmers – Meteorologist 1929-1931. Simmers Peaks - four rocky peaks near Cape Close, Enderby Land were named for Ritchie Simmers. From New Zealand. Nickname Simmo. The Ritchie G Simmers Collection is at the Canterbury Museum, New Zealand.

    Alfred Howard – Chemist 1929-1931. He was also a Hydrographer. Later he obtained a PhD in Linguistics and was made an Honorary Doctor of Statistics. From Melbourne. Alf lived to be 104. Howard Bay in Mac.Robertson Land is named for Alf Howard. I had the privilege of meeting him.

    William Wilson Ingram – Medical Doctor and Bacteriologist 1929-1931. He also was the Discovery's Dentist. Before and after BANZARE he was a Soldier-Doctor. Ingram was also a Physician and a Pathologist. From the Winning of Australia by Grenfell Price in 1962 - see page 186 - Ingram Bay was for Dr Ingram. This name has not featured on Australian Maps since about 1962. Born in Scotland. From Sydney. Nickname the Doc.

    Morton Henry Moyes – Instructor Commander RAN - Hydrographic Surveyor 1929-1930. On BANZARE he was also a Cartographer. In the Royal Australian Navy he taught Mathematics and Navigation. Moyes was on the AAE 1911-1914. Born Koolunga, South Australia. Cape Moyes in Queen Mary Land and Moyes Islands in King George V Land have been named for Moyes for his time with the AAE 1911-1914, and Moyes Peak in Mac.Robertson Land for BANZARE, Voyage 1. I had the privilege of meeting him.

    James William Slessor Marr – Oceanographer 1929-1930. He was also a Zoologist, Marine Biologist and an expert in Krill. Nickname was Babe or Scout. He was on an early Shackleton expedition. Mount Marr is a peak in Enderby Land named for Dr Marr for his participation in BANZARE. At the start of WW II Marr conducted hands-on research in the Antarctic into the feasibility of whale meat for human consumption. Moreover, in 1940 Marr was commissioned by the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve serving in Iceland, the Far East and South Africa. In 1943 he was a Lieutenant Commander. He led ‘Operation Tabarin’ in 1944-1946. It was a British Antarctic Expedition ‘secretly’ set up to establish permanently occupied bases in the Falkland Island Dependencies. Marr Point, Marr Bay (Bahia Marr), Marr Glacier and Marr Ice Piedmont are also named for Dr James Marr. Marr Ice Piedmont - covering half of Anvers Island, Palmer Archipelago, and extending from Cape Bayle in N to Arthur Harbour in S, was presumably sighted by GAE, 1873-74; roughly charted by FAE, 1903-05 and 1908-10; named after Dr James William Slesser Marr (1902-65), British marine biologist; member (as boy scout), Shackleton-Rowett Antarctic Expedition, 1921-22, and (as biologist) British expedition to Svalbard, 1925; member of DI scientific staff, 1927-49, and of National Institute of Oceanography, 1949-65; William Scoresby, 1928-29, and Discovery II, 1931-33 and 1935-37; biologist, BANZARE, 1929-31 (Sir Douglas Mawson), and whale factory ship Terje Viken, 1939-40; Commander (as Lieut. Cdr, RNVR), Operation "Tabarin", and Base Leader, "Port Lockroy"; surveyed in part by FIDS from "Arthur Harbour" in 1955 and photographed from the air by FIDASE, 1956-57.

    Karl Erik (Eric) Oom – Lieutenant RAN – Hydrographic Surveyor 1930-1931. He was also a Cartographer. He was the Captain of Ships when on loan to the Royal Navy and also in the Royal Australian Navy. Born Chatswood, New South Wales. Oom Bay and Oom Island near Cape Bruce, Mac.Robertson Land have been named for Lieutenant Oom.

    Alexander Lorimer Kennedy – Physicist 1930-1931. He was also a Magnetician, Cartographer, Draughtsman, Surveyor and later a Mining Engineer. He was on the AAE 1911-1914. Born in Woodside, South Australia. Cape Kennedy and Kennedy Peak, both in Queen Mary Land have been named for Kennedy for AAE 1911-1914, and Mount Kennedy in Mac.Robertson Land for his time with BANZARE Voyage 2.

    James Francis Hurley – Photographer 1929-1931. He was also a Cinematographer. At the time of BANZARE he was also a capable mechanic and an expert at tin smithing and brasswork. He was a capable carpenter and model boat builder. Hurley's photography of Shackleton's expedition ship the Endurance being crushed in the ice; and explorers of the AAE 1911-1914 expedition facing katabatic winds at Cape Denision are the stuff of legends. Hurley was also a book author and a broadcaster. During BANZARE it was Frank Hurley who wrote the wording for many of the Proclamations made by Sir Douglas Mawson. From Sydney. His photography was sometimes artistic as he wanted to create a reality. During WW1 he was made an Honorary Captain. Cape Hurley near the Mertz Glacier was named for Frank Hurley's participation in the AAE 1911-1914. Mount Hurley a high peak in Enderby Land has been named for Frank Hurley for BANZARE 1929-1931.

    Stuart Alexander Caird Campbell – Flight Lieutenant RAAF 1929-1931. Senior RAAF Pilot. Stuart was obviously an excellent Aerial Navigator. He had a Bachelors Degree in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. After BANZARE he flew Catalinas out of Darwin and was involved in mine laying missions in the South Pacific. He was a leader in the establishment of Australia's Sub Antarctic bases of Heard and Macquarie Islands. He later spoke fluent Thai and became an author of Thai language books. Campbell Head in Mac.Robertson Land and Campbell Peak on Heard Island have been named for Stuart Campbell.

    (Gilbert) Eric Douglas – Flying Officer RAAF 1929-1931. From Melbourne. Nickname Fiskebolle or Doug. His first flight was with Harry Hawker at the age of 11 - a good use of pocket money. At the time of BANZARE Eric was also a Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Air Mechanic, Aero Fitter and Aero Rigger, RAAF A1 Flying Instructor and Parachute Folding Expert. Plus he was also a Motor mechanic for motor vehicles, motor bikes and marine engines. He was also a capable carpenter and a real and model boat and a model plane builder. Obviously Eric was an excellent Aerial Navigator. On BANZARE although the junior pilot he was responsible for the maintenance of the Gipsy Moth's engine, and for the running and maintenance of the ship's motor boat. Eric was the person who calculated the oil and fuel needed onboard the Discovery for the moth and the motor boat. He physically repainted the motor boat while it was onboard the Discovery. The motor boat's engine was overhauled at the end of voyage 1. Douglas Bay and Douglas Peak in Enderby Land have been named for Eric Douglas. Douglas Lake on Kerguelen was also named for Eric Douglas by Sir Douglas Mawson during BANZARE Voyage 1 - but nothing came of that. I have a sketched map of Kerguelen with the lake sketched in. Nickname Doug or Fiskebolle. The Eric Douglas Collection is listed at the Archives Hub (Scott Polar Institute).

    The Ship’s Crew

    For the Ship’s crew of BANZARE I could not find any AADC names for
    Josiah John Pill – Chief Steward 1930-1931,
    Stanley R Smith – Fireman 1929-1930,
    Joseph Williams – Carpenter 1930-1931,
    W Simpson – Boatswain 1929-1930,
    A Hendrickson – Able Seaman 1930-1931,
    William Franklin Porteous – Able Seaman 1930-1931,
    and Norman C Matear – Able Seaman 1930-1931

    Frank G Dungey – Chief Steward 1929-1930. Mount Dungey in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land have been named for Frank G Dungey.

    Josiah John Pill – Chief Steward 1930-1931. In 1928 and 1936 he was on the Australian Electoral Roll at Denison, Tasmania.

    F Sones – Cook 1929-1930. Mount Sones one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    John E Reed – Cook 1930-1931. Mount Reed in the Tula Mountains of Enderby Land have been named for him.

    George James Rhodes – Assistant Cook 1930-1931. Mount Rhodes one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    Allan J Bartlett – Cook’s Mate 1929-1930 and Second Steward 1930-1931. He was presented with his Polar Medal and Bar by the King on the Royal Yacht at Cowes in July, 1934. Mount Bartlett one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land was named for him.

    Clarence H V Sellwood – Assistant Steward 1929-1930. Clarence Henry Victor Sellwood - https://www.spink.com/lot-description.aspx?id=13003000081 Mount Selwood in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land was named for him. It appears that it should be Mount Sellwood.

    Harry V Gage – Assistant Steward 1929-1930. Gage Ridge in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land is named for him.

    Ernest Bond – Assistant Steward 1930-1931. Mount Bond in the Tula Mountains of Enderby Land have been named for him. According to Frank Hurley's notes on 'negatives by others' Bond took quite a few which became part of the 'official collection' taken on BANZARE.

    Frank Hurley also attributes a few negatives to a man with the surname of Brock?

    The Firemen would be the Coal Stokers for the Discovery's 450 HP triple expansion coal fired steam engine. Steam was supplied by two coal-fired Marine boilers. There was no heating as such on the Discovery and the warmest someone could get was to go near the Fiddly or Fiddley (a hatch over the engine or fireroom). Hence the Fiddley Club on the Discovery - about which Harold Fletcher said that a tell tale sign about being there was a burn on the seat of one's pants through sitting on an ash bucket! It has been said that 50 tons of coal had to be retained as the Discovery's ballast.

    Stanley R Smith – Fireman 1929-1930

    James T Kyle – Fireman 1929-1930. Kyle Nunataks - three nunataks in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land are named for him.

    Richard V Hampson – Fireman 1929-1930. Mount Hampson in the Tula Mountains of Enderby Land is named for Richard V Hampson.

    Frank Best – Fireman 1930-1931. Australia Antarctic Data Centre - Mount Best one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    Murde Campbell Morrison – Fireman 1930-1931. The Australia Antarctic Data Centre - Mount Morrison one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him. His name is given as H C Morrison. Obviously his first name was not Murde.

    William Edward Crosby – Fireman 1930-1931. Crosby Nunataks in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land are named for him.

    John J Miller – Sailmaker 1929-1931. Also referred to as Joe Miller. Mount Miller one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    C Degerfeldt – Carpenter 1929-1930. Mount Degerfeldt one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land has been named for him.

    Joseph Williams – Carpenter 1930-1931. In the Voyages of the Discovery by Ann Savours it says that he was still shell shocked from WW1.The Dundee Heritage Trust list C Steward as the Carpenter on BANZARE Voyage 2.

    W H Letten – Donkeyman (Auxillary Engineer) 1929-1931. Mount Letten one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    W Simpson – Boatswain 1929-1930

    James Hamilton Martin – Able Seaman 1929-1930 and Boatswain 1930-1931. Lieutenant James Martin RNVR was lost at sea through enemy action in June 1940 - http://uboat.net/allies/merchants/crews/person/16223.html From the web - '...On 29th June 1940 HMS Edgehill was in the South West approaches of the English Channel when she was hit by a torpedo at 00.12, fired by U-51. Due to her buoyant cargo the ship did not sink whereby the U-boat surfaced and at 01.06 it fired another torpedo that again struck the ship. However, the ship remained afloat and only finally sunk slowly by the stern after a third torpedo fired by U-51 hit the ship at 01.06. Sixty seven men lost their lives in the attack. The following report appears in Berrow’s Worcester Journal, Saturday 21st September 1940: Lieutenant James Martin, who was reported missing and is now presumed killed on active service with the Royal Navy, was the only son of Mrs and the late Mr Hugo Martin, of “Oakwood,” West Malvern – a member of the well-known banking firm of that name. Lieutenant Martin obtained a Commission in the Grenadier Guards on leaving Harrow in 1917, and served with them until 1919. He then went into business for a short period, but found a life of adventure more suited to him, and joined the crew of the windjammer Garthpool – the last of the British four-masted vessels on the Australian route. After further experience, he sailed with Mawson’s expedition to the Antarctic in 1929 on the Discovery, and was eventually promoted boatswain...' Nickname Lofty. The James Martin Collection is listed at the Archives Hub (Scott Polar Institute). Martin Reef off the Mawson Coast in Mac.Robertson Land was named for him in 1931.

    Kenneth McLennan – Able Seaman 1929-1930. Mount McLennan on the Beaver Glacier, Enderby Land was named for him.

    Raymond C Tomlinson - Able Seaman 1929-1930. Mount Tomlinson on the Beaver in Enderby Land has been named for him.

    F Leonard Marsland – Able Seaman 1929-1930. Mount Marsland in Enderby Land was named for Marsland.

    John A Park – Able Seaman 1929-1930. Mount Park on the Beaver Glacier, Enderby Land is named for him.

    Lauri Parviainen - Able Seaman 1930-1931. From Finland. He was never presented with his Polar Medal as his first name was incorrectly spelt as Louis and he could not be traced. It has since been found that he was alive in 1978. His medal was given to the National Museum of Finland. Mount Parviainen one of the Tula Mountains in Enderby Land is named for him.

    A Hendrickson - Able Seaman 1930-1931

    David Peacock - Able Seaman 1930-1931. Peacock Ridge in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land was named for him.

    William Franklin Porteous - Able Seaman 1930-1931. William was born in 1901 in Geelong, Victoria. William's Polar Medal was presented to his mother in May, 1934 in Melbourne, as he had died tragically in the Falklands in February, 1932. He was an ANZAC - National Archives of Australia.

    Norman C Matear - Able Seaman 1930-1931

    Fred G Ward - Able Seaman 1930-1931. According to the AADC Ward Rock in the Scott Mountains, Enderby Land was named for Fred J Ward. From Melbourne. Fred kept a diary about BANZARE. His words are backed up with colourful illustrations of the Antarctic.

    William E Howard - Able Seaman 1930-1931. He took a whole series of excellent photographs which are at Flickr, by the University of Newcastle, Australia. In 1951 Howard Lt W E RANR was living at the Railway Club, Tamworth, NSW – listed in the Antarctic Club (British) of 1929 – List of Members – Booklet – the Australian Section commenced in 1940. In 1951 W E Howard was listed in the Australian Section. In the 1949 Booklet he is listed in the British Section and living at 22 Wakefield Street, Kent Town, South Australia. The London Gazette lists him as William E Howard - https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/34046/page/2788/data.pdf The Australian Antarctic Data Centre lists him as W E Howard - Howard Hills on the Beaver Glacier, Enderby Land are named for him. He may have been William Edward Howard who was born in Prahran in 1907 and was AB in 1928. He resigned from the RAN Reserve in 1929 and was back in the Reserve by 1939. The National Australian Archives have two entries on this man. Is this the same W E Howard? https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/096714/ He appears to be the William Edward Howard who was born in Prahran in 1907 and he could be the same man as Able Seaman W E Howard. The father of this William Edward Howard appears to have also been a William E Howard who piloted Japanese Warships up Port Phillip Bay when they came on a goodwill visit in 1925. Able Seaman William E Howard had a sister named Nell.

    George Ayres – Able Seaman 1929-1931. From the web - 'Londoner George Ayres sailed across the Antarctic threshold with the BANZARE; though the 31-year-old Great War merchant navy veteran signed on as Able Seaman, he was elevated to Netman during the expedition...'

    John Matheson - Able Seaman 1929-1931. Born 1893. Nickname Jock. Mount Matheson in the Tula Mountains, Enderby Land was named for him for his participation in BANZARE. Further British Antarctic Territory of Matheson Glacier is named for him - "Flowing E into Lehrke Inlet, Black Coast, was seen from the air and from the ground by USAS in December 1940; surveyed by FIDS RARE from "Stonington Island" in November 1947 and named after John ("Jock") Matheson (b. 1893), Operation "Tabarin" general assistant, "Port Lockroy", 1943-44, and "Hope Bay", 1944-45; previously with Hudson Bay Company, with BANZARE in Discovery, 1929-31, and with DI as Able Seaman in Discovery II, 1931-33, 1933-35 and 1935-37; photographed from the air by USN in 1966 and further surveyed from the ground by BAS from "Stonington Island", 1972-73". The Operation Tabarin site lists Jock Matheson as the Handyman at Deception Island in 1944.

    The Polar medal was bronze and issued to all BANZARE explorers. It has a white ribbon. A bar was also issued for those men who participated in two voyages. It appears that a miniature silver medal was also issued to all. It also had a white ribbon. These miniatures were the medals which could be worn after 6pm at formal dress functions. The bronze medals were also worn eg in the RAAF when other medals roughly the same size were also worn. For the RAAF pilots a white bar could be worn by itself or as a bar also incorporating other appropriate RAAF colours.

    Many times the Bar is referred to as a Clasp - it actually takes the form of a bar and I was told in the 1950's that it should be called a Bar and not a Clasp - the Bar being the correct title and description.

    Many Antarctic landmarks and features were named for the individual men of BANZARE and some for BANZARE - BANZARE Coast, BANZARE Glacier, BANZARE Bank (Bank) and BANZARE Seamount and Seamounts (Bank) and BANZARE Rise (Bank). Also named for the Discovery during BANZARE is DISCOVERY Bank which is a submarine bank on the Kerguelen Plateau.

    Many of the landmarks and features were named by Sir Douglas Mawson during BANZARE but some appear to be as a result of Aerial surveys by ANARE in 1956. I suppose to make sure that the BANZARE Ship's Crew had their individual participation also recognized by Australia and SCAR. https://data.aad.gov.au/

    James Forbes was not on BANZARE but likely on the Discovery in the Falklands a bit earlier http://www.antarctica.gov.au/news/2010/australian-antarctic-glaciers-named The Australian Antarctic Division agrees with me on this but they gave not amended their website.

    Sally Douglas

    121 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-07-23
    User data
  11. BANZARE - Sea Shanties - RRS Discovery 1 or SY Discovery
    List
    Public

    City of Baltimore

    Oh’ One fine day in the month of May
    When I was out-ward bound,
    I had no tin to buy gin, as I hopped the streets all round
    My coat was out of the elbows, and I was sore in need,
    So I shipped as Able Seaman on the City of Baltimore.

    Chorus
    No more I’ll go to sea, to sail the Western Ocean,
    A-hauling and a-pulling I never will again,
    No more I’ll go to sea, to rove the salty ocean,
    But ever more I’ll stop ashore, I’ll go to sea no more.

    No more I’ll haul on the lee Fore Brace, or by the Royal halyards stand
    No more I’ll cry as aloft I fly with a Tar Pot in my hand
    No more I’ll reef these Top’sls or brail the Spanker in,
    Gaff Top’sl tack I’ll dip no more on the City of Baltimore

    No more I’ll take my first look-out
    No more I’ll take my wheel
    No more I’ll cry as aft I fly to hold the big log reel,
    I’ll stop ahore in comfort, I’ll stop at ease ashore,
    Around the Horn I’ll beat no more on the City of Baltimore


    Susannah

    Oh, we know the lights of Santos
    And the loom of the Azores
    But here we sign in a Coffin Ship
    With condemned Navy Sto-----rea

    Chorus
    Susannah, my Fair Maid
    Way Ho, you London Girls
    Why do’nt you catch the Tow-rope?

    Oh, down we went to the River
    The crimps got our half pay
    With a red faced Mate in that floating crate,
    And Salt-horse on Signing On Day

    Then down into the Channel
    With hazers on the Poop
    Across the Bay like a stack of Hay
    An’ a full wack of Belayin’ Pin Soup,

    And so on down to the Trade Winds,
    Still sailing like a box
    With fifteen men in that hard case Ship
    A’walking round with the Fox.

    Oh, a hundred and fifty to Sydney,
    On Salt Horse all the Day,
    With the Skipper ashore with a Bloody Old Whore,
    And never a Dollar for Pay.

    Now it’s time for us to leave her
    To the Diggings we will go,
    Where there’s Lots of Gold so I’ve been told,
    And the Grub by the Ton to Stow


    The Intrepid Explorer
    (Tune: The Old Tarpaulin Jacket)

    The Intrepid Explorer lay dying
    And as in his cabin he lay
    To the friends who were gathered
    around him
    These last dying words he did say

    Chorus
    Wrap me up in my Whybrows
    and Burberry
    My Jaeger Scarf wound round my mouth
    And with three Cardiff Briquettes
    please bury me
    The day we find land to the south

    The Discovery sailed off in the evening
    She steamed all that night back
    and forth
    But Moyes's first sight in the morning
    Made her 30 more miles to the north
    Chorus Wrap me up...

    They put out the townets for plankton
    And took echo soundings all day
    But though Griggsy threw on some more
    blubber
    They made no more southing that day
    Chorus Wrap me up...

    And once when they thought they were
    winning
    The Spirit of Ice in his wrath
    Blew the Fast pack ice close under their Bowsprit
    And they drifted away to the north
    Chorus Wrap me up...

    To stop drift they put out the big
    dredges
    They buggered nets by the score
    But at dinner J.K. told Sir Douglas
    That they were still further north than
    before
    Chorus Wrap me up...

    The Intrepid explorer still dying
    And wearied of shifting about
    To the other Intrepid Explorers
    These last dying words he did shout

    Final Chorus
    Put me down on the first bit of
    Pack ice
    With Yalumba uncorked near my mouth
    And leave me to die unmolested
    For I see we'll never get south

    The Seadogs Lament
    (Tune: Down in the Canebrake)

    Once I went exploring in the old
    Discovery
    We had one bloody scientist
    and seamen fifty-three
    We didn't have an aeroplane
    or echo sounder then
    We didn't have no long haired
    sheep in a wooden pen

    (Chorus)
    In days gone by just
    forty years
    We sailed away and we had no cheers
    In days gone by and we had no
    cheers

    The sea we sailed like Capt Cooks
    Our stars we knew like a ruddy
    book
    We ate salt horse and we like it
    very well
    In forty years things have gone to hell
    Chorus In days gone by...

    We didn't have Yalumba or Tomango
    squash
    We didn't have hot water and we never had a wash
    We didn't play with Plankton nets
    or shoot the otter trawls
    We didn't dredge with Monegasques
    and make an utter balls
    Chorus In days gone by...

    We didn't have an engine to help
    us on our way
    We didn't let the scientist have
    stations every day
    We didn't count the dust mites or
    let balloons go free
    We only sailed like Capt Cooks
    upon the wide blue sea
    Chorus In days gone by...

    But now those days are over and
    seamen six have we
    Thirteen ruddy scientists who do not
    know the sea
    They say all sorts of stupid things
    which pain me in the head
    So now I think I'll leave the bridge
    and make my way to bed
    Chorus In days gone by...

    On the Discovery - (Tune:Vive la Compagnie).

    Oh, this is the song of the BANZARE
    On the Discovery.
    The Antarctic coastline seems totally fled
    On the Discovery.
    Bay ice and bergs and penguins galore
    But no bloody sign of the mythical shore.
    But it's Christmas today
    So let us all say
    Here's to discovery.
    Sir Douglas, our leader has been down before,
    Making discovery.
    He's taking us now to Enderby's shore,
    On the Discovery.
    His hobby is knocking off big lumps of rock
    And issuing cardigans, singlets and socks,
    Cursing the slow
    But making it go,
    On the Discovery...

    Encore
    We carried an aeroplane down all the way
    On the Discovery.
    And two jolly airmen on Government pay
    On the Discovery.
    They work winches and launches and hammer and screw,
    For the Moth she was stubborn and prospects looked blue,
    But now it's New Year
    They've been in the air
    On the Discovery.

    Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection (Gilbert Eric Douglas).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  12. BANZARE - The layout of the SY Discovery or Discovery
    List
    Public

    The Discovery in name, was one of a line of no fewer than six earlier British Polar Exploration ships called the Discovery, commencing in 1602 when William Baffin sailed into the waters of Hudson’s and Baffin Bays. The Discovery of BANZARE was the last of these wooden vessels. It was built along the lines of an Arctic whaler, the type of which was developed in the first three-quarters of the 1800’s. These ships were designed to sail in high seas and push forcefully through loose pack ice.

    This latest Discovery was of an extreme of this type, with an unusual solid hull built to withstand heavy ice pressure – length 198 ft, extreme breadth 34 ft, displacement at the 16 ft water-line of 1600 tons, with a net carrying capacity of about 600 tons of stores and coal. The hull was built as a U-shape in cross-sections. The bows were constructed very solidly. At the stern, the stern post was massive and the propeller post was also massive. Therefore the ship’s capacity for speed was diminished.

    Although heavily dependant on sail, sailing was of little or no value in the Antarctic. For there was with imminent hazard of pack ice and icebergs, together with a lack of suitable winds or hurricane conditions.

    The Discovery had three masts, square rigged on the fore and main and the great expanse of yards and rigging aloft offered much wind resistance, which were potentially disadvantageous in an Antarctic hurricane. In such a situation the only course for the navigator was to steam into the wind and wait it out. So steps were taken to reduce the wind resistance when the Discovery was in Cape Town late in 1929, just before Voyage 1. The yards and square rigging on the main mast were abolished, making the rig barquentine rather than barque.

    The Discovery was launched in March, 1901 in Dundee, Scotland as the Discovery. (It seems fitting that it is now back in Dundee). 'Lloyds Register of Ships' show that it was registered as a sailing ship in 1901. In its later life it was registered as a steamship rather than as a sailing ship, but it was both. Mainly it was a sailing ship but backed up by a Cardiff briquette or coal fuelled steam engine.

    The Discovery was designed by Mr W E Smith who was the chief constructor for the Royal Navy. The ship was built by the Dundee Shipbuilders Co. and its engine was constructed by Messrs Gourlay Brothers Co. of Dundee.

    The Discovery was designed and built for Robert Falcon Scott’s British Naval Antarctic Expedition 1901-1904. It was designed along the lines of the Discovery of the 1875 Arctic Expedition. The keel of the ship was laid in March, 1900 at St Stephen’s Yard in Tay, Dundee. The frame of the vessel is of English oak beams 11 in thick. These beams were held together by two skins of timber, and lined by a third skin. The latter skin was of Riga fir, 4 in thick. The main outer planking is pitch pine or Canadian elm, according to its position, and is covered by an outside sheathing of greenheart 4 in thick. The spaces in between the frames and contained between the inner lining and outer skins were packed with rock salt, which pickles the wood and prevents dry rot. This rock salt would need renewing about every three years.

    The hull was heavily stayed by strong beams, and divided by bulkheads of solid construction. The bows are still stronger, being a network of timber girders and struts bolted together. Some of bolts were 8 ft long. Further protection was afforded by outer armour of steel plates extending several feet on either side of the stem. The stem had much overhang so that when charging an ice floe the bow glides upwards for several feet and with the weight of the vessel it came down with force crushing the ice floe.

    The engine room was situated well aft and housed a triple expansion engine capable of developing 450 hp. Steam was supplied by two coal burning marine boilers of 150 lb maximum water pressure. There was also a steam driven electric generator. Plus a paraffin driven emergency generator set was installed for operation when steam was not available. Either set was capable of lighting the whole vessel. The engine room also contained circulating and feed pumps, an evaporator and a well furnished workshop.

    Navigation was conducted from what was described as ‘a spacious bridge’.

    On the upper deck below the bridge was the main deckhouse, massively constructed of teak. In this building was the chartroom, wireless room, a cabin for the navigating captain, and a large deck laboratory. Further aft was a strongly built steel house for enclosing trawling winches. Forward of the main deck was a smaller one providing entrance to the crew’s quarters and galley, which were on the deck below. Forward below the forecastle head was a steam windlass for dealing with the ship’s cables.

    The main deck was found below the upper deck and it was of Dantzig fir. There was a large room right aft for stowage of sails and scientific equipment. Next was the upper part of the engine and boiler rooms. Further forward the main deck was devoted to living quarters. Firstly there was a wardroom 24ft long by 12ft wide executed in polished mahogany, around which are the cabins of the ship’s officers and the scientific staff. Light for the wardroom was provided by a large skylight for light and air. There were no portholes in the Discovery. Forward of this are the men’s quarters (ship’s crew) and finally the galley store and the galley, which was in the centre of the ship. In this portion of the ship there was also a laboratory for hydrological work, a photographic dark room and a surgery for the use of the Medical officer, who was also the Dentist. Meals on the Discovery were divided into two sittings. Forward of the galley was the forepeak with the cabin lockers and stowage for the ship’s stores.

    There appears to have been 16 accommodation cabins, including the Navigator's cabin on the upper deck and so most of the living quarters had to shared as there were to be 38 persons onboard on Voyage 1. (19 of the Ship's Company and Scientific party and 19 of the Ship's crew). On the main deck there were two relatively larger cabins and in the case of BANZARE I presume for the Expedition Commander and the Ship's Captain. Sir Douglas Mawson's cabin was described as being a small one at the aft end of the wardroom. It contained a bunk, a writing desk, a wardrobe, a washstand and 'shelves of tightly packed books'. For the rest of the Ship's Company and Scientific party there were 6 cabins to be shared and 2 single use or smaller cabins (perhaps the latter 2 were also shared with a top and bottom bunk). In 1929/30 Eric Douglas shared a bunk room with Alf Howard and in 1930/31 with Frank Hurley. It wouldn't have been too comfortable as there was no heating as such for the Discovery and it was a 'wet ship' and many times in stepping out of one's bunk it meant reaching straightaway for gumboots or seaboots. Also Eric Douglas related that to stay in his bunk when the ship was rolling necessitated being strapped in.

    For the Ship's crew there were 5 cabins. On Voyage 2 there were 40 men with the extras being two more of the category Able Seamen. So on Voyage 2 there were 21 Ship's crew sharing 5 cabins.

    Below the main deck, and underneath the galley and men’s quarters were hold spaces subdivided by five watertight bulkheads. The bulk of the expedition stores and equipment were stowed here. Entrance was provided through flush hatches in the main deck floor. Under the ward room was a large stowage area for coal. This was additional to the space provided by the bunkers which flanked the engine room on either side. The total space available in these areas allowed for the carrying of 200 tons of coal. Coal was also stored in other areas of the vessel, and as deck cargo, such was the need for this fuel. Cardiff coal was the ideal product as it was of a very high grade and came in convenient solid rectangular blocks, weighing 23 lbs each. Moreover, some of the coal had be retained as ship's ballast.

    From Discovery Reports, and NLA Newspapers of the day (1929).

    Digital RRS Discovery - http://www.rrsdiscoveryscan.com/images/discovery/gallery/gallery_4.jpg

    S Douglas

    42 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-08-05
    User data
  13. BANZARE - Types and Descriptions of Icebergs seen on this expedition
    List
    Public

    Adrift from the glaciers of Princess Elizabeth Land - a tilted stump of a tabular iceberg. It was in an advanced stage of disintegration.

    Fields of stranded icebergs off Mac-Robertson Land. Mast high

    Wave worn and decaying iceberg 200 feet in height and 900 miles north of the Antarctic coast.

    Dec 7th 1929 - Sighted first ice berg. First honour to Capt Hurley. Dec 9th 1929 - Met first pack ice. Old pack, very broken. More ice bergs of increasing size. 1/4 mile long 150ft out of water, deep blue colour in crevasses.

    19th Dec 1930 - Large ice bergs in sight, occasionally pushing through heavy pack (25ft thick).

    3rd January, 1931 - grinding bergs

    4th January, 1931 - an immense grounded flat-topped iceberg

    8th January, 1931 - grounded icebergs

    11 February, 1931 - enormous tabular berg

    Cathedral type iceberg

    Black and white iceberg

    Glacier icebergs

    Serried ranks of icebergs

    Turreted icebergs

    Sally Douglas

    30 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-07-29
    User data
  14. BANZARE - Vicinity of Scullin Monolith and Douglas Bay - By Eric Douglas
    List
    Public

    Friday 13th Feb. 1931
    Hoisting The Flag
    We were awakened by the Dux at 4.30AM and told to be ready to go ashore in half an hour. We had breakfast at 5AM and then waited until the ship steamed a little closer to the first of these Rocky Peaks. The sky was fairly clear with rather a strong cold wind blowing off the ice slopes. At about 6.30AM we pushed off in the motor boat, there being twelve of us on board. We had four hundred yards to reach the rocky shore face and on the way in, sea spray coming aboard was quickly frozen on our clothes and on the floor of the boat. It was impossible to land owing to the rock face rising steeply and to a surge along the water edge. Several other places were not so steep but rocks jutting out kept us off. This rock hill extended about half a mile long and 1000 feet high with heavily crevassed ice at each end. However the Dux read over the Proclamation and taking our opportunity we threw the Flag and sealed proclamation on to some water washed boulders. We then returned to the ship, and the launch was hauled up clear of the water. The ship then steamed westwards towards another Rock hill that was several miles ahead. The wind had eased off greatly and at 10.30AM away we went again towards what appeared a better chance of landing. We cruised slowly along the rock face looking for a reasonable place to land on. After a while we came slowly into a boulder strewn beach and Stu jumped ashore with a line, he made it fast on a rock and by careful manoeuvring and watching the surge, the Dux, Hurley, Falla and Fletcher got ashore without much trouble. They then hoisted the Flag and read over the Proclamation, we cruised up and down for about an hour while those ashore gathered specimen rocks, birds and took photos. We came close in and threw a bag with a line attached ashore, this was filled with rocks and hauled on board. Then watching for a calm spell those ashore scrambled aboard, getting a bit wet in this operation. But we had accomplished the hoisting of the Flag and the Dux was well pleased. We arrived back at the ship at noon.
    The launch was hoisted up and the ship steamed away west along the coast. In the afternoon the wind died right away and it was very pleasant in the sun. About 7.30PM we ran into a shallow area (15 fathoms) several rocks were visible just showing out of the water. Several miles ahead we had a view of a wonderful serrated Glacier. This is caused by shoal water near where the Glacier ice pours out into the sea, this ice becomes grounded and the moving ice from far inland pushes towards with irresistible force, the result is huge blocks of ice ride up and over other fast ice, and for several miles the ice is torn and twisted until its upper surface looks like rows of saw teeth.
    At 11PM the ship was stopped, this being the most prudent thing to do, because of shoal water and an hour or two of darkness. Noon position LAT 67 45 LONG 66 58. Distance run 70 miles.

    Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection (Gilbert Eric Douglas) from the log of the second BANZARE Voyage 1930/31.

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  15. BANZARE 1929-1931- Photography by Sundry Staff Members
    List
    Public

    The information supplied here appears to relate solely to BANZARE Voyage 2 in 1930-1931.

    In the Official Photographs collection for BANZARE 1929-1931 I believe that there are over 16,000 different still images. The majority of the photography would be by Frank Hurley.
    However there is also photography by “Sundry Members of Staff” which includes Sir Douglas Mawson. This photography totals at least 1196 images. The 1196 images were individually described and listed by Frank Hurley and the list is called BANZARE - General Negatives List - by Sundry Members of Staff – General Catalogue BANZARE - Photographer.

    Eric Douglas’ photography in this list is –
    29 – Adelie Penguins amongst pack-ice
    30 – Adelie Penguin – Cape Denison
    31 – Adelie Penguins at Rookery – Cape Denison
    56 – King Penguins – Lusitania Bay, Macquarie Island
    62 – King Penguin Rookery – Lusitania Bay, Macquarie Island
    102 – Sea elephants – south of Buckles Bay, Macquarie Island
    125 – Bull elephants roaring - Macquarie Island
    132 – The Kosmos
    157 – Two whale chasers with which contact established adjacent to Southern Empress
    158 – Whale chaser alongside showing harpoon gun
    159 - Whale chaser alongside when close by Southern Empress
    208 – Flying Officer Douglas on board the Discovery, Antarctica
    209 – Flying Officer Douglas on board the Discovery, Antarctica
    216 – In launch off Scullin Monolith – Ingram, Kennedy, Howard and others
    220 – Aeroplane on skids above boat deck looking forward
    221 – Showing aeroplane on skids assembled ready for flight
    222 – Discovery amongst pack-ice. Showing aeroplane on skids and overhead net protecting wings
    223 – Aeroplane assembled on skids
    224 – Aeroplane on floats in pool amongst pack-ice
    225 – Aeroplane on floats in sea along pack-ice margin
    228 – Aeroplane taxiing on floats
    231 – Aeroplane taking off in lee of berg in neighbourhood of the 78th degree of East Longitude.
    232 – Aeroplane rising above iceberg. Same locality as 231.
    233 – Aeroplane dismantled and towed on skids – return voyage to Australia, 1931.
    235 – Crowd at end of Queen’s Pier at Hobart on departure of Discovery. Nov. 1930
    236 – Hobart from the Discovery when passing outwards down the Derwent. Nov. 1930
    238 – Glimpse of the crowd on the wharf on departure from Hobart. Nov. 1930
    239 – The Discovery at sea
    240 – The Discovery amongst loose pack North of the Ross Sea
    242 – The Discovery alongside the Sir James Clark Ross
    247 – Douglas and Stanton on fo’c’stle head.
    259 – Neighbourhood of the hut – Cape Denison
    260 – View at head of Boat Harbour – Cape Denison
    261 – The AAE Hut – Cape Denison. MacKenzie, Douglas Mawson, Colbeck and Ingram
    276 - West Side of Old Hut – Cape Denison
    280 – Frame work of old air tractor – Cape Dension
    295 – View of Wireless Hill – Macquarie Island – seen from the north-east
    297 - Sealers’ huts from the Spit looking South – Macquarie Island
    305 – The Bishop and Clark Islet – situated South of Macquarie Island
    310 – The Murray Monolith – MacRobertson Land
    313 – The Murray Monolith – MacRobertson Land
    314 – The Murray Monolith – MacRobertson Land
    344 – In pack-ice
    345 – Scattered pack-ice
    347 – Weather-worn pack-ice
    355 – Floe berg with reflection
    358 – Floe berg with freak ice wall
    373 – Tabular berg
    379 – Tabular berg with weathered frieze
    383 – Berg with storm-heaped glacons
    392 – The weathered face of a cavernous berg
    399 – A many-cusped berg
    404 – A many-cusped berg
    410 – Rocks outcropping at sea level below the ice cap – Commonwealth Bay, King George Land
    419 – The Sir James Clark Ross
    421 – The Kosmos showing stern tunnel
    431 – The Kosmos
    439 – Whaling mother ship – flensing operations
    487 – Camp at Buckles Bay, Macquarie Island.
    496 – Royal Penguins surfing – Nuggets Beach
    500 – Royal Penguins at Nuggets Beach
    501 – Congregation of Royal Penguins – Nuggets Beach
    504 – Royal Penguin Rookery Inland from Nuggets Beach
    505 – Royal Penguin Rookery Inland from Nuggets Beach
    511 – King Penguins, Lusitania Bay – Macquarie Island
    514 – King Penguins and Young - Lusitania Bay – Macquarie Island
    547 – Adelie Penguins disporting themselves at Cape Denison
    548 – Adelie Penguins disporting themselves at Cape Denison
    550 – Adelie Penguins on overhanging ice foot – Cape Denison
    554 – Mickey invades rookery – Cape Denison
    562 – Face of a glacier berg
    569 – Pack-ice
    570 – Pack-ice
    592 – The Murray Monolith – MacRobertson Land
    604 – Penguin population of Scullin Monolith
    607 – Rock formation at Scullin Monolith
    705 – Sheep in pen on Discovery

    I can identify many but not all of these. This list (it is a copy) was given to me by Kevin Bell, Head of the AAD Multi-Media Section many years ago.

    Re. Sundry Staff Members - I think that there are other lists and more images that can be attributed to Sundry Staff Members as this list seems to be on BANZARE, Voyage 2 only. I also have three lists on Frank Hurley's photography and they likely relate to BANZARE Voyage 2 only.

    The Aeroplane was Gipsy Moth VH-ULD rigged as a seaplane with floats. It also carried aeroplane skis inside the floats.

    The 78th degree of East Longitude is at Princess Elizabeth Land.

    Mac-Robertson Land (now Mac.Robertson - 2017) and Princess Elizabeth Land were both discovered by Sir Douglas Mawson and BANZARE and named by Sir Douglas Mawson.

    Scullin Monolith and Murray Monolith were both in Mac-Robertson Land.

    Sally E Douglas

    10 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-27
    User data
  16. CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA - October, 1929
    List
    Public

    South Africa – October 1929
    “...The Discovery is 198 ft long and 34 ft beam and 16 ft draught, she is fairly small, but very strong, and neatly built, her engines are 400 HP and drive her at 6 knots, she uses about 7 tons of coal per day. They took the yards off the center or main mast, to stop her rolling and to stop windage. She is square rigged or the fore mast with trysails in between the other masts and a mizzen sail aft. . .She has loaded an enormous amount of gear aboard here. We are issued with warm Geelong blankets, a pair of trousers, a lumber jacket, books and an Antarctic Cap. We will get other clothes later on. They have plenty of tobacco, books and food etc. ..I brought some tools as they have very few for my job...We are taking 800 gallons of petrol, enough for 160 hours flying. I expect we will only do about 70 hours. The wireless set for our machine is a sending and receiving set, which should work OK up to 100 miles away from the ship. It is also fixed that in case of a forced landing we can send and receive messages. We will have all sorts of recording instruments attached to the machine so I suppose we will have our work cut out getting it off the water at times.” By Eric Douglas

    Before the Discovery left Cape Town in October, 1929 - Things Seen To-day (Newspaper report) - "Flying Officer Douglas of the Antarctic expedition, keenly in training by sprinting up and down Fish Hoek beach at dawn (Fish Hoek being a coastal town near Cape Town)...Several cases of Australian manufactured blankets consigned from Geelong 'to SY Discovery, Table Bay Docks'...Wry faces by Sir Douglas Mawson's band of explorers when they heard there was to be 'an Official Inspection'...Captain Hurley, in a grimy white sweater, photographing Vice-Admiral R M Burmester (Rudolph M Burmester of the Royal Navy) in Naval frock-coat on board the Discovery - a seafaring contrast".

    (Eric Douglas Collection)

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    43 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-11-01
    User data
  17. CAPTAIN Alexander Lorimer Kennedy
    List
    Public

    Alexander Lorimer Kennedy (1889-1972) was a born at Woodside, South Australia. He became a Draughtsman, Surveyor, Magnetician and Cartographer. He had studied Science at the University of Adelaide and was in the Militia there. In 1915 Kennedy completed a Bachelor of Engineering Degree at the University of Adelaide. He later obtained a Diploma in Mining and became a Fellowship member of the Australian School of Mines.

    In 1930-1931 Kennedy was on Voyage 2 of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931. Sir Douglas Mawson was the organizer and leader of the expedition and the ship was the Discovery. Like all the explorers on BANZARE Kennedy undertook a variety of tasks and all were expected to participate and that included such activities as Marine stations, Hydrogen balloon tests to measure the upper atmosphere with a theodolite, gathering specimens from the Sub Antarctic and Antarctic lands, photography, landings from the motor boat or dinghy, shovelling Cardiff briquettes, and even the ship’s carpentry and taking part in night-time entertainment such as dressing up and singing and dancing. Plus as the sails were furled sea shanties by the ship’s crew accompanied the task.

    So it is no surprise that Kennedy wrote the copperplate script on rag paper for Sir Douglas Mawson’s Antarctic Proclamation of 5th January, 1931 at Anemometer Hill, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Frank Hurley had written the wording for him to copy. The proclamation was signed by Sir Douglas Mawson and stored in a canister made from three cocoa tins soldered together. The soldering was carried out by Frank Hurley and Eric Douglas. They soldered canisters for the many proclamations. The original proclamation can be found online at the National Museum of Australia, and is now replaced by a replica plaque at Commonwealth Bay.

    During the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911-1914 Kennedy was in the party which set up the Western base in 1912. On this expedition Kennedy was a Magnetician and Cartographer and much of his work was night observation work. He also had to establish his equipment in an igloo to avoid contact with anything metallic as it would influence his magnetic readings. The Western base was on the ice shelf in Queen Mary Land. Dr Douglas Mawson was the leader of the expedition and the ship was the Aurora. During this Western base experience Kennedy was involved in several sledging surveying parties and as a Cartographer he accompanied Frank Wild on a sledging journey mapping a vast area of the Queen Mary Land's coast.

    On returning from the Antarctic in 1914 Kennedy was appointed as Magnetic Observer at the Carnegie Institute in Washington, District of Columbia.

    During 1916-1918 he was in the AIF Australian Tunnelling Corps and served in France for two years in WWI. From 1921 Kennedy worked at the University of Adelaide for four years and was the Chief Assistant at the Adelaide Observatory. In 1924 he spent two years at Mt Stromlo Observatory in the ACT where he was Assistant. By 1928 Kennedy was a Mining Engineer in Western Australia. During WW II he enlisted in the Australian Army at Woodside, South Australia in April, 1943. He gave his next of kin as Melba Kennedy.

    It is noticed that in September, 2007 Kennedy’s ‘referee’ field hockey stick was up for sale at Christie’s, London. It had been taken by him to the Antarctic at the time of AAE 1911-1914 and later given to a neighbour by his family. It made $3,035. While in November, 2014 Captain Alexander Lorimer Kennedy’s medals plus two sets of fibre dog tags were up for sale at the Noble Numismatics Company.

    See - http://www.eoas.info/biogs/P002232b.htm

    Eric Douglas did comment in his notes that soldering tins together to be used as canisters did become a bit tedious. He preferred to do some carpentry around the ship.

    Sally Douglas

    8 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-20
    User data
  18. CAPTAIN John King Davis
    List
    Public

    John King Davis (1888-1967) was born at Kew, Surrey, England. His family had early connections with Australia. Davis’ father James Green Davis had taught at Sydney Grammar School and Henry Edward King of Queensland was his uncle.

    Captain John King Davis became a Seaman, a Ship’s Mate, Master of Troop carrying vessels and Antarctic exploration ships and a Ship’s Navigator. He was Australia’s Director of Navigation for nearly 30 years.

    Davis went to School in London and then Oxfordshire. In 1900 he and his father left London for Cape Town, South Africa. On arriving at Cape Town Davis junior joined the crew of the mail-steamer Carisbrooke Castle as a steward boy working his way to London. On reaching London he signed up for four years on the sailing ship Celtic Chef and visited Australia for the first time. He then completed his apprenticeship as a seaman and in July, 1905 passed the certificate of 2nd Officer (or 2nd Mate).

    In July, 1907 at the age of about twenty Davis was chosen by Ernest Shackleton as Chief Officer on the steam sailing ship Nimrod which was to head south to the Antarctic. On board as well but a few years older than Davis was the young Douglas Mawson who was participating as a Geologist.

    On completion of this expedition in 1909 Davis took command of the Nimrod and until March 1911 Davis assisted Sir Ernest Shackleton in winding up the affairs of this expedition.

    Captain Davis was then appointed Master of the ship Aurora by Dr Douglas Mawson for the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911 – 1914. Being involved in this expedition meant that three Antarctic Voyages were made by Davis as Master of the ship Aurora - December, 1911 to March, 1912; December 1912 to March 1913 and November, 1913 to February, 1914.

    At the start of WW I Davis volunteered for duty and became attached to military embarkation staff in Sydney and he subsequently commanded the transport ship Boonah conveying troops and horses to Egypt and England.

    In October 1916 again with Shackleton as leader, he commanded the Ross Sea Relief Expedition endeavouring to rescue a shore party of ten set up by Shackleton at Cape Evans in McMurdo Sound on the Ross Sea. This was a logistics support party which was the second part of a two part Antarctic adventure by Sir Ernest Shackleton under the heading of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition 1914-1917. This party of ten had become stranded when the Aurora which was previously used for the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911-1914 broke away from its mooring in a gale a McMurdo Sound in May, 1915. The ordeal for the men on the ship was to last for 312 days of aimless drifting while the men on shore were stranded with meagre rations.

    The Aurora was caught in extremely heavy pack ice and it was carried into the Ross Sea and Southern Ocean but unable to get through the pack, it was locked in. The 312 day drift took the ship and crew on an unwanted journey of 1600 nautical miles. In February, 1916 as the pack ice broke up the Aurora was finally able to break free but it took till March, 1916 to get completely out of the pack and reach Port Chalmers, New Zealand.

    The Aurora had to have major repairs and finally in January, 1917 it headed to McMurdo Sound with Captain Davis as Master to collect the stranded men. In that interval however three of the ten men had perished.

    From April 1817 Davis supervised the erection of a mechanical coal–handling plant at Port Pirie.

    He also became a Lieutenant Commander in the Royal Australian Navy reserve and was appointed as the Naval Transport Officer in London and dealt with the repatriation of the Australian Imperial Force.

    In 1920 he became the Commonwealth Director of Navigation and he remained in this position until his retirement in February 1949. It was a position which he had really sought and at last the position was his.

    Nevertheless, Davis took leave from his position as Director of Navigation in 1929-1930 to join Voyage 1 of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition with Sir Douglas Mawson as leader. Davis was appointed by Mawson as the Master of the ship Discovery but the understanding (by Mawson anyway) was that if Mawson was onboard then Davis was second in command and he was only in command if Mawson was not on the ship. This led to ongoing but civilized conflict between Mawson and Davis and this conflict is documented in diaries by these two men and by other crew members. Davis did not join Voyage 2 of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition in 1930-1931.

    From 1947 to 1962 Davis was a member of the Australian Government’s Planning Committee on Australian Antarctic Policy. Davis received many awards and in common with his fellow BANZARE Antarctic explorers he received the Polar Medal, bestowed by the King in 1934. All members of BANZARE expedition received the Polar Medal and if the two voyages were made a bar or clasp was also awarded. A miniature medal was also part of the award.

    Features in the Antarctic were also named for Captain Davis by Mawson as were features named by Mawson for members of what he called the ‘Scientific party’ and also the ‘Ship’s Company’. Importantly features were also named by Mawson for members of the Government both British and Australian eg Scullin Monolith after the Australia’s Prime Minister and Financial Benefactors eg Mac-Robertson Land after Sir Macpherson Robertson. In Australia’s case for these features to remain on Australian maps they had to, or have to ultimately be gazetted by the Australian Government.

    Davis wrote about the Antarctic in "With the Aurora in Antarctica" 1911-1914 (published in 1919) and "High Latitude" (1964). As well his Antarctic journals have been published as "Trial By Ice - The Antarctic Journals of John King Davis" - edited by Louise Crossley - Erskine Press 1997.

    The State Library of Victoria website shows that they have papers by Davis and many of his images are online there.

    The Australian Antarctic Division at Kingston, Tasmania holds a box of lantern slides by Captain Davis.

    Captain John King Davis was recognized by his contemporaries as a skilled navigator of Antarctic seas and oceans. Davis knew the geography of the Antarctic and the associated maps and charts were his forte. He depended on barometer readings and variation charts to keep the Discovery on track. But there were times during BANZARE when Davis had incomplete information and had no idea what was in store and he wrote about these concerns in his Journal, even if briefly. “...It is difficult to know what to do for the best...As it is, we are blindly groping about in a maze of ice...” December 26th, 1929.

    Davis’ was known to be impatient with Scientists and laymen, hence his nickname ‘Gloomy’. He was determined to stay in command of the ship and he placed the safety of the ship and its crew as paramount.

    Sally Douglas

    4 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-03-14
    User data
  19. Captain Kenneth Norman MacKenzie - BANZARE
    List
    Public



    Kenneth Norman MacKenzie (1897-1951) was born in Oban, Argyllshire, Scotland.

    Before he joined BANZARE MacKenzie was working with the Ellerman City Line in London.

    He was appointed as the Chief Officer of the Discovery on BANZARE Voyage 1 in 1929-1930 and was the Master of the Discovery on BANZARE Voyage 2 in 1930-1931 after Captain John King Davis had resigned. When BANZARE finished in 1931 MacKenzie sailed the ship Discovery back to London via New Zealand and Cape Horn.

    Kenneth Norman MacKenzie had joined up for WWI at the age of about 16 but when his correct age was identified he was kept under training for two years. In WWI he eventually fought on the Western Front. He was captured twice and was gassed and he had over a year in hospital recuperating.

    After the War he joined the Merchant Fleet as a radio officer. Soon after that, with his Marconi certificate in hand he was sailing to the Far East as the Chief Radio Officer in the Blue Funnel liner, Titan. However, with his career stalling MacKenzie resigned and was then employed with the Union Castle Line as a Seaman, and was later promoted to Bosun.

    Subsequently he passed his certificates as a Watch Officer and a Master with the Ellerman City Line. After returning to England from BANZARE in 1931 MacKenzie returned to the Ellermman City Line. In 1933 he made another move and was gazetted into the Egyptian Navy with the rank of Commander. He made continuous voyages of research from Alexandria to the Indian Ocean till May, 1934. On returning to London MacKenzie became the Assistant Marine Superintendent of the Ellerman City Line. Soon after he joined the British Railways as Assistant Marine Superintendent of the railway’s fleet of cross channel steamers.

    His health was never really good after his WWI experiences. He had a heart attack in 1938 and he worked under increasing strain till he died in 1951.

    Captain MacKenzie’s logs of BANZARE are at the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich. They are under Collections, then search BANZARE – “Typescript transcript of Captain Mackenzie's two volume diary kept as mate and then master of the DISCOVERY during the B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931”.

    Images of Captain Kenneth Norman MacKenzie can be found at the Dundee Heritage Trust site, online. There are also some written artefacts which show MacKenzie’s signature.

    Sally Douglas

    6 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-03-27
    User data
  20. CAPTAIN TICKELL - and the Hotchkiss Shells or Shot. Hotchkiss 37mm Steel Projectiles
    List
    Public

    A letter from Mr Thomas to Eric Douglas - likely in the early 1920's - "Mr Douglas - As I think these shells may be of interest to you. Would you accept them from me for your past kindness. They were given to My Mother in law years ago from Capt. Tickell. I think at that time he was C.O. of the old turret ship H.M.A.S. Cerberus. It was at the finish of the Boxer rebellion in China the Boer War was at the same time if I am not mistaken. It is peculiar that he gave them, he had not noticed that they were live shells and after returning to Melbourne, he sent a telegram saying do not handle the shells until I see you again. They are harmless now so all is well. R these guns are out of date now? Yours Mr Thomas"
    These shells (or more correctly shots I was told) were donated, along with the letter from Mr Thomas; to John Rogers, President of the Cerberus in December, 2012. http://www.cerberus.com.au/hotchkiss_1pounder_slideshow.html
    John advised me almost immediately that they were not Pom Pom shells as the Australian War Memorial had advised me in good faith but were Hotchkiss Shells (Shots) from the 1st Class Torpedo Boat Childers. What is more one of the shells still had its fuse and gun powder and the other had traces of gunpowder - so not so safe at all. In my time I had always handled these shells with great care 'just in case they were live'! It was not till I re-visited that letter in 2012 that I connected that it was about the shells which I knew nothing about in terms of their history.
    The letter and shells were destined for the Geelong Maritime Museum.
    I think that Mr Thomas may have been a resident of Brighton or Middle Brighton, Victoria at the time that he wrote the letter.

    (Eric Douglas Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    21 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-01-15
    User data
  21. CONSTITUTIONAL CLUB, MELBOURNE - address by Eric Douglas in 1936
    List
    Public

    Ellsworth Expedition - the Polar Star and the Wyatt Earp - Discovery 2 at the Bay of Whales in 1936

    ...possibly this...

    "The trip South in the Discovery 2

    I was asked to come to-day to give you gentlemen a brief resume of our trip south in the Discovery 2; to attempt the rescue of the American explorer, Mr Lincoln Ellsworth, and his pilot Mr Hollick Kenyon.

    After hurried preparations we left Melbourne on December 23rd for the Bay of Whales via Dunedin.

    Xmas day was one to be remembered. We ran into heavy weather. The ship was rolling and pitching and you can imagine that some of us did not do justice to our Xmas dinner.

    At Dunedin we took aboard our final fuel supplies and headed South.

    For the next five days the ship made rapid progress in fine weather, we were very busy preparing emergency gear to be carried by the Wapiti Seaplane.

    This embraced a sledge, tent, sleeping bags and sufficient food and fuel for 2 men to last 30 days. This is necessary as in the advent of a forced landing on the ice plateau we were prepared to sledge back to our base.

    By this time isolated bergs were sighted and shortly afterwards we met up with pack ice.

    After 120 miles in open pack it became heavier and closed together and our rapid progress was brought practically to a standstill. This pack is approximately 25 feet thick with only 4 to 6 feet showing above the surface of the water.

    The following day we broke into a small pool of water which enabled F/O Murdoch and myself to take our first flight in the moth seaplane. As the air temperature was now at freezing point the engine had to be pre-heated before starting, this taking approximately, 25 minutes. We were then lowered from the ship into the water, we taxied for some minutes to ensure that our run-way was free from submerged ice before the take off.

    We climbed to 2000 feet and flew several miles to observe the conditions to the south.

    The following day we made another flight which was of great assistance to the Captain of the ship because we observed impenetrable ice to the east with good conditions to the south west.

    Next morning we came to the open sea and were only 300 miles from the Bay of Whales. In all we had broken through approx 400 miles of pack ice.

    On the morning of Jan 15th, the ice glare of the Ross Barrier was visible over the horizon. This appears as a bright white land in the sky.

    Soon afterwards the barrier face came into view. The barrier extends over 500 miles in an east west direction, with a sea face of approximately 100 feet high. At the Bay of Whales it extends towards the Pole for 480 miles.
    At about 8PM we entered this bay and steamed towards the edge of the frozen sea. The mouth of the bay would be about 8 miles across.

    Twenty minutes later the ships Officers reported that they could see two orange coloured flags fluttering in the breeze alongside what appeared to be a tent. We knew that Ellsworth carried signal strips of this colour and our hopes were raised that he and Kenyon might be at Little America.

    The ship then fired off half a dozen maroon rockets which exploded with tremendous noise.

    As no movement was observed on the Barrier, Murdoch and myself made ready for a flight to Little America.

    It was a difficult take off, the sea spray froze on our wings and floats due to the low temperature. We flew over their tent and observing no sign of life set a course to Little America which is 6 miles further South. As we progressed, flying conditions became very difficult. We were now experiencing the snow blind light which Admiral Byrd describes as “Flying in a bowl of cream”.

    The conditions became clearer and we saw what appeared to be cracks in the ice, but on approaching closer these changed shape into wireless masts and poles. We knew then that we were over Little America.

    After circling for some minutes, to our amazement a figure of a man appeared as if he had emerged from a burrow. He casually waved his arms and did not seem concerned at our arrival.

    We dropped a small parachute containing food and a letter from the Captain of Discovery 2 asking him if they were fit to begin walking towards the coast. We were more than delighted to know that at last one of the fliers was safe.

    We then flew back to the ship, alighted alongside and shouted the glad tidings to the anxiously awaiting Captain and crew.

    The news was immediately wirelessed to the outside world who were also waiting. A little late a rapidly moving figure could be seen on the sky line. A party from the ship met him some distance away and it proved to be Kenyon.

    Kenyon greeted our people by saying casually “Its jolly good of you chaps to drop in on us like this”. We learnt that Ellsworth was suffering from minor frost bitten feet and would attempt the walk next day. A party made the journey to Little America and safely returned with him.

    On later investigation we found that the huts were completely snowed over and a ramp had been cut through the snow to the door of the hut in which they had lived for a month. Mr Ellsworth was glad to be on board the Discovery and was amazed at the preparation made on his behalf by the Australian Government.

    Knowing a little of the flying conditions in the Antarctic I consider that their Trans-Antarctic Flight was a magnificent achievement. This, to my mind, is only possible of accomplishment with due attention to three main factors, namely:-
    A suitable aeroplane
    Camping and sledging equipment and
    A trained and competent crew.

    Mr Hollick Kenyon the pilot of the “Polar Star” was formerly a pilot in the Canadian Airways. The experience gained in flying in Canadian winters adapted him for Antarctic flying.

    Our venture having a successful termination we look back with gratitude to the people responsible for the organizing and equipping of the expedition.

    It is fitting for me to close by saying that we on board the Discovery 2 heard with deep sorrow of the death of his Majesty King George the 5th. Our ceremony at the Bay of Whales was simple. We lowered the flag to half-mast and observed two minutes silence.

    Thank you Gentlemen."

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection)

    Press cuttings on the search for Ellsworth and the deck log for the RRS Discovery II are held at the National Oceanography Centre at the University of Southampton. A press cutting example - http://viewer.soton.ac.uk/nol/image/2253/282/#head

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    37 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  22. De Havilland Gipsy Moth DH60X – RAAF Serial No – A7-55
    List
    Public

    De Havilland Gipsy Moth DH60X – RAAF Serial No – A7-55 – Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935-1936.

    The de Havilland Gipsy Moth A7-55 was unusual at the time in that it was built at Cockatoo Island Dockyard and Engineering Company and would have been built under the watchful eye of Sir Lawrence Wackett, who became known as the father of the Australian Aircraft Industry. Eric Douglas knew and admired Lawrence Wackett, and he was Eric’s boss at Point Cook in 1925.
    This Gipsy Moth was delivered to the RAAF on 4th April, 1933. A de Havilland Aircraft production record online has it listed as a DH60G but Eric Douglas wrote that it was a DH60X. On 22nd April, 1937 it was listed as ‘deteriorated as beyond repair’.
    There were two RAAF seaplanes loaded aboard the Discovery II at Williamstown in December, 1935 as part of the preparation for the search for Lincoln Ellsworth and his flying companion Herbert Hollick–Kenyon, known from the search party’s point of view as the Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935-1936.
    One aircraft was a Westland Wapiti Mark 1A with a Jupiter V111F Engine – RAAF Serial Number A5-37 and the other was the de Havilland Gipsy Moth DH60X – RAAF Serial No A7-55.
    The Gipsy Moth was housed on the roof of the Discovery II’s hospital. While the Wapiti was stowed at the stern of the ship with its wings removed. The Wapiti did not fly in the Antarctic. It was a back up plane and taken if flights into the hinterland were to be made, but this did prove to be necessary.
    The de Havilland Gipsy Moth DH60X was rigged as a float seaplane for this search. A land under-carriage and skis were carried to convert the moth if necessary for ice and snow operations, but that did not prove to be the case.
    The aircraft was fitted with an extra fuel tank of 12 gallons capacity, which together with its normal tankage of 19 gallons would have provided 4 ½ hours safe of duration cruising at a speed of 80 miles per hour (Eric Douglas' notes).
    When the Gipsy Moth was in the air there was no communication between it and the ship. So the plan for the aircraft was that it was to be primarily employed in local reconnaissance flights and to not proceed beyond the visibility distance of the ship. The flying operations for the Gipsy Moth were in the vicinity of pack ice and in short reconnaissance flights in the Bay of Whales.
    The running of the Gipsy engine, a guide from previous experiences - If the air temperature was to fall below 34 F it would be necessary to pre-heat the engine and lubricating oil prior to starting the engine. In this regard, benzoline which is a low volatile spirit is excellent for priming the cylinders. Before attempting a take off the engine must be thoroughly warmed up by steady taxying at medium revs (Eric Douglas' notes).
    The slinging of the seaplane ("out" and "in" board) and taking off, a guide from previous experiences - The most suitable derrick boom is one of sufficient length which enables the aircraft to be hoisted out board nose first with its engine running. For the take off, the best position of the ship is one where sufficient up wind distance, at least 400 yards exists with the aircraft lowered over on the lee side with the ship practically stationary. It is advisable to have a motor boat party standing by during the flying operations.(Eric Douglas' notes).
    By Eric Douglas from a short version of the locating of Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon who proved to be safe at ‘Little America’ –
    “…We were now about 400 miles from the barrier face of the famous Ross Ice Barrier. Except for isolated ice bergs we were now in a glorious blue sea and able to continue at full speed. Early on the morning of 15th January we saw the ice glare of the barrier which was observed as a bright white glare over the southern horizon.
    At about 3PM the barrier face came into view and by 4PM we were close to the ice cliffs and steaming parallel to them to the east towards the Bay of Whales. At this time there was a terrific glare over the ice barrier, the height of which appeared to be about 100 feet, it was a weird sight.
    The air temperature had dropped from freezing to 18 degrees Fahrenheit due to the cold outflow of air from the barrier. This was also noticeable by the formation of sea smoke over the sea caused by the cold air striking the relatively warm water. At 8PM we reached the Bay of Whales and steamed south until we arrived at the edge of the frozen bay ice. The width of the bay appeared to be about 8 miles.
    At 8.20PM the Ships Officers reported that they could see two orange coloured flags fluttering in the breeze on top of the barrier face to the east. I had a look through the binoculars and agreed with the observation made. We knew that Ellsworth carried orange coloured signal strips in his plane, several signal rockets were then fired from the ship. They exploded with tremendous noise at a height of about 1000 feet over the ship.
    As no movement was seen on the barrier ice it was presumed that the missing aviators were either dead or possibly at ‘Little America’ 6 miles due south of the flags. Despite the lateness of the evening it was decided to carry out a reconnaissance flight in over the barrier ice as far as ‘Little America’ to see whether there was any indication of life before commencing the search with our Wapiti aeroplane.
    At about 7PM Flying Officer Murdoch and myself were lowered overboard in the Moth and towed clear of the ship. Due to the low temperature (8 F) the sea spray when flying froze on the floats and undersurfaces of the lower wing and it was obvious that we must get off quickly to stop the icing up otherwise the aeroplane would have to be hoisted onboard to clear the ice with hot water. After a long run I managed to get the plane into the air and then climbed slowly to 1000 feet. When we levelled out it was surmised that water in the floats had run aft in the climb and then frozen. I turned towards the barrier and set a course for the locality of ‘Little America’ which we knew would be distinguishable by several tall masts or poles rising out of the snow and ice.
    As we progressed in over the barrier the flying conditions became extremely bad and it was all I could do to keep a steady course. This was due to the snow blind light which we were now experiencing, no horizon to the south was visible due to the extreme glare from the barrier ice merging with the reflected glare from a layer of light clouds and we could see nothing ahead of us except a yellowish glare.
    Some minutes later Murdoch observed what appeared to be black cracks in the ice below and to our surprise as we both looked the cracks appeared to ‘stand up’, we then realised they were poles running out of the snow and ice and that we were over ‘Little America’. I carefully circled the area and we then noticed orange coloured strips near the poles.
    Suddenly we saw the figure of a man appear out of a hole and he started to wave his arms. This caused great excitement between us as we realised it must be either Ellsworth or Kenyon. I continued to circle and after a few minutes we threw overboard a small bag attached to a letter from the Captain of the Discovery II congratulating Ellsworth and Kenyon on their achievement and asking them that if they were well enough, to start out on the six mile hike to the barrier face where they would be met by a land party from the Discovery II…
    I then headed away to the Ross Sea and steered towards an arc of water sky which appeared black against the glare of the barrier and in a few minutes we could pick out the ship. We turned along the barrier face looking for a suitable place for a land party to climb to the barrier from the frozen sea.
    I then flew back to the ship and made an alighting close by. We shut off our engine and shouted out the startling news to the anxiously awaiting Captain and all other members who down to the ships cook had gathered on the poop.
    After the plane was hoisted onboard congratulations were passed all round and all hands joined in the toast to the happy occasion. Within ten minutes after our arrival the news was flashed to Australia…”
    From Eric Douglas’ notes and report on the Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935-1936.

    Sally Douglas

    21 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-30
    User data
  23. DISCOVERY - Motor Boat or Launch 'the BANZARE'. Built by Mr E A Jack of Launceston
    List
    Public

    Captain John King Davis of the RRS Discovery (SY Discovery) commissioned Mr Jack of Launceston to build a Motor Boat or Launch for the Ship. (Constructed entirely of Huon pine, 24 ft in length, 7 ft beam, fitted with an 8 horse power engine, two-cylinder marine engine, fitted with a special cabin top and painted navy grey). The boat carried up to 12 persons, had an inboard engine and a removable cabin type of cover. The boat often towed the phram or dingy when trips were made ashore to Sub-Antarctic or Antarctic Islands or the Antarctic mainland. Sometimes the Motor Boat was anchored close to the shore and the final section was made in the phram or dinghy.

    In Antarctic Days with Mawson, the author Dr Harold Fletcher of BANZARE said on page 57 (Voyage 1 - out from Cape Town) "Our motor boat engine was checked by Eric Douglas and found to be in perfect condition. About 5.5 metres in length, the boat had a small wooden cabin forward which could be detatched. It was specifically constructed by a Tasmanian boat builder who had provided similar types for use in the Australian light house service. It was shipped to Cape Town and housed together with the Moth seaplane (initially still in crates) in a grating above deck, in a space usually occupied by the ship's two lifeboats which were left behind..." The motor boat also had oars.

    There was also a collapsible canoe onboard (Mark Pharaoh - Senior Collections Manager of the Mawson Centre).

    It appears that full contingent of boats onboard were the motor boat, the dinghy, and two lifeboats or whale boats and a collapsible canoe. Out of this number a lifeboat or whale boat was left behind at Kerguelen when the ship was there. An image of the Discovery in December, 1929 (after the visit to Kerguelen) shows three boats onboard - perhaps one was the motor boat, another the dinghy and the third was a lifeboat or whaleboat

    Eric Douglas was responsible for the running, fuelling, safety, maintenance and repair of the motor boat during the period of the two BANZARE voyages in the Discovery. Eric Douglas said in a letter dated 8th November, 1929 that the motor boat had an 8HP twin Regal engine. "...The boat was about 20 ft in length and does 7 knots".

    Departing from and boarding the Discovery for and from other boats or ships during BANZARE was by means of rope ladders.This method applied too when visiting other ships such as Whaling ships.

    MOTOR BOAT TRIPS - DURING B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. - 1929/30 & 1930/31. (From Eric Douglas' Motor Boat log)
    __________________________________________________________

    Voyage 1 on the S.Y. Discovery
    24-10-29 Adjusted clutch and magneto. Cleaned carb. Adjusted tappets.
    1-11-29 Motor Boat to Crozet Islands
    2-11-29 Motor Boat run for 30 minutes - O.K.
    3-11-29 Run for 1 1/2 hours. Clutch slipping. Oil leaking at telltale glass. Adjusted clutch. Fitted new Bosch conflux starter magneto. Fitted brass tube in place of telltale glass.
    5-11-29 Kerguelen Island. Engine run - O.K.
    12-11-29 1/2 hour - O.K.
    13-11-29 1/2 hour - O.K.
    16-11-29 1 1/2 hours. From Jeanne d'Arc to Island - 4 miles down sound & back - O.K.
    18-11-29 Advanced up magneto slightly (5 degrees).
    19 -11-29 3 1/2 hours. From Jeanne d'Arc up sound. 15 miles. &
    20 -11-29 3 1/ hours. Stopped overnight and return - OK.
    21-11-29 1/2 hour. Towed whale boat ashore. O.K.
    22-11-29 1 1/2 hours. Trawling work at second anchorage. OK.
    23-11-29 Trawling. 2 1/2 hours.
    26-11-29 Heard Island. Running from ship to Atlas Cove. 5 hours. to
    2-12-29 OK.
    3-12-99 2 1/2 hours. Engine cut out. Water in petrol.
    5-12-29 Cleaned engine down & inspected engine.
    23-12-29 1 hour. Around ship in pack ice. O.K.
    13-1-30 1 hour. To Proclamation Is & return. Engine giving trouble. Water in petrol.
    14-1-30 Cleaned & dryed tank. Oiled engine.
    10-2-30 2 hrs. Dredging etc in Royal Sound, Kerguelen Is.
    11-2-30 2 hrs. Soundings and trip in Royal Sound.
    13 &14-2-30 6 hrs. Trip down Buenos Aires Sound, Royal Sound Channel and Bras Bolinder Sound. O.K.
    15-2-30 5 hrs. Trip around Observatory Bay & return.
    16-2-30 Drained sump. New oil. Inspected magneto. Plugs. Carb. Adjusted reverse gear. Engine O.K.
    18-2-30 1 hour. Around vicinity of ship - Jeanne d'Arc. (Flying operations).
    19-2-30 To Observatory Bay via long route.
    20-2-30. Running around Observatory Bay.
    21-2-30 To ship at Observatory Bay.
    22-2-30 4 hours. Hog Island to Murray Is. About 20 miles.
    23-2-30 1 1/2 hours. To Murray Is and return.
    25-2-30 1 1/2 hours. To Sukur Is and return.
    27-2-30 1 hour. To Long Is. Soundings etc.
    28-2-30 1/2 hour. Soundings in vicinity of anchorage. Engine unsatisfactory. Leaky valves.
    1-3-30 1 hour. To mainland and return. Engine O.K
    5-3-30 Engine painted up.
    20-3-30 Valves ground in. Magneto adjusted. New oil packings fitted. Engine O.K.
    (Boat painted inside and out)

    Totals - Voyage 1.
    44 Gallons of Petrol
    14 1/2 Pts of Oil
    51 Hours of Running in the Motor Boat.

    October 1930 Motor Boat engine overhauled at Williamstown. Valves ground in. Cylinders decarbonised. New gaskets fitted. Carburettor cleaned. New petrol pipe fitted. Petrol filter attached. New oil. Box water pump made up and fitted to launch.

    Voyage 2 on the S.Y. Discovery
    2-12-30 1 hour. Motor Boat run from ship to shore etc. Macquarie Is.
    3-12-30 1 hour. Motor Boat from ship to shore etc. Northeast Bay.
    4-12-30 1 hour. From ship to shore etc. Lusitania Bay.
    29-12-30 30 minutes. From ship to Kosmos & return. (Factory ship).
    5-1-31 3 1/2 hours. From ship to boat harbour. Commonwealth Bay.
    6-1-31 4 hours. To Mackellar Islets. Engine O.K.
    6-2-31 30 minutes. Across to Norwegian ship “Falk” & return.
    10-2-31 45 minutes. Across to English ship "New Sevilla" & return.
    13-2-31 2 hours. From ship to Rocky coast & return. MacRobertson Land. Long 66.

    Totals - Voyage 2.
    11 Gallons of Petrol
    4 pts of Oil
    13 1/4 hours of Running in the Motor Boat.

    Totals - Voyages 1 and 2.
    55 Gallons of Petrol
    18 1/2 pts of Oil
    64 1/4 hours of Running in the Motor Boat.
    (Approx 7 pints petrol per hour of running).

    HEARD ISLAND - VOYAGE 1 (As related by Eric Douglas to John Thompson of the ABC in the early 1960's) -

    Sir Douglas said the it wasn't much good getting down to the Antarctic before December - otherwise we'd have the pack ice too far north - so after calling at Kerguelen he elected to go across to Heard Island and spend a few days exploring.

    We did that, and about eight of us went ashore in the motor-launch. Luckily we found a small hexagonal hut that had been built by sealers, and after we'd kicked out the sea elephants and titivated it up a bit it was quite habitable. Sir Douglas didn't mean to stay more than two or three days, but while we were there a gale came on and we saw the ship up-anchor and disappear in the snow and mist. Sir Douglas said, "Righto, you chaps, we'll have to kill a few seals and get a bit of food stored." So we did that, and three or four days went by.

    Then one morning we saw the ship come in, and we spoke to them by semaphore, and they said that the glass was falling and that we'd better come off. Well, we went to the motor-launch, and Sir Douglas said that as the seas were still a bit high only three or four of us should go off, so three or four of us set off with him, and we eventually got to the ship quite safely. But it was then blowing up and we couldn't return, so we stayed aboard the ship that night, and in the morning Sir Douglas said he'd run off and pick up the rest of the party, and for myself to go with him.

    We set off together, and after running about a mile from the ship we had to clear a rocky headland, and Sir Douglas said, "The engine of the motor-boat hasn’t been giving any trouble, has it? "and I said, "No, it's been running very well." And with those words it misfired and stopped.

    We weren't in a very good position because we were fairly close up to the high cliffs and there was a reef about two hundred yards on the lee of us, and the boat was too big for us to row. I said I'd have to get the engine going, and Sir Douglas went up forward and threw out the heavy anchor, but after the rope had run out, I think about a hundred and fifty feet of it, it just dangled on the rope. The water was very deep.

    I'd always had an idea that if the engine did cut, it would be due to water coming out of the fuel-tank through condensation, and going down the fuel line and freezing into ice. That was just what happened. I kept a piece of piano wire on board, and poked this wire up the pipe to break the ice, and the petrol rushed out, and I coupled up, started the engine, and put the clutch in half a head. Then we tried to pull the anchor up. Well, we were both up forward and I remember we pulled and pulled until the both of us were exhausted. We fell into the bottom of the boat, and Sir Douglas said to me after a while, "Well, shall we give it another go?" I said, "Yes Sir," and with that, we tackled it again and eventually got it aboard.

    Then we got round and picked up the other party, but in the meantime the weather had deteriorated quite a bit. We pushed out to sea, and snow squalls started to come down and blot out the land. We had a compass, we'd taken some bearings, so we were able to keep a reasonable course, but the sea was quite dangerous.

    I noticed that Sir Douglas, who was holding the tiller, had to prop one of his eyes open by holding the lids with his fingers; the other eye was frozen shut. I asked him several times if I could take the tiller, but he refused, and in the end I just sat down and pushed him to one side, and I thought he would reprimand me, but he just said, "All right". I took the tiller and steered the boat out to sea for another half-mile, and then, with the compass bearings I'd had before, I put the boat before the sea, and later on we could hear the bell on the "Discovery" tolling. The drill then was to run down and try to hit the ship straight ahead. This was more or less what we did.

    Suddenly the ship loomed up out of the murk, heaving and plunging, and we rounded up on the lee side, and there was pandemonium getting to the lifelines, every man for himself.

    About a whale boat onboard - BANZARE Voyage 1 -

    In 'The Voyages of the Discovery' by Ann Savours, it states on page 231 that at Cape Town "...A new motor boat was shipped and a whaler landed in place on a specially constructed platform..." This platform was to house the Gipsy Moth Seaplane when the Discovery reached the Kerguelen Islands, for here this whaleboat was towed ashore by the motor boat skippered by Eric Douglas. It was taken ashore and left at those Islands to make way for the Gipsy Moth which was to be assembled on the deck of the Discovery by the two RAAF pilots - Campbell and Douglas. On the return journey the Moth was taken apart and the whaleboat collected from Kerguelen.

    By Sir Douglas Mawson "...21st Nov 1929 at Kerguelen...A whale boat was taken ashore to slip at whaling station and drawn up and berthed ashore with idea of picking it up on return to the island from the south. This was done in order to clear skids for aeroplane when assembled in Antarctica..."

    Dr Harold Fletcher says on page 80 of his book (Voyage 1 - At Kerguelen) "While the Discovery was berthed at the wharf the ship's sole remaining lifeboat was taken ashore and stored at the Whaling Station until our return the following year. Its space on the ship was needed to stow the seaplane when assembled on the voyage".

    In Trials by Ice - The Antarctic Journals of John King Davis (Kerguelen-21st November, 1929) Davis said "Sent launch ashore with starboard lifeboat, which we are leaving here until we return, to facilitate with getting the Moth aeroplane out and in...(19th December, 1929)...The aeroplane is now out of its case and on top of the skids. It looks very big to me and I do not think it will be much good after we have had a gale. It should have had proper cover. It is painted a bright lemon colour...(Kerguelen - 20th February, 1930)...The aeroplane was taken to pieces this morning and we have been able to replace our lifeboat, which was left behind in November, in its place on the skids".

    In the recent book of published Antarctic related stories by Captain Morton Moyes entitled 'Aura of the Antarctic' Captain Moyes says that the first landing at the Crozets was by whale boat (early November, 1929). While in relation to landings at Heard Island, Captain Moyes said "...the motor boat had a large cabin along half its length and when Sir Douglas had come ashore, Captain Davis thought that the cabin made the boat top-heavy and had it taken down..."

    In a photo at the University of Newcastle (online) the Motor boat is shown off Macquarie Island on 2nd December, 1930 (and obviously towing the dinghy). The motor boat has it's cabin cover on. In another image in that same collection at the University of Newcastle (online) it shows the Discovery off Queen Mary Land on 1st February, 1931. On the right on the deck is the Motor boat or launch complete with it's cabin in place. These photos are by William E Howard who was an Able Seaman on the Discovery, and they are excellent.

    Sally E Douglas

    44 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-01-20
    User data
  24. DISCOVERY and CARDIFF coal or briquettes, and other provisions
    List
    Public

    The first Banzare Voyage -

    The RRS Discovery 1 or SY Discovery (also called Discovery and Discovery 1) was a 'steam yacht'. The ship was registered as a SY for the purposes of the Banzare Antarctic Voyages - although the words RRS Discovery were embedded across her stern for the those voyages.

    Prior to the 1st Voyage of Banzare in 1929 Sir Douglas Mawson had said in August 1929 "...The arrangement agreed was for the Discovery to load coal at Cardiff. She will be there for some days. We are shipping a special coal in briquette form for easy stowing. The Discovery will probably take 250 to 300 tons at Cardiff. Sir Douglas added that the expedition is now engaged dealing with the food provisions, and various Australian firms were assisting. Australian grown products would be taken, including meats and canned and dried fruits".

    Crews' Wardrobe - 22nd June, 1929 "...Captain Davis, commander of the Discovery has selected 1500? garments with which to clothe the 24 members of Sir Douglas Mawson's expedition...The Discovery's wardrobe is intriguing, comprising hundred of socks, shirts, mitts, blankets, helmets etc..."

    In July 1929, two hundred privileged Australians had inspected the Discovery at East India Dock in London. "...For the benefit of the guests a deck shed was laid out with an amazing array of food stuffs, samples of cosy sleeping bags, suits, skis and sledges, but the chief interest was the stout little ship, flying the Australian flag...Over the deckhouse amidships seaplanes (one seaplane only) are stowed in huge cases. Indeed, the Discovery is a lesson of using every inch of space to advantage...(In fact it proved necessary to repack most items on the SY Discovery in Hobart prior to the second voyage, commencing at the end of 1930). The Discovery goes to Cardiff...to bunker coal and special briquettes. She will sail for Capetown on August 10th."

    Another report on this event states the suits as being 'ice suits' whatever that means. It is likely that this is reference to the 'Burberry' clothing of jackets, pants, gloves and blizzard protective 'helmets' or headgear. This Burberry fabric was a fairly thin and light weight and that was a advantage. Nevertheless, there may have been limitations as to how effective this ice suit was in very cold, windy and wet blizzard conditions but it was the very best available for those days of Antarctic exploration and adventure. Antarctic clothing and gear had not changed much since the heroic days of the early 1900's. The explorers also had oilskin jackets and these may have provided better protection against the wet and cold when onboard the ship, with the Burberrys being more suitable for use when on the land?

    On 6th September, 1929, it was reported "...With only 80 tons of coal on board, the Discovery, which is expected at Capetown at the end of October, sailed for Cardiff and St Vincent. She will again replenish bunkers at Capetown, the reason for the frequent bunkering being that there is no spare room on the ship for anything except what is absolutely necessary. Commander Moyes (of the Discovery) said...from Capetown the Discovery would sail to Kerguelen Island, where more coal would be taken on board at the French whaling station..."

    Report of 16th September, 1929 '...Christmas boxes for the 40 members of the expedition (have been prepared by the wives of members of the the Royal Geographic Society of South Australia)...Great secrecy is being maintained regarding the contents...for the parcels will not be opened until Christmas Day, and will contain only serviceable material.

    SY Discovery -
    (1) Report of 7th September, 1929 'It is in order to guard against the possibility of being frozen (in) that 12 months' supplies of food are being taken'.
    (2) Report of 7th October, 1929 'Tons of preserved food are stored on the Discovery, but once the ice is reached seals and penguins will be caught. (Birds and their eggs were also eaten and this included penguins' eggs). According to one member of the crew "they go down all right with plenty of pickles". The library is limited to 100 books, the Encyclopaedia Britannica being the the final court of appeal to settle arguments. Two (one) aeroplanes and spare parts (but no spare airframe parts) are lashed on the deck. (On the second voyage the two RAAF pilots had to resort to using wood from the aeroplane's packing cases to make repairs to the airframe of the gipsy moth seaplane VH-ULD!) Coal briquettes are packed into every corner to feed the engines when the ice-pack has been reached. Coal will be taken on at Kerguelen Island (made up of numerous islands) and the Discovery will then head south for Enderby Island (sic Land)'. (Trove)

    From Eric Douglas's log in October, 1929 "...She has loaded an enormous amount of gear aboard here. We are issued with warm Geelong blankets, a pair of trousers, a lumber jacket, books and an Antarctic Cap. We will get other clothes later on. They have plenty of tobacco, books and food etc. ..I brought some tools as they have very few for my job...We are taking 800 gallons of petrol, enough for 160 hours flying. I expect we will only do about 70 hours. The wireless set for our machine is a sending and receiving set, which should work OK up to 100 miles away from the ship. It is also fixed that in case of a forced landing we can send and receive messages. We will have all sorts of recording instruments attached to the machine so I suppose we will have our work cut out getting it off the water at times.”

    From the Queenslander of 24th October, 1929 '...The Discovery carries a more complete equipment from seaplane to X-ray than any other previous expedition...'

    A newspaper report of 2nd November, 1929 included a short description of the ship's engine room 'The engine-room, which is situated well aft, houses triple expansion engines capable of developing 450 h.p. Steam is supplied by two coal-burning marine boilers of 1501b. maximum working pressure. There is also a steam-driven electric generator of about 15 K.W. at full power. A paraffin-driven emergency generating set is also installed for operation when steam is not available. Either set is capable of lighting the whole vessel, as well as supplying power for the searchlight and wireless installations. The engine-room also contains circulating and feed pumps, an evaporator, and a well-furnished workshop, with high-grade screw-cutting lathes'.

    The 5th November, 1929 and it was reported "...the net carrying capacity in the matter of stores and coal is about in, the neighbourhood of 600 tons".

    The engines - 3rd December, 1929 It was related that these 'are only auxiliary to sail, upon which more dependence is placed (going to and from the sub-Antarctic and Antarctic). The use of sail whenever feasible, permits saving of fuel, and even when all the fuel has been consumed, allows the safe return of the vessel to civilization (providing the ship is not for example in the pack ice or in the midst of a blizzard). Economy in fuel consumption is always a matter of serious consideration for vessels engaged in ice-laden seas, for the possibilities of navigation within such waters are measured in terms of steaming hours available; sail has little power or value in pack-ice'.

    In spite of what appears to have been a preoccupation with coal/briquettes and the large quantities 'bunkered' on the SY Discovery, the dependence wholly on steam in Antarctic waters and the 'weighing down' of the ship did obviously place limitations on the exploration that could be undertaken by Sir Douglas Mawson and his band of Explorers.

    '...the Discovery is furnished with three masts, square-rigged in the fore and main. This provision of sail gives her considerable sailing powers'. (Trove).The SY Discovery was a barque rig on leaving London and Cardiff, but to make her more efficient as a sailing yacht or ship, when at Cape Town (Capetown) she was converted to a barquentine rig. Eric Douglas likened the Discovery to 'sturdy hollow log' and said 'that she was probably the strongest wooden ship ever made'.

    Eric Douglas reported in a personal letter of 8th November, 1929 that "...They issued us out with sea boots, oilskin, singlets, socks, pullovers, cardigan, scarf, cap, underpants and a special pair of Ski boots (Whybrow Melbourne make). All the clothes are of wool and special thickness and make ('Jaegar' English make), so you can see that we have any amount to choose from...I haven't shaved since leaving Cape Town and of course had no bath because water is scarce and the bathroom won't work, and anyhow it is filled up with gear...I bought more tools in Cape Town and just as well I brought some from home because they have very few on board. There is a lathe in the engine room but the Engineers (2 of them) keep it to themselves, no oxey plant onboard. (I am sure that this situation would have been made easier by the fact that Eric Douglas and William Colbeck one of the ship's Engineers on both Banzare Voyages became firm friends). In fact tools seem to be the only thing that they did not bring..."

    Eric Douglas's short log of about 24th November, 1929 'Coal left here by a ship going south.' (Kerguelen) & 'Cardiff briquettes 500 tons'. 'Departed 24th Nov 1929 - Ship low in water with heavy cargo of coal'.

    Newspaper reports of early January, 1930 "...Sir Douglas Mawson has finished coaling at Kerguelen and has set his compass for the Pole...A cargo of coal has been taken on at Kerguelen which will be the final cargo for the Antarctic cruise. Every available space has been used for storing briquettes. The success of the expedition will depend very largely on the coal available, and as bunker space on the Discovery is very restricted a large space on the deck has been devoted to coal storage. Some time has been spent in making the cargo secure in the event of the expedition running into rough weather...the Discovery is carrying a more complete scientific equipment than any previous expedition, into polar seas. There is even an X-ray plant on board...Food provisions for the Discovery's crew include 15 sheep, which occupy a pen amidships...Bales of fodder have been packed between the aeroplane cases, and the Shell Oil Company was responsible for the scientific stacking of large quantities of paraffin and oil cases in the stern...Many additional items of equipment from blankets to test-tubes for the scientists are stowed away in the strong wooden hull of the Discovery, the most important item to be taken on board being a supply of dynamite. This may have to be used to blast channels through the ice along the coasts of Antarctica..."

    It was reported in the newspapers on 26th February, 1930 that ' Four hundred tons of coal were shipped from Cardiff to Kerguelen for the expedition'.

    Eric Douglas's short log around 8th February, 1930 'Coaling ship in readiness to sweep south again towards Queen Mary land on way home.'

    From Eric Douglas's short log of Mar 23rd 1930 'Getting into warmer regions. Change into better clothes. Longing for a feed of fresh food. Tinned foods are not satisfying over a long period. Eggs still appear on Menu but only in form of curried eggs etc. Meet P&O S.S. Cathay in Bight, fresh food & papers dropped & picked up by us. Very welcome.'

    Towards the end of March, 1930 when on her way home from the Antarctic and direct from Kerguelen (having called there both on the way to and on leaving the Antarctic) the SY Discovery 'under sail' (the SY Discovery sailing wherever possible and practical) met the steamship Cathay in the Australian Bight, 520 miles from Adelaide and greetings were exchanged and according to custom when a steamer met a sailing ship in mid-ocean it was traditional to drop overboard a cask of fresh provisions and literature, and offer a 'hook, or tow, into port,' and the occasion warranted the revival of the old ceremony, so Captain Niven of the Cathay dropped a cask overboard with a flare attached, to make it more plainly visible. 'The cask floated in our wake' (SY Discovery) and was picked up by members of the Discovery's crew in a small boat. It was laden with good things that the crew had not seen for many months. Immediately the Discovery ran the 'Thank you' signal flags to the mast, and Sir Douglas Mawson sent the following telegram to Capt. Niven 'All on board greatly value congratulations from Cathay and very much appreciate your kind action in passing on barrel of good cheer.' The contents of the barrel included six frozen chickens, fresh New Zealand butter, fresh green vegetables, such as lettuce and cabbages, fresh fruit and tomatoes, and all the latest magazines and papers that could be obtained...(Trove)

    On the second Banzare voyage heavy reliance was also placed on the use of coal or briquettes for steaming along and the situation of a scarcity placed stress on the expedition outcomes, for there is evidence that coal shortages prevailed.

    (Eric Douglas's writings and Trove papers)

    Sally E Douglas

    185 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-07-15
    User data
  25. DOUGLAS - CLOCK AND WATCHMAKERS - Victoria, Australia and Scotland
    List
    Public

    It appears that the art of Clock and Watch making evolved from the skills of the Metal Workers or Hammermen/Hammersmiths who were part of the system of Medieval Guilds (Gilds). In the case of the commencement of this line of Douglas Watchmakers in Jedburgh, Roxburghshire where John Douglas was born in 1759, it was a town or village where the Guild system had made its mark. John's likely grandfather James Douglass born c1669 (possibly September - father John) was a man of note in Jedburgh as he was a Councillor and Burgess of the town as well as being a Gardener (Gardiner) and in his time alignments in local elections closely followed occupations and hence Guilds. James's son George Douglas 1720 Jedburgh a tenant of Howden and a Gardener was the father of John Douglas 1759. However even though John followed two generations of Gardeners, local Hammermen were part of a Guild which had been influential and it seems feasible that John Douglas learnt the art of Clock and Watch making from them.

    I have noticed that maps of the Jedburgh area, show two places called 'Howden' near Jedburgh - one close to Jedburgh and to the south east, while the second one is to the north west near Bonjedward.

    As a further point of interest James Douglass c1669 and his son George Douglas 1720 are buried in the Jedburgh Abbey Graveyard, and buried with James are three of the infant children of his son George. See - http://haygenealogy.com/hay/scotland/jedburghcemetery.html George Douglas is at no 113 with other members of his immediate family and James Douglass is no 126. I also have an image of the tombstone of James Douglass c1669. William Douglas has kindly displayed it here - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Places/Churches&Abbeys/jedburgh_abbey.htm

    James Douglas c1669 was made a Burgess of Jedburgh likely sometime well before 1734 (Petitions - Royal Burghs of Scotland - the House of Commons - 15 February, 1738) "...at Jedburgh, the prefiding Burgh of that Diftrift, on Saturday the 18th May, 1734...James Douglas...was duly elected Delegate for the faid Burgh of Jedburgh, not being prefent at the Election of a Burgefs for the faid Diftrift..." Douglas Scott author of the 'Hawick Word Book' advised me on this "There were lots of Burgesses in a town the size of Jedburgh. All tradesmen, merchants etc. - basically the middle class - were usually Burgesses. They ran the town, set rules (so that non-Burgesses have a hard time trading), elected the Council and all the rest. It seems that the 1738 (sic 1734) record is of the Burgh of Jedburgh selecting a *particular* Burgess to serve as a "delegate". And then the delegates from a collection of burghs chose one among their number to be Member of Parliament for this "District of Burghs". It was perhaps a historical peculiarity, but nevertheless a fact that these joint towns elected an M.P., separate from the M.Ps. elected in the counties where each of them was located. Your James Douglas must have been a prominent man in Jedburgh to have been their delegate".

    With reference to the above and my thoughts that James Douglas was likely made a Burgess of Jedburgh, well prior to 1734, it appears that assessment may need some slight adjustment? For an article in the Glasgow Herald dated Mar 3 1930 just discovered by me (Google newspapers online) states under 'Freedom of Jedburgh for Councillors' - "At the monthly meeting of the Jedburgh Town Council yesterday the practice of enrolling members of the Council as Burgesses, allowed to lapse for the past three years, was resumed...The present roll dates from 1736, when a James Douglas had the honour of the first entry..." There is a good chance that it could have been referring to James Douglas c1669. From this site - http://db.poms.ac.uk/record/factoid/78003/
    see Ragman Roll - it shows that there were Burgesses of Jedburgh at least by 1296. So James Douglas may have been a Burgess well prior to 1734 and the commencement of a (signed) roll in 1736 was a new type of record on the Burgesses. In regard to the types of Burgesses, Douglas Scott of the 'Hawick Word Book' has advised about the roll set up in 1736 "... it may be that the roll of burgesses...was the list of Honorary Burgesses). Hawick's list starts in 1734, and so that's probably not a coincidence. These were people appointed to express the town's gratitude, and who had the formal rights without having to pay. Certainly the later people mentioned in the Glasgow Herald article would be 'honorary' ." Robert Burns 1787 likely being one of the honorary Burgesses.

    James Douglas also gets a mention in the House of Lords entries in 1737/38 - he was involved in a Petition and Appeal taken to the House of Lords concerning the Council of Jedburgh - An Appeal by 'William, Marquis of Lothian & al V Haswell & al'. The fight was over who was the Provost of Jedburgh and the Councillors and the from the point of view of the Marquis, the opposing forces were 'Interlocutors'. James Douglas, Gardener is mentioned on the side of the Marquis, and along with all others involved his name is preserved on a parchment scroll. I have a digital copy of that scroll, obtained from the House of Lords - Archives in London, England.

    In the 1737/38 Appellant's Case those of influence in the affairs of the Town Council included - the Council Dean, the Bailiff, the Deacon of the Guilds, Burgesses (including James Douglass or Douglas c1669) and the Deacons of the Guilds of Merchants, Glovers, Wrights, Taylors (likely my ancestor Gabriel Newton), Fleshers, Shoemakers, Weavers, Masons, Sadlers, Smiths and Hammermen, plus some individuals who acted for themselves such as a Tobacconist and a Writer.

    The Appeal case from the Marquis was - "That the said Interlocutors, so far as they are in the Appeal recited, may be reversed, varied, or amended; and that the Appellants may obtain such Relief as this House shall find just. As also upon the joint and several Answer of the said John Haswell and the Persons last named put in to the said Appeal, and due Consideration had of what was offered on either Side in this Cause."

    Judgement (by the House of Lords). It is Ordered and Adjudged, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Interlocutor of the Lords of Session, of the 19th of January last, whereby the Elections of the Appellants were reduced at the Suit of the Respondents, be affirmed. And it is Declared, That the Elections of Counsellors and Magistrates for the Borough of Jedburgh, insisted on by the Respondents, were irregular and void. And it is therefore further Ordered and Adjudged. That the same be reduced, and that so much of the other Interlocutors complained of, whereby the Court of Session decerned in the Declarator, at the Instance of the Respondents, and assoilzied from the Reduction at the Instance of the Appellants, with regard to all the Elections thereby quarrelled (excepting those of Robert Winterup and George Scougald), be reversed.

    The Jedburgh Abbey Graveyard image of the tombstone of George Douglas 1720 Jedburgh, his wife Annie Oliver 1726 Hawick, their daughter in law Jean Oliver and perhaps their son James Douglas who was Jean's husband - http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Douglas&GSiman=1&GScid=2379229&GRid=77355254&

    For Douglas as Gardiners or Gardeners (mostly my research and text) in Jedburgh (they are direct ancestors of this Douglas family which is mine). So see - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Lists/jedburgh_gardeners.htm

    Some examples of early Clocks and Watches in Scotland -
    * The Kockmakers (Clockmakers) of Dundee, Angus - By 1650 there were a number of Knockmakers in Dundee as a branch of the Locksmiths' trade and 'this allowed them to become Hammermen' (as well). James Douglas 1794 of Dundee was one such Knockmaker - John Smith (1850).
    * The Hammermen of Brechin, Angus - Early Clocks and Clockmaking - In the 17th Century there was a steeple clock in Brechin and in 1736 a new tolbooth clock was acquired. In 1741 William Lawson entered the Brechin Hammermen's Incorporation as a 'free master clocksmith and hammerman', the only Clockmaker in the book (1741 - 1744) - Brechin Hammermen 1600 - 1762... by David G Adams (2000).
    * From Cassell's - Old and New Edinburgh, Vol IV (1880's) - Hammermen - 'the first knockmaker appears in 1647, but his business is so limited that he added thereto the making of locks'.
    * From the Memorials of Edinburgh by Sir Daniel Wilson in 1816, recording about the area of Bow - 'In 1675, it appears from records of the Corporation of Hammermen (Edinburgh), a watch was, for the first time added to the Knockmaker's essay (attempt or trial), previous to that date it is probable that watches were entirely imported'.
    * The Hammermen of Edinburgh - It is recorded that in 1689 under the Clockmakers/Knockmakers essay, 'a house clock, with a watch larum (alarm), and locks upon the doors' and in 1701 'a pendulum clock, with a long and short swing, and a lock to the door, with a key, and in 1712, the movement of a watch' - Society of Antiquities, Vol 1 of 1792.

    For an excellent site on Clockmakers go to the Guildhall Library in London now merged with the London Metropolitan Archives at - http://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/visiting-the-city/archives-and-city-history/london-metropolitan-archives/Pages/default.aspx Also follow their link to the Worshipful Clockmakers of London.

    For some Douglas history on clocks (on Scotland and Australia my research and text) go to - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Businesses/clock_and_watch_makers.htm The entries down the bottom of that page in white and red are my contributions, plus the section which relates to John Douglas 1759 Jedburgh, a Master Clock and Watchmaker - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/john_douglas3.htm

    For more on John Douglas 1759 Jedburgh see - http://loudounkirk.wikifoundry.com/page/Douglas%2C+John+%281759%29 where I submitted a story on John some time ago (It was called Wet Paint then). Also see the tombstone of John Douglas 1759 which was kindly photographed for me - without asking - by Agnes Wilson ot the Wet Paint site - http://douglashistory.ning.com/profiles/blogs/seeking-ancestors-through John Douglas died in about 1833 in Galston.

    John Douglas 1759 and his wife Mary Newton/Nuton c1762 had 3 sons - Gabriel 1784, Walter 1786 and John 1794 and 2 or 3 daughters - Jean 1786, Jean 1788 and Christian 1789 - the latter then being a girl's name. Records do not make it clear as to whether there were one or two daughters named Jean. The three sons became Watchmakers although Gabriel Douglas 1784 also became an Inn Keeper and Vintner. Mary Newton died in January, 1803 and was buried at Loudoun Kirk, Ayrshire. I have an image of the tombstone of Mary Nuton that William Douglas has kindly displayed, see the Gravestone Inscription down this page - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Businesses/clock_and_watch_makers.htm

    In October 1808, John Douglas 1759 married Agnes Allan in Galston, Ayrshire and they had 2 sons - George and James; and 4 daughters - Mary, Isabella/Isobel, Margaret Mason and Maria, the last two being twins. James Douglas appears to have died young (and is buried with Mary Newton c1762) but George Douglas and his son George were Watchmakers. The other son of the first George was a John Douglas and he became a Ship's Engineer - in 1861 he was a Shop Boy at 129 High Street, Bonhill, Dunbartonshire; in 1871 he was an Engineer boarding at 16 Crescent Street, Greenock East and in 1901 he was a Ship's Engineer living at 5 Bishop Street, Holy Trinity, Portsea, Portsmouth, Hampshire.

    For Australia see my Immigration Bridge entry for Gabriel Douglas 1822 of Muirkirk - http://immigrationplace.com.au/story/gabriel-douglas/

    So far I have found about 24 Watchmakers within this Douglas family - five of them are women - daughters of Thomas Napier Douglas 1830 Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire (brother of James Douglas 1827 Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire); and one had Lamont as a surname. To clarify, these five daughters of Thomas Napier Douglas namely - Miss Mary McLiver Douglas, Miss Grace Buchanan Douglas, Mrs Lily Campbell (Douglas) Tough, Mrs Agnes Lamont (Douglas) Macara and Miss Ellen Douglas may or may not have been Watchmakers but they carried on the Business 'Douglas & Son, Watchmakers and Jewellers' at 9 Hamilton Street, Greenock, Renfrewshire after their father had died in 1903. From the end of 1913 the Business was continued by Miss Mary McLiver Douglas and Miss Ellen Douglas as Limited Partners, with Peter Boag Neill as the General Partner. (Edinburgh Gazette of August 14, 1914).

    Some were Jewellers and Engravers as well, and in the case of Thomas Napier Douglas a Goldsmith. Another strong skill for this Douglas family was snuff box painting, picture restoring and picture painting. Portrait painting and other art such as the painting of animals, scenes and genre, was carried by the Douglases in the 1800's, and then the next step for some was studio photography, including carte de visite. For more on Douglas photographers and artists visit http://www.edinphoto.org.uk/PP_D/pp_douglas_th_photographers_and_artists.htm Also at Douglas History on Edwin James Douglas 1848 Edinburgh (mostly my research and text as it is too for some of the other artists, painters and photographers at this site). So see - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/templates/edwinouglas.htm#.UODcWnwaySM

    The following information on Thomas Harigad Douglas 1836 St Cuthberts, Edinburgh (a Douglas of the Moreton line) is my research and text - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/thomas_douglas.htm#.UONvZnwaySM Though Thomas Harigad Douglas was not related closely to my Douglas family he obviously worked with John Douglas 1813 of Dollar, Clackmannan and his sons who were Painters and Photographers, as a carte de visite Photographer in Glasgow. Thomas was also involved with his own Photographic studios in Edinburgh and Leith and he was also a Writer and Searcher of Public Records - following in the footsteps of his father Major James Torry Douglas 1751 Craufordmuir, Peebles who was also Searcher of Public records. While John Douglas 1813 and his sons also had a studio at Helensburgh, Dunbartonshire. John Douglas 1813 and his wife Mary Lorimer had 6 sons and it appears that 5 of them were Artists, Photographic Artists and Photographers - Walter, John, Robert, William and Arthur Lorimer. They strongly identified as being Artists and Photographic Artists. It is thought likely too that two of the sons of John Douglas - John and Robert - also had a Photographic studio in partnership in Edinburgh as 'J and R Douglas'. It appears highly probable that Thomas Harigad Douglas also worked in closely with this Douglas family in Edinburgh. The other son of John Douglas and Mary Lorimer - Thomas Lorimer Douglas became an Accountant and Insurance Agent.

    These finds on Douglas baptisms from Jedburgh films, are also my research and text - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/Lists/jedburgh_baptisms.htm

    This subject also relates to Douglas of Timpendean - http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=21722 This Douglas family is of the line of Bonjedward and then a branch of it which was Timpendean - both domains were close to Jedburgh in the Scottish Shire of Roxburghshire (ancient Teviotdale). The Timpendean line of these Douglas Watchmakers may have branched off at about the 5th Laird or Lord of Timpendean - Stephen Douglas born about 1567. Stephen Douglas married Jean Haliburton/Halyburton daughter of Andrew Haliburton of Muirhouselaw, Berwickshire - two likely sons have been found - John Douglas c1608 who became the next Laird and Andrew (Andro) Douglas c1612 who had died by September, 1656.

    The ancient ancestors of these Douglases were possibly Sir William de Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas born c1321 at Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire and his mistress Margaret Stewart, 3rd Countess of Angus (Stewart line) born c1349 (her husband Thomas of Mar c1332 was the brother of William's wife Margaret Moremar, 10th Countess of Mar). Sir William de Douglas and Margaret Stewart supposedly had two 'natural' children - Margaret/Margarete Douglas c1376 and George Douglas c1378 (commencement of the Red Douglas line). Margaret Douglas c1376 married Thomas Johnstone/Johnson and they took the name of Douglas and Margaret Douglas commenced the line of the Lairds or Lords of Bonjedward. I accept that there are different theories but there is some substance to this supposition. Margaret Douglas, the 3rd Countess of Angus passed her Angus title (from her father Thomas 2nd Earl of Angus) to her son George Douglas, who became the 1st Earl of Angus (Douglas line, as opposed to Stewart).

    Sir William de Douglas had two of three legitimate children with Margaret Moremar - James (Jamie) Douglas c1358 2nd Earl of Douglas, Isobel/Isabella Countess of Mar and Garioch c1360 (and perhaps Christian who married Sir Edward Keith?)

    Margaret Stewart was a direct descendant of Walter FitzAlan the 1st High Steward of Scotland c1106 Oswestry, Shropshire, England and before that back to Flad de Dol c1005 Dol, Ille-et-Villaine, St Malo, Bretagne (Britanny) France.

    While the Douglas ancestry of Sir William de Douglas the 1st Earl of Douglas can be traced back at least to William de Douglas 1st Lord of Douglas, c1165 Douglas Castle, Douglas, Lanarkshire who married Margaret Kerdal de Moray - sister of Freskin/Friskin de Kerdal of the Lairds of Moray - from paradox.poms - see below. The Kerdals were of Flemish descent. William and Margaret de Douglas had six sons - Freskin, Brice (Bricus), Henry, Hugh (Hugone), Archibald and Alexander; and a daughter Margaret. There may have even been another child. There is an interesting database at http://paradox.poms.ac.uk/ This William de Douglas was a Knight and a witness to a charter of Jocelin/Jocelyn who was the Bishop of Glasgow by 1174 - the charter itself was witnessed between 1174 and 1199. William also attended the Court of 'William the Lion' and witnessed many charters of that Monarch. Moreover when William married Margaret de Kerdel he was an Abbot of Melrose Abbey (The order at Melrose Abbey at the time was linked to the White Friars or Monks who originally came from Citeaux near Dijon in eastern France - Jocelin himself had been a Monk and an Abbot of Melrose before moving to Glasgow).

    A History of the House of Douglas Vol 1" by Sir Herbert Maxwell – Freemantle 1902 p8 “...The earliest known mention of the water and lands of Douglas occurs in charters granted prior to 1160, of aqua de Douglas and territorium de Douglas adjacent thereto, in the county of Lanark, and again they are mentioned by Walter the Steward, before 1177, as one of the boundaries of the Forest of Mauchline...the sudden appearance between 1174 and 1199 of William de Douglas, bearing the territorial name, would be quite consistent with his being one of the native chiefs of Clydesdale, who had recently received a charter of his hereditary lands...(but there is also) a strong possibility...that the houses of Moray and Douglas were derived from a common Flemish or Frisian stock...” Some authorities say that there is a close ancient 'tribal' link between the Douglases of Douglasdale and the Kerdals of Moray.

    Douglas descendants of John Douglas 1759 (Master Clock and Watchmaker) and his wife Mary Newton c1762 whom I have traced as being in Victoria, Australia (but I have not found their migration records) were -
    * Gabriel Douglas (Watchmaker) 1822 Muirkirk, Ayrshire - son of Walter Douglas (Master Watchmaker) - 1786 Jedburgh, Roxburghshire.
    * Gabriel's first cousin James Douglas (Watchmaker) - 1827 Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire - son of John Douglas (Master Watchmaker) 1794 Jedburgh, Roxburghshire.
    * Plus I have very good reason to believe that Gabriel's brother George Douglas (Watchmaker) born 1820 in Old Cumnock, Ayrshire also migrated to Victoria as a George Douglas (Watchmaker) appears on location indexes (1864 onwards) as working with and near Gabriel Douglas 1822 Muirkirk, Ayrshire and it was far too early for George Douglas (Watchmaker) 1862 Daylesford to be working with his father Gabriel 1822. He would have only been an infant!

    Gabriel Douglas 1822 and James Douglas 1827 appear in newspapers on Trove. Gabriel Douglas was in Ballarat, Daylesford, Melbourne - Swanston Street, Russell Street and Latrobe Street, South Melbourne, Port Albert, Richmond, Port Melbourne, Williamstown, Footscray and Fitzroy. Whereas James Douglas was in Colac.

    George Douglas the eldest of the three Watchmaking sons of Gabriel Douglas 1822 Muirkirk, besides pursuing the traditional skills of being a Watchmaker and Jeweller he fixed music boxes and even pierced the ears of the 'Fair Sex'. Actually the three Watchmaking sons of Gabriel's - George Douglas 1862, Gabriel (Gilbert) Douglas 1869 and Robert William Arthur Douglas 1881 were the only 3 sons to reach adulthood.

    (Trove and Family history research).

    Sally E Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    261 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-11-30
    User data
  26. DOUGLAS - of Timpendean, Roxburghshire, Scotland
    List
    Public

    Possibly these are the Lairds or Lords of Timpendean -
    * 1 Andrew (Andro) Douglas c1466
    * 2 Archibald Douglas c1495
    * 3 Andrew Douglas c1519
    * 4 Andrew Douglas c1538
    * 5 Stephen Douglas c1567
    * 6 John Douglas c1608
    * 7 William Douglas c1633
    * 8 John Douglas 1656
    * 9 William Douglas 1684
    * 10 Archibald Douglas Esq 1718 (and assumed the title Laird of Bonjedward)
    * 11 Sir William Douglas 1770
    * 12 Captain George Douglas 1819
    * 13 Captain Henry Sholto Douglas 1820 (brother of George Douglas 1819)

    Siblings of Captains George and Henry Sholto Douglas - William Douglas c1811, Helen Douglas c1814, Mary Anne (Marianne) Douglas 1815, Thomas Douglas 1816, Surgeon Major Frederick Douglas 1823, Emma Douglas c1824 and William Archibald Douglas c1827.

    See images of Timpendean and Timpendean Tower on the web.

    (Family history research and Williiam Douglas of the Douglas Archives - online)

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    28 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-03-04
    User data
  27. DOUGLAS FAMILY - snow or alpine skiers
    List
    Public

    The Douglas brothers - Cliff, Eric (Gilbert Eric) and Gill (Leslie Gilbert) were keen recreational snow or alpine skiers. Cliff and Eric were especially keen on this sport - both were downhill as well as Langlauf or cross country skiers. They were early members of the Ski Club of Victoria with Eric joining in 1927 and continuing through as a member till 1931. However he was still skiing in 1936 and on the other side of 1927 he likely commenced skiing in about 1925 at the age of 22. In the Ski Club of Victoria Membership list of 1929 both Cliff and Eric are listed and in the 1933 list of course only Cliff is listed. Copies of the relevant pages showing 'Douglas' of these two lists were personally obtained by me at the Ski Club of Victoria lodge 'The Whitt' (Ivor Whittaker) at Mount Buller in recent years.
    In 1925 through the initiatives of the Ski Club of Victoria a slide was cut at Mt Donna Buang and the erection of a chalet at Mt Feathertop was proposed. In 1927 the ski resorts in Victoria included - Mount Nelson, Mount Cope, Mount Jim, Dibbin's Hut, Mount St Bernard Hospice and Mount Hotham. While in 1930 the Victorian ski resorts included - Mt Donna Buang, Mt Bogong, the High Plains, Bon Accord Spur, Cope Hut, Feather Top, Hotham Heights and Mount Buller.
    Eric was the most 'experienced' skier, out of his family and friends, and told a story that when on the downhill approach to Mt Hotham all the luggage was strapped to him. It didn't take long for him to end in a heap!
    Both the wives of Cliff - Doris Watson - and Eric - Ella Sevior - were also early skiers in the Victorian Alps, obviously having been introduced to the sport by their husbands. Doris and Ella skied at Mt Buffalo and Mt Buller in 1935.
    While skiing in the Bogong High Plains in September, 1937 Arthur Downer a friend of Cliff's, and a member of a skiing party which included Cliff was injured when he fell heavily into soft snow near the Cleve Cole Memorial Hut. He was taken to the hut and two of his party members - Cliff Douglas and Tom Fisher - left at 8pm to ski to Bright for assistance. They travelled all night and crossed the Mountain creek eight times before reaching Bright at 4am. They saw a local doctor for advice on first aid and the best means of over snow transport. The result was that they obtained a stretcher and with the assistance of a Mr Maddison took it to the hut which they reached at 1am the next morning.
    Then the ski party members made a makeshift sledge out of a ladder and two pairs of skis and they placed Arthur Downer on an improvised matress on the sledge and left on a 10 to 12 mile journey to the snowline near Tawonga. The sledge was pulled by eighteen members of the skiing party over the 10 to 12 miles of snow. Part of the journey was made along a slope of 45 degrees were a slip would have meant a drop of 500 ft.
    One version of the story indicates that from the snowline to the car park where one of the members had left his car, the stretcher was placed on a pack horse and taken down a cattle track to the car park near a downhill section of the Mountain creek.
    Cliff Douglas then went with the driver of the car and they drove overnight to Melbourne where Arthur Downer was admitted to the Alfred Hospital at 8am the next day. (Trove newspapers for this story).
    I consider myself fortunate to have met the legendary Mick Hull in the late 1960's when I wandered into the lodge where he was staying at Mount Hotham. In happened to be in the midst of a blizzard when I lost the rest of my ski walking party when we walked in from the car park on the southern side of Hotham, along the Great Alpine Road. The carpark was somewhere close to what is now the village of Dinner Plain. I bent down to readjust my backpack for a minute or so and the party of about fourteen were quickly out of sight in the heavy mist as they rounded the bend in the road that wound back towards Hotham village, some distance from Hotham Heights. I was not too perturbed and I considered my best bet was to follow the flatness of the partly now snow covered road and I could soon see lodges and huts in the distance and I made my way to an accessible hut and inside were Mick Hull and other skiers. (Mick being one of the other two skiers with Cleve Cole when he lost his life at Mt Bogong in August, 1936. The other skier was Howard Michell).
    It was so blizzardy that day that a few of the skiers had even decided to make their way back to Melbourne rather than face a walk of about 7 miles laden with our skis which we were wearing and our back packs with clothes and some food provisions for a week - luckily much of the dried food and basic provisions were already at the Melbourne University Ski Club (USC) where we were to stay, having been taken in by summer working parties. We had good leaders in our skiing party and they would not let us rest on the way in other than a short stop for a bent up and frosted but welcome sandwich, and I imagine a drink of water. If you stop in such a situation you get cold and what is more important in a way you can loose the mental attitude to move on. It could all become too difficult. The elements must be respected. What is more I remember non essential provisions being left off the side of the road on the way in to Mount Hotham and these provisions included our cardboard wine casks, known as 'Chateau cardboard' in some circles!
    Eric Douglas had a great admiration for the skiing abilities of Helmut Koffler who he knew and watched ski at Mt Buller - he said that Koffler's ski jumps over a ramp were absolutely amazing.

    Sally E Douglas

    85 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-11-16
    User data
  28. DOUGLAS ISLANDS - ANTARCTICA
    List
    Public

    The 'Douglas Islands' off the coast of Mawson base are named and gazetted by Australia and these islands are also called Douglas Islands by Russia and the United States of America. They were named for Rear (sic Vice) Admiral Sir Henry Percy Douglas CMG, Hydrographer of the Royal Navy. They are 'two small islands, with rocky outliers, about 33 km north east of Mawson' (Antarctic Gazetter). On 31st December, 1929 - RAAF Pilots, Flying Officer Stuart Campbell and Pilot Officer Eric Douglas made an historic flight in the RAAF Gipsy Moth Seaplane VH-ULD which was taken south onboard the SY Discovery (RRS Discovery 1). Stuart and Eric were the two pilots seconded to 'the Seaplane Division' of the RAAF for the purpose of joining Sir Douglas Mawson's Banzare (Antarctic Voyages) of 1929/30 and 1930/31 and on that day in December, 1929, 'a group of islands was reported...' (The Winning of Australian Antarctica by A Grenfell Price - 1962 - the Mawson Institute) although Eric Douglas said in his log that it was uncertain what they had seen in the distance from a height of 5,000 feet. However the islands were named by Sir Douglas Mawson for the famed British Hydrographer, with the surname of Douglas.

    The observations by Eric Douglas as in his log were "...beyond this again appeared the distant shape of land but it is hard to say definitely. This apparent land extended towards the SW, from the SW to the W there was a haze. To the SE and E fairly hazy with some small waterways. To the West the water extended as far as we could see. To the North and North east, very broken thin pack ice, and cloudy to the NE..."

    By the way, the moth was taken onboard at Cape Town, South Africa for the first Banzare Voyage and as for both voyages it was packed in cases and the bulk of it stored on the deck of the Discovery. While viewing cargo being loaded onto the Discovery at Cape Town, in October, 1929 Eric Douglas readily recognized the moth in boxes and for him it was a great excitement. On the way to the Antarctic and nearer to their flying destinations the fragile and mainly wooden 'alfresco' seaplane with floats (the floats being made at RAAF Point Cook) was assembled by the two versatile and talented pilots. Eric was responsible for the accurate assembly and the running of the moth, for prior to becoming a Pilot and Flying Instructor he had qualified as a Motor Mechanic, Air Mechanic and Fitter and Rigger. He was also responsible for the maintenance and running of the ship's motor boat.

    Little did Eric Douglas envisage when he saw the moth in it's packing cases that there would be a time after a raging blizzard in the Antarctic, when the plane's wings and fabric was to be badly damaged and that he and Stuart Campell, with other helping hands on Banzare would have to set to work patching up the plane; even being forced to resort to using some of the packing case wood on the seaplane itself!

    When Banzare revisited that region in 1931 again in the Discovery, the islands in question were found to be situated in a slightly different locality off the Antarctic coast. However it wasn't till 1947 under ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition) that the 'Douglas Islands' were finally gazetted by Australia; but it took until 1956 for their locality to be accurately established and that information was provided because of an ANARE sledge party led by Peter Crohn. The islands were not found in the locality as pinpointed in the 1931 Banzare visit, but two unchartered islands slightly further south were defined as the 'Douglas Islands'.

    The Norwegians at the time of Banzare and with their expedition at more or less the same time, apparently had some doubts about the existence of these islands. The competition between Riiser-Larsen on the 'Norvegia' for Norway and Sir Douglas Mawson for Britain and the Commonwealth on the 'Discovery' in matters of discovery of new lands in Antarctica was keen but cordial, and there was generous co-operation. Obviously the two Antarctic exploration leaders had the utmost respect for each other. When they met up in their respective ships in the Antarctic it was a friendly occasion. Moreover, Sir Douglas Mawson and Riiser-Larsen remained firm friends well after their days of Antarctic Adventure.

    Banzare was the idea of the leader Sir Douglas Mawson and he put in a great deal of time and effort raising funds both privately and from Governments for the forthcoming Antarctic voyages. These funds were raised especially in Britain and Australia and part of the understanding was that he would acknowledge the generous contributions by naming newly discovered Antarctic features and lands, for those persons on the 'Discovery Committee', or whom the Committee wished to honour, as well as for benefactors such as Macpherson Robertson, politicans such as the Australian Prime Minister James Henry Scullin and for members of the Banzare expedition such as the members the Discovery 'Ship's Company' and the 'Scientists'. It is a telling fact about Sir Douglas Mawson that he named no features for his own name or names on either of the Banzare Voyages.

    The Douglas Islands can be located on the LIMA - NASA satellite site (LIMA being short for Lansat Mosaic Images of Antarctica) and can be captured and saved and/or printed out in a choice of natural and/or digitally enhanced formats. There are at least three different starting points for a search at the site - http://lima.usgs.gov/ and http://lima.usgs.gov/view_lima.php and http://lima.nasa.gov/

    Also see the Australian Antarctic Data Centre, Gazetter - https://data.aad.gov.au/aadc/gaz/display_name.cfm?gaz_id=872 & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Islands.

    See the Geographica Names site - NASA image http://www.geographic.org/geographic_names/antname.php?uni=4025&fid=antgeo_107

    Weather forecast for the Douglas Islands, Antarctica - http://www.yr.no/place/Antarctica/Other/Douglas_Islands/

    Photographs of Sir Henry Percy Douglas at the National Portrait Gallery in London - http://www.npgprints.com/search/keywords/sir%20henry%20percy%20douglas

    Sir Henry Percy Douglas at Douglas History - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/henrypercydouglas.htm#.UOtN53waySM

    Sir Henry Percy Douglas (Captain) devised the Douglas Sea Scale which classifies Sea Swell, Wind, and Wave length and height. It is wide use today - http://www.eurometeo.com/english/read/doc_douglas & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Sea_Scale. There are other sea scales in use such as the Beaufort Wind Scale which was used by Sir Douglas Mawson on his Banzare Voyages to the Antarctic in 1929/30 and 1930/31. The Douglas Sea Scale and the Beaufort Wind Scale are complimentary measurement navigational scales

    The Beaufort Wind Scale was also used on the MV Orion when I ventured south to Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay in 2007. For just after leaving Macquarie Island and heading south we hit a storm of many hours duration, which at it's height registered force 11 (violent storm). In this storm I was thrown from my bed into a large chair some feet away and got a gash in my leg which I had to leave bleeding as it was too rough to attend to it. In the main sitting and entertainment room I saw chairs come unhooked and slide across to the other side of the ship with passengers smartly removed sideways or upwards. In the dining room at breakfast time food ready for about ninety passengers crashed to the floor along with plates, cups, glasses and cutlery. Needless to say our breakfast that morning was far more modest than the lavish choice that we were becoming accustomed to. I heard stories about people somersaulting out of their beds and being covered in bruises. I saw some of those bruises. The ship's lift was closed and the outside doors of the ship were locked for safety reasons. The essence was to try and 'stay put' and 'hang on' and not venture around unnecessarily. At one point I was forced to order some food that was manageable, and it happened to be a couple of bananas. As the ship lent towards me two of the crew came through the cabin door with the bananas and when the ship lent the other way they went out backwards. Naturally we all had a laugh! My brother who had been leader of the ANARE base Davis in 1960 wished me 'a b. good blizzard' and I got one!

    A further innovation by Sir Henry Percy Douglas (when he was a Captain) was the Douglas Navigation Protractor. It is a square 360 degrees protractor for plotting courses and bearings - http://www.starpath.com/catalog/accessories/1852.htm This protractor has proved to be an ideal navigational guide since it was invented and its use suits the present digital age. Tellingly its widespread application is illustrated by the multitude of sites (using a search engine) which display it in many variations. Nowadays it is made from a choice of materials and is used for example for shipping and ocean yacht racing and also air navigation. I image that it is also used for land navigation and remote exploration too; and that there digital versions. I wonder if there are apps for ipad and android use?

    One more nautical invention by Sir Henry Percy Douglas was the joint invention of the 'Douglas-Applyard Arcless Sextant' - for use in surveys and aerial navigation.

    Eric Douglas had an affinity here as he was always fascinated by air and sea navigational instruments, and he used and needed guiding instruments, maps and charts; as a pilot, flying instructor and competitive yachtsman. At one stage he had a large desk compass, which was balanced by mercury and a smaller pocket sized compass which he often 'read' and his alignment was always with the geomagnetic south pole.

    Even with just a small knowledge of these contributions by Sir Henry Percy to Hydrography, there is reinforcement that the naming the 'Douglas Islands' in his honour by Sir Douglas Mawson, is a fitting tribute to some of his obviously excellent work in sea navigation, mapping and charting.

    From 1928 to 1932 Sir Henry Percy Douglas was on the London based 'Discovery Committee', so Sir Douglas Mawson and Sir Henry Percy Douglas would have known each other quite well.

    Two other Antarctic features named for Sir Henry Percy Douglas (but not by Sir Douglas Mawson) are the Douglas Range and Douglas Strait.

    (Some knowledge of the Antarctic by the writer and from writings by Eric Douglas].

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-12-17
    User data
  29. Dr Alfred Howard (known as Alf)
    List
    Public

    Alfred Howard (1906-2010) was born in Camberwell, Victoria. However Alf had said that he still felt that Melbourne was home, even when he was over 100. He was well known for being the last member of BANZARE to be alive.

    Dr Alfred Howard was the Chemist and Hydrologist on the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931.

    When he was approached for BANZARE by Sir David Orme Masson who chaired the BANZARE Committee, Dr Alfred Howard was doing work in Organic Chemistry. Nevertheless, two days later and he was on his way to London and then on to Plymouth to spend a short period of study at an analytical laboratory. Alf Howard had to make his way to Fremantle to join the steamship Orvieto bound for Toulon and to then get to London. He went by train from Toulon and then caught the ferry from Calais to Dover. Besides attending the laboratory of the Marine Biological Association in Plymouth, Howard made his way to the Fisheries Laboratory in Lowenstoft on the other side of England. He later said that his training “...was intensive and turned out to be invaluable...”

    Alf Howard and Ritchie Simmers the Meteorologist who had both been chosen for BANZARE left Southampton on the liner the Armadale Castle on 20th September, 1929 to meet up with the Discovery at Cape Town. The Discovery had left London on 1st August, 1929 for Cape Town, to officially commence BANZARE from that port city. Luckily for the two men they had earlier met up in London. Under their charge were some ‘expedition stores’ which had been despatched on the Armadale Castle. The voyage from Southampton was one of excitement and anticipation with the liner calling in at Cherbourg in France, Madeira and then steaming past the Verde Islands. In 1927 Howard had completed his Master of Science degree at the University of Melbourne and it has been said that it was one of five degrees obtained there by him. He also received an Honorary Doctorate in Statistics and a PhD in Linguistics from the University of Queensland. He worked with the Department of Human Movement as a Programmer and Statistics Consultant for 20 years without pay until he was 97.

    Alf Howard was the man who monitored the sea water temperatures on the expedition and collected sea water samples for chemical analysis. (Alf Howard did not keep logs for himself on BANZARE).

    Eric Douglas wrote about some of Alf’s work in his BANZARE logs - 27th January, 1930 “...I gave Alf Howard a hand on his water bottle tests. The water temperatures are interesting. It shows a warm layer of water at 100 fathoms and 800 fathoms...” and - Tuesday 4th March, 1930 “...I gave Alf Howard a hand at his machine for water bottle samples, samples and temperatures are taken at 0, 10,20, 30, 40, 50, 60,70, 80, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400 metres. The water temp was + 6 Centigrade at the surface, it fell to a minimum at 150 metres (2.5C) and then rose again to 3.5C at 400 metres. From these stations the oceans currents directions are made known. The deep water bottle test carried out on the forecastle had to be repeated owing to the messenger (which closes the water bottles at the required depths) catching on a kink in the wire...”

    Dr Alfred Howard lived to be 104, and when congratulated on his age a bit before that he said “What for?” He obviously would have liked to have still been actively contributing to life. One of the best documentations of his life and work is Mawson’s Last Survivor – the story of Dr Alf Howard AM – by Dr Anna Bemrose. (Boolarong Press – Brisbane – 2011).

    Sally Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-21
    User data
  30. Dr James Marr
    List
    Public

    James William Slessor Marr (1902-1965) was born in Turriff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Marr became a Zoologist and Marine Biologist, specializing in the study of Antarctic Krill. He was on the BANZ Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), Voyage 1 in 1929-30. This expedition in 1929-1931 was under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson.
    In his early life Marr read classics at the Aberdeen University and was a patrol leader in the First Aberdeen Scout Group. He was chosen as one of two boy scouts by Sir Ernest Shackleton to join the Quest in 1921 on the ‘Shackleton Rowett Antarctic Expedition’ to Coats Land on the Weddell Sea and some rarely visited Antarctic islands. However engine trouble and Shackleton falling ill on the journey forced a change of direction and the Quest headed for South Georgia via Rio de Janeiro. Shackleton had a heart attack and died on the Quest in Grytviken Harbour at South Georgia in January, 1922. Marr later wrote about the journey in his book Into the Frozen South dated 1923. Marr served as a cabin boy on the Quest. He earned the nickname ‘Babe’ because of his involvement at a young age in that expedition. His alternative nickname was Scout.
    In about 1924 Marr resumed his studies at Aberdeen University and he Graduated with an MA in Classics in 1924 and a Bachelor of Science in Zoology in 1925. In 1925 James Marr participated in the British Arctic Expedition to Franz Joseph Land.
    Marr was involved in the ‘Discovery Investigations’ as a Biologist and as part of these ongoing investigations he went on the ship William Scoresby to the Antarctic during 1928-1929. The Discovery Investigations were set up by the Discovery Committee in London to study the biological resources of the Falkland Island Dependencies and in particular the biology of Southern Ocean whales. Marr was on the Discovery II in 1931-1933 and again in 1935-1937. These were also Discovery Investigations. So he was onboard the Discovery II at the time of the ‘Ellsworth Relief Expedition’ in 1935/1936 when a RAAF party boarded the ship in Melbourne, together with a RAAF Gipsy Moth and a RAAF Wapiti. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas previously of BANZARE led this RAAF party.
    At the start of WW II Marr conducted hands-on research in the Antarctic into the feasibility of whale meat for human consumption. Moreover, in 1940 Marr was commissioned by the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve serving in Iceland, the Far East and South Africa. In 1943 he was a Lieutenant Commander. He led ‘Operation Tabarin’ in 1944-1946. It was a British Antarctic Expedition ‘secretly’ set up to establish permanently occupied bases in the Falkland Island Dependencies. During 1944 the wintering team led by Marr was at Port Lockroy on the Antarctic Peninsula.
    James Marr returned to the Discovery Investigations after the War and in 1949 was appointed principal Scientific Officer at the National Institute of Oceanography at Godalming, Surrey. The James Marr collection can be found at the Scott Polar Research Institute at the University of Cambridge.

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-25
    User data
  31. Dr XAVIER MERTZ
    List
    Public

    Dr Xavier Mertz (1882 – 1913) was from Basel, Switzerland. He was a skilled and experienced Skier and Mountaineer. In 1906 Mertz was third in the Swiss cross country skiing championships and he came second in the German championships. While in 1908 he won the Swiss ski jumping championship. Moreover as a Mountaineer, Mertz had climbed the Swiss Alps, including Mount Blanc the most challenging and highest peak of all.

    Mertz was also academically well qualified as he had obtained a Degree in Patent Law at the University of Bern and a Degree in Science from the University of Lausanne, specializing in glacier and mountain formations. So as a Glaciologist he had ideal skills for Antarctic research and exploration.

    In 1911 Dr Xavier Mertz was initially chosen by Dr Douglas Mawson as a Geologist for the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911-1914. However, on arriving at Commonwealth Bay Mertz became a Dog handler along with Lieutenant Belgrave Ninnis. Part of the reason for the change of roles was that he and Ninnis had developed a strong friendship on the boat journey to the Antarctic. Forty nine Greenland or Husky dogs were taken to the Antarctic for this expedition, with the main party setting up the hut (Mawsons Huts) at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. The site was in the region of King George V Land and Adelie Land which was a French Antarctic Territory. From the main base party at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay – Dr Douglas Mawson formed a Far Eastern sledging party of three – Dr Xavier Mertz, Lieutenant Belgrave Ninnis and himself. Their intention was to explore the unexplored coastal regions of Cape Adare, 500 miles away towards Victoria Land.

    This small party of three left the hut (Mawsons Huts) at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay on 10th November, 1912 to explore, survey and chart King George V Land. After about a month of what was regarded as excellent progress tragedy struck, for Ninnis suddenly fell through a gap in a snow covered crevasse (now known as the Ninnis Glacier) on 14th December, 1912. Mertz and Mawson were ahead of Ninnis and had passed over this crevasse with their weight dispersed. Mertz was on skis and Mawson was on a sledge but Ninnis was jogging behind the second sledge and it is thought that he must have breached the top of the crevasse with his weight. When Mawson and Mertz looked back Ninnis was nowhere to be seen. They could not believe it. Mertz and Mawson called for some hours near the top of the crevasse but Ninnis was never heard from or seen again. Also meeting with that same fate were six of the husky dogs, most of the party’s rations, their tent and other essential supplies. A husky dog could be seen on a snow ledge far below and there was moaning and near it was another dog and scattered gear.

    Mawson and Mertz having no sleeping protection were forced by circumstances to sledge back for about twenty seven continuous hours to locate a spare tent which they abandoned thinking that they had no further need of it. After they had retrieved it they used part of a sledge and a theodolite stand or skis to hold it up. Antarctic explorers had to be good at improvising. They had one week’s provisions – biscuits, raisins, pemmican and cocoa for two men - and no dog food but plenty of fuel and a primus stove.

    Ultimately they were forced to eat their remaining huskies for food and this husky meat and bones was mixed with pemmican. Mawson and Mertz became extremely ill trying to survive on the meagre rations, pemmican and husky meat. In Mertz’s case he only had wet clothes as his waterproof overpants were lost on Ninnis’ sledge, so hyperthermia would have been setting in. Also it is though that Mertz must have been mortified and depressed by the loss of his friend Ninnis. He became weak, delirious and was very agitated and in poor physical condition with skin even coming off his legs. Mertz finally succumbed and died on 8 January 1913. His death was later thought to be due to Vitamin A poisoning from eating husky livers. Mawson buried Mertz in his sleeping bag under the snow, with papers and other records. The Mertz Glacier is named for Dr Xavier Mertz.

    Dr Douglas Mawson was obviously made of strong substance both mentally and physically. Somehow he staggered back into the hut at Cape Denison a month later after a lonely and reflective journey of about 80 miles. On the return journey on his own Mawson fell into a crevasse and somehow managed to pull himself back with his harness rope attached to his sledge. Once again his journey was delayed on the way back. For he had found and sheltered in Aladdin’s Cave, a food depot set up about five and a half miles from the main base but he was trapped there for a week as a blizzard raged outside.

    It has been said that Mawson was physically ideal for Antarctic exploration for he was extremely fit and robust, did not feel the cold like others and had a very strong intellect and mind. Nevertheless, Mawson had his physical challenges on this lonely journey in that he had to tie up the soles of his feet as they were pulling away from the flesh. Moreover, he was unrecognizable by those members of the expedition who had stayed behind at the hut after the Aurora had left Commonwealth Bay to collect expedition members at the Western base. They wanted to know which member of the party he was.

    At Mawson’s request a Memorial Cross and a Plaque dedicated to Lieutenant Belgrave Ninnis and Dr Xavier Mertz were erected at Azimuth Hill, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay in November, 1913. The cross was carefully built by Francis Bickerton of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition. Over the years the cross has been blown off its position many times and has had to be replaced and repositioned. The original plaque from the cross can now be located in the Australian Antarctic Division’s Library at Kingston, Tasmania. A replica plaque is on the Memorial Cross at Azimuth Hill. When at sea it stands out on the coastline on the approach to Cape Denison.

    The story of the demise and death of Mertz will always remain controversial.

    Some of this story I heard first hand from my father Eric as told to him by Sir Douglas Mawson. My mother Ella too was conversant with this epic journey.

    Sally Douglas

    15 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-23
    User data
  32. EDWIN JAMES DOUGLAS - and Douglas artists and photographers
    List
    Public

    'Jersey Beauties' by Edwin James Douglas 1848 Edinburgh is signed E D entwined with the Douglas heart which was his distinctive signature. It is a horizontal and richly coloured oil painting on canvas, of some feet in height and width, surrounded by a gold frame. The painting is a landscape likely of the Jersey Islands and shows a young lady on the right leading a goat across a shallow stream and at the same time driving three jersey cows and a small calf across the same stream. The small calf is leading the way. Tall dark brown/black trees are a backdrop to a large part of the scene, with dark brown/black banks on both sides of the stream. In the top left hand corner the far away horizon shows hints of green grass and a sky of pale colours - blue, pink and yellow.

    This painting which was a gift to the Adelaide Art Gallery/Art Gallery of South Australia in the early 1900's was ultimately sold by them and is now owned privately, but not by anyone associated with or related to the Douglas family.

    I am not an art critic but just an art lover and in my opinion this painting is worthy of hanging in any art gallery in the world.

    Edwin James Douglas born 14th July 1848 in Edinburgh, Midlothian was the son of James Douglas born 24th July 1810 Kilmarnock, Ayrshire and Margaret McIlwraith c1804 Ballantree, Ayrshire. James Douglas was an Artist, Picture Restorer and Picture Liner following two generations of Clock and Watch makers - John Douglas 1759 a Master and Gabriel Douglas 1784 who was also an Innkeeper and Vintner. Gabriel was father to at least twelve children and James was number four.

    Besides Edwin James Douglas, James and Margaret Douglas had five daughters - Leonora, Georgina, Julia, Cecilia and Caroline.

    Edwin James Douglas married Christiana Maria (Feake) Martin born 25 December 1847 at Halstead, Essex on 23rd April, 1874 at Little Laver Church, Ongar, Essex (married as Edwin Douglas and Christian Maria F Martin) - they had nine children - Clare Henry, William Bruce, Guendolen Blanche, Charles Preston, Violet Constance, James Sholto, Marguerite (Margot) Laura, Edwin Roland and Cedric Christian.

    Edwin James Douglas and his father James Douglas both exhibited their art at the Royal Scottish Academy.

    Advice from the Royal Scottish Academy in 2006 -
    Dr Joanna Soden the Assistant Keeper/Librarian said that James Douglas attended the Royal Scottish Academy Life Class for the sessions 1841-1842, 1842-1843 and 1843-1844 and Edwin James attended for sessions 1866-67 and 1867-68.
    They exhibited at the RSA and/or the Royal Glasgow Institute of Fine Arts - Annual Exhibitions.
    Three relevant references suggested were -
    1. The Dictionary of Scottish Art & Architecture - P McEwan - Glengarden Press 2004
    2. The Royal Scottish Academy Exhibitors 1826-1990 - Hilmarton Manor Press 1991
    3. The Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts 1861-1898 - The Woodend Press 1990

    "In 1831 a number of natives of Kilmarnock (and others) formed themseves into a society, under the name of the 'Kilmarnock Drawing Academy...They rented an apartment at Cheapside Street, where they exhibited their pieces..." they also studied art and the venture only lasted two or three years. "...The more prominent of the members, who were twelve in number were Messrs, William Macready, James Douglas, Thomas Barclay, and John K Hunter...Mr James Douglas resides, we believe, in Edinburgh, and follows the art of portrait-painting. In imitating the old masters, and retouching and repairing ancient pictures, he is said to be very successful..." (The history of Kilmarnock - Chapter 24 - by Archibald M'Kay - 1858).

    The (Kilmarnock) Academy had in its membership one riddlemaker, two house painters, one cobbler, one tailor, one confectioner, one cabinetmaker, one mason, one pattern designer, one currier, and two young artists, Douglas and Morris. The Academy was to be a home for wandered artists, or artists visiting the town were to be recognised as honorary members..." (Scenes from an Artist's Life by John Kelso Hunter 1802 to 1873).

    Art of James Douglas 1810 Kilmarnock -
    * James Douglas painted his grand-father John Douglas 1759 Jedburgh, Roxburghshire Master Watch and Clock maker in about 1826 - at the age of about 16 likely either in Kilmarnock his home town or Galston were his grand father John Douglas 1759 now lived ( I have tracked John Douglas as living in Galston by 1803 and he was there sometime after 1794).
    * James Douglas also painted a self portrait around the same time and later on he painted his son Edwin James Douglas. James Douglas apparently painted Lord Melville and the painting hung in Archer's Hall of the Royal Scottish Academy, he also painted several pictures of the Duke of Buccleuch, Earl of Strathmore and Earl of Moray. His equestrian portrait (after Sir Anthony van Dyck) hung in the Great Hall of Daraway Castle. In 2006 the Royal Scottish Academy checked with the current Lord Darnley re the painting that hung in the Great Hall but no positive outcome - I was told that at some stage there had been a fire in the Great Hall and the inference was that it may have been destroyed?
    * In 1830 James Douglas painted a coloured 'Self Portrait' where he is sitting, wearing a jaunty hat and watching an archeological dig.
    * James Douglas Painter - exhibited 1837 to 1843. Edinburgh Painter. Lived at a couple of addresses at Hill Square and exhibited a number of Portraits and Subject Paintings at the RSA.
    * James Douglas Painter - 1837 to 1843 - 9 Hill Square. Painted - 1837 "Crazy Jane", 1838 "Innocence", 1839 "The Young Coquet", 1840 "Portrait of a Gentleman" and "Portrait of a Lady", 1841 "The Parting Gift', 1842 "The Confidants" and 1843 "The Fisherman's Daughter"

    Some of the Art of Edwin James Douglas 1848 -
    * From the Royal Collection in 2006 "...According to our computer database the Royal Collection holds an oil painting by Edwin James Douglas of the racehorse 'Persimmon', dated 1897 (RCIN 406475). According to our records this painting was presented to the Prince of Wales by Sir James Blyth (late 1st Baron Blyth), summer 1897..." This painting can be viewed online in the Royal Collection.
    * 'Alderneys' Mother and Daughter (Jersey Islands) created 1875 - black and white, oil on canvas is at the Tate Britain in London. This painting can be viewed online at the Tate Gallery.
    * From the Easy Art site http://www.easyart.com/art-prints/artists/Edwin-Douglas-1328.html - "Edwin Douglas was born in 1848 and flourished between 1869 and 1892. Born in Edinburgh, he was the son of James Douglas, a noted portrait painter, and exhibited his first work at the Royal Scottish Academy at the age of only 17. Edwin Douglas' paintings were mainly of a sporting nature and he attracted many notable patrons, including Sir Charles Tennant and Queen Victoria. Edwin painted a [small autographed] picture of setters for Queen Victoria to be given by her as a birthday present to King Edward VII". It hung in Marlborough House in 1877 - it is no longer in the Royal Collection - Valerie Martin of the Findon Village site.
    * Edwin James Douglas exhibited around 40 paintings at the Royal Academy from 1869 to 1900 and he also exhibited at the Manchester City Art Gallery, the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool, the Tate in London and at the Worthing Art Gallery.

    More on the art of Edwin James Douglas 1848 -
    * Painted sporting animal and genre subjects somewhat in the style of Landseer whom he imitated...Works at the RSA included "The Deer Path - 1866"... In 1875 he illustrated the "Poems and Songs of Robert Burns". One of his best known works was a Portrait of the Triple Crown winner in 1896 "Persimmon" drawn in a stable interior and exhibited RSA 1869-1900.
    * Edwin James Douglas 1848 to 1914 - Painter and Engraver -1865 to 1872 - 24 Grange Loan, Edinburgh - Exhibited 1865 to 1872 inclusive. 1874 Dorking, Surrey and 1878 Lawbrook House, Guildford, Surrey.
    * Edwin James Douglas 1869 - 1872 - 24 Grange Loan, Edinburgh. 1873 Westcott Hill House, Dorking Surrey and 1877 to 1882 - Lawbrook House, near Shere, Guildford, Surrey.

    Some of my 2008 research on Edwin James Douglas -
    Main Categories found on his art (my category headings) -
    * Highland and Jersey Cattle, Dogs, Horses and Sheep (Edwin James Douglas had studied anatomy). His best work is perhaps of 'Persimmon' the race horse, Highland and Jersey cattle and dogs of many types eg - mongrel, puppies, Cairn Terrier, Fox Terrier, Pugs, Greyhound, Setters - Gordon and English and Collies.
    * Edwin James Douglas family portraits of Christiana Maria (Martin) Douglas and Margot (Marguerete Laura) Douglas
    * 4 different images, Coaching Postcards
    * 3 different images, Horse and Jinker
    * 3 different images, Hunting with hounds
    * Lone rose
    * Tranquil roses in a vase
    * Sailing ship
    * Baroque
    * Other categories (my category headings) -
    * ~ Nature sets - Tropical, Tahitian Sunset, Autumn Elegance, Alioa Fields
    * ~ Specifically Botanical sets - Rojo Botanical, Graceful State, Mystic Opus, Centimento, Equatorial, Bonaire
    * ~ Somewhat abstract - Palimpsest, Always Special, Geo Mosaic
    * ~ Ancient/Old World - Eden, Epoch, Etruscan, Old World, Tuscadero, Timeless Equino
    * ~ Oriental - Garden Haiku (perhaps Japanese), Japanese Feelings, InnerChi (perhaps Chinese)
    * 4 paintings/drawings by Geundolen Douglas
    * 1 drawing by Christiana Maria (Martin) Douglas
    * Reference to art by Margot Douglas - Marguerite Lora Douglas a Painter in France (likely daughter of Edwin James Douglas 1848)
    * Reference to art by Georgina Douglas Painter, Helensburgh, 1885 (likely sister of Edwin James Douglas 1848 Edinburgh)

    Personal details on Edwin James Douglas and Christiana (Feake) Martin and their lives can be found online at Valerie Martin's site of Findon Village - http://www.findonvillage.com/inded.htm

    The Worthing Museum and Art Gallery in Sussex has infomation on, and some on the art of Edwin James Douglas, including 'My Queen' which is of his wife Christiana - http://www.worthingmuseum.co.uk/collections/

    Also see - http://www.gis.net/~shepdog/BC_Museum/Permanent/Douglas/Douglas.html

    Also visit - http://www.edinphoto.org.uk/PP_D/pp_douglas_artists_family_tree.htm where I have sent some information on Artists, Photographers and Clockmakers in the Douglas family.

    Visit as well - http://www.douglashistory.co.uk/history/edwindouglas.htm#.UOpCDqz4WSo where I have submitted some discoveries on Edwin James Douglas and some of the other Douglas Artists.

    From British newspapers of the day - some of the paintings produced and exhibited by Edwin James Douglas –
    • January 1866 Edwin obtained a prize for ‘Time Exercises’ in Drawing
    • May 1876 'Hailing the Ferry' sold for 262 pounds and 10 shillings
    • December 1882 a painting of a fat and dyspeptic pug called ‘Throw Physic to the Dogs’
    • May 1884 Paintings exhibited at the Royal Academy
    • June 1886 Edwin sold ‘Evening at South Downs’ for 400 pounds
    • May and November, 1889 an oil painting of a fox terrier
    • May 1889 ‘The Three Disgraces’ – three puppies scrambling on a hunting coat
    • February 1890 ‘The Firstlings of the Year’ was on display at the Atkinson Art Gallery in Southport
    • July 1890 ‘Grey Hack and Grey Hound’
    • February 1892 displayed a sheep picture called ‘Tally Ho’
    • September 1892 ‘Prize Jerseys’ was on display at the Birmingham City Council, either in the Great End Gallery or the Wedgwood Gallery
    • September 1892 – Edwin produced an Academy (England) picture of horses and foals, entitled ‘Young England’

    James Douglas 1810 died at 16 Amberley Grove, Croydon, Surrey on 17th March 1888 and Edwin James Douglas died on 22nd October 1914 at Thakenham, Essex.

    From the sites indicated it can be seen that there are a number of other Artists in this Douglas family and also there were a number of Photographers including Portrait, Landscape and Carte de Visite.

    Moreover there are many art sales sites on the web which are involved with selling Edwin James Douglas original art, to sites selling engravings, prints and posters.

    (From family history and other research including Trove).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    29 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-01-07
    User data
  33. ELIZABETH (BURRELL/BIRREL) SHIELS/SHIELDS
    List
    Public

    Elizabeth (baptised Elisabeth) Shiels (Shields) was the wife of William Shiels born 1815 in Markinch, Fife, Scotland - Proprietor and Licensee of the James Watt Hotel in Spencer Street, Melbourne - and after William's death Elizabeth became the Proprietor and Licensee. Elizabeth's nephew was Henry Burrell of the Argus newspaper and her niece was Agnes (nee Greig) Franks of Eureka fame. Henry Burrell was the son of Elizabeth's brother James Archibald Burrell 1826 Kirkcaldy, Fife; and Agnes was the daughter of her sister Margaret (nee Burrell/Birrel) Greig 1816 Linktown, Abbotshall, Fife. Margaret's husband John Greig 1815 Abbotshall, Fife - had a tent city on the goldfields at Ballarat and before that prospected for gold. John Greig and his daughter Agnes Greig were present at the time of the Eureka Stockade or Rebellion. Elizabeth's husband William Shiels had sucess in finding gold at Mt Alexander near Castlemaine likely fairly soon after the arrival of the family in Sydney in 1849 - as steerage class passengers on the barque rigged sailing ship "Agenoria" (670 tons in the old measurement and 724 tons using the new measurement) which had been built in 1846 in Saint John, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Canada and was 'sheathed in yellow metal' in 1848. A painting of this ship is to be found in an art gallery in Nova Scotia.

    The Barque Agenoria which transported WIlliam and Elizabeth (Burrell) Shiels and their family to Sydney in 1849 - http://trove.nla.gov.au/list?id=34647

    (Trove and Family history research)

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    33 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-07-25
    User data
  34. EMPIRE AIR TRAINING SCHEME - RAAF Point Cook - May 1940
    List
    Public

    The first flying training school established in Australia unit under the Empire Air Training Scheme known as EATS was at Point Cook - No1 SFTS. At the end of May, 1940 the then Squadron Leader Eric Douglas was appointed as the Engineer Officer. (In June, 1940 Eric Douglas was promoted to the rank of Wing Commander.) All the appointments at Point Cook were made by the Minister for Air, Mr Fairbairn.

    From the Australian War Memorial site - The Empire Training Scheme was set up at the beginning of WW II in response to the RAF not having a guaranteed supply of Air Crews. So the British Government proposed to it's Dominions that they jointly establish 'a pool' of trained Air Crews. From Australia's point of view the proposal was accepted in essence by the War Cabinet and after negotiation an agreement was signed on 17th December, 1939 which was to last for three years. Australia undertook to provide 28,000 (individuals for) Air Crews in the three years.

    The basic flying course commenced on 28th April, 1940, when training began in all participating countries.
    The following flying skills were to be taught -
    • Initial Training
    • Elementary Flying Training
    • Service Flying Training
    • Air Navigation
    • Air Observer
    • Bombing and Gunnery
    • Wireless Air Gunnery (AWM).

    Empire Air Training Scheme, Training of Aircrews - Initial subjects are to be about Air Force life. While amongst the technical subjects taught are - Mathematics, Navigation, Electrical Science, Signalling, Law and Administration, Anti-gas and Armament, a Brief outline of the Air Force Medical Service including Hygiene and Sanitation, Instruction in the Link Trainer to familiarise them with the controls of an aircraft. Then further training for those suitable to become - Pilots, Air Observers and Wireless Air Gunners. (September, 1940).

    The planes proposed for the Empire Air Training Scheme were to be - Avro Ansons and Fairey Battles from Great Britain; Wirraways, a prototype light reconnaissance bomber (to be built by CAC) and Wackett trainers made in Australia; and a share in machines to be produced in the United States. (September, 1940)

    Acquisition of new types of Aircraft for the Empire Air Training Scheme were to be - Airspeed Oxfords and a small fleet of Douglas DC-2 (14 passenger) planes, to be fitted as 'flying classrooms'. (January, 1941). * Note DC2's and not DC42's - ADF Serials.

    From mid 1937 to about mid 1942 Eric Douglas was in charge of the No 7 Service Flight Training School at Deniliquin.

    By December, 1940 Eric Douglas was also in charge of the No 1 Aircraft Training Depot at RAAF Laverton

    S E Douglas - 2nd November, 2015

    39 items
    created by: public:beetle 2015-11-01
    User data
  35. Eric Douglas - Aviator, Aeronaut, Yachtsman and Skier - both Snow and Water.
    List
    Public

    Gilbert Eric Douglas (known as Eric) (1902-1970) was born at Parkville, Victoria.

    This is where it all started. As a young child he saved his pocket money to go for ‘a flip’ with pioneer aviator Harry Hawker. The seeds were sown for of a life flying. He talked about the flip many times. In the meantime he would hang out of a tram window with his arms outstretched on school journeys.

    From 1916 to 1919 he belonged to the Senior Cadets. At the same time he was studying Mechanical Engineering at Swinburne Senior Technical College. In November, 1920 Eric Douglas joined the Australian Air Corps as an Air Mechanic and a little later he was also an Aero Fitter and Aero Rigger. He commenced work at the Central Flying School, Laverton on 12th December, 1920. (In a couple of hand written documents by Eric he says that he was in the Australian Flying Corps for five months before joining that RAAF but I have been told that it was the Australian Air Corps).

    In 1921 when the RAAF was formed Douglas transferred to the Service as an Aero Fitter ACI. His initial intention was to sign on for six years. At the same time he was doing a Motor Mechanics course by correspondence. In February, 1922 he commenced work in the Machine Shop at Point Cook and part of his aero work was on seaplanes. In September, 1922 he was transferred to the No I Flight (Flying) Training School at Point Cook to work on ‘B Flight Aeros’.

    From 1920 until he learnt to fly in 1927 he gained valuable experience as ‘crew’ on RAAF Cross Country flights.

    Interestingly in June, 1925 the seaplane Savoia-Marchetti S 16 ‘Gennariello’ was serviced at Point Cook and it appears that it was a full engine replacement. Eric Douglas was one of the RAAF servicemen who worked on this plane, under the leadership of the then Squadron Leader Lawrence Wackett, who became known as the father of Australian Aviation. The ‘Gennariello’ flew from Rome to Melbourne, with a successful return to Rome. Eric Douglas was at the official welcome to the Italian flyers at St Kilda Pier.

    In 1927 Douglas had graduated as a Pilot from the Central Flying School at Point Cook as a Sergeant Pilot, coming first in flying and third in theory in the ‘A’ Pilots Course. By 1928 he was a RAAF ‘AI’ Flying Instructor and had also attained AI in Gunnery. In 1928 Douglas also completed a course in parachute folding and maintenance. Then in April, 1929 he completed a special Air Pilotage course which was aerial navigation by the visible identification of landmarks.

    Eric Douglas also had a Civil Pilot’s licence and was a flying member of the Victorian Aero Club in his early flying days. He was also a flying examiner and safety pilot for the Aero Club.

    During May, 1929 Douglas took part in the RAAF search for Flight Lieutenant Keith Anderson and Mr Henry Smith (Bobbie) Hitchcock his mechanic who were lost in the Wave Hill and Tanami desert area of the Northern Territory in Anderson’s Westland Widgeon ‘Kookaburra’. Douglas left Laverton flying a training aircraft, a DH9A with the serial Number of A1-20.The RAAF search culminated in a wilderness search in the Tanami desert in a 1927 Buick tourer, on foot and by horseback; with two RAAF personnel (one being Eric Douglas), the Manager of Vestys who was based at Wave Hill Station and three trackers (station hands from Wave Hill Station) and 26 thirsty horses.

    In the period 1929 to 1931 Douglas was one of the two RAAF pilots chosen for the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition, under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson. For the purposes of this expedition the two RAAF pilots were transferred to the ‘Seaplane division’ of the RAAF. The aeroplane flown on the two Voyages which made up the expedition was de Havilland Gipsy Moth VH-ULD rigged as a seaplane with floats. Skis were also taken for the plane and they were stored in the floats. The pilots assembled and disassembled the Moth on the ship Discovery more than once. Douglas was also responsible for the maintenance and running of the Discovery’s motor boat on BANZARE.

    From November 1935 to February 1936 Douglas led the RAAF party of seven on the Discovery II searching for Lincoln Ellsworth and his pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon who were flying in Ellsworth’s plane the Polar Star from Dundee Island to the Ross Ice Barrier. The search by the Discovery II and the RAAF search party took place in the region of ‘Little America’, Bay of Whales, Ross Sea, Antarctica. The search was known as the ‘Ellsworth Relief Expedition’. In December, 1935 two RAAF aeroplanes rigged as seaplanes were loaded onto the Discovery II when it diverted to Williamstown, a de Havilland Gipsy Moth A7-55 and a Westland Wapiti A5-37. They were for the RAAF party.

    Sailing was introduced to the RAAF Air cadets at Point Cook as a recreation by Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas. It was called the Point Cook Class and Douglas was in charge. This class raced in regattas in Port Phillip Bay in the late 1930’s.

    During the period 1928 to 1937 Douglas became an AI Flying Instructor and an Aerobatic Pilot. He was often in RAAF air shows doing demonstrations and aerial stunts and taking part in aerial formation fly pasts and in flying escorts for pilots such as Amy Johnson, Bert Hinkler and Charles Kingsford Smith.

    From 1934 to 1938 he was a lecturer to RAAF flying cadet courses.

    From 12th April, 1936 to 12th June, 1936 Eric Douglas was at RAAF Headquarters.

    By 14th June 1937 Douglas was the Officer in Charge of the Aircraft Repair Section (ARS) of Number I Aircraft Depot, Laverton. He was also a Test pilot.

    From about 1937 to 1941 he was in Charge of the No 7 Flight Training School at Deniliquin.

    In 1938 Eric was the Staff Recruiting officer for the RAAF

    During 1938 to 1940 Douglas was the Officer in Charge of Workshops at Point Cook. He was also a Test pilot testing aeroplanes for the Workshop, Depot and Trade. In 1939 he successfully undertook a ‘Conversion Course’.

    From 1940-1942 he was the Commanding Officer of No1 Aircraft Depot, Laverton.

    Eric Douglas was posted to No 3 Aircraft Depot, Amberley in June, 1942 as an acting Group Captain and Commanding Officer [RAAF Amberley being known then as 3AD (Aircraft Depot)]. In October, 1943 when 3AD became Station Headquarters Eric Douglas became the Station Commander and he was made a Group Captain (later confirmed as from 1st December, 1943, with seniority). Group Captain Eric Douglas remained as Commanding Officer until the end of June, 1948. At Amberley Douglas also personally supervised the ‘Test and Ferry section’ of RAAF Amberley from 1942 to 1948. In about 1944 to 1946 Douglas invented and had patented the ‘Airwash Spray Mask’ (for breathing protection).

    In 1949 Eric Douglas was with the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Australian Navy in the Directorate of Aircraft Maintenance and Repair, known as DAMR. His role was as an Aircraft Engineer. He was a member Royal Aeronautical Society and Division Head (Civilian) at DAMR, Navy Office, Melbourne from 1949 to 1964. He had initially joined the Civilian Technical Staff of DAMR, Navy Office in 1949 as ‘a Technical officer on Airframes’.

    Eric Douglas was a keen and skilled yachtsman, joining the Royal Brighton Yacht Club in 1920 and the Port Phillip Yacht Club in 1922. He sailed in hundreds of Club races and Regattas from 1921 until 1936 and had many successes in winning yacht racing cups and trophies. His most favoured yacht was ‘the Vendetta’ B18 which he owned with a brother. It was registered as being with the Royal Brighton Yacht Club. He was also a hobby builder of boats and of models - planes, gliders and boats and of kites.

    Besides, he was also an early motor bike and motor car enthusiast. Being acrobatic it was no trouble for him in his youth to do a handstand on the handle bars while riding one of his eight motor bikes. He picked up this enthusiasm from an interest in Houdini. While to take an engine apart and reassemble it was for him a pure joy. There was nothing like being covered in grease. He was a downhill and cross country skier in the Victorian Alps from about 1921 to 1935 and belonged to the Ski Club of Victoria in its early days. Some of the cross country skiing by Eric was as RAAF recreation and sport.

    He did other things such as swimming, water skiing (aqua planing), ocean surfing, fishing, morse code and semaphore, knew all the boating knots and many of the star formations and he could read the weather by what the winds were doing and by how cloud formations were behaving in the sky. He was a risk taker but always did his 'homework' and had a mind on safety and unexpected outcomes. Besides, no practical task or technical solution was outside his range of ability and expertise.

    I have an Official RAAF letter telling Eric when he wanted to transfer to RAAF Administration that he would have retire at the age of 45. This happened and he was discharged from the RAAF because of 'high blood pressure'. The RAAF Doctor at the time was Dr Catchlove. Eric lived for another 22 years.

    Note: On Eric's wedding day on 6th January, 1934 his Best Man was Flying Officer Alister Murdoch and his Groomsman was Flight Lieut Wight - Wig immediately sprang to mind. So 'Wig' Wight.

    Sally Douglas

    55 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-22
    User data
  36. Eric Douglas Collection - Antarctic books etc donated to the Australian Antarctic Division
    List
    Public

    Antarctic books and one book on the Arctic donated to the Australian Antarctic Division Library in August, 2008. The list of books donated by me -

    Antarctic
    The Home of the Blizzard Sir Douglas Mawson Paperback - Rigby/Seal Books as Seal 1969. Printed Name GE Douglas - by SE Douglas
    The Home of the Blizzard Sir Douglas Mawson Hodder & Stoughton, London September, 1930. Signed by Eric Douglas - 1930 (book is spotted)
    Such is the Antarctic Lars Christensen Hodder & Stoughton, London 1935. Interesting that Lars was accompanied by his wife
    Edward Wilson George Seaver John Murray, London 1950 Reprint
    High Latitude J K Davis MUP 1962. Cost $1
    South with Mawson Charles F Laseron Angus & Robertson Second Ed 1957. Signed by Eric Douglas - 1960
    Five to Remember Ed John Thompson Lansdowne 1964. Eric's comments were also taped by John Thompson
    South Latitude F D Ommanney Readers Union/Longmans, Green & Co, London 1940
    South Latitude F D Ommanney Longmans 1938. Signed by Eric Douglas - 1938. I have kept a later version for myself
    Skyward Commander Richard E Byrd G P Putnam's Sons 1928. Signed by Eric Douglas
    South Sir Ernest Shackleton William Heinemann 1927 Reprint. Signed by Eric Douglas -1931- cost 17 shillings-bought with prize winnings from Eric's yacht Vendatta - Royal Brighton Yacht Club (book is spotted)
    South with Scott Admiral Sir Edward Evans Collins 1950? Originally belonged to Peter Winchester, Malaya
    The Winning of Australian Antarctica Based on Mawson Papers - A Grenfell Price Hardback - Angus & Robertson 1962. Signed by Eric - 1962. I have kept a copy for myself
    A History of Polar Exploration L P Kirwan Paperback - Penguin 1962
    The Crossing of Antarctica V Fuchs & E Hillary Paperback - Penguin 1960

    Artic
    Artic Explorations - In search of Sir John Franklin Elisha Kent Kane Hardback - T Nelson & Sons 1885 Page 12 falling out. Originally belonged to someone who lived at Riddells Creek, Victoria
    New Soviet Discoveries in the Arctic Vasily Burkhanov Slim paperback - Foreign Languages, Moscow 1956

    My personal favourite is the Winning of Australian Antarctica by Grenfell Price (It covers BANZARE 1929/1930 and 1930/1931).

    In addition in the Multi-Media section of the Australian Antarctic Division at Kingston, Tasmania, there are about three unclassified files of material relating to BANZARE 1929/1930 and 1930/31, and the Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935/1936 put together by an Australian Antarctic Division Librarian from newspapers and other material sent to him by me over a period of a few years. (These files were initially held in the Australian Antarctic Division Library).

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-05-29
    User data
  37. Eric Douglas Collection - copies of BANZARE Reports donated to the Australian Antarctic Division
    List
    Public

    BANZ ANTARCTIC RESEARCH EXPEDITION 1929 -1931 - REPORTS (By Sir Douglas Mawson and others).
    Published by the BANZAR Expedition Committee - Adelaide - Hassell Press (unless stated otherwise). Copies of BANZARE Reports donated to the Australian Antarctic Division Library in February, 2006 - by me.

    Series A - Oceanography Volume 3 Part 2 Hydrology D MAWSON & A HOWARD Jan-40
    Series B Volume 2 Birds R A FALLA 20/8/1937
    Series B Volume 4 Part 3 Diptera, ...Insecta, Lepidoptera H WOMERSLEY & N B TINDALE 30/10/1937
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 8 Nemerteans of Kerguelen & the Southern Ocean J F G WHEELER 20/12/1940
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 4 & 5 Sipunculids & the Mollusca of Macquarie Island A C STEPHEN & J R Le B TOMLIN 30/7/1948
    Series A Volume 2 Part 6 Marine Tertiary Fossils H O FLETCHER Mar-38
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 5 Opiliones & Araneae V V HICKMAN 25/2/1939
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 2 Scleractinian Corals JOHN W WELLS - Government Printer, Canberra Jul-58
    Series A - Geology Volume 2 Part 3 Petrology of Heard Island & Possession Island G W TYRRELL Nov-37
    Series B Volume 4 Part 2 Cumacea & Nebaliacea H M HALE 30/10/1937
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 8 Part 1 Taxonomy…of Euphausiacea (Crustacea) KEITH SHEARD 30/6/1953
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 12 Turbellaria Dr LIBBIE H HYMAN - Government Printer, Canberra Jul-58
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 3 Isopoda - Valvifera HERBERT M HALE 15/7/1946
    Series B Volume 4 Part 1 Collembola, Loricata, Brachiopoda & Coleoptera H WOMERSLEY & B C COTTON 20/8/1937
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 7 Endoprocta T HARVEY JOHNSTON & L MADELINE ANGEL 30/9/1940
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 9 Asteroidea A M CLARK - The Griffin Press, Adelaide Aug-62
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 2 Parasitic Nematodes T HARVEY JOHNSTON & PATRICIA M MAWSON 24/9/1945
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 1 Part 3 Cephalodiscus T HARVEY JOHNSTON & NANCY G MUIRHEAD 10/8/1951
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 2 Isopoda HERBERT M HALE 24/7/1952
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 1 Pycnogonida ISABELLA GORDON 24/11/1944
    Series A Volume 2 Part 5 Tertiary Lavas from …Kerguelen Archipelago A B EDWARDS Feb-38
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 1 Part 4 Tunicata… PATRICIA KOTT & HAROLD THOMPSON 26/4/1954
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 1 Part 2 Fishes J R NORMAN 10/12/1937
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 6 Crinoidea D DILWYN JOHN 30/3/1939
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 4 Polychaeta C C A MONRO 20/2/1939
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 9 Decapod Crustacea HERBERT M HALE 18/7/1941
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 8 Part 6 Parasitic Copepoda of Fishes Z KABATA - The Griffin Press, Adelaide Jun-65
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 7 Part 10 Radiolaria in Antarctic Sediments WILLIAM R RIEDEL - Government Printer, Canberra Apr-58
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 6 Hirudinea J PERCY MOORE - Commonwealth Printer, Canberra Jul-57
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 3 Free-Living Nematodes PATRICIA M MAWSON - Government Printer, Canberra Nov-56
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 5 Acanthocephala STANLEY J EDMONDS - Government Printer, Canberra Mar-57
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 9 Mollusca …Victoria-Ross Quadrants A W B POWELL - Government Printer, Canberra Jan-58
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 13 Free-Living Nematodes…Section 2 PATRICIA M MAWSON - Government Printer, Canberra Aug-58
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 7 Mollusca …Kerguelen & Macquarie Islands A W B POWELL - Government Printer, Canberra Sep-57
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 4 Part 10 Echinoidea TH. MORTENSEN 22/6/1950
    Series A Volume 2 Part 8 Plant Microfossils…Lignites of Kerguelen Archipelago ISABEL C COOKSON Dec-47
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 8 Medusae P L KRAMP - Government Printer, Canberra Sep-57
    Series A Volume 2 Part 7 Soils from Subantarctic Islands - Sections 1 & 2 C S PIPER & Miss P M ROUNTREE Mar-38
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 1 Part 1 Biological Organization & Station List T HARVEY JOHNSTON 15/8/1937
    Series A - MeteorologyTerrestrial Magnetism Volume 4 Part 1 Terrestial Magnetism CLINTON COLERIDGE FARR Oct-44
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 7 Lichens & Lichen Parasites CARROLL W DODGE 20/7/1948
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 14 Free-Living Nematodes…Section 3 PATRICIA M MAWSON - Government Printer, Canberra Sep-58
    Series A - Geology Volume 2 Parts 1 & 2 Rocks from…Enderby Land & MacRobertson Land C E TILLEY Year 1937
    Series A - Oceanography Volume 3 Part 1 Soundings S A C CAMPBELL, M H MOYES, K E OOM & … Aug-39
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 3 Copepods…Plankton Samples W VERVOORT - The Griffin Press, Adelaide Mar-57
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 5 Part 6 Foraminifera WALTER J PARR 24/5/1950
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 4 Cestodes from Mammals BETTY W McEWIN - Government Printer, Canberra Mar-57
    Series B - Zoology & Botany Volume 6 Part 1 Plankton…Australian-Antarctic Quadrant…Part 1 KEITH SHEARD 25/11/1947

    Many reports were produced and issued over the years following BANZARE and as far as I am aware all the BANZARE explorers received a copy of each. Some of the reports sent to my father did not survive the rigours of time since his passing.

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-05-29
    User data
  38. FLYING LOG BOOK 1 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public


    FLYING LOG BOOK 1 - 18th MAY, 1927 to 27th February, 1929

    In 1927 Eric undertook the 'A' Flying Course and qualified in December of that same year
    In 1928 Eric was under Instruction as a Flying Instructor and was a Flying Instructor - he was an A1 Flying Instructor by June, 1828.
    In 1928 and 1929 Eric was a Flying Instructor, Test Pilot, Aerobatic pilot and a Formation flying pilot.

    'A' Flying Course at the No 1 Flying Training School RAAF - Point Cooke, 1927. (It had evolved out of the Central Flying School)

    Date
    Pilot Instructor
    Student Pilot
    Machine

    18/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    19/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    20/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    25/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-48

    26/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-48

    27/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-48

    27/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    27/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    30/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    30/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    30/5/1927
    F/o Eaton
    Eric Douglas
    A3-9

    30/5/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    30/5/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    30/5/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    31/5/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-29

    31/5/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    1/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    2/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    2/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    3/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    3/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    7/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    7/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    7/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    7/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    8/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    9/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    13/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    13/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    14/6/1927
    Sgt Trist
    Eric Douglas
    A3-48

    14/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    14/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    15/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    16/6/1927
    Sgt Trist
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    16/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    17/6/1927
    Sgt Trist
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    17/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    21/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    21/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    21/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    21/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    22/6/1927
    F/o Eaton
    Eric Douglas
    A3-29

    22/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    23/6/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-29

    23/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    24/6/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    4/7/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-29

    4/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    4/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-29

    8/7/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    11/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    12/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    12/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    13/7/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A3-9

    13/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-9

    14/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    19/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    19/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    20/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    21/7/1927
    F/Lt Bladen
    Eric Douglas
    A3-40

    21/7/1927
    Sgt Trist
    Eric Douglas
    A3-10

    21/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    25/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    25/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-40

    28/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    28/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    28/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    28/7/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    2/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-8

    3/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    3/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    9/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    9/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-48

    10/8/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A6-22

    11/8/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A6-22

    11/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-10

    12/8/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A6-22

    12/8/1927
    F/Lt Bladen
    Eric Douglas
    A6-22

    15/8/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A6-22

    15/8/1927
    Sgt Rice - Oxley
    Eric Douglas
    A6-20

    15/8/1927
    F/Lt Bladen
    Eric Douglas
    A6-1

    15/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A6-1

    16/8/1927
    F/Lt Bladen
    Eric Douglas
    A6-1

    16/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A6-22

    16/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A6-22

    17/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A6-22

    17/8/1927
    Eric Douglas - Solo
    A6-22

    19/8/1927
    F/Lt Bladen
    Eric Douglas
    A3-8

    22/8/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Eric Douglas
    A3-12

    30/8/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-12

    1/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-45

    2/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    2/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    6/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    6/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    7/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    8/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-52

    9/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    9/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-52

    12/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    12/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-52

    12/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    12/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    12/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    13/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4 (Note: SE 5A - A2-4 is at the AWM, Canberra)

    14/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31 (Note: SE5A replica A2-31 is at the RAAF Museum, Point Cook)

    14/9/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    14/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    16/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    16/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    20/9/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    20/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    21/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    21/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    22/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    23/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    26/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    26/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    30/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    30/9/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    30/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    30/9/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    4/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    5/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    5/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    7/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    10/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    10/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-12

    11/10/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    11/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    11/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    12/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    12/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    13/10/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A1-11

    13/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    13/10/1927
    F/Lt Wilson
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A1-11

    13/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    17/10/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A1-24

    17/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    19/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    19/10/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    20/10/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A2-36

    20/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-31

    20/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    20/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    27/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-4

    28/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    28/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    28/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    28/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    29/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    30/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    30/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    31/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    31/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    31/10/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    3/11/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    3/11/1927
    Sgt Denny
    Corporal Eric Douglas
    A1-24

    7/11/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A2-16

    8/11/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-52

    9/11/1927
    Corporal Eric Douglas - Solo
    A3-52

    Avro and SE5A - Eric's flying was above average; the DH9 and DH9A - were not assessed

    Eric came first in flying in his 'A' Flying Course and third in theory.

    RAAF - First Series; A1 - DH9A, A2 - SE5A, A3 - Avro 504K, A6 - DH9A

    Book 1 - RAAF aeroplanes flown or flown in by Eric from 4th January 1928 to 27th February, 1929 (Flying - Instructing by Eric; and the 'A1' Instructors Course being undertaken by Eric in 1928) –
    A1-15, A1-16, A1-20, A1-24, A1-27
    A3-1, A3-11, A3-13, A3-25, A3-26, A3-30, A3-35, A3-37, A3-41, A3-43, A3-45, A3-49
    A6-2, A6-16, A6-19, A6-21, A6-46
    A7-2, A7-4, A7-5, A7-6
    A8-1 (DH50)
    Warrigal 1 (trainer aeroplane designed by Wackett).

    A7 Series was the DH60 Cirrus Moth and A8 Series was the DH50A

    Also recorded in Book 1 -
    Eric had flown dual controls on the Avro, DH9, DH9A and SE5A.
    Eric had flown solo on the DH Moth and the Warrigal 1

    In Book 1 Eric had also recorded - Types Flown
    Avro, DH9, DH9A, DH50, DH Moth, Warrigal 1, Fairy Seaplane, Wapiti, Gipsy Moth Seaplane and the Spartan. (These were types flown up to a later point in time which is not specified).

    In Book 1 Eric had also recorded - Types Flown in as a Passenger -
    Southampton, Seagull, Sopwith GNU, Bristol Tourer and Warrigal.

    Aircraft and Engines, Types Flown in (from Flying Log Book 1) -
    Avro - 130HP Clerget & 80HP Le Rhone
    DH9 - 240HP Siddley ‘Puma’
    DH9A - 400HP ‘Liberty’
    SE5A - 200HP ‘Viper’
    DH 50 - 240HP Siddley ‘Puma’
    DH Moth - Mark 2 ‘Cirrus’ 80HP & Gipsy Moth 100HP Gipsy Engine
    Warrigal 1st - 200HP ‘Lynx’
    Fairy (Fairey) Seaplane - 375HP Rolls Royce
    Wapiti - 480HP Bristol Jupiter
    Gipsy Moth Seaplane - 100HP Gipsy Engine
    Spartan - 105HP Mark 3 Cirrus.

    Aircraft and Engines, Types Flown in as a Passenger (from Flying Log Book 1) -
    Southampton - Two 520HP Napier Lions
    'Seagull' - 450HP Napier Lion
    Sopwith 'GNU' - 200HP Bently Rotary Engine
    Bristol Tourer 240HP Siddley 'Puma' and 'Warrigal' - 200HP Lynx.

    Subjects undertaken for the ‘A’ Flying Course at Point Cook in 1927 included –
    The History of Flight – Aero Dynamics with Professor Langley, Airmanship such aspects as definition of aircraft, propeller swinging, rudder control, wind indicators, landing without wind indicators, forced landings, types of landing surfaces, ground strips and aircraft signals, landing on mark, flying accidents, preliminary inspection of aeroplanes, the engine, instruments, anchoring machines in heavy weather, cross-country flying, compass flying, maps, ground contours, departure messages, aerial route cards, selection of aerodromes, landing spaces, emergency landing grounds and surrounding areas, layout of the aerodrome and technical and non-technical buildings, salvaging of crashed machines, log books and schedules, flying kits and the use of diagrams. Also Air Pilotage, Ignition Systems – Aero Engines, Petrol and Pressure Systems, Carburettors, Internal Combustion Engines Theory, Hygiene, Meteorology, Wireless Telegraphy, the Production of Pig Iron and Cast Iron and Steel, Reconnaissance from the Air and Army Co-Operation, Bombing with Dr Hoskins, Squadron Drill and Squadron Formation were undertaken. Other subjects likely pursued were Engine and Machine Airworthiness, Aeroplane Rigging and Air Navigation.

    “Aero Engines
    Types of Engines–
    1) The Vertical engine – an engine having its cylinders vertical and above the crank-shaft...
    2) The Vee engine – an engine having its cylinders arranged in two rows or banks forming in the end view the letter V...
    3) The Broad arrow or W engine – cylinders arranged in 3 rows forming in the end view the letter W or \|/...
    4) The Inverted engine – an engine having its cylinders below the crank-shaft and vertical...
    5) The X engine – an engine having 4 rows of cylinders whose axis meet the crank-shaft center in a manner resembling the letter X...
    6) The Flat engine – an engine having cylinders arranged in two rows on opposite sides of the crank-shaft...
    7) The Radial engine – that is an engine having stationary cylinders arranged around a common crank-shaft...
    8) The Rotary engine – an engine having revolving cylinders arranged radially around a common fixed crank-shaft...
    9) Band type – an engine having its cylinders arranged equidistant from & parallel to the main-shaft.” (Notes by Eric from Internal Combustion Engines Theory in 1927)

    Flying skills learnt in the ‘A’ Course included – Flying turns such as gentle - with engine off, straight, sharp and climbing, gentle turns with the engine off, gliding turns, figure of 8 turns, spins, stalling and regaining engine, landings and take-offs, approaches, forced landings, side slipping, circuits, aerobatics, cloud flying, general practice and practice of each specific flying skill. Also formation flying including cross-country such as a trianglular course around Point Cooke and return journeys to Diggers Rest, Geelong, Melbourne, Ballarat and Richmond in New South Wales. Plus skills such as instrument formation flying and formation gunnery, gunnery – camera target and Vickers gun ground target and Popham panel, dual flying and solo flying, reconnaissance and weather flying.

    Some interesting flights in the period soon after Eric became an 'A' Pilot (graduating in December, 1927) and when he was doing his 'A1' Instructors Course in 1928 -
    A flight on 18th March, 1928 from Point Cooke to Flemington in DH9A A1-16 with Pilot Officer Evans, being part of an escort formation to (Bert) Hinkler. A1-16 left Point Cooke at 1430 hours and the flight was 1.35 in length of time.
    A flight on 13th June, 1928 from Point Cooke to Seymour in DH9A A1-27 with Pilot Officer Stevens as the passenger, as part of a formation for (Charles) Kingsford Smith. A1-27 left Point Cooke at 1315 hours and the flight took 3.10 in length of time.

    Flying skills being learnt and practiced by Eric in 1928 and early 1929 -
    Dual control, back seat flying and landing, night flying, bombing - 'Wimpens' sight bombing, formation bombing, high bombing at 4000' and 6000', testing the Lewis Machine gun, parachute dummy dropping, inspecting landing grounds, observing bomb hits, cross wind landing, photography as an observer - including overlap, high banking, rolls and half rolls, 'Aldis' signalling lamp, semaphore, morse code, testing of Engines and Machines - Eric was both a Mechanic and an Air Mechanic before he undertook his 'A' Flying Course. Plus a special parachute folding course was undertaken by Eric in 1928.

    On 18th June, 1930 Eric was the second pilot on Southampton Flying Boat A11-2 that flew from Point Cooke to Queenscliff/Geelong (and return) to 'Welcome Amy Johnson' to Geelong. Other RAAF Personnel on the flight were F/O Campbell, Sgt Kirk, Cpl Kelly, LAC McCormack, LAC Holst, AC1 Richmond and AC1 Doherty.

    In February 1935 Cdt 'Barney' Creswell commenced as a student pilot of Eric's. Barney Cresswell was one of the 44 RAAF student pilots fully trained to fly by Eric. Also Barney was one of number of courageous RAAF Pilots never forgotten by Eric.

    As well in March 1936 Cdt Hitchcock began as a student pilot.

    On 4th and 5th October, 1937 Eric was the pilot of Avro Anson A4-4 which made three Naval Reconnaissance Flights in Western Bass Strait. These operations were ordered by the Air Board.
    The aircrews were –
    • 4/10/37 – 0740 – Sgt Clark, AC Marr and AC Crutchett
    • 4/10/37 – 1330 – Sgt Clark, AC Marr and AC Willmore
    • 5/10/37 – 0810 – Sgt Clark, AC Ranford and AC Marr

    Aeroplanes flown by Eric around Point Cooke in the year 1938, illustrating a flying skills diversity in one year - A1-2, A1-4, A1-17, A1-18, A1-37, A1-55, A1-58, A1-59, A1-60 (Hawker Demon) A4-26, A4-35, A4-36, A4-37, A4-43 (Avro Anson 652) A5-4, A5-14, A5-35, A5-37 (Westland Wapiti 2) A6-1, A6-12, A6-13, A6-14, A6-15, A6-16, A6-17 (Avro Cadet 643) A7-27, A7-54, A7-64 (De Havilland DH60 Moth) A12-2, A12-3 (Bristol Bulldog 11A) and A15-1 (Miles Magister).

    Eric's Flying Log Books number from 1 to 6 - with entries in No 6 ending on 31st January, 1948 when Eric returned to Amberley, Queensland as a passenger with W/C Hampshire in Lincoln A73-18, after attending an AOC (Southern Command) Conference at Schofields, New South Wales.

    Eric's last recorded flight as a RAAF Pilot was when he flew an Anson (number not supplied) on 21st August, 1946 with W/c Fleming as a passenger. The flight was for a tour of inspection - from Amberley to Strathpine, Kingaroy, Lowood, Archerfield and return to Amberley.

    As a further point of interest is a flight that Eric took as a passenger on a TAA DC3 on 2nd June, 1947 from Essendon (Melbourne) to Eagle Farm (Brisbane). The time taken for this flight was 6 hours for what was usually a '5 hour flight' (Eric's words), with Eric already having flown from Eagle Farm to Essendon on 29th May, 1947 on a 6 hour flight. A return journey on a TAA DC4 from Essendon to Eagle Farm on 12th July, 1947 took 5 hours. Similarly flights from Eagle Farm to Mascot (Sydney) or vice versa and from Essendon to Mascot or vice versa took a scheduled 2 hours and 50 minutes.

    Postscript: Harry Hawker was a catalyst for Eric to take up flying and for his love of aeroplanes and all things technical. He related a story that as a child he saved up his pocket money to go for a 'flip' in Elsternwick Park with Harry Hawker. Kevin O'Reilly - Writer of aeroplane histories has recently confirmed that Harry Hawker indeed flew at Elsternwick Park in 1914 - at this time Eric was only 11 and living in Elsternwick and likely attending Caulfield State School (which he did go to). Eric was so taken with these flying experiences that he used to hang out of the doors of the old trams on his way to and from school in 'make believe' flight. An image just found at www.kingstonavition.org (3/10/2014) shows Harry Hawker and his father George at Elsternwick Park. Moreover, Harry's plane there was a Sopwith, probably an SS.

    A further hero of the times for Eric was Harry Houdini - he marvelled at his escapism from seemingly impossible situations and also admired his enthusiasm for flight and flying. He talked about Houdini's dive into the Yarra (1910) when he (Houdini) was chained up and escape seemed impossible. Eric spoke as though he was present at the event; at this age he was only seven years old and I feel that experiences and impressions for him as a child were life defining events. (At this time his family was likely living at Middle Park where Eric attended his first school).Here were the seeds of Eric's love of Acrobatics and Aerobatics.

    [Eric Douglas Collection]

    ADF Serials state - "A2-4 Forced Landing on 20/10/27 at Anakie, Vic - Crew Corporal G E Douglas"

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    17 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-08-19
    User data
  39. FLYING LOG BOOK 2 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public


    RAAF aeroplanes flown by Eric Douglas from 1st March, 1929 to 26th May, 1932 - from Point Cooke (Cook) and Laverton -
    • A1-5, A1-7, A1-9, A1-14, A1-16, A1-20, A1-21, A1-28 (DH9A)
    • A2 (SE5A) Dual - 6 hours and 35 mins.
    • A3-41 (Avro 504K)
    • A5-1, A5-2, A5-3, A5-4, A5-6, A5-7, A5-8, A5-9, A5-11, A5-12, A5-15, A5-21 (Wapiti)
    • A7-4, A7-5, A7-6, A7-7, A7-9, A7-11, A7-13, A7-14 (A7-14 DH Moth Seaplane) A7-16, A7-17, A7-18, A7-22, A7-24 (A7-24 DH Moth Seaplane) A7-26 (A7-26 DH Moth Seaplane) A7-35, A7-38, A7-40, A7-43, A7-47, A7-48, A7-50, A7-51 (DH Moth)
    • A10-4 (Fairey 3D)
    • A11-2 (Southampton)
    • A12-3, A12-5 (Bulldog)
    • Warrigal 1
    • Spartan. Solo 15 minutes
    • VH-ULD (Gipsy Moth seaplane).

    As an A1 Flying Instructor Eric’s RAAF student Pilots in this period were –
    F/Lt Hewitt (eg dual instruction), F/Lt Ross (eg inverted flying), F/Lt Waters (eg blind flying), F/Lt Campbell (eg blind flying), F/O Henry (eg dual instruction), F/O Stewart (eg forced landings and instruction - Category B - D.E.F.H.I.), F/O Probert (eg dual instruction), F/O Evans (eg Instructors Course), F/O Klose, F/O Compaquonie, F/O Tamlyn, F/O Gibson, F/O Harding, F/O Wright, Sgt Austin, Sgt Collopy, Sgt Cameron, Sgt Curtain, LAC Holdsworth, LAC Brier, LAC Hamilton, LAC Stubbs, LAC Neil, LAC Redroff, LAC Newton, LAC Kennedy, LAC Ford, LAC Allen, LAC Davenport, LAC Bottomore, LAC Toll, LAC Mattock, LAC Harris, LAC Charters, LAC Morgan, LAC Spooner, LAC Byrnes, LAC Jordan, LAC Brockie, LAC Burns, LAC Sheppard, LAC Richards, LAC Selke, LAC Bateman, Cpl Barter, Cpl Cameron, Cpl Barlow, Cpl Harkur, P/O Shaw, P/O Boucher, P/O Grant, P/O Harding, P/O Heffernan, P/O Hancock, P/O Wright, P/O Thomson, P/O Dalton, P/O Hely, P/O Pither, P/O Blamey, P/O Strangman, Cdt Graham, Cdt Berry, Cdt Bates, Cdt Cameron, Cdt Webb, Cdt Proud, Cdt Lees, Cdt Littlejohn, Cdt Berg, Cdt Draper, Cdt Glen, Cdt Stowe, Cdt Miles, Cdt Bowman, Cdt Grace, Cdt Bennett, Cdt Paget, Cdt Rae, Cdt Smith, Cdt Drew, Cdt Murdoch, Cdt Garing, Cdt Candy, Cdt McLachlan, Cdt Curnow, Cdt Boss-Walker, Cdt Judge, AC1 Charters, AC1 Heading, AC1 Bateman, AC1 Cook, AC1 Corser, AC1 Jordan and AC1 Strickland. (Some are the same person but at different ranks).

    Moreover, as an A1 Flying Instructor (1928 to 1937 inclusive) Eric fully trained 44 RAAF student Pilots which was a British Empire record at the time.

    Flying lessons taught to the student pilots covered –
    forced landings, aerobatics, passenger flying, taxying, taking off, effect of controls, landings, gentle turns, gliding turns, approaches, steep turns, spinning, figure of 8 turns, side slipping, cloud flying, inverted flying, climbing, alightings, air gunnery, back seat gunnery, camera gun target, ground target gunnery, line bombing, testing bomb racks and bombs, high bombing, live bombing, diving on ground target, blind flying, front seat flying, slow rolls, rigging, wireless telegraphy, navigation, cross country wind landings, message picking up, weather testing, to scene of crash and return, Air Pilotage and even the A1 Instructors course (the skills were taught according to specific needs of the students).

    The sequence of Instruction was –
    * Passenger flying
    * Taxying and handling the engine
    * Effect of controls including aileron drag
    * Straight and level flying
    * Stalling, climbing and gliding
    * Taking off into wind
    * Landing and judging distance
    * Medium turns
    * Gliding turns
    * Steep turns, with and without engine
    * Spinning
    * Elementary forced landings
    * Low flying - with Instructor only
    * Solo test
    * Solo
    * Climbing turns
    * Sideslipping
    * Action in the event of fire
    * Taking off and landing across wind
    * Advanced forced landings
    * Aerobatics
    * Front seat flying
    * Air Pilotage
    * 10 hour test
    * Height test
    * Cross country test
    * Passenger test and
    * Instrument flying
    (1934 sequence of Instructions)

    In the interim, Eric personally brushed up on his solo flying on skills such as –
    night flying, inverted aerobatics, speed testing, M/C and engine testing, aerobatics, formation flying and meteorological surveys.

    On 17th October 1930 Eric flew in Supermarine Southampton A11-2 with F/Lt Lachal from Point Cooke to Mornington and return - the purpose was 'Signalling and Codes'.

    While on 12th August, 1931 Eric flew with S/Lr Jones in DH60 Cirrus Moth A7-47 on a 50 minute 'flying test'.

    At 1330 on 18th August 1931 Eric went on a 10 minute 'travel flight' in DH60 Cirrus Moth A7-55 from Point Cooke to No1 AD (Laverton) with S/Lr Brownell and Eric returned solo to Point Cooke at 1515 in Westland Wapiti A5-1.

    Additionally in this period Eric went as a RAAF Sergeant Pilot and Air Mechanic on the search for the Kookaburra in April and May of 1929 under the leadership of Flight Lieut Charles Eaton. LAC Smith accompanied Eric in DH9A A1-20 to Wave Hill Station in the Northern Territory. However Eric returned to point Cooke with Flight Lieut Eaton as co-pilot in DH9A A1-7, as A1-20 was written off at Wave Hill Station (the result of an engine fire on start-up). The DH9A A1-1 which Flight Lieut flew to near Tennant Creek from Point Cooke was also written off as it crash landed near Tennant Creek.

    Moreover as a Pilot Officer (Voyage 2 as Flying Officer) Eric was chosen as one of the two RAAF pilots for the two Banzare Antarctic Voyages with Sir Douglas Mawson on the SY Discovery (RRS Discovery) in 1929/30 and 1930/31. The other RAAF Officer (senior pilot) chosen was Flying Officer Stuart Campbell (Voyage 2 as a Flight Lieut). For both voyages Douglas and Campbell were transferred to the 'Seaplane Division' of the RAAF, and flew RAAF Gipsy Moth seaplane with the call sign VH-ULD. Both Eaton and Campbell attained the rank of Group Captain as did Eric Douglas.

    Cirrus Moth A7-13 is now displayed at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney as VH-UAU.

    [Eric Douglas Collection]

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-09-07
    User data
  40. FLYING LOG BOOK 3 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public

    FLYING LOG BOOK 3 – Eric Douglas RAAF - 2nd June, 1932 to 14th May, 1934.

    RAAF aeroplanes flown by Eric Douglas in this period – Solo, Dual Controls, searching for a missing boat in Port Phillip Bay, Aerobatics, Wireless Telegraphy exercises, as a Test Pilot; and an A1 Flying Instructor and Instructors Refresher Course – for students.
    • Westland Wapiti A5 – 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 15, 17, 19
    • DH60 Cirrus Moth A7 – 13, 20, 23, 25, 38, 40, 48 (some of the flying in A7-48 was to Geelong and Essendon), 50, 53, 54 (some of the flying in A7-54 was to Colac and Camperdown, returning to Point Cook via Ararat and Ballarat).
    • DH60 Cirrus Moth Seaplane A7- 24, 26
    • Supermarine Seagull A9 – 6. Flown from Point Cook to Welshpool, Chinamen’s Beach (SE side of Corner Inlet), Cape Liptrap, Rhyll (Phillip Island, Western Port) and return - for RAN and RAAF combined exercise in October, 1933
    • Supermarine Southampton A11 – 1
    • Bulldog A12 (Solo - 5 hours 20 mins.) A12-1 was flown in this period and it was likely all in A12-1.

    Cirrus Moth A7-13 is now displayed at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney as VH-UAU.

    [Eric Douglas Collection]

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-09-30
    User data
  41. FLYING LOG BOOK 4 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public

    From Flying Log Book 4 – 14th May, 1934 to 12th November, 1935.

    Planes flown in this period were -
    Westland Wapitis – A5-1, A5-2, A5-3, A5-4, A5-5, A5-7, A5-9, A5-11, A5-12, A5-14, A5-15, A5-19 and A5-28
    DH60 Cirrus Moths – A7-23, A7-25, A7-31, A7-33, A7-38, A7-44 A7-47, A7-51, A7-52, A-53 and A7-54
    DH60 Cirrus Moths (Seaplanes) A7-24 and A7-43
    Bristol Bulldog – A12-2

    In this period to the end of June 1934 Eric Douglas was with ‘A Flight No 1 FTS at Point Cook and from then to the beginning of July 1934 till the end of this period he was with the ‘B Flight’.

    Some highlights of this period -
    On 15th May, 1934 with LAC Kennedy as crew Eric Douglas took part in the RAAF flying formation over Melbourne for the ‘Centenary appeal’ in DH 60 Cirrus Moth A7-53.
    On 21st May, 1934 Eric Douglas flew A7-54 from Point Cook to the Deniliquin drome with Ft Lieut. Wight as the passenger.
    On 5th June, 1934 Eric flew solo in Bristol Bulldog A12-2 on a ‘Meteorological flight’.
    In September, 1934 when instructing three flights were made in Westland Wapitis A5-3 (two flights) and A5-7 from Point Cook to the Western District. Pupils on these flights were Cadet Lavarack (A5-3), Cadet Carr (A5-3) and Cadet Walker (A5-7).
    On 21st September, 1934 a flight was made with Eric Douglas as pilot in Westland Wapiti A5-1 from Point Cook to Gisborne, Yendon and return to Laverton – Cadet Carr was his pupil pilot.
    On 3rd October, 1934 Eric flew solo doing ‘inverted flying’ in DH60 Cirrus Moths A7-25 and A7-38.
    The 18th October, 1934 and Eric was in Wapiti A5-1 as part of an escort for the HMS ‘Sussex’ to Port Melbourne with F/O Lightfoot as passenger. Later that same day Eric in A5-1 took part in formation flying over Melbourne and a ‘Welcome to HRH the Duke of Gloucester’. The plane’s passengers on this occasion were ACI’s Busteed and Everingham.
    On 29th October, 1934 in Wapiti A5-11 Eric practised ‘towing moth off ground and in air’ with F/Lt Rae and in Moth A7-47 went solo practising the same exercise (being towed by a Wapiti).
    10th November, 1934 and Eric Douglas was flying Wapiti A5-1 from Point Cook as part of formation ‘flypasts’ (three) in the ‘Air Pageant’ at Laverton – LAC Hurford was the passenger each time. That same day Eric carried out the manoeuvre of towing a moth (twice) from Wapiti A5-11 with LAC Ford as the crew both times. Moreover ‘Dummy parachute drops’ were made by Eric from Wapiti A5-11 with LAC Lalor as the crew.
    The 19th November, 1934 in Wapiti A5-1 with passengers LAC Mackintosh and LAC Russell as crew, Eric Douglas flew from Point Cook to Junee, NSW and then on to Richmond, NSW.
    On 22nd November,1934 the same team in Wapiti A5-1 took part in formation flying over Sydney and ‘a Welcome to HRH the Duke of Gloucester’.
    On 26th November, 1934 in Wapiti A5-11 Eric Douglas took part in the Richmond Pageant with ‘Tow home’ – ACI Torpey was the crew (twice) and a ‘Dummy parachute drop’. Also on that same day Eric was part of the ‘Fly Past’ (twice) in Wapiti A5-1 with LAC Mackintosh as the passenger.
    A ‘Fly past’ for the ‘Kings Jubilee’ was made over Royal Park, Melbourne on 6th May, 1935 and Eric Douglas was flying Wapiti A5-11 and u/o Creswell was the crew.
    On 8th May, 1935 after returning from a solo flight in Wapiti A5-7 Eric Douglas ran into a tractor and part of the lower wing was damaged.
    On 30th October, 1935 in Wapiti A5-7 Eric Douglas flew from Deniliquin to Echuca with Cpl Cottee as passenger and return to Deniliquin solo. Then he returned to Echuca with AC Sewell as passenger. The next day Eric piloted A5-7 from Echuca to Point Cook with F/O Headlam and A C Marriott as crew.

    (Eric Douglas Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-10-29
    User data
  42. FLYING LOG BOOK 5 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public

    Flying Log 5
    This log book commences on 13th November, 1935 – ending on 9th April, 1938

    RAAF Planes flown by Eric Douglas in this period –
    Westland Wapiti – A5-1, A5-3, A5-4, A5-5, A5-9, A5-11, A5-12, A5-14, A5-16, A5-19, A5-21, A5-23, A5-26, A5-27, A5-28, A5-33, A5-34, A5-35, A5-37
    Wapiti Seaplane – A5-37 – December, 1935
    Avro Anson – A4-4, A4-5, A4-11, A4-13, A4-15, A4-16, A4-17, A4-26, A4-36, A4-37, A4-38
    Avro Cadet – A6-5, A6-7, A6-9, A6-12, A6-13, A6-14, A6-15, A6-16, A6-17
    Hawker Demon – A1-1, A1-2, A1-4, A1-17, A1-18, A1-53, A1-55, A1-56, A1-57, A1-58, A1-59, A1-60
    Bristol Bulldog – A12-2, A12-3, A12-6
    NA -16
    Miles Magister – A15-1
    Moth Seaplane – A7-55 – in the Antarctic in the search for Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon in January, 1936.
    Moth Seaplane – A7-46
    DH 60 Cirrus Moth – A7-27, A7-30, A7-44, A7-48, A7-51, A7-52, A7-53, A7-61, A7-74
    There was a balance between Flying Instructing, tests for cadets and pilots under instruction, plane engine, frame and rigging testing in flight and solo flying
    A flight was made to Deniliquin and return from Point Cook, on 15th May, 1936 with LAC Morgan as crew in Westland Wapiti A5-23
    A flight was made to Hamilton and return from Point Cook, on 30th September, 1936 with W/Commander Brownell as crew in Westland Wapiti A5-33
    A flight was made to Richmond, NSW from Point Cook on 29th November, 1936 with Flight Sgt. Studley as crew in Moth A7-30
    A flight was made to Richmond, NSW from Point Cook on 3rd December, 1936 with Flight Sgt. Studley as crew in Westland Wapiti A5-37 (it had been earlier been a seaplane). The return flight was made on 4th December, 1936.
    Other flying activities included –
    * Operations ordered by Air Board to Currie, King Island and Naval Recce.
    * Air Pilotage
    * Dummy parachute dropping
    * Dive bombing
    * Vickers Gun test
    * Weather testing
    * General flying
    * Photography
    * Camera test
    * Night Flying
    * Gunnery
    * Circuits
    * Landing tests
    * Forced landings
    * Instrument flying
    * Rear seat flying
    * Compass flying
    * Navigation
    * Air Pageants - Flemington
    * Formation flying
    * Aerobatics

    (Eric Douglas Collection)

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-01-16
    User data
  43. FLYING LOG BOOK 6 - Group Captain Eric Douglas RAAF
    List
    Public

    Commencing on 12th April, 1938 and ending on 31st January, 1948 (Last Flying Log Book).

    ...1938 -
    12 April, 1938 – Demon A1-60 with CPL Smith as crew – Dummy parachute (run)
    Air Display, Richmond (17 to 22 April, 1938) -
    • 17 April, 1938 – Demon A1-55 with CPL Scaschiqini as crew – (RAAF) Laverton to (RAAF) Richmond
    • 21 April, 1938 – Demon A1-37 with LAC Ellerton as crew – Richmond – local
    • 22 April, 1938 – Demon A1-37 with LAC Ellerton as crew – Richmond – local
    • 24 April, 1938 – Demon A1-37 with CPL Nankervill as crew – Richmond – Laverton
    15 July, 1938 – Moth Seaplane A7-54 with AC1 Symons as crew – Point Cook – local
    20 July, 1938 – Wapiti A5-14 with LAC Ferris as crew – Point Cook – local
    10 August, 1938 – Anson A4-35 with Sgt Reid and 3 A/C’s as crew – Point Cook – local
    16 August, 1938 – Moth A7-27 with AC1 Harley as crew – Point Cook – local
    16 August, 1938 – Wapiti A5-35 with LAC Darlow as crew – Point Cook – local
    1 September, 1938 – Anson A4-35 with F/o Podger and 3 A/C’s as crew – Point Cook – local
    22 September, 1938 – Wapiti A5-37 with LAC Doherty as crew – Point Cook – local
    27 October, 1938 – Moth A7-54 with LAC Bennett as crew – Point Cook – local
    27 October, 1938 – Anson A4-43 with F/Lt Murdoch and 2 A/c’s as crew – Point Cook – local
    28 October, 1938 – Moth A7-64 with LAC Darlow as crew – Point Cook – local
    2 November, 1938 – Anson A4-43 with 3 A/C’s as crew – Point Cook – local
    17 November, 1938 – Avro Trainer A6-1 with LAC Darlow as crew – Point Cook – local
    1 December, 1938 – Avro Trainer A6-12 with LAC Ferris as crew – Point Cook – local
    2 December, 1938 – Avro Trainer A6-12 with SM1 Lister as crew – Point Cook – local

    1939 – January to March
    24 January, 1939 – Moth A7-70 with LAC Redenback as crew – Point Cook – local
    24 January, 1939 – Moth A7-70 with AC1 Clark as crew – Point Cook – local
    27 January, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-12 with LAC Baty as crew – Point Cook – local
    30 January, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-5 with LAC Fotheringham as crew – Point Cook – local
    2 February, 1939 – Moth (Seaplane) A7-54 with F/o Carroll as crew – Point Cook – local
    6 February, 1939 – Moth A7-39 with AC1 Bailey as crew – Point Cook – local
    16 January, 1939 – Moth Seaplane A7-54 with F/o Cohen as crew – Dual inst. Take off & alightings
    24 January, 1939 – Moth Seaplane A7-54 – solo – Point Cook – local
    9 March, 1939 – Moth A7-65 with AC1 Newport as crew – Point Cook – local
    14 March, 1939 – Anson L with LE Guest and two Airmen – Point Cook – local (Appears to be before the allocation of a RAAF serial number).
    17 March, 1939 – Moth Seaplane A7-54 – solo – Point Cook – local
    24 March, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-8 – with AC1 Savage as crew – Point Cook – local
    29 March, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-8 – with CPL Graham as crew – Point Cook – local
    29 March, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-8 – with F/o Carroll as crew – Point Cook – local
    31 March, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-8 – with Cpl Ferris as crew – Point Cook – local
    31 March, 1939 – Avro Trainer A6-5 – solo – Point Cook – local

    April 1939 –
    • Moth A7-53, A7-72
    • Avro Trainer A6-3 (A6-3- testing oil pump), A6-16
    • Anson A4-43
    May 1939 –
    • Avro Trainer A6-3
    • Wapiti A5-35
    July 1939 –
    • Avro Trainer A6- 4, A6-10, A6-15
    • Wapiti A5-17, A5-32
    August 1939 –
    • Wapiti A5-17, A5-42
    • Avro Trainer A6-10
    September 1939 –
    • Moth A7-71
    • Moth Seaplane A7-36 (one flight was for an engine test)
    • Seagull A2-6 (Dual take off & alighting by F/L Connelly with Eric Douglas as crew)
    • Avro Trainer A6-11
    October 1939 –
    • Avro Trainer A6-2
    • Wapiti A5-35 (27 October with AC1 Coltheart as crew – Force Landed and return from FL)
    November 1939 –
    • Wapiti A5-43 (radius rod pulled out)
    December 1939 –
    • Avro Trainer A6-8 (tail heavy)
    • Moth A7-30
    • Wapiti A5-1

    January 1940 –
    • Avro Trainer A6-5, A6-16
    February 1940 –
    • Wapiti A5-42
    • Avro Trainer A6-4, A6-25
    • Moth A7-66 (flight for a M/c & Engine test). A7-78 (A7-78 - one flight - knock in engine to be investigated. The next flight was for an engine test). After that - on 24 February, 1940 - ‘Cross country’ from Point Cook to Parafield, with short stops (re-fuelling – from the ‘Route Card’) at Ararat and Bordertown
    March 1940 –
    • Wapiti A5-16, A5-21 (M/c & Engine test for both A5-16 & A5-21)
    • Avro Trainer A6-14 (to Essendon & return), A6-28 (engine test), A6-34 (M/c & Engine test)
    • Moth A7-44 (M/c & Engine test)
    April 1940 –
    • Wapiti A5-21 (M/c & Engine test)
    May 1940 –
    • Avro Trainer A6-7, A6-12, A6-28 (All M/c & Engine test)
    • Wirraway A20-55 S/L Holinswood as pilot and Eric Douglas as crew (M/c & engine test)
    June 1940 –
    • Moth Minor A21-11 – Delivery to No 1 AD
    • Tiger Moth R 4882 and R 4888 – Test flight after erection on R 4888 and to test the rigging on R4882 – both solo flights
    • Anson N 3337 – ‘Self’ and ‘3 Airmen as crew’ – test
    (Once again appears to be before the allocation of RAAF serial numbers).
    July 1940 –
    • Hudson A16-97 – two flights after erection by Mr Parker as pilot – Eric Douglas with Mr Reynolds and Mr Sandifer as crew
    August 1940 –
    • Anson N 4955 – M/c and engine test – Eric Douglas as pilot and P/o Higgins and AC1 Stokes as crew
    • Battle – no number provided – one circuit flight by F/Lt Archer with Eric Douglas as crew, and then one circuit flight by Eric Douglas – solo. On 23 August 1940
    December 1940 –
    • Anson – no number provided – Eric Douglas with 2 A/C’s as crew.

    1941 Plane flights logged –
    • Anson W 1534, W 1961, W 2255, R 3529
    • Beaufort T 9540 (Pilot S/L Ingledew & crew F/Lt Hasker, self [Eric Douglas] and 1AC)
    • Wapiti A5-12
    • CAC Trainer A3-6

    1942 Plane flights logged –
    • Anson AX 285
    • Boeing B17 – no number supplied
    • Wapiti A5-12
    • Avro Trainer A6-31
    • DH Moth A7-63
    • C47 – no number supplied. Pilot Captain Taylor & crew self [Eric Douglas]) – observation flight around Amberley, Q
    • Vengeance A27-6. Pilot Capt. Kelly crew self [Eric Douglas] – Test flight. Another flight – Eric Douglas Pilot & IAC crew – General practice
    • Tiger Moth A17-, A17-19, A17-355, A17-426, N 6906
    • Beechcraft A39-,Pilot F/Lt Wood, Self crew [Eric Douglas]. General flying
    • Moth Minor A21-25.

    1943 Plane flights logged –
    • Lodestar – no number supplied. Self [Eric Douglas] solo from Archerfield to Townsville & return
    • C39 – July 1943 - self [Eric Douglas] a passenger from Mascot to Essendon, Essendon to Archerfield. September 1943 self [Eric Douglas] a passenger from Archerfield to Mascot. Another flight in September 1943 self [Eric Douglas] a passenger from Essendon to Mascot.
    • Anson EF 922 – Eric Douglas pilot with 5 crew – Amberley to Evans Head and return
    • Gipsy Moth A7-44
    • Oxford – no number supplied. Pilot W/C Adler and Eric Douglas as passenger. From Amberley to Oakey and return.

    1944 Plane flights logged –
    • Hudson A16-215 F/Lt Madden as pilot, Eric Douglas as crew – Local Amberley
    • Anson DJ 231 – Amberley to Evans Head and return. EG 473 – Amberley to Evans Head and return.
    • Vengeance A 35 B Model – Solo – Local Amberley
    • Gipsy Moth A7-44
    • Lancaster A66-1. F/Lt Isaacson as pilot, Eric Douglas as crew. Amberley, Tweed Heads, Warwick, Archerfield
    • Wapiti A5-16
    • 14th May 1944 – Empire Flying Boat – Qantas. Eric Douglas was a passenger. Brisbane to Sydney. 20th May 1944 returned on the Empire Flying Boat – Sydney to Brisbane.
    19th November 1944 Empire Flying Boat from Brisbane to Sydney – Eric Douglas was a passenger
    • Liberator B24-J _ A72-31. F/Lt Overheer was the pilot, plus Eric Douglas and crew. Liberator A72-105. F/Lt Rae was the pilot, plus Eric Douglas and crew. Liberator A72-108 – Pilot was F/Lt Rae and Eric Douglas the crew – to 6AD and return.
    • Oxford BG 614 – Pilot for three flights was F/Lt Rae and Eric Douglas for one flight.
    • Tiger Moth A17-730.

    1945 Plane flights logged –
    • Wapiti A5-16
    • Oxford BG 614- Passenger
    • C47 VH- Passenger
    • Liberator A72-317
    • Dakota – no number supplied.

    1946 Plane flights logged –
    • Dakota A65-, A65-60, A65-88
    • Anson – no number supplied

    1947 Plane flights logged –
    • DC3 – TAA. Passenger - Eagle Farm to Essendon (two trips) & Essendon to Eagle Farm (one trip). Eagle Farm to Mascot, Mascot to Essendon.
    • DC4 – TAA. Passenger – Essendon to Eagle Farm (two trips)
    • Liberator A72-395 - W/c Hampshire was the Pilot and Eric Douglas was the crew.
    • Lincoln A73-11 - W/c Hampshire was the Pilot and Eric Douglas was the crew.

    1948 Plane Flights logged –
    • January, 1948 – Lincoln A73-18 - W/c Hampshire was the Pilot and Eric Douglas was the crew.
    • At some stage (possibly in 1948) Eric flew on TAA DC3 on June 20th from Essendon to Launceston & returning on a TAA DC3 on June 23rd.

    (Flying Log Books - relate to many RAAF flights by Eric Douglas reported in Newspapers at Trove).

    Sally E Douglas

    3 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-02-05
    User data
  44. GABRIEL or GILBERT DOUGLAS - born 1869 Russell Street, South Melbourne (Melbourne)
    List
    Public

    Gabriel Douglas was a Watchmaker, Jeweller, Optician and Property Developer. He was also an accomplished Rider and Horseman and did not share the love of boats, boat making and sailing of his sons Cliff, Eric and Gill. His recreation preference was to be well-groomed and riding a fine horse. This would have suited his own good looks really well.

    Gabriel Douglas was named as such on his birth, first marriage and death certificates. He also went by the name of Gilbert in his adult life. The story was that he changed his name from Gabriel to Gilbert by deed poll? Apparently he didn't like the name Gabriel, but it may have been that his father was also named Gabriel and was also Watchmaker and Jeweller, so having a different first name would set them apart? Besides his father who was a Watchmaker, Gilbert had two brothers who were also Watchmakers - George Douglas 1862 and Robert William Arthur Douglas 1881.

    In 1887 Gilbert Douglas, Watchmaker was living at 22 Merton Cresent, South Melbourne (Sands & McDougall). Some of the old Victorian directories list Gabriel Douglas as a Watchman, rather than as a Watchmaker but in today's language if I use Watchman it can be misinterpreted as a 'Security Officer' which certainly was not the case in those earlier times!

    In 1891 Gilbert Douglas, Watchmaker was living at 175 Macpherson Street, North Carlton (Sands & McDougall)

    In February 1891 and Gilbert Douglas was a Watchmaker in Bacchus Marsh. His business was in the shop belonging to Mr W Watts, nearly opposite the Mechanics' Institute. (The shop was in Main Street, Bacchus Marsh). It was said that Douglas had come from 'some of the best establishments in Melbourne'.

    I wonder what attracted him to also take his watchmaking skills to Bacchus Marsh and a little later also to Gisborne?

    Mr G Douglas, Jeweller presented the First Trophy for Alderneys at the Bacchus Marsh show in September, 1891. The show was held by the Agricultural and Pastoral Society at the Society's Showgrounds, next to the Bacchus Marsh Railway Station. Mr G Douglas came third in the Lady's Palfreys 'owned in Bacchus Marsh'. (The Palfrey was a highly valued riding horse). Plus the Mr G Douglas comic singer with encores, at the Show Night concert was likely to have been Gilbert Douglas.

    G Douglas subscribed to the Bacchus Marsh Agricultural and Pastoral Society in October, 1892. This would refer to Gilbert Douglas. In July, 1892 Gilbert Douglas advertised as 'G Douglas - Watchmaker, Jeweller and Optician of Main Street, Bacchus Marsh'. Besides, in July 1892 a Mr G Douglas was the Secretary and Treasurer of the Bacchus Marsh Dramatic Club, and G Douglas also played the part or 'Peter Fletcher' in H J Byron's Comedy in Three Acts - this G Douglas was likely Gilbert Douglas.

    In July 1892 Gilbert Douglas commenced Watchmaking in Gisborne.

    From July to October 1892 Mr G Douglas had Watchmaking Businesses in both Gisborne and Bacchus Marsh. At Bacchus Marsh he had opened a shop next to Mr Hodgson's and in October 1892 was still there. Moreover in July, 1892 Gilbert Douglas also called at Mr Heath's the Saddler to attend to orders. The Saddle and Harness Maker was likely to have been Thomas Heath situated in Main Street, Bacchus Marsh.

    The G Douglas, Watchmaker working in Bacchus Marsh in 1893 would have been Gilbert Douglas. At this date Gilbert was still working from Mr W Watts's shop.

    In October, 1893 G Douglas advertised a Dog Cart and Harness for Sale in Bacchus Marsh - 'cheap'. (A Dog Cart is a light horse drawn vehicle). This was likely to have been an ad by Gilbert Douglas. It was probably used as a mode of transport for getting around Bacchus Marsh. The journey from Melbourne to Bacchus Marsh and Gisborne was likely made by train. By 1892 some of the Victorian country goods trains also carried first and second class passengers.

    From the Bacchus Marsh Express of 10th February, 1894 - "Mr. G. Douglas, watchmaker and jeweller, has resumed business at his father's establishlment, 71 Gertrude street, Fitzroy, and will visit Bacchus Marsh and district at regular intervals, when all orders entrusted to him will receive every attention". Once again this is about Gilbert Douglas.

    In 1893 and 1894 Gilbert Douglas Watchmaker was in Bacchus Marsh [regular visits] (Wise’s). In 1893 and 1894 Gilbert Douglas was living on the Esplanade, Port Melbourne (Sands & McDougall)

    In February, 1895 Gilbert Douglas was on the General List of Electors for the District of Bourke West, Bacchus Marsh Division.

    In April, 1895 Gilbert Douglas had his watchmaking business in Gertrude Street, Fitzroy. This was a branch of his business at his father's location of business.

    In October 1894 and also in December 1896 Gilbert Douglas advertised himself as a 'Practical Watchmaker' and stated that he was at 345 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne, near Lonsdale Street and that he had previously been in the watchmaking business at Bacchus Marsh. In 1896 Gilbert had still been visiting Bacchus Marsh.

    From 1895 to 1900 Gilbert Douglas was in business at 345 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne (Wise’s and Sands & McDougall)

    On 1st June, 1898 Gilbert Douglas married Elizabeth (Bessie) Thompson at her parent's home in Upper Hawthorn, Victoria. Moreover, Gilbert and Elizabeth (Bessie) Douglas were in Melbourne West in 1899.

    In 1901 Gilbert Douglas was still in business at 345 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne and by 1902 he and his family were living in 139 Park Street (now Park Avenue), Parkville within riding (horse) or walking distance from his work. (This property is still standing to date - 2013).

    By January, 1904 Gilbert Douglas was living at 'Larnook', Longmore Street, Middle Park. Gilbert Douglas and his family were still living in Middle Park in about 1907.

    In 1904 Gilbert Douglas still gave his Watchmaking address as 345 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne.

    In 1909 the Gilbert Douglas family was living at 26 Armstrong Street, Middle Park - Gabriel Douglas was listed as a Jeweller.

    At the time of the Australian Electoral Roll in 1914 Gilbert Douglas was living in Clarence Street, Elsternwick.

    In January 1915 at the Carnival at Luna Park, a Gabriel Douglas went dressed as a Tramp.

    In November 1918 and Gilbert Douglas was a Watchmaker at 316 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne. Yet in December, 1918 he advertised that he was at 345 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne.

    At the time of the AE Roll in 1919 Gilbert Douglas was living in Kooyong Road, Elsternwick (near North Road) where his first wife Elizabeth (Bessie) ran a small grocery business and one of his old clocks still sits perched high up on the outside of that old shop, which is now a local 'milk bar' or 'corner shop'. (This clock though perched high up has since been stolen). Another clock I have 'found' by Gilbert Douglas is an old 'Railway Clock' of the late 1890's/early 1900's and it is owned by a gentleman who lives near Ballarat - I have only seen a digital image of it attached to a living room wall!

    By December, 1922 and Gilbert Douglas had moved his Watchmaking business to 520 Elizabeth Street, opposite the Victoria Market.

    In November, 1924 the address of Gilbert Douglas's Watchmaking business was at 512 Elizabeth Street. As at September, 1926 and December, 1927 Gilbert Douglas was still a Watchmaker at 512 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne.

    In terms of his home - at the time of the AE Roll in 1924 and 1931 Gilbert Douglas was living at 'Allambie' (9) Marriage Road, Brighton (demolished in recent times).

    When Gilbert Douglas died in 1946 he was living in Bambury Street, Boronia. However his death certificate states that he died at Mooroopna, near Shepparton, Victoria.

    Gilbert Douglas had five children in his first marriage and two in his second.

    Gabriel/Gilbert Douglas was a great grandson of John Douglas, Master Clock and Watchmaker of Jedburgh, Roxburghshire and Galston, Ayrshire; a grandson of Walter Douglas born in Jedburgh who was a Master Clock and Watchmaker in Old Cumnock, Muirkirk, and (later) in Galston, Ayrshire - Dollar in Clackmannan - and Holytown, Bothwell (Glasgow) Lanarkshire; and he was a son of Gabriel Douglas born in Muirkirk, Ayrshire, who was a Watchmaker and Jeweller in Scotland and Victoria, Australia.

    (Trove and family history research).

    Sally E Douglas

    132 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-07-07
    User data
  45. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 1)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 1 - PREAMBLE

    During July 2008, 316 items of pictorial content were accepted by the Melbourne Museum (or Museum Victoria - now Museums Victoria) for donation from the Group Captain Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection. (Donation by me). All items donated were originally owned by my father Eric Douglas. Moreover, much of the photography in this collection was by Eric Douglas.

    These 316 items consist of 328 full images, plus eleven 'split' images. (The split images are by Frank Hurley, baring one and they are on Lantern Slides or Glass Plate Negatives). These 316 items cover the BANZ Antarctic Research Expedition of 1929/1930 and 1930/1931 and the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935/1936, plus some other miscellaneous images by Frank Hurley relating to other Antarctic Expeditions. The BANZARE photography included here is by Eric Douglas and Frank Hurley the official photographer and cinematographer of BANZARE. While the Ellsworth Relief Expedition photography is by Eric Douglas, Mr Alfred Saunders the official photographer for the Discovery II (Discovery Committee) and miscellaneous photography, mainly by the Press.

    The Museum has allocated 320 item numbers for these Antarctic images, but four of the item numbers are not of images, so 316 items in total, covering the 328 full images (and another 11 images if the split images are counted as two images).

    I have used capital letters at times to emphasize some headings.

    The collection is made up of black and white Lantern Slides or Glass Slides, some of the slides being made up of 'split' images; black and white 'Whole Plate' Glass Negatives (Frank Hurley's terminology), most of which hold two full negatives, black and white prints and two paintings - 1. an oil painting of the Discovery II 1935/1936 by a British member of the crew and 2. a water colour painting of Lincoln Ellsworth's Northrop Gamma 'Polar Star' flying over an ice-covered plateau in Antarctica. This painting is by Sydney Austin Bainbridge the Purser on the Discovery II and is dated 1935 and it was signed by Lincoln Ellsworth in January, 1936. Both these paintings were presented to then Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas by the two artists. At that time Eric Douglas led the RAAF party of seven onboard the Discovery II in the search for the American Polar Explorer Lincoln Ellsworth and his Canadian based (an Englishman) Antarctic Pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon who were missing in the vicinity of Little America, Ross Ice Barrier, Bay of Whales, Ross Sea, Antarctica in late 1935.

    Also in the collection are seven professionally crafted coloured glass slide advertisements, obviously made in the period 1930/1931 to be shown at cinemas with Frank Hurley's Antarctic Films - Southward Ho! and Siege of the South (a revised and updated version of the first mentioned). So Eric Douglas obtained copies of some of them. Whenever we had a home sitting of Antarctic slides over the years (which was infrequent) Eric always showed these ads at our interval and when we saw the one of the Polar Bear enjoying an ice cream cone we all knew that it was time for an ice cream (sometimes homemade).

    Many of the photographic prints and the two paintings were initially framed. However over time some of the frames had deteriorated to the stage where they had fallen off or had to be removed. The paintings still retain their frames (as far as I am aware). Also donated to the Melbourne Museum a bit later was Eric Douglas' Zeiss Ikon Icarette camera which he used to take most of his Antarctic photographs. Eric also owned a Box Brownie camera; plus possibly other cameras in the early days of his life. However the Icarette was the main camera used by him for his Antarctic photography.

    I will make a brief run down of the items donated to the Museum in their ad hoc numbering sequence -
    * Black and white, Lantern Slides or Glass Slides and Coloured Advertisement Slides - 112743 to 112774 inclusive, 112780 to 112785 inclusive, 112791, 112797 to 112801 inclusive, 112809, 112810 to 112814 inclusive, 112822, 112825, 112829 to 112845 inclusive, 112854 to 112857 inclusive, 112880 to 112811 inclusive, 114700 to 114748, and 117500 to 117651 inclusive. (274 items).
    * Whole Plate Glass Negatives or Glass Plate Negatives, two paintings and Photographic prints - 114907, 114906, 114902, 114905, 114904, (The next two are Photographic prints) 117213, 117065, 28028 (oil painting), 28062 (water colour painting), 114913, 114909, 114908, 114912, 114903, 114974 to 114975 inclusive, 114941, 114919, 114938, 114940, 114939, 114937, 114918, 114916, 114911, 114917, 114914, 114901, 114915, 114910, (Photographic prints follow) 117078, 117075, 117068, 117077, 117072 to 117074 inclusive, 117076, 117070, 117069, 134407 and 117071 (42 items).

    Bearing in mind the sequence above -
    * Black and white Lantern Slides ...
    BANZARE items - 112743 to 112880, Frank Hurley AAE 1911-1914 image 112881, Ellsworth Relief Expedition items - 114700 to 114735, BANZARE items - 114736 to 114740, Coloured Ad Slides - 114741 to 114747, BANZARE items - 114748 to 117567, Frank Hurley AAE 1911 -1914 image 117568, BANZARE items - 117569 to 117587, Ellsworth Relief Expedition items - 117588 to 117651.
    * Glass Plate Negatives ...
    BANZARE items -114907 to 114906, Frank Hurley AAE 1911-1914 image 114902, BANZARE item - 114905, Frank Hurley AAE 1911-1914 image 114904, BANZARE items - 117213 and 117065, Ellsworth Relief Expedition (Paintings) - 28028 and 28062, BANZARE items - 114913 to 114903, Ellsworth Relief Expedition items - 114974 to 114918, BANZARE items - 114916 to 117068, Ellsworth Relief Expedition item - 117077, BANZARE items - 117072 to 117069, Frank Hurley Photographic print 'Crystal Canoe' relating to South Georgia and the Endurance Expedition c1916-1917 item 134407, BANZARE item (Photographic print) - 117071.

    A copy of this same photograph of the 'Crystal Canoe' by Frank Hurley is in the Art Gallery of New South Wales - https://www.artgallery.nsw.gov.au/collection/works/250.2014/

    The split images are Frank Hurley images except for one image. They are made up of two images on a Lantern Slide or Glass Plate Negative. The relevant BANZARE images are - (Lantern Slides follow) 112743 - is of two charts made of BANZARE surveys of 1929-1930 and 1930-1931. It is attributed to Sir Douglas Mawson and BANZARE explorers. All the rest are split images by Frank Hurley - 112763, 112783, 112812, 112832, 112854, 112855 and 117579. While the relevant BANZARE Glass Plate Negatives are 114909, 114911 and 114910. (It means that if these eleven images were added to the 328 full images then the number of separate images would in fact be 339).

    The Glass Plate Negatives with two whole images to a plate are -
    BANZARE - 114907 and 114916, Frank Hurley AAE 1911-1914 image 114902, and Ellsworth Relief Expedition images (made from a copy of two photographs) - 114974, 114975, 114941, 114919, 114938, 114940, 114939, 114937 and 114918. (It means that if these twelve images are added to the 316 items, then the number of full images donated to the Melbourne Museum is 328 as referred to in line 5 of this list).

    The identification of the BANZARE and Ellsworth Relief Expedition images involved -
    * The commencement of my scanning of the Lantern Slides or Glass Slides in the Multi-Media Section at the Australian Antarctic Division at Kingston, Tasmania in about 1996. Before that I had already visited the Division at Kingston and much earlier when it was based in Melbourne to let them know that I had Antarctic material belonging to my late father Eric Douglas. This visit to the Division at Kingston was followed up by about four succeeding visits over the years mainly for scanning Antarctic images. Kevin Bell the Director of Multi-Media told me on my first visit for scanning that I was the first to scan Lantern Slides or Glass Slides there. So it was good to be a first I suppose.
    * The last time I carried out any serious scanning there at the Division was just before the brilliant Antarctic photographer Wayne Papps plunged to his death at Bruny Island. That last time I saw him just before the tragic happening he had moved to another computer so that I could use his computer. I found him to be a quiet but a very lovely person. That last time he and I got into more conversation than was usual and he showed me results of his stitching of photos to create earlier and later digital panoramas of Heard Island. We discussed how he was recovering from food poisoning and I told him that my father had always said in the past 'be careful as it could come back'. Then on the next day which was a Friday I visited the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery and viewed some of Wayne's Antarctic photos in the Gallery and I couldn't wait to return to the Division on the Monday to tell him what I thought about his great images, but it was all too late. Wayne Papps and some of his photography - http://www.antarctica.gov.au/news/2003/wayne-papps-1959-2003
    * Scanning about 400 prints (Three Antarctic albums and loose prints) and over 800 silver gelatin negatives at home as I had by now worked out the techniques and bought myself top class Epson Scanners and the one for scanning negatives has proved particularly useful. Scanning the negatives for instance took me 800 hours and one problem which I had was the negatives curling with the heat of the scanner. I also wanted to get a result with images sitting straight, with the best contrast possible and I even digitally blackened the vertical and horizontal boundaries so that they would have a more finished look.
    * The prints and my father's comments on many proved to be extremely useful in helping me to identify what, where, when and who took the image etc.
    * Moreover, my father had made two wooden boxes for the BANZARE Voyages, Lantern Slides or Glass Slides and one for the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, Lantern Slides or Glass Slides. However, there was also a bit of an overflow in other smaller containers. Anyway the slides being roughly in three wooden boxes dedicated to the three Antarctic journeys by Eric Douglas was pivotal in helping me with identification of the individual images. The Lantern Slides of course were not in perfect voyage order in the boxes and there was also a mixture as over time my father had taken images out of their place to convey a story as he projected the slides eg about flying and the seaplanes or about brash ice and icebergs. Then as one would suspect they ended back somewhere else in the boxes.
    * Also I knew that there was an Album of photographs on the Ellsworth Relief Expedition which had been given to Dr Falla, the Director of the Dominion Museum - now the Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington, New Zealand. On sending an email to that Museum the relevant Curatorial contacts replied that they would bring forward the scanning of that album and place and digital images online. That was a very responsive outcome.
    * Identification of the Photographer for each image may not be 100 percent definitive but was made with the information accessible to me. For instance many of the images appear also in my father's two Albums of photographs on BANZARE, and by scanning the over 800 silver gelatin negatives by Eric Douglas that helped me with this exercise - BANZARE and Ellsworth Relief Expedition negatives. Plus I have an Album of Frank Hurley photographs owned by Eric Douglas. Moreover for BANZARE the split images on Lantern Slides were obviously the photography of Frank Hurley, except for the chart 112743. Additionally for the BANZARE Glass Plate Negatives they would be by Frank Hurley. The Antarctic Division has a site online which I often referred to when researching. Then there are the many Frank Hurley images online especially at Trove and also at the State Library of New South Wales, Art Galleries and even in the Royal Collection. Another excellent source were the photos on Trove Newspapers. An additional resource of course was the many excellent books on Sir Douglas Mawson, Frank Hurley and other Antarctic books which also contain photographs.
    * Over the earlier years too I had made contact (sometimes face to face) with many people of an Antarctic predisposition eg Dr John Cumpston who wrote officially about the Antarctic for the Australian Government, Lady Mawson, Group Captain Stuart Campbell, Dr Phillip Law, Commander Morton Moyes, Dr Alfred Howard, Dr Brian Roberts who wrote officially on the Antarctic for the British Government, Mrs Lincoln Ellsworth, Ellsworth's friend Beekman Pool, Herbert Hollick-Kenyon, Dr George Deacon - later Sir George Deacon, the Leader and Chief Scientist on the Discovery II, Dr Frank Ommanney a Scientist and Author on the Discovery II. Plus I visited the Adelaide University's Mawson Wing and the Scott Polar Institute at Cambridge. I also went onboard the Discovery at Canary Wharf in the Thames.
    * For all the images scanned or otherwise I had to set up data bases, rough approximations to begin with and gradually more refined as my knowledge of each item developed over many years in terms of detail and accuracy.
    * Even now there remain some items which I cannot identify fully or cannot be completely certain as to who the photographer was. Usually it was a toss-up between Eric Douglas or Frank Hurley for BANZARE. For the Ellsworth Relief Expedition it was mainly between either Eric Douglas or Alfred Saunders.
    * Then there was the need to pore over of my father's Antarctic writings as well as word-processing them.
    * So to get to work. I have spent about 200 hours preparing specific information on each of the 316 items for the new Melbourne Museum over the last 3 and a half years. But still the task of conveying all the precise and correct information to the Melbourne Museum's online site remains incomplete. If there has been any satisfaction for me it has been in the journey and not in the endgame.
    * None of this is probably of interest to most persons but for a serious Antarctic researcher now or in the future I consider that this story behind the images will mean something in deciding what is historical and authentic.

    The following items contain the same image (also cross referenced here) -
    (Lantern Slides or Glass Slides) 112744 & 112745, 112745 & 112744, 112746 & 114916, 112755 & 114917, 112760 & 117076 & 117078, 112768 & 117074, 112797 & 117072, 112798 & 117547, 112801 & 114907, 112811 & 117065 & 117213, 112822 & 114903, 112832 & 114911, 112834 & 117071, 112840 & 114908, 112854 & 112855 & 114909, 112855 & 112854 & 114909, 112857 & 117075, 112881 & 114902, 114705 & 114919, 114708 & 114941, 114724 & 114974, 114729 & 114938, 114730 & 114975, 114731 & 117614, 114748 & 114915, 117502 & 114907, 117506 & 117070, 117535 & 114913, 117538 & 117543, 117543 & 117538, 117547 & 112798, 117559 & 114916, 117562 & 114905, 117563 & 114914, 117565 & 114906, 117568 & 114904, 117575 & 117073, 117579 & 114910, 117583 & 114912, 117588 & 114937, 117614 & 114731, 117615 & 114938, 117625 & 114918, 117627 & 114937, 117628 & 114975, 117631 & 114974, 117635 & 114939, 117643 & 114940, 117644 & 114941, 117645 & 114939, 117646 & 114940,
    (Glass Plate Negatives and Photographic Prints) 114907 - top image is the same as 112801 and the bottom image is the same as 117502, 114906 & 117565, 114902 & 112881, 114905 & 117562, 114904 & 117568, 117213 & 112811 & 117065, 117065 & 112811 & 117213, 114913 & 117535, 114909 & 112854 & 112855, 114908 & 112840, 114912 & 117583, 114903 & 112822, 114974 - top image is the same as 114724 and the bottom image is the same as 117631, 114975 - top image is the same as 114730 and the bottom image is the same as 117628, 114941 - top image is the same as 117644 and the bottom image is the same as 114708, 114919 - bottom image the same as 114705, 114938 - top image is the same as 114729 and the bottom image is the same as 117615, 114940 - top image is the same as 117646 and the bottom image is the same as 117643, 114939 - top image is the same as 117645 and the bottom image is the same as 117635, 114937 - top image is the same as 117588 and the bottom image is the same as 117627, 114918 - top image is the same as 114718 and the bottom image is the same as 117625, 114916 - top image is the same as 117559 and the bottom image is the same as 112746, 114911 & 112832, 114917 & 112755, 114914 & 117563, 114915 & 114748, 114910 & 117579, 117078 & 112760 & 117076, 117075 & 112857, 117072 & 112797, 117073 & 117575, 117074 & 112768, 117076 & 112760 & 117078, 117070 & 117506, 117071 & 112834.

    These are some of the headings used by the Melbourne Museum in their database (though not a complete list) -
    Details under the image
    MM number and Object Name
    Summary
    Description of Content
    Physical Description
    More Information
    • Collection Names
    • Collecting Areas
    • Acquisition Information
    • Place and Date Depicted
    • Creator - sometimes used
    • Photographer
    • Original Owner
    • Publisher if applicable
    • Expedition Leader - sometimes used
    • Person Depicted – sometimes used
    • Individuals Identified - sometimes used
    • Ship Depicted - sometimes used
    • Format
    • Language
    • Classification
    • Category
    • Discipline
    • Type of item
    • Mount Dimensions
    • References
    • Keywords

    When all these items are 'harvested' by Trove NLA from the Museums Victoria site (original digital images remaining with the Melbourne Museum) an extra heading of Date Published appears (I have discussed this with Trove and it is there because of Books). However in the case of the Museum the Date Published against an item is more to do with the Creation Date of the image and indicates that the item is held (now owned) by Museum Victoria. So within that heading two separate pieces of information are supplied.

    Eric Douglas was a keen photographic recorder of events in which he participated. The over-riding goal would have been for the sake of recording what was in time to become history. He recorded his early sailing and skiing days in this manner. Plus he recorded many of his RAAF experiences including early events in RAAF history and RAAF and RAAF related aeroplanes as well as the outback search for Lieutenant Keith Anderson's 'Kookaburra', the Antarctic - BANZARE and the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, and his days as Commanding Officer at RAAF Amberley. Of course too there were numerous things which happened in his working and recreational daily life which were not recorded by camera activity as life has to be lived and not only captured through the eyes of a camera, but I think that he captured enough images to give a real feeling of his life and times.

    In his early youth Eric made rough notes in small notebooks on some of his yachting and RAAF experiences. However he kept more substantial records on his part in the RAAF search for the Kookaburra in 1929, the BANZARE Voyages of 1929/1930 and 1930/1931 and the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935/1936. Plus there are also his six RAAF Flying Logs (donated by me to the RAAF Museum at Point Cook), his RAAF Flying Course notes which I still have as the RAAF Museum said that they did not require the originals as I had already given them copies, and a few notes relevant to Eric's time as Station Commander at RAAF Amberley. Plus he made a few summaries on his Career, also covering his time from 1949 to 1964 as a Technical Officer on Airframes, and later Aeronautical Engineer with DAMR at the Fleet Air Arm (RAN).

    These 316 items can all be found at Trove NLA with or without the MM prefix in each case.

    A few other points of interest -
    * Gipsy Moth VH-UDL flown on the two BANZARE voyages was a de Havilland DH60G while the Gipsy Moth flown on the Ellsworth Relief Expedition was a de Havilland DH60X with the RAAF serial number A7-55.
    * Captain Robert Falcon Scott's old ship the (RRS) Discovery used on BANZARE was registered separately on Lloyds Shipping Register as both a sailing and also a steam ship - ideally using Cardiff Briquettes; while the (RRS) Discovery II used by the search party on the Ellsworth Relief Expedition was an oil burning steamship.
    * For the purposes of BANZARE the Discovery was registered as a sailing ship belonging to a sailing club on the Thames, hence the 'SY Discovery'. (This move was possibly for Insurance purposes). Although it is noted that during BANZARE the ship was still inscribed as 'RRS Discovery'. When the Discovery II came into existence the Discovery in hindsight was also known as the 'Discovery I'.
    * At the time of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition the RRS Discovery II was known as that and also as the Discovery II.
    * During the time of BANZARE the home City and State locations of Sir Douglas Mawson was Adelaide, South Australia; Frank Hurley was Sydney, New South Wales and for Eric Douglas was Melbourne, Victoria. These names keep cropping up in the Melbourne Museum's database for the 316 items.
    * At the time of BANZARE, Kerguelen or the Kerguelen Islands were part of the French Colony of Madagascar.
    * The term Southern Ocean appears to be subject to debate as to its boundaries. The term seemed to have used loosely even if the terminology was that another ocean was more correct eg Antarctic Ocean or Indian Ocean.
    * The Antarctic lands and territories claimed by Sir Douglas Mawson in January, 1931 at Commonwealth Bay, Antarctica were in the name of the King and the British Commonwealth. These lands were later assigned by Britain as Australian Antarctic Territory.
    *Although the Melbourne Museum refers to the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection component of 274 slides as Lantern Slides which is a correct name Eric Douglas always referred to them as 'the slides'. (The other 42 images in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum are of Glass Plate Negatives, Photographic Prints and Two Paintings). The inference being that to use the term Lantern Slides was a bit outdated and he more likely understood them to be glass slides. Moreover, they were shown with a Lantern in the 1930's, 1940's and 1950's but I never heard it referred to as a 'Magic Lantern' by him, it was always the projector. Eric showed these slides at times over the years until the projector (lantern or magic lantern) started to run 'too hot' and would only last for a few slides till we had to wait for it to cool a bit. This understandingly became a bit tedious. Our 'screen' in the 1950's was either a white or a cream wall or a white bedsheet hung up over a square object or a blind or a curtain rail. I also have some memories in the 1940's of a white screen on a stand. That was probably mislaid or lost. When these slides were shown by my father Eric over the years it was exciting and today's equivalent of showing 'home movies' or even later watching movies or films in your own home 'dedicated theatre'.
    * I have always known or regarded these slides to be 'black and white'. However in some parts in the Melbourne Museum's description they call them 'Monochrome' a definition of which could be "Monochrome describes paintings, drawings, design, or photographs in one color or shades of one color. A monochromatic object or image has colors in shades of limited colors or hues" (from the web). To me although Monochrome covers it, 'black and white' is more precise as the slides are not coloured, though I do have a few Paget process prints.

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-05-29
    User data
  46. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 10)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 10

    Numbering of the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives) Paintings and Photographic Prints by the Melbourne Museum.

    Glass Plate Negatives were called Glass Negatives by the Melbourne Museum. Frank Hurley in fact called his Glass Plates, "Whole Plate Negatives".

    The numbering on the left is numbering which I used when I initially scanned the images at the Australian Antarctic Division (The numbers which they asked me to use). The numbers on the right are the initial numbers by the Melbourne Museum when they scanned or photographed the images some years later -
    BANZARE
    Glass Plate Negatives - Boxes 1 and 2
    BOX 1
    For AAD purposes & Melbourne Museum
    840E mm114912-001
    841E mm114913-001
    842E mm114914-001
    843E mm114915-001
    844E mm114916-001
    845E mm114916-002
    846E mm114917-001
    BOX 2 BOX 2
    For AAD purposes & Melbourne Museum
    827E mm114901-001
    828E mm114902-001 - With Banzare - but is AAE 1911 to 1914
    829E mm114902-002 - With Banzare - but is AAE 1911 to1914
    830E mm114903-001
    831E mm114904-001- With Banzare - but is AAE 1911 to 1914
    832E mm114905-001
    833E mm114906-001
    834E mm114907-002
    835E mm114907-001
    836E mm114908-001
    837E mm114909-001
    838E mm114910-001
    839E mm114911-001

    Lincoln Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935/1936
    Glass Plate Negatives - these were in a Box numbered 3
    For AAD purposes & Melbourne Museum
    938E mm114918-002
    Twin with 938E mm114918-001
    939E mm114919-001
    Twin with 939E mm114919-002
    940E mm114937-001
    Twin with 940E mm114937-002

    Lincoln Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935/1936
    Also in Box numbered 3 -Scanned at Home (rather than at the Australian Antarctic Division)
    Number assigned by me & Melbourne Museum number
    ED1 mm114941-002
    ED2 mm114941-001
    ED3 mm114975-001
    ED4 mm114975-002
    ED5 mm114974-001
    ED6 mm114974-002
    ED7 mm114938-001
    ED8 mm114938-002
    ED9 mm114939-001
    ED10 mm114939-002
    ED11 mm114940-001
    ED12 mm114940-002
    The Museum renumbered all these images to become eg 114940-001 and 114940-002 became 114940. With numbers such as mm114912-001 where there was only one item, it became eg mm114912. I just deducted this.

    The Photographic Prints and Paintings which I obviously did not scan were given these numbers initally by the Melbourne Museum. But for the record I did photograph them all.
    mm117075a
    mm117076a
    mm117078
    mm117065a
    mm117213a
    mm117073a & c
    not yet advised - this was a single donation by me, sometime later than July, 2008. It became 134407
    mm117074a & c
    mm117071a & c
    mm117072a & c
    mm117969 & a & b
    mm117070a & c
    mm117068 & a

    It looks like there was also mm117077?

    Then there were the two paintings.

    Anyway they were finally all given these numbers (now 42 tems) -
    114907
    114906
    114902
    114905
    114904
    117213
    117065
    28028 - Painting
    28062 - Painting
    114913
    114909
    114908
    114912
    114903
    114974
    114975
    114941
    114919
    114938
    114940
    114939
    114937
    114918
    114916
    114911
    114917
    114914
    114901
    114915
    114910
    117078
    117075
    117068
    117077
    117072
    117073
    117074
    117076
    117070
    117069
    134407
    117071

    The 114 Series are the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives) and the 117 Series plus 134407 are the Photographic Prints and the two Paintings were part of the 117 Series.

    NOTE: The 114 Series and 117 Series numbering was also given to some of the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) by the Melbourne Museum).

    The Glass Negatives, Paintings and Photographic Prints totalled 42

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-16
    User data
  47. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 11)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 11

    Identification of the Photographer (where applicable) -

    Lantern Slides or Glass Slides -
    112743
    112744
    112745
    112746 Frank Hurley
    112747 Frank Hurley
    112748 Eric Douglas
    112749 Frank Hurley
    112750 Eric Douglas
    112751 Eric Douglas
    112752 Eric Douglas
    112753 Eric Douglas
    112754 Eric Douglas
    112755 Frank Hurley
    112756 Eric Douglas
    112757 Eric Douglas
    112758 Eric Douglas
    112759 Eric Douglas
    112760 Frank Hurley
    112761 Eric Douglas
    112762 Eric Douglas
    112763 Frank Hurley
    112764 Frank Hurley
    112765 Frank Hurley
    112766 Frank Hurley
    112767 Eric Douglas
    112768 Frank Hurley
    112769 Frank Hurley
    112770 Frank Hurley
    112771 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    112772 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    112773 Eric Douglas
    112774 Eric Douglas
    112780 Eric Douglas
    112781 Frank Hurley
    112782 Frank Hurley
    112783 Frank Hurley
    112784 Eric Douglas
    112785 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    112791 Frank Hurley
    112797 Frank Hurley
    112798 Eric Douglas
    112800 Eric Douglas
    112801 Frank Hurley
    112809 Frank Hurley
    112810 Eric Douglas
    112811 Frank Hurley
    112812 Frank Hurley
    112813 Eric Douglas
    112814 Eric Douglas
    112822 Frank Hurley
    112825 Frank Hurley
    112829 Frank Hurley
    112830 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    112831 Eric Douglas
    112832 Frank Hurley
    112833 Eric Douglas
    112834 Frank Hurley
    112835 Frank Hurley
    112836 Douglas Mawson
    112837 Eric Douglas
    112838 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    112839 Frank Hurley
    112840 Frank Hurley
    112841 Eric Douglas
    112842 Frank Hurley
    112843 Eric Douglas
    112844 Eric Douglas
    112845 Frank Hurley
    112854 Frank Hurley
    112855 Frank Hurley
    112857 Frank Hurley
    112880 Eric Douglas
    112881 Frank Hurley
    114700 Eric Douglas
    114701 Eric Douglas
    114702 Eric Douglas or Alfred Saunders
    114703 Alfred Saunders
    114704 Eric Douglas
    114705 Alfred Saunders
    114706 Eric Douglas
    114707 Alfred Saunders
    114708 Alfred Saunders
    114709 Eric Douglas
    114710 Eric Douglas
    114711 Eric Douglas
    114712 Alfred Saunders
    114713 Eric Douglas
    114714 Eric Douglas
    114715 Eric Douglas
    114716 Eric Douglas
    114717 Eric Douglas
    114718 Alfred Saunders
    114719 Eric Douglas
    114720 Eric Douglas
    114721 Eric Douglas
    114722 Eric Douglas
    114723 Eric Douglas
    114724 Alfred Saunders
    114725
    114726 Alfred Saunders
    114727 Eric Douglas
    114728 Eric Douglas
    114729 Alfred Saunders
    114730 Alfred Saunders
    114731 Eric Douglas
    114732 Eric Douglas
    114733 Likely by Alfred Sauders
    114734 Eric Douglas
    114735 Eric Douglas
    114736 Eric Douglas
    114737 Likely by Frank Hurley
    114738 Frank Hurley
    114739 Frank Hurley
    114740 Frank Hurley
    114741
    114742
    114743
    114744
    114745
    114746
    114747
    114748 Frank Hurley
    117500 Eric Douglas
    117501 Eric Douglas
    117502 Frank Hurley
    117503 Eric Douglas
    117504 Eric Douglas
    117505 Frank Hurley
    117506 Frank Hurley
    117507 Eric Douglas
    117508 Eric Douglas
    117509 Eric Douglas
    117510 Eric Douglas
    117511 Eric Douglas
    117512 Eric Douglas
    117513 Eric Douglas
    117514 Eric Douglas
    117515 Eric Douglas
    117516 Eric Douglas
    117517 Eric Douglas
    117518 Eric Douglas
    117519 Eric Douglas
    117520 Frank Hurley
    117521 Frank Hurley
    117522 Eric Douglas
    117523 Frank Hurley
    117524 Eric Douglas
    117525 Eric Douglas
    117526 Eric Douglas
    117527 Eric Douglas
    117528 Eric Douglas
    117529 Eric Douglas
    117530 Eric Douglas
    117531 Eric Douglas
    117532 Eric Douglas
    117533 Eric Douglas
    117534 Likely by Frank Hurley
    117535 Frank Hurley
    117536 Eric Douglas
    117537 Eric Douglas
    117538 Eric Douglas
    117539 Eric Douglas
    117540 Likely by Frank Hurley
    117541 Eric Douglas
    117542 Eric Douglas
    117543 Eric Douglas
    117544 Frank Hurley
    117545 Eric Douglas
    117546 Eric Douglas
    117547 Eric Douglas
    117548 Eric Douglas
    117549 Eric Douglas
    117550 Eric Douglas
    117551 Eric Douglas
    117552 Eric Douglas
    117553 Frank Hurley
    117554 Eric Douglas
    117555 Eric Douglas
    117556 Eric Douglas
    117557 Eric Douglas
    117558 Eric Douglas
    117559 Frank Hurley
    117560 Eric Douglas
    117561 Eric Douglas
    117562 Frank Hurley
    117563 Frank Hurley
    117564 Eric Douglas
    117565 Frank Hurley
    117566 Eric Douglas
    117567 Eric Douglas
    117568 Frank Hurley
    117569 Eric Douglas
    117570 Eric Douglas
    117571 Eric Douglas
    117572 Eric Douglas
    117573 Eric Douglas
    117574 Eric Douglas
    117575 Frank Hurley
    117576 Likely by Frank Hurley
    117577 Frank Hurley
    117578 Eric Douglas
    117579 Frank Hurley
    117580 Frank Hurley or Eric Douglas
    117581 Frank Hurley
    117582 Frank Hurley
    117583 Frank Hurley
    117584 Eric Douglas
    117585 Eric Douglas
    117586 Eric Douglas
    117587 Frank Hurley
    117588 Alfred Saunders
    117589 Eric Douglas
    117590 Eric Douglas
    117591 Eric Douglas
    117592 Eric Douglas
    117593 Eric Douglas
    117594 Eric Douglas
    117595 Eric Douglas
    117596 Eric Douglas
    117597 Eric Douglas
    117598 Eric Douglas
    117599 Eric Douglas
    117600 Eric Douglas
    117601 Eric Douglas
    117602 Eric Douglas
    117603 Eric Douglas
    117604 Eric Douglas
    117605 Eric Douglas
    117606 Eric Douglas
    117607 Eric Douglas
    117608 Eric Douglas
    117609 Eric Douglas
    117610 Eric Douglas
    117611 Eric Douglas
    117612 Eric Douglas
    117613 Eric Douglas
    117614 Eric Douglas
    117615 Alfred Saunders
    117616 Eric Douglas
    117617 Eric Douglas
    117618 Eric Douglas
    117619 Eric Douglas
    117620 Eric Douglas
    117621 Eric Douglas
    117622 Eric Douglas
    117623 Eric Douglas
    117624 Eric Douglas
    117625 Alfred Saunders
    117626 Eric Douglas
    117627 Alfred Saunders
    117628 Alfred Saunders
    117629 Eric Douglas
    117630 Eric Douglas
    117631 Eric Douglas
    117632 Eric Douglas
    117633 Eric Douglas
    117634 Eric Douglas
    117635 Alfred Saunders
    117636 Eric Douglas
    117637 Eric Douglas
    117638 Eric Douglas
    117639 Eric Douglas
    117640 Eric Douglas
    117641 Eric Douglas
    117642 Eric Douglas
    117643 Alfred Saunders
    117644 Alfred Saunders
    117645 Alfred Saunders
    117646 Alfred Saunders
    117647 Eric Douglas
    117648 Alfred Saunders
    117649 Eric Douglas
    117650
    117651

    Identification of the Photographer of the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives) and Photographic Prints and the Artists of the Two Paintings -
    114907 Frank Hurley
    114906 Frank Hurley
    114902 Frank Hurley
    114905 Frank Hurley
    114904 Frank Hurley
    117213 Frank Hurley
    117065 Frank Hurley
    28028 Painting - by a member of the crew of the Discovery II
    28062 Painting - by Sydney Austin Bainbridge, the purser on the Discovery II
    114913 Frank Hurley
    114909 Frank Hurley
    114908 Frank Hurley
    114912 Frank Hurley
    114903 Frank Hurley
    114974 Top - Alfred Saunders & Bottom Image Eric Douglas
    114975 Alfred Saunders
    114941 Alfred Saunders
    114919 Alfred Saunders
    114938 Alfred Saunders
    114940 Alfred Saunders
    114939 Alfred Saunders
    114937 Alfred Saunders
    114918 Alfred Saunders
    114916 Frank Hurley
    114911 Frank Hurley
    114917 Frank Hurley
    114914 Frank Hurley
    114901 Frank Hurley
    114915 Frank Hurley
    114910 Frank Hurley
    117078 Frank Hurley
    117075 Frank Hurley
    117068 Press
    117077 Star Newspaper
    117072 Frank Hurley
    117073 Frank Hurley
    117074 Frank Hurley
    117076 Frank Hurley
    117070 Frank Hurley
    117069 Frank Hurley
    134407 Frank Hurley
    117071 Frank Hurley

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-15
    User data
  48. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 2)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 2

    Item details for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) in order as in the Melbourne Museum's database spreadsheets -

    112743
    A horizontally split slide showing two charts drawn up by the BANZARE Expedition surveys of 1929-1930 and 1930-1931. Published in August, 1932 by the Royal Geographical Society, London as 'Antarctic Regions - Mawson'. Eric Douglas said on this 'The chart is from sketch surveys made by the BANZARE Expedition during the Summer seasons of 1929-1930 and 1930-1931, adjusted by frequent astronomical observations taken on board the Discovery and at Scullin Monolith. The coastline with the exception of the parts shown by thicker lines, consists of inaccessible ice cliffs, 100 to 150 feet high. Kemp Land west of Cape Heard was charted from the Gipsy Moth seaplane at a height of 5,500 feet. Large numbers of icebergs were found at varying distances from the land. The new names on this chart were those proposed by Sir Douglas Mawson'.

    112744
    112744 is the same image as 112745.
    A chart depicting BANZARE Antarctic Territorial Claims 1929-1930.The claims are shown as 'Australian Dependency'. The discoveries and claims from BANZARE were initially in the name of the British Empire.

    112745.
    112745 is the same image as 112744.
    A chart depicting BANZARE Antarctic Territorial Claims 1929-1930.The claims are shown as 'Australian Dependency'. The discoveries and claims from BANZARE were initially in the name of the British Empire.

    112746
    This image is also on Glass Plate Negative 114916 - bottom image of two images.
    Southward Ho! Photograph of a Sea Elephant taken during BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. It is a composite photo of a roaring Bull Sea Elephant leaning towards a nesting bird. The roaring sound emitted by the Bull Sea Elephant is through his large proboscis (nose). Below the image is a caption which reads 'Southward Ho! with Mawson'. This was also the name for Frank Hurley's movie released after this voyage, but it was not considered a commercial success. Some of this film was reworked by Frank Hurley for his next Antarctic film 'Siege of the South' which was released to mainstream movie-goers after Voyage 2 of 1930-1931. The film premiered at Brisbane's Majestic Theatre in October, 1931, with Frank Hurley introducing the program. Screen Australia states that "the 'Siege of the South' is a great achievement in Antarctic actuality filmmaking". Frank Hurley took many risks for his reality photographs and film making, such as being strapped to the ship and hanging over the Discovery's side or even diving into an icy sea.

    112747
    Preparing Bird specimens on board the Discovery, BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930. Harold 'Cherub' Fletcher (left) Zoologist and Robert 'Birdie' Falla Ornithologist (right), were two members of the BANZARE 'Scientific party'. They were working in the area on the Discovery known as the 'bird cage' and were preparing bird specimens (specimens of bird types) for distribution to Museums at the completion of the voyage.

    112748
    Icebergs. It is hard to tell whether this is one oddly shaped iceberg or a few bergy bits travelling along together. Eric Douglas said 'Here and there are ice bergs looking like old castles and ramparts'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112749
    The Discovery at Cape Town, South Africa, Oct. 1929. The main wharf and port at Cape Town, South Africa, with the SY (Steam Ship) Discovery berthed at left. Table Mountain, a distinctive geographical feature of Cape Town is to the right. On 1st August, 1929 the Discovery berthed in London, commenced the journey to Cape Town bunkering coal at Cardiff, Wales on the way and also calling at St Vincent. The ship arrived in Cape Town on 5th October, 1929. In Cape Town it was converted from a barque to a barquentine rig as the Captain John King Davis considered that the barque rigging made the ship unsuitable for sailing to the Antarctic - somewhat top heavy and cumbersome. His intention was 'to make the vessel easier to handle with a small crew and to reduce wind resistence aloft when under steam'. Here it is pictured prior to the 'official' commencement of BANZARE Voyage 1 on 19th October, 1929. Nevertheless in spite of the alterations Eric Douglas wrote in his notes that the Discovery 'was like a hollow log of wood' it was rather a slow sailer but was capable of withstanding enormous crushing pressures 'when beset with ice.' He would not have said anything but being 'a Fiskebolle' (of the sea) and an experienced yachtsman he commented in his notes too that the Discovery was only sailed properly once during BANZARE.

    112750
    Table Mountain, Cape Town in South Africa. Photograph taken before the official commencement of BANZARE Voyage 1 on 19th October, 1929.

    112751
    The Discovery in the port at Cape Town. Eric Douglas said that 'the ship departed from England in early August, 1929 and arrived at Cape Town, South Africa in early October, 1929'...'This ship spoke of the sea and adventure, and excitedly I viewed a large case behind the main mast, in this was stowed a Gipsy Moth aeroplane'. Photograph taken before the official commencement of BANZARE Voyage 1 on 19th October, 1929.

    112752
    'Sail set' on the Discovery, 'bow view'. This sail is carried on horizontal spars or yards. After departing from Cape Town on 19th October, 1929, the Discovery was rigged as a barquentine having been modified from a barque or bark when in Cape Town early in October 1929. The Discovery by design had three main masts, square rigged on the fore and main and the great expanse of yards and rigging aloft offered much wind resistance, which was potentially disadvantageous in an Antarctic hurricane. In such a situation the only course of action for the navigator was to steam into the wind and wait it out. So steps were taken to reduce the sail wind resistance when in Cape Town before the official commencement of BANZARE. The yards and square rigging on the main mast were abolished, making the rig barquentine rather than barque. This meant that the ship was now square rigged only on the fore mast. The Discovery and crew gained in that the ship would be more stable but the downside was that as a sailer it would have less sailing options without its full rigging and would be more sluggish. Although the Discovery was heavily dependent on sail, sailing was of course was of little or no value in the Antarctic. For there was the imminent danger of pack ice and icebergs, together with a lack of suitable winds or in complete contrast hurricane conditions. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 'Sail set' 'stern view', 112753.

    112753
    'Sail set' on the Discovery, 'stern view'. This sail is carried on horizontal spars or yards. After departing from Cape Town on 19th October, 1929, the Discovery was rigged as a barquentine having been modified from a barque or bark when in Cape Town early in October 1929. The Discovery by design had three main masts, square rigged on the fore and main and the great expanse of yards and rigging aloft offered much wind resistance, which was potentially disadvantageous in an Antarctic hurricane. In such a situation the only course of action for the navigator was to steam into the wind and wait it out. So steps were taken to reduce the sail wind resistance when in Cape Town before the official commencement of BANZARE. The yards and square rigging on the main mast were abolished, making the rig barquentine rather than barque. This meant that the ship was now square rigged only on the fore mast. The Discovery and crew gained in that the ship would be more stable but the downside was that as a sailer it would have less sailing options without its full rigging and would be more sluggish. Although the Discovery was heavily dependent on sail, sailing was of course was of little or no value in the Antarctic. For there was the imminent danger of pack ice and icebergs, together with a lack of suitable winds or in complete contrast hurricane conditions. This photograph was taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 'Sail set' 'bow view', 112752

    112754
    West Coast of Heard Island with a rookery of penguins in the forefront. Eric Douglas' said 'West Coast of Heard Island...The island appears to be about twenty miles long by eight miles wide. It has several peninsulars and the land slopes up from all sides to terminate in a huge mountain 9,000 feet high (Big Ben)...There are several heavily crevassed ice glaciers running down for miles to terminate at the sea. The sea breaks heavily on this ice and every now and then large pieces of ice break away and fall into the sea with a deep roar. The origin of this island appears to be volcanic, near our hut were two volcanic craters and several square miles of lava...The weather seems to be of continual mists, snow and sleet with north east to north west winds prevailing, and now and then a ray of sunshine...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112755
    112755 is the same image as 114917.
    Kerguelen Cabbage growing on Kerguelen Island. The cabbage was growing wild and it was there in abundance. Eric Douglas said 'Kerguelen Cabbage grows in great numbers on all these islands...We motored about two miles up against the wind and went ashore on a fairly large island called Sukur... Wonderful vegetation, numerous Kerguelen Cabbages and plenty of duck...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112756
    Part of the 'Scientific party' from the Discovery in the ship's motor boat which is approching the Antarctic coast. It shows two of the explorers who are facing towards the bow and hence away from the camera lens. The Discovery's motor boat or launch for BANZARE was commissioned by Captain John King Davis. It was built by Mr Jack of Launceston, Tasmania. It was constructed of Huon pine, 24 ft in length, 7 ft beam and fitted with an inboard 8 horse power, two-cylinder marine engine. It was painted navy grey and fitted with a special removable hard top cabin. The carrying capacity of the boat was up to 12 persons. It was shipped to Cape Town from Australia to be loaded onto the Discovery at that port. The motor boat often towed the Norwegian built snub nosed phram or dinghy when excursions were made from the Discovery. Sometimes the motor boat was anchored close to the shore and the final section of the journey was made in the phram. Eric Douglas was responsible for the maintenance and running of the motor boat during BANZARE. Comments by Eric Douglas on the motor boat "I spent the morning looking over the ships motor boat engine. It is a twin 8HP Regal engine...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112757
    A Snowy Sheathbill, also known as a Paddy, perched on a rock at Kerguelen. Eric Douglas captioned this image 'An inquisitive Paddy'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112758
    'SY Discovery' near an iceberg. Two explorers can be seen leaning on the ship's rail. It depicts a very peaceful scene with reflections from the berg and calm Antarctic waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112759
    Three of the ship's sailors out on the boom fixing the topsail of the the ship Discovery. Eric Douglas captioned the image, 'Stowing the upper topsail'. This picture was taken on the journey between Hobart and Macquarie Island. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112760
    112760 is the same image as 117076 & 117078
    Heard Island looking west from Atlas Cove. Sea elephants are in the foreground lazing on the shoreline. Eric Douglas captioned the image. 'Typical day at Heard Island- View from Atlas Cove looking Westward'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112761
    The Discovery returning to Hobart, BANZARE Voyage 2, 1930-1931. The ship is in an ocean swell and some of the ship's rigging comprising cables, cordage and lines can be seen in a limited view. This would have been taken on the same photographic exercise as 112762.

    112762
    A limited view showing cables, cordage and lines of the Discovery which was on the return journey to Hobart, BANZARE Voyage 2, 1930-1931. The ship is in an ocean swell. This would have been taken on the same photographic exercise as 112761.

    112763
    A horizontally split slide. The top picture is of a coastal landscape at Royal Sound, Kerguelen and image below shows a whaling station in the Port of Jeanne d'Arc. Eric Douglas said for the top one 'Entrance to Royal Sound, Kerguelen Island and the bottom one ' Jeanne d'Arc - old Whaling station built in 1908'. About Kerguelen by Eric Douglas 'Eventually arrived off Royal Sound on 12th November, 1929. We steamed 20 miles up a winding fiord to the old Whaling station of Jeanne d'Arc. Coal was left here by a ship going south. Cardiff briquettes 500 tons. This island belongs to France. It is controlled by Governor of Madagascar. Size 80 miles by 40 miles. Wonderfully pretty, with inland lakes and glaciers. The mainland is overrun with rabbits, seals scarce, penguins on islands'. Photographs taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112764
    The Waterfall Gully, Port of Jeanne d'Arc, Kerguelen Island. Frank Hurley said 'The Discovery at Jean D'Arc from the cliffs above the cascade'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112765
    Summit of Mount Ross, Kerguelen Island. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Aerial view of Mount Ross Kerguelen Island - 6000 feet above sea level'. Mount Ross is the highest mountain in the Kerguelen Islands. It is a Volcanic cone. Kerguelen was often referred to as Kerguelen Island but it is in fact consists of one main island 'Grand Terre' and some hundreds of smaller islands. When Kerguelen initially became French Territory it was part of the French Colony of Madagascar. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112766
    Three of the Discovery's explorers at one of the Kerguelen Lakes. Those three men would have been part of what was known as the 'Scientific party'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112767
    A wooden pen of live Sheep on the SY Discovery's deckhouse roof. This pen was used for Husky dogs on previous voyages of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112768
    112768 is the same image as 117074
    Sea Elephants and Gentoo Penguins, Crozet Islands. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Sea Elephants and Gentoo Penguins, Crozet Islands...Twelve of us went ashore in the motor boat, anchored same about 100 yards offshore then did short trips in the dinghy we towed, bit of a surf running and a few of us got water down our sea boots'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112769
    An old Norwegian hut at Heard Island with a British flag to the left and seven of the Discovery's explorers gathered around the hut. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Scientific party ashore at Heard Island. An old Norwegian Hut, November, 1929'. Eric Douglas said of the hut 'It appeared that this hut had been erected by sealers some years before as a shelter during their periodic visits when hunting seals and sea elephants and then left as a safeguard for ship wrecked people. It was complete with a rain water tank and a large steel tank containing “rusks” a form of hard toasted bread. The hut was securely fastened to the ground by wire cables and from the apex of its roof projected an iron chimney pipe. We found that its sides were about seven feet long and that the interior contained two tiers of wooden bunks with a stove for burning either coal or seal blubber in the centre of its earthen floor. The hut was a fortunate find as it offered good shelter for our period of stay and avoided the necessity to live under small tents which we had brought in the motor boat...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112770
    The 'Scientific party' ashore at the Crozet Islands. Nine of the Discovery's explorers having a lunch break on Possession Island, one of the Crozet Group. Three Paddys or Sheathbills have gathered in front of them. The men were identified by Eric Douglas as 'Back row - Marr, Johnston and Ingram, Front - Moyes, Douglas, Campbell, Sir Douglas Mawson, Falla and Fletcher'. Eric Douglas said of Possession Island 'This island is 4,000 feet high, twenty miles by ten miles and plenty of snow on the hills and mounts. The wind comes down the valleys in terrific gusts, and whips the sea into spray about 20 feet high and just about blows one overboard'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112771
    An Aerial view of 'Bras Bossiere' (Bossiers Arm) of the Kerguelen Lakes, Kerguelen Island. Besides Frank Hurley taking aerial photographs Campbell and Douglas did go out on a seaplane flight assignment together and took aerial photographs at Kergeuelen. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112772
    Three of the Discovery's Scientific party standing around a Weather Balloon filled with hydrogen gas.The men are measuring the upper atmospheric wind flow. One man is standing behind a theodolite on a tripod. Ritchie Simmers, the Meteorologist was in charge of this operation. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112773
    Antarctic iceberg and its reflection. Eric Douglas related that it was not a black and white world in the Antarctic but a world full of colour. However, he did miss the sight or trees and flowers and the scent of the Australian bush. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112774
    A Wandering Albatross with out-stretched wings perched on the rail of the Discovery and an explorer to the right. Eric Douglas captioned this image 'Wandering Albatross - 11 ft 6' (wingspan). This wingspan was about the upper size limit, with the Wandering Albatross having the largest wingspan of all birds. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112780
    'SY Discovery' sailing through loose pack ice. It is likely that only a small amount of sail was set. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112781
    The de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD stowed on board the 'SY Discovery'. Hot air from the ship's stoke hole is being led through a canvas chute to warm the seaplane's engine. The RAAF pilots tried a couple of methods to 'warm up' the Gipsy Moth's engine, before it was even slung over the side of the ship, the SY Discovery. The method shown here seemed to work fairly well. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112782
    Four of the Discovery's Scientists carrying out a scientific inspection of a netted sea haul. From left to right - Sir Douglas Mawson, Dr William Wilson Ingram, James William Slessor Marr and man behind the door is unidentified. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112783
    A horizontally split slide, showing Sea Elephants. Both images show a cradle of sea elephants basking in the sun on the Crozet Islands. Eric Douglas captioned the slide 'Top - Sea Elephants' and lower - Sea Elephants basking in the sun'. Photographs taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112784
    Three of the Discovery's explorers out on the ice. They could be collecting ice for water or checking the ice condtions for the safe passage of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112785
    An Aerial view of the Kerguelen Lakes, Kerguelen Island. Taken from the de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112791
    The Discovery pushing slowly through pack ice with Adelie penguins in the foreground. Eric Douglas has said of this image 'SY Discovery slowly pushing south far in the pack ice and Adelie Penguins looking on - December 1929. Location 80 degrees East Longitude and 65 degrees South Latitude'. There are Adelie penguins in the foreground on the pack ice. Photograph taken in December 1929 - BANZARE Voyage 1.

    112797
    112797 is the same image as 117071
    A Cathedral type iceberg seen near Enderby Land. Eric Douglas has said of the taller berg in this image, 'A Cathedral type berg - 320 feet above sea level'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112798
    112798 is the same image as 117547
    Antarctic waters with an iceberg looming up in the distance. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112800
    Berg on the move. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112801
    112801 is the same image as 114907
    Superimposed image created by Frank Hurley of the Discovery 'pushing' through heavy pack ice. It is included with Hurley's BANZARE Voyage 1 photos of 1929-1930. Eric Douglas said the purpose was to give some reality as to what the Discovery would look like with its full sailing rig in solid pack ice and he added 'don't get too alarmed for the safety of the ship'.

    112809
    SY Discovery in open waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112810
    Explorer at the bow of the Discovery's motor boat, approaching the Antarctic mainland. This could be in the vicinity of Mac-Robertson Land. (Named for the Discovery's benefactor Macpherson Robertson of chocolate fame). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112811
    112811 is the same image as 117065 and 117213
    Discovery in loose pack ice near Enderby Land. The ship's doctor, Dr Wlliam Wilson Ingram, stands looking out to sea. He is holding a whale marking gun. Eric Douglas has said of the image: 'SY Discovery near Enderby Land - Time approximately 10pm with the sun low in the sky...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112812
    A horizontally split slide. The top image shows the bow of the Discovery with Proclamation Island in the distance. The image below provides a view of brash ice ahead. Eric Douglas has said 'Top - The Discovery closing in on Proclamation Rock. This Rock is a small island just off the coast and is 600 feet above sea level and Below - Brash Ice held in by the ocean swell. The outline of the Antarctic Coast can be seen straight ahead'. Although this land feature became 'Proclamation Island' it had just been discovered and at this early stage to call it Proclamation Rock was quite acceptable. The Antarctic coast ahead was part of Enderby Land. Photographs taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112813
    Four Adelie penguins are standing on rocks at Cape Denison, Adelie Land or King George V Land. Initially Sir Douglas Mawson referred to this area as Adelie Land and when boundaries were defined it was in King George V Land. Eric Douglas said 'On our port bow is Cape Denison, a rocky outcrop extending half a mile or so seawards. The old huts are situated between two rocky rises and on the nearest rise can be seen the Cross erected by Sir Douglas in 1914 in memory of Lieut Ninnis and Dr Mertz who lost their lives while on a sledging trip'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112814
    The Discovery in open water. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112822
    112822 is the same image as 114903
    An aerial view of the Antarctic coast and Proclamation Island as seen from the de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD, at an altitude of 1500 feet. Eric Douglas' caption 'Close up view Antarctic Coast and Proclamation Rock - Open water near the coast - taken from 1500 ft altitude'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112825
    Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) pilots Pilot Officer Eric Douglas - left and Flying Officer Stuart Campbell - right, standing alongside de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD, on board the ship Discovery. The Gipsy Moth was a new aeroplane built by de Havilland in England and it was crated on the Discovery to Cape Town and then to the Antarctic. When conditions were nearly suitable for flying it was uncrated and assembled by the RAAF pilots on the deck of the ship. Its storage place was normally for a whaleboat or lifeboat which was taken off the ship to make room for the aeroplane. On this voyage the whaleboat was taken off at Kerguelen Island and collected on the return journey, which meant of course that the Gipsy Moth was re-crated. The moth was flown as a float seaplane on the BANZARE Voyages. As well as the floats, skis had been made for the aeroplane and they were stored in the floats. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112829
    Proclamation Island, showing a rocky peak. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112830
    A very old and tall iceberg seen off the coast of Enderby Land. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'A very old Iceberg seen off Enderby Land - Observed height 342 ft. Possibly the tallest iceberg ever seen'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112831
    The Discovery pushing through solid pack ice. It is heavy going. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112832
    112832 is the the same image as 114911
    A vertically split slide. The left image is an aerial view of the ship Discovery with Frank Hurley, looking up at the camera lens from within the ship's barrel. The right image shows the bow of the Discovery in open water. Eric Douglas said 'Left - Captain Hurley in the Barrel - A Bird's Eye View and Right - Heading South'. Photographs taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112833
    A large iceberg throwing a shadow. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112834
    112834 is the same image as 117071.
    Adelie Penguins seen along the slopes of Proclamation Island and with Icebergs in the far distance. Eric Douglas said 'Adelie Penguins sun baking on the slopes of Proclamation Rock'. Although this land feature became 'Proclamation Island' it had just been discovered and at this early stage to call it Proclamation Rock was quite acceptable. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112835
    Explorers aboard the Discovery looking towards the Norwegian ship 'Norvegia'. Eric Douglas' log of 14th January, 1930 - '...8PM Sail - Oh. Capt Davis reported a ship in sight dead ahead 8.30PM. She appears to be the “Norvegia” a wooden ship about 120 feet long, ketch rigged but uses steam all the time down here. She appears (from one mile off) to have two machines on board, stowed fore and aft. The one forrard is an American “Lockheed Vega” Cabin monoplane, the one aft is a German seaplane monoplane, after the style of their junkers. The Commander R Larson and first mate Mr Nielson came aboard'. Although there was intense rivalry at the time between the British and Norwegian Governments in terms of Antarctic Discoveries and claims, Capter Hjalmar Riiser Larsen of the Norvegia and Sir Douglas Mawson respected each other and got on extremely well. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112836
    An explorer from the Discovery planting the British Flag on Proclamation Island on 13th January, 1930. The Discovery is in the distance. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112837
    In the Pack Ice Belt. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112838
    Three Rockhopper penguins - a crested type of penguin. In fact all Rockhopper Penguins are crested. These Rockhoppers were probably seen on the Crozet Group or at the Kerguelen Islands. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112839
    A black and white iceberg. The black area is filled with with grit and mud, indicating that it has probably rolled over. Black bergs are actually translucent. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Black and White - a once grounded berg that has drifted away showing mud impregnated ice'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112840
    112840 is the the same image as 114908
    A barrel view of de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD housed on board the ship Discovery. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'A view showing the housing of Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112841
    The housing of de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD seaplane on the skids or the skid deck of the ship Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112842
    Three of the Discovery's explorers walking along the coast of Proclamation Island, Enderby Land. A large amount of pack ice can be seen floating in the water. Eric Douglas said 'View of the Antarctic Coast from Proclamation Rock'. Although this land feature became 'Proclamation Island' it had just been discovered and at this early stage to call it Proclamation Rock was quite acceptable. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112843
    Two explorers from the Discovery with rope standing in front of the de Havilland DH60G Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD. They may be checking ice conditions. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112844
    The Discovery in heavy pack ice. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112845
    Two Wandering Albatrosses flying over water. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112854
    112854 is the same images as 112855 and 114909
    A vertically split slide. The image on the left shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man on the deck wearing a sailor's hat. The image on the right shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man climbing up the rigging of the ship's mast. Eric Douglas said 'Left - The Bridge looking aft and Right - A view from the foreyard looking aft'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112855
    112855 is the same image as 112854 and 114909
    A vertically split slide. The image on the left shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man on the deck wearing a sailor's hat. The image on the right shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man climbing up the rigging of the ship's mast. Eric Douglas said 'Left - The Bridge looking aft and Right - A view from the foreyard looking aft'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112857
    112857 is the same image as 117075
    Crabeater Seals and Adelie Penguins drifting on an ice floe. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Crabeater Seals and Adelie Penguins drifting on their frozen raft'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    112880
    An Iceberg side on. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    112881
    112881 is the same image as 114902
    An Antarctic Explorer leaning on or against the katabatic wind of Cape Denison. Photograph taken during the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911-1914.

    114700
    RRS Discovery II in the pack ice zone in the Ross Sea. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114701
    RRS Discovery II and Cape Crozier, Ross Island in view. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114702
    Loading of spares for the two RAAF seaplanes - DH 60X Gipsy Moth A7-55 and Westland Wapiti A5-37. Note the fuel drums on the right. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114703
    Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas in the cockpit of the RAAF aircraft Wapiti in Williamstown, Victoria. Eric Douglas said 'RAAF Wapiti being loaded aboard the Discovery II at Williamstown, Victoria, December 1935 - Flight Lieut Douglas in the cockpit'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114704
    Three crew members on the deck of the Discovery II. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114705
    114705 is the same image as 114919
    RAAF Personnel Flight Lieutenant Douglas right and Sergeant Cottee left, binding a sledge. This sledge was loaned for the search by Sir Douglas Mawson. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114706
    Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas standing on the RAAF Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 near the lifting hook. This was at the end of the Reconnaissance flight of 13th January, 1936. Eric Douglas' log '...We climbed to about 1100 feet (could not go higher owing to clouds) and flew south for several miles. We sketched the general lay out and observed open water about 28 miles south. Heavy unbroken floes to the east. The ship was slowly steaming but with the wind on the wrong side for us to come on board, so I flew low and indicated to the Skipper to turn the ship about. This he did and then I alighted close by and tried to come on board, but the ship still had way on, so I put Al (Alister Murdoch) off into the motor boat and then took off solo to try and alight in a better position. This I did and without much trouble was hoisted on board'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114707
    Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 on board the ship Discovery II. Eric Douglas' caption reads 'Final Rigging of the Moth Seaplane in the quiet waters of the Ross Sea - January 1936'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114708
    114708 is the same image as 114941
    Group photo of the RAAF Party on board the ship Discovery II on the return journey to Melbourne. Lincoln Ellsworth is in the middle of the front row. Lieutenent Leonard Hill, the Captain of the Discovery II is on Ellsworth's right and Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas leader of the RAAF contingent is on Ellsworth's left side. The other six men are members of the RAAF party of seven. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114709
    Pilot ship Akuna in Port Phillip Bay - 18th February, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114710
    RAAF Westland Wapiti A7-35 stowed aft (with its wings detached) on the Discovery II. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114711
    An Antarctic Island of the Balleny Group. It could be Young Island. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114712
    Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 is ready with its engine running. It is rigged as a seaplane with floats and it is sitting on the Discovery II while the RAAF pilots wait for a patch of open water. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114713
    On the Discovery II or dinghy with the Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf) or Polar Ice in the distance. It is January, 1938. At the forefront on the left of the image, there appears to be part of a scientific tow net resting on the surface of the water. The men responsible for these nets on such a ship were known as 'Netmen'. The nets were of several different sizes and mesh types. It was said by an authority that 'the mouth of one tow net (on this ship) was the size of a dinner plate, with another believed to be the largest in the world...' Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114714
    On the deck of the Discovery II. Lieutenant Leonard Charles Hill, the Captain of the Discovery II is on the right and one of the ship's Engineers Andrew Porteous is on the left. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114715
    RAAF pilot, Flying Officer Alister Murdoch at 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114716
    Four members of the Discovery II search party at 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier in January, 1936. Eric Douglas called this search party an 'Ice Party'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114717
    Rowing party from the Discovery II off Cape Crozier, Ross Island. The Discovery II is in the distance. The date is January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114718
    114718 is the same image as 114918
    Discovery II search party at 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier in January, 1936. Eric Douglas called this search party an 'Ice Party'. The hole leading to the underground hut is near the man standing on the left. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114719
    RAAF - Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas, left and Flying Officer Alister Murdoch, right, flying the RAAF flag (actually the RAF flag) in the Antarctic, during January, 1936. Initially the British RAF flag was adopted by the RAAF. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114720
    Stowage of the Gipsy Moth seaplane which was a de Havilland DH60X with the RAAF serial number A7-55. Also shown three RAAF search party members near the Gipsy Moth which is sitting on the hospital of the Discovery II. The RAAF roundel (actually the RAF roundel) can be seen on the underside of the lower wing of the Gipsy Moth. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114721
    This shows the Wyatt Earp which was Lincoln Ellsworth's Expedition Ship. It was at the ice edge at the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea in January, 1936. Ellsworth's spare plane the Texaco 20 can be seen partly covered over sitting on the Wyatt Earp. A man can be seen standing on the ship in front of the Texaco 20. In the foreground on the ice are four explorers with skis. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114722
    RAAF Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55. There is a pilot in the cockpit and three other men in the dinghy in the water at the tail end of the aeroplane. Some last minute adjustments are being made to the Gipsy Moth. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114723
    The Wyatt Earp, Lincoln Ellsworth's Expedition Ship in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114724
    114724 is the same image as 114974
    The RAAF Wapiti A5-37 being loaded onto the RRS Discovery II at Williamstown, Victoria in December, 1935. Flight Lieut Eric Douglas is in the cockpit. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936

    114725
    A slide of a chart from BANZARE was used by Eric Douglas to illustrate the routes of some of the participants in the search for Lincoln Ellsworth and his pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon in 1935-1936. Three overlay lines using coloured pens were drawn by Eric Douglas on the slide. The black line is for the track for Ellsworth's Northrop Gamma 'Polar Star' from Dundee Island to 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier (Shelf). The red line is for the track of the Discovery II to the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea and the blue line is for the track of the return journey of the Discovery II to Melbourne. This slide was used by Eric Douglas to illustrate 'tracks taken' by some participants during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936 as there was no other suitable slide of the Antarctic available for use.

    114726
    RRS Discovery II in polar ice in the Ross Sea. View looking aft, with the the two figures on the platform trying to push the ship stern's clear of the ice floes with a long pole. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114727
    RRS Discovery II off Cape Crozier, Ross Island. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114728
    Flying Officer Alister Murdoch ot the RAAF search party holding the edges of the RAAF flag which is on a pole. This was at 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114729
    114729 is the same image as 114938.
    This is in the Ross Sea ice in January, 1936. Two of the crew from the Discovery II are 'poling off' standing on ice near the bow of the ship. Other crew members are assisting from the ship's deck above. Someone had to relay back to the Captain or Navigator as to what was happening in such a situation. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114730
    114730 is the same image as 114975.
    Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 taking off in the Ross Sea. Eric Douglas' caption 'Solo Reconnaissance Flight in open water in the Ross Sea - January, 1936. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas - Care has to be taken to avoid contact with brash ice during take off'. Eric Douglas' log of 12th January, 1936 'At about 8.30AM this morning we entered a pool of fairly clear water which seemed to me to have possibilities in regard to a reconnaissance flight. So the Skipper was in agreement we got the moth ready. At about 10.30AM I was lowered over the side and after a bit of manoeuvring I took off solo and climbed to 1100 feet (I could not go higher owing to clouds) and noticed that to the south (true) it appeared to offer the best path for the ship. About 30 to 35 miles away appeared to be clear water. I then alighted and was safely hoisted on board again'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114731
    114731 is the same image as 117614.
    Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf), Bay of Whales, Ross Sea, Antarctica, during January, 1936. This was and is the largest Ice Barrier in the Antarctic and it runs for hundreds of miles, with a vertical ice front to the open sea of the Ross Sea. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114732
    Bow view of 'Discovery II' in rough seas in the Southern Ocean. Drums, rigging and the front post or pole can be seen. The Discovery II was a triple oil burning steamship. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114733
    Group photo of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) party on board the ship 'Discovery II' with Lincoln Ellsworth in the middle in the front row. Eric Douglas' caption 'Moth seaplane (A7-55) with engine housing device. Personnel - Back Row - Reddrop, Cottee; Front Row - Easterbrook, Murdoch, Lincoln Ellsworth, Douglas and Gibbs'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114734
    RAAF members of the search party on the deck of the Discovery II. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas the leader of the party is on the right. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114735
    An Antarctic Island in or near the Ross Sea. This could be of Ross Island or an Island in the Balleny Group. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    114736
    A Bull Sea Elephant and a female sea elephant on Macquarie Island. The caption by Eric Douglas reads 'A Bull Sea Elephant'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    114737
    BANZARE Explorers on Christmas Day in 1930 in the wardroom of the Discovery. On the right seated - Eric Douglas (left), Sir Douglas Mawson and Captain Kenneth MacKenzie. On the left seated at the front is Professor T Harvey Johnston. There are gifts laid out on the table and balloons hanging from the ceiling. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    114738
    Five explorers (from the Scientific party) and the Discovery's motor boat on the shore at Bossiers Arm (Bras Bossiere), Kerguelen Island. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    114739
    The Discovery at Cape Town, South Africa in October, 1929. This photo was taken prior to the departure of the Discovery on BANZARE Voyage 1 of 1929-1930. Eric Douglas' caption 'SY Discovery and the Ship's Company at Cape Town'. Frank Hurley is in the middle row on the left.

    114740
    Young Sea Elephants at Heard Island. The caption by Eric Douglas reads 'Young Sea Elephants at Heard Island'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    114741
    'Prevent Forest Fires', a coloured advertisement for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film,1930-1931. A colourful picture is shown with a devil burning down some bushland with a match and cigerette butt. Prevent Forest Fires. Put out that flaming match! Issued by the Forests Commission of Victoria. The date is 1929-1931.

    114742
    'Carlton Bock', a coloured advertisement for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film,1930-1931. An advertisement for Carlton and United Breweries (CUB). Pictured is a sick man in a robe seated on a couch with a glass of bock in his hand. There is a yellow background on the slide and a bottle of 'Carlton Bock' to the left. Highly recommended for Invalids! The date is 1929-1931.

    114743
    'Berlei Step-in' coloured advertisement, for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film, 1930-1931. An advertisement for Berlei step-in corsets. The slide is painted yellow with a picture of a woman wearing black stockings and yellow undergarments. She is bending down to place a golf ball on the ground. Comfort unbelievable, Freedom unhampered, Joy untold in a Berlei Step-in! The date is 1929-1931.

    114744
    'Berlei Foundation' coloured advertisement for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film, 1930-1931. Pictured on the slide is a silhouette of a woman wearing a pink corset. The date is 1929-1931.

    114745
    'Sennitt's the ice cream that is different', coloured Ad for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film, 1930-1931. An advertisement for Sennitt's ice cream. The slide is painted blue with a picture of a white polar bear licking a vanilla ice cream and a young boy crying. Bear In mind Sennitt's. This was the highlight of the slides when we showed the glass slides or lantern slides with the projector (magic lantern). We all knew that it was time to have an ice cream and Sennitt's if possible, but sometimes it was homemade (when Eric Douglas was showing the slides in the 1940's and 1950's this was our routine). Besides, the projector (lantern) ran 'hot' and had to be left for awhile to cool down. The date is 1929-1931.

    114746
    'Khaki Stout', coloured advertisement for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film, 1930-1931. An advertisement for Carlton and United Breweries (CUB). The slide is painted green and yellow with a Khaki Stout bottle pictured on the left side. Most nourishing. The date is 1929-1931.

    114747
    'Palais De Danse', St Kilda, coloured advertisement, for use with BANZARE Lantern Slides and Film, 1930-1931. An advertisement for the next Saturday at the 'Palais de Danse' in St Kilda. The date is 1929-1931.

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-05-31
    User data
  49. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 3)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 3

    Item details for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) in order as in the Melbourne Museum's database spreadsheets -

    114748
    114748 is the same image as 114915.
    Proclamation Flag Raising, Proclamation Island, BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930. Sir Douglas Mawson and some of the 'Scientific party' at Proclamation Island where they carried out a Proclamation ceremony and flag raising of the British Flag. This photo was taken after the reading of a Proclamation by Sir Douglas Mawson on the summit of this 'new' Island on 13th January, 1930. RAAF pilots Eric Douglas and Stuart Campbell were not present as they were working on the Gipsy Moth VH-ULD. Eric Douglas' Log of 13th January, 1930 '...9AM. A party left in the motor boat (ten of them) their main job being to hoist the flag. At 12 noon we saw them on top of this rock and observed the flag was hoisted. Stu and I spent the morning working on our machine...The party returned at 3PM with specimens of rock, penguins, birds etc'.

    117500
    'Dipping Our Ensign' (Eric Douglas caption). The SY Discovery leaving Hobart on 22 November, 1930. Dipping the Ensign was a maritime tradition. By Eric Douglas - 'At 2PM there was a large gathering on the pier and at 2.30PM the pier lines were let go and we slowly backed out to the resounding cheers and shouts of the people on the pier. We gave three lusty cheers for the Citizens of Hobart and then three blasts from our whistle'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931. The SY Discovery had come from Melbourne, but the 'Official' start of this voyage was from Hobart. In the Winter of 1930 the ship had docked and been refitted at Harbour docks, Williamstown (Eric Douglas).

    117501
    'Goodbye to All That' (Eric Douglas caption). SY Discovery leaving Hobart on 22 November, 1930. A crowd of onlookers at Queen's Pier, Hobart watching the SY Discovery depart for Macquarie Island and Antarctica. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117502
    117502 is the same image as 114907.
    A Gentoo Penguin colony on Macquarie Island. Eric Douglas said 'Rookeries are situated in the foot hills some distance from the foreshore. A mountain stream connects the Rookery to the foreshore. Penguins go by the water way to and from the Rookery...' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117503
    Three explorers on the deck of the SY Discovery. Nearest the camera Eric Douglas is on the left and Max Stanton the 1st Mate is on the right. Douglas and Stanton are standing on the fo'c'stle (forecastle) head. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117504
    A large colony of penguins and seals are on the beach at Macquarie Island.The caption by Eric Douglas is 'Penguins Playing on the Sandy Beach.' Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117505
    A large colony of Royal Penguins swimming and spread out along the beach. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'The Nuggets - Macquarie Island' and added 'Royal Penguins gathered on the foreshore - The Rookerie is situated some distance inland. They come and go via a stream connecting the Rookerie to the coast'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117506
    117506 is the same image as 117070.
    SY Discovery. Eric Douglas said 'Under full sail'. It was a Barque or Bark rigging. This photograph was taken before the official start of BANZARE Voyage 1. In Cape Town the Discovery was converted to a Barquentine rig. It is included with Frank Hurley's BANZARE Voyage 1 photos of 1929-1930.

    117507
    Macquarie Island from a distance. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Nor East End of Macquarie Island'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117508
    Four BANZARE explorers from the SY Discovery are pitching their tents on Macquarie Island. This appears to be at Buckles Bay. The Discovery can be seen in the background. These tents weighed 10 lbs and were made for Sir Douglas Mawson in Sydney by S Walder Limited, during September, 1929. The material used was balloon or parachute silk and the tents had the capacity to be completely airtight. The tents were of the pointed at the top, supported by five bamboo poles which were drawn together. Running around the full circumference at the bottom of each tent is a flap and when the tent is erected this flap lies flat on the ground or in the snow. Then say in the case of snow more can be piled on the flap holding it down excluding the cold winds. Eric Douglas said ' Preparing for a short stay at this Island'. From Eric Douglas' log of 2nd December, 1930 'Twelve of us landed and the launch and dingy were taken back to the ship by the Second Engineer and a seaman. The tops of the adjacent hills were obscured by mist and the wind was blowing fresh from the west. The ship was anchored in north east bay and was fairly well sheltered. We immediately erected four tents and put our camping gear inside to keep it dry'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117509
    Eric Douglas said 'Young King Penguins'. This was likely to have been at Lusitania Bay. It was on Macquarie Island. An explorer who could be Frank Hurley is looking towards the camera lens surrounded by a colony of young King Penguins. The SY Discovery is in the distance. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931. The image is missing from the web?

    117510
    Eric Douglas captioned this image 'Inquisitive Penguins'. This was likely to have been at Lusitania Bay. It was on Macquarie Island. An explorer who could be Stuart Campbell is standing behind a row of King Penguins. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117511
    Eric Douglas captioned this 'The Stately King'. King Penguins on Macquarie Island, with a bunch in the foreground and more scattered in the background. This was likely to have been at Lusitania Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117512
    The Whaling factory ship Kosmos, showing its tunnel. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117513
    Tunnel and stern of the whaling factory ship 'Kosmos'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117514
    Macquarie Island and Royal Penguin Rookeries. Eric Douglas captioned this image 'Penguin Rookeries- Royal Penguins'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117515
    Two different types of whale chasers in Antarctic waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117516
    The Discovery is hugging the Antarctic coast. To add to the scene the sun is setting while the 'SY Discovery' sits in calm waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117517
    Eric Douglas captioned this as 'Captain Frank Hurley Taking Some Cine'. Macquarie Island with Frank Hurley on the beach shooting some film footage of two seals wrapped up in seaweed. The camera he is using is set upon a tripod. His camera equipment was often very heavy and so he needed the other explorers to help carry it at times. This was one such occasion, and Eric Douglas and Stuart Campbell had been lending a hand. They had been asked to do this by Sir Douglas Mawson. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117518
    'Bishop and Clerk Rocks' off the southern end of Macquarie Island. Eric Douglas had captioned the image 'Bishop and Clark Rocks'. (Note Clark rather than Clerk). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117519
    Loose polar pack ice in Antarctic waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117520
    At Macquarie Island. An abadoned Sealers hut on the beach which has lost its roof and some of its walls. There are penguins and seals in the background. Looking south along the Nuggets beach towards Tom Ugly Point. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117521
    There were thousands of Royal Penguins in Rookeries on Macquarie Island - 2nd December, 1930. Eric Douglas' log 'Soon we came across a stream, and going up and down this stream were many (Royal) penguins. They were going to and from their rookeries. We walked up the shallow stream for several hundred yards and then came across a large rookery. Frank Hurley took cinema along the way and at the rookery. We returned to the beach and watched the penguins surfing. They were playing around just like people on the beach. The Penguins here were quite tame and did not take much notice of us.They estimate there are at least half a million penguins at this part of the Island. Probably the biggest rookery in the world'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117522
    The Whaling factory ship the 'Sir James Clark Ross' and dead whales alongside the ship. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117523
    Snowy mountains and the coast, likely Macquarie Island. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117524
    Five BANZARE explorers out on the ice near Boat Harbour at Cape Denison. Three of the men are dragging a sledge full of ice . Eric Douglas is on the right. Eric Douglas said on 5th January, 1931 'Frozen snow was loaded into the motor boat and carried off to the ship, this was repeated several times until our tanks were full, roughly four tons were brought off in this way'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117525
    Icebergs and rough seas. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117526
    The SY Discovery on the left, with the Whaling factory ship the Kosmos on the right in the Antarctic. Eric Douglas said 'We are now heading towards the Kosmos. This ship is 20 feet longer than the James Clark Ross and is 22,000 tons. She has nine chasers in attendance and is a Norwegian concern financially... The Kosmos broke a world’s record the other week when she handled forty whales in twenty four hours. Normally she cuts up about twenty whales per day'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117527
    The SY Discovery on the left, with the Whaling factory ship the Sir James Clark Ross on the right. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117528
    The Whaling factory ship Kosmos. It is a side view of the Kosmos. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931

    117529
    The deck of a Whaling factory ship on the right. A man is standing beside a whale's tail. The small ship moored to the left alongside the whaling factory ship is the Discovery. The Discovery is separated from the Whaling factory ship by the use of whale blubber as padding. Eric Douglas found whaling factory ships and their operations to be 'rather a gruesome sight, awful stench, blood and bones being continually emptied overboard (Norwegian and English Companies)'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117530
    The SY Discovery with the backdrop of the Antarctic coastline. These are quiet waters. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117531
    The Antarctic coast at Cape Denison Commonwealth Bay, looking towards the land. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117532
    A Whale chaser with a swivelling harpoon gun set up at the bow of the ship. Eric Douglas said in brief notes 'Chasers are powerful small vessels 90-100 ft long, 2000HP and 15 knots. They contain a muzzle loading swivelling gun for throwing an explosive headed harpoon'. The gun was operated by either the Captain of the vessel or a Gunner. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117533
    This is of a dead whale which had inflated with its own gas. Eric Douglas said 'In the afternoon we sighted what first appeared to be a black ice berg or a small island. But on approaching nearer we saw it had been a mirage effect and the object was a dead blue fin whale. It was blown up by its own gas to a huge size. Hundreds of birds were feeding off its tongue'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117534
    Adelie Penguins gathered in a Rookery at Cape Denison. (The slide is edged with newspaper printed text). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117535
    117535 is the same image as 114913.
    Looking out to sea from the ice engulfed Boat Harbour at Cape Denison, with the Mackellar Islets showing up in the distance. Eric Douglas captioned this image 'Boat Harbour at Commonwealth Bay, Adelie Land'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117536
    A Whale chaser with a swivelling harpoon gun at its bow. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117537
    A Whale chaser in Antarctic waters with its Captain or Gunner ready for the chase standing near the swivelling harpoon gun on its bow. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117538
    117538 is the same image as 117543.
    Looking inland towards the Antarctic Plateau from an icy Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117539
    Adelie Penguins at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117540
    Adelie Penguins on the ice covered coastal fringe at Cape Denison with more of the coast visible on the left in this image. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117541
    Adelie Penguins at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. They are playing on a coastal ice covered rocky outcrop and the Discovery is well out to sea. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117542
    The de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD seaplane housed on skids or the skid deck of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117543
    117543 is the same image as 117538.
    Looking inland towards the Antarctic Plateau from an icy Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117544
    Ten BANZARE explorers are in a cabin on the Discovery. Three are lying on a top bunk and the others are seated below. Some are smoking pipes and cigarettes. There is a gramophone on the right and one man is holding a banjo. This was the 'Fiddely Club'. Eric Douglas said 'Out Antarctic Club - In the Top Bunk from the left - Eric Douglas, 2nd Mate Colbeck, Simmers and Lower row from the left - Stu Campbell, 'Cherub' Fletcher, Doc Ingram, 'Babe' Marr, 'Birdie' Falla, and Center two - 3rd Mate Child and Alf Howard'. They got together sometimes in the evenings to discuss events of the day and to play and listen to music. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117545
    A Barrel or Crow's Nest view of Gipsy Moth Seaplane VH-ULD. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117546
    The Antarctic coast. The shadow cast on the right side of the slide is from the side rail of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117547
    117547 is the same image as 112798.
    Antarctic waters with an iceberg looming up in the distance. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117548
    'Mickey Mouse and friends' at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay (Eric Douglas caption). Eric Douglas always thought of the penguins as friends. These are Adelies. This photo shows an image of a wooden cutout Mickey Mouse who is propped up between rocks in an Adelie Penguin Rookery. Mickey Mouse is raising his hat and the Adelie Penguin on the right is a bit interested. The cutout was likely made by Frank Hurley and Eric Douglas of BANZARE. The cartoon character Mickey Mouse was created by Walt Disney in 1928. Eric Douglas said 'this was a three ply cutout of Mickey Mouse standing about two feet high. In the Rookery he was received by pecks and beating flippers from the birds standing on their pebbled nests. Later we planted him in a pathway that the penguins take when walking along the icy foreshore, and here he was on object of great interest'. I understand fully why there was always a Mickey Mouse in our household when I was growing up! Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117549
    Two BANZARE explorers - Left - Frank Hurley and Right - Harold Fletcher standing at the side near the entrance of the 'old hut' (Mawsons Huts) at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117550
    Four BANZARE explorers - From the left - Captain Kenneth MacKenzie, Sir Douglas Mawson, William Colbeck and Doctor William Wilson Ingram at the back of the 'old hut' (Mawsons Huts) at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. They are all holding ice walking sticks. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117551
    Adelie Penguins beside a HMV Gramophone, donated to BANZARE by His Masters Voice, in a Rookery at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. This gramophone was taken ashore at Cape Denison from the Discovery by Eric Douglas for purpose of playing music to the Adelies and getting their response and some photographs. A few were interested but most took no notice in spite of one version where they were responding in kind, but they were superimposed on that image by Frank Hurley (That image is not in this particular Antarctic collection). This image is by Eric Douglas. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117552
    The Memorial with a cross and plaque at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay at the top of Azimuth Hill. It commemorates the lives of Lieutenant Belgrave Ninnis and Dr Xavier Mertz who lost their lives in the Antarctic while on the Far Eastern sledging trip with Sir Douglas Mawson, during the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911- 1914. The hill on which the cross is standing is 25 metres high at the north end of a narrow rocky outcrop overlooking the old hut (Mawsons Huts). Eric Douglas said 'The Cross was erected on the direction of Sir Douglas in 1914 in memory of Lieut. Ninnis and Dr Mertz who lost their lives while on a sledging trip...' The Cross may have even been erected in 1913. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117553
    The interior of Sir Douglas Mawson's hut in Cape Dennison, Commonwealth Bay on 6th January, 1931. Eric Douglas said 'They had made an entry in the main hut through a skylight, snow was packed near the roof but the hut was fairly clear and one could walk about. Beautiful snow crystals were attached to old books, bottles, bunks and rafters, somewhat like inside a crystal cave'. Frank Hurley took flash light photos of the inside. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117554
    Abandoned Airframe at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. These are remains of the Air Tractor taken to the Antarctic with the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911-1914. It was taken there on the ship Aurora as a Air Tractor and flight was not intended. Before the AAE left it was stripped of it's engine and other mechanical parts and was virtually just an airframe sitting at the edge of the Boat Harbour. As an Air Tractor it proved to be cumbersome and heavy. Many years after the BANZARE visit in early 1931 to Cape Denison it disappeared. Small remnants of the airframe have been found in the Boat Harbour in recent years. There is still an ongoing interest by the Mawson Huts Foundation to find more parts of this Airframe.There could not have been much conversation about this Airfame when the BANZ Expedition called in during January, 1931 as Eric Douglas was under the impression that it had been taken to Cape Denison to fly it (but it was damaged and taken south by Sir Douglas Mawson at the time of the AAE of 1911-1914 with the intention that it would not fly but was to be an Air Tractor). I suppose it was a case of lessening the disappointment of not having a flyable plane? Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117555
    The de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD seaplane flying over a very large Tabular Berg. Eric Douglas said that he skimmed closed to a berg once to see what the surface looked like in case he had to land in an emergency. I believe that this berg was in the neighbourhood of the 78th degree of East Longitude,which places it at Princess Elizabeth Land. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117556 and 117558.

    117556
    A very large Tabular Iceberg. Eric Douglas had said that some of the tabular bergs were as big as Melbourne city 'blocks' eg Flinders, Swanston, Collins and Elizabeth Streets as a block. I believe that this berg was in the neighbourhood of the 78th degree of East Longitude,which places it at Princess Elizabeth Land. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117555 and 117558.

    117557
    The de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD seaplane. One of the RAAF pilots is standing on the fuselage. The Discovery is nearby. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117558
    The de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD rigged as a seaplane with floats. The seaplane is taking off in open water and there is a very large Tabular Berg nearby.I believe that this berg was in the neighbourhood of the 78th degree of East Longitude, which places it at Princess Elizabeth Land. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931. This would have been taken the same photographic exercise as 117555 and 117556.

    117559
    117559 is the same image as 114916.
    The de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD on the aeroplane hoist on the Discovery. The two RAAF Pilots with BANZARE are standing on the plane. Pilot Officer Eric Douglas on the left and Flying Officer Stuart Campbell on the right. This was at the completion of the historic flight of 31st December, 1929. Mac-Robertson land was sighted for the first time on this flight. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117560
    An Iceberg and its reflection in the water. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.

    117561
    Eric Douglas said 'A Berg with much brash ice'. The Berg was ahead of the Discovery and can be seen from just behind the front mast. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117562
    117562 is the same image as 114905.
    'Peaks of Enderby Land' in the distance. Nunataks as seen from the Ship Discovery in January, 1930, they were Mount Codrington, Simmers Peaks and Mount Johnston. This is a copy of a printed version of the image. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117563
    117563 is the same image as 114914.
    'Mac-Robertson Land' in the distance. The Masson and David Ranges are shown and they are part of the Framnes Mountains. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117564
    Murray Monolith, Mac-Robertson Land, Antarctica. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). However, there is some chance that this could be Scullin Monolith for the two Monoliths are hard to separate in photographs. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117565
    117565 is the same image as 114906.
    Coast of Enderby Land, Antarctica. Mount Biscoe is on the left, Cape Ann in the centre and Mount Hurley on the right. (The three closest images). This is a copy of a printed version of the image. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117566
    Coast near Mac-Robertson Land. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117567
    Explorers (Scientific party) in the Discovery's motor boat near Scullin Monolith. Five men can be seen in the boat. It holds up to twelve persons. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117568
    117568 is the same image as 114904.
    Frank Hurley said on this 'Margin of the Ice-Caped Land'. It is of an explorer at Lands End, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. This is a copy of a printed version of the image. Photograph taken during the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911- 1914.

    117569
    Murray Monolith in Mac-Robertson Land. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117570
    An Adelie Penguin on the rocks at Cape Denison. The Adelie Penguin Rookeries are in this vicinity. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117571
    A Penguin Colony on Murray Monolith, Mac-Robertson Land. It is now spelt as Mac.Robertson (2017). Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931. The image is missing from the web?

    117572
    Adelie Penguins in a Rookery are mingling with a wooden cutout of Mickey Mouse at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117573
    Royal Penguins at Macquarie Island. Eric Douglas said 'off for a surf'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117574
    A hint of the Discovery and choppy seas, taken from the deck of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117575
    117575 is the same image as 117073.
    A typical Tabular Iceberg with the sun reflected on its surface. Eric Douglas said 'A Typical Berg - 200 ft above sea level and 1000 ft below - it is heavily crevassed'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117576
    Adelie Penguins sliding down a rock face into Antarctic waters. This may be a copy of a printed photo. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117577
    Ship's Officers and the Scientific Party on the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), Voyage 2 of 1930-1931. The Expedition Leader, Sir Douglas Mawson is pictured middle row and third from the right. Eric Douglas is in the bottom row and second from the right and Frank Hurley is to the left of Eric Douglas. This photo was taken by Frank Hurley with the assistance of Eric Douglas using the remote cord to activate the camera. Pictured here are - Back row from the left - Williams, Kennedy, Fletcher, Campbell, Falla, Child, Simmers; Middle row from the left - Griggs, Ingram, Captain MacKenzie, Sir Douglas Mawson, Johnston, Colbeck; Front row from the left Howard, Oom, Hurley, Douglas, Welch. Stanton who was the Chief Officer on this Voyage is absent. They are on the Discovery in Hobart at the completion of BANZARE. Photograph taken at the completion of BANZARE, 1929-1931.

    117578
    Eric Douglas on deck of the Discovery at the bow end. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117579
    117579 is the same image as 114910.
    A horizontally split slide. Eric Douglas said 'Southward Ho!'. Two pictures showing sail settings of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117580
    An aerial view of the Discovery steaming along in open water. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117581
    A compilation of portraits by Frank Hurley of the Scientific Party from the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), Voyage 1 of 1929-1930. Each portrait is signed by the person shown. Pictured are - from the Top on the right, and moving clockwise - Mr Robert Falla, Commander Morton Moyes, Flying Officer Stuart Campbell, Dr William Wilson Ingram, Pilot Officer Eric Douglas, Mr Ritchie Simmers and Professor Harvey Johnston and the Centre two - Left to right - Mr Alf Howard and Mr James Marr. Captain Frank Hurley who took and compiled these portraits is missing from the compilation. This was compiled during the BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117582
    An Albatross flying. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117583
    117583 is the same image as 114912.
    A Wandering Albatross getting ready to land. Eric Douglas said 'Albatross getting ready to alight'. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 1, 1929-1930.

    117584
    Frank Hurley, left and James William Slessor Marr, right are washing their clothes in buckets on the deck of the Discovery. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117585
    Very steep seas in the Southern Ocean as seen from Discovery. Showing in the foreground is a rowlock or oarlock of the ship's dinghy. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117586
    The Discovery in a Southern Ocean swell. Photograph taken on BANZARE Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117587
    A Portrait of Sir Douglas Mawson, the Expedition Leader of the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) of 1929-1931. This photo was taken on board the Discovery. Photograph taken during the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE), Voyage 2 -1930-1931.

    117588
    117588 is the same image as 114937.
    The RAAF DH 60X Gipsy Moth A7-55 seaplane is in the distance in the air. This was at the commencement of the Reconnaissance flight in the Ross Sea. Eric Douglas said 'Start of the Reconnaissance flight in the Ross Sea, F/Lt Douglas and F/OMurdoch - from the Discovery II. The search for Explorers Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117589
    A Ross Seal lying on an icefield. It is a comparatively rare species of seal. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117590
    A Discovery II explorer feeding a penguin at Cape Crozier, Ross Island in January, 1936. There is a colony of penguins in the background. This was taken in the vicinity of Mt Terror and Mt Erebus. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117591
    The Southern Ocean as seen from the Discovery II. In the foreground at the right is part of the ship's dinghy. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117592
    Small white top waves in the Southern Ocean from the Discovery II. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117593.

    117593
    White top waves in the Southern Ocean from the Discovery II. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117592.

    117594
    Showing rigging on the Discovery II which is in open seas in the Southern Ocean. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117595
    Pilot Ship Akuna - Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, 18 February, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117596
    A snow capped Antarctic Island - probably Franklin or Coulman. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117597
    Aviator and Polar Explorer, Sir Hubert Wilkins who was in charge of the Ellsworth's expedition ship the Wyatt Earp. Taken in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea, Antarctica in January, 1936, Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117598
    Six of the Discovery II crew members with an Adelie Penguin on board Discovery II. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117599
    Eric Douglas at the right, wearing snowshoes and saying hello to a couple of Adelie penguins on the Ross Ice Barrier in January, 1936. Five fellow explorers are in the background. Some of the party have skis. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117600
    Eric Douglas in front is with other members of the search party from Discovery II, en route to 'Little America', in January, 1936. Eric Douglas called this the 'Ice party'. Behind the men is the ship's motor boat which carried them and their gear to the ice edge of the Ross Ice Barrier. Their ship the Discovery II can be seen well out at sea. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117601
    The Wyatt Earp in the distance at the Ross Ice Barrier in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117602
    The Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf) in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. The Discovery II and in the foreground is the deck of the ship. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117603
    Explorers with a snow tractor left behind at an icy landing strip by Admiral Richard Byrd near Ver-Sur-Mer Inlet on the Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf). One man is sitting on the tractor. It was in January, 1936. This and another tractor were discovered half buried in the polar ice by Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon when they were on their way to 'Little America' after abandoning Ellsworth's aeroplane the 'Polar Star'. These tractors were used by Herbert Hollick-Kenyon and members of the Wyatt Earp's crew to later tow the 'Polar Star' back to the Wyatt Earp to be loaded on board for the return trip to the United States. The ship Wyatt Earp is in the background inscribed with the words 'Ellsworth Expedition'. The Texaco 20 Lincoln Ellsworth's spare aircraft is on the deck of the ship. Sir Hubert Wilkins was in charge of the Expedition Ship the Wyatt Earp. He and Lincoln Ellsworth got on well then but they later drifted apart. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117613.

    117604
    The bow of Discovery II is shown in loose brash or pack ice. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117605
    An explorer on skis is on the ice. He is standing alongside Lincoln Ellsworth's ship the Wyatt Earp. This was in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117606
    The Radio Operator from the Discovery II is wearing headphones and is positioned in front of the ship's radio equipment. This Radio Officer was Petty Officer A E Morris. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117607
    The Discovery II moving through a solid icesheet. Two men on deck are leaning over to view the ice situation.This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117608
    A search party from the Discovery II is at 'Little America'. This was in January, 1936. The party has a sledge and are on skis or wearing snow shoes. Four men are in this picture. Eric Douglas called this the 'Ice party'. Wireless tripod masts of a height of 35 feet and snow measurement poles are in the background. These had all been erected by Admiral Byrd and his Antarctic expedition members on one of his previous expeditions to 'Little America'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117609
    The Discovery II in the Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117610
    RAAF pilot Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas who was in charge of the RAAF contingent on the Discovery II is out on the ice pack checking space for taking off and landing and the ice conditions for a flight in Gipsy Moth A7-55.This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117611
    A fraction of the side of the Discovery II can be seen. The ship is moving through a lead (fracture) in the solid ice. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117612.

    117612
    A side view of the Discovery II. The ship is negotiating a passage through the thick pack. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117611.

    117613
    An explorer sitting in a closed snow tractor left behind at an icy landing strip by Admiral Richard Byrd near Ver-Sur-Mer Inlet. This was in January, 1936. One man is sitting on the tractor. This and another tractor were discovered half buried in the polar ice by Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon when they were on their way to 'Little America' after abandoning Ellsworth's aeroplane the 'Polar Star'. These tractors were used by Herbert Hollick Kenyon and members of the Wyatt Earp's crew to later tow the 'Polar Star' back to the Wyatt Earp to be loaded on board for the return trip to the United States. The ship Wyatt Earp is in the background inscribed with the words 'Ellsworth Expedition'. The Texaco 20 Lincoln Ellsworth's spare aircraft is on the deck of the ship. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. This would have been taken in the same photographic exercise as 117603.

    117614
    117614 is the same image as 114731.
    The Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf), at the Bay of Whales. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117615
    117615 is the same image as 114938.
    Lincoln Ellsworth's expedition ship the Wyatt Earp in sea ice and the Discovery II is in the background. These two ships are in the Bay of Whales.This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117616
    Discovery II in heavy pack ice in the Ross Sea. The RAAF Gipsy Moth A7-55 is sitting on the ship's hospital. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117617
    The RAAF party and the Discovery II explorers on deck. In the foreground are two cattle carcasses hanging from the rigging. Also part of the RAAF Westland Wapiti A7-35 can be seen at left. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117618
    A Burgee of the the Royal Brighton Yacht Club flying at 'Little America', Antarctica. This was in January, 1936. This Burgee belonged to Eric Douglas, who was a long term member of the Royal Brighton Yacht Club (RBYC). This Burgee together with many signatures of the Discovery II, the RAAF party and Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon is proudly displayed at the Club together with a wall board of BANZARE Antarctic Prints. Also displayed is a Club Burgee on the Kookaburra story of 1929 which was presented to Eric Douglas by the RBYC. All items were donated by Eric Douglas, except for the last which was donated back to the Club me. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117619
    Open seas in the Southern Ocean. A very small part of the dinghy belonging to the ship Discovery II can be seen at bottom right in the image. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117620
    The Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf).This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117621
    A Colony of Penguins at Cape Crozier, Ross Island. This was in the vicinity of the volcanic mountains Mt Terror and Mt Erebus. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117622
    Penguin chicks seen moulting at Cape Crozier, Ross Island. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117623
    Discovery II berthed at Dunedin, New Zealand. Dunedin was the only port of call by the Discovery II when in New Zealand where they stocked up on fuel and fresh provisions.The RAAF Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 is housed on top of the ship's hospital. In the background are Port warehouses. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    Sally E Douglas

    June 2017

    5 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-10
    User data
  50. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 4)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 4

    Item details for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) in order as in the Melbourne Museum's database spreadsheets -

    117624
    An explorer from the Discovery II in amongst the penguins at Cape Crozier, Ross Island. That man could be RAAF pilot Flying Officer Alister Murdoch. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117625
    117625 is the same image as 114918.
    This shows the bow of the Discovery II entering a lead (fracture) in sea ice. The Latitude was 72 degrees South. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117626
    This is likely to be the coast of New Zealand. The Discovery II approached Dunedin, New Zealand by rounding the bottom of the South Island. The date is December, 1935. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117627
    117627 is the same image as 114937.
    Five members of the Discovery II search party at 'Little America' which is defined by tripod wireless masts and snow measurement poles. Eric Douglas called this the 'Ice party'. Access to the radio and accomodation hut was through a hole in the ice near the figure of the man on the left. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117628
    117628 is the same image as 114975.
    Polar explorers Lincoln Ellsworth at the left and Herbert Herbert Hollick-Kenyon right, on deck of the Discovery II in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117629
    A Penguin colony on Cape Crozier on Ross Island. The Discovery II is well out to sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117630
    The Discovery II is at the left in the image and the Wyatt Earp is out to sea at the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. A motor boat party from one of the two ships can be seen near the Wyatt Earp. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117631
    117631 is the same image as 114974.
    A search party from Discovery II. Lincoln Ellsworth is pictured in the middle. Eric Douglas called this an 'Ice party'. (Two small prints with makings on the back verify this was by Eric Douglas - the Te Papa Tongarewa Museum in Wellington shows this was by Alfred Saunders). Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117632
    Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas at the left and Flying Officer Alister Murdoch with a RAAF flag at 'Little America'. The RAAF had adopted the RAF flag. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117633
    This is of a Motor Boat party of six explorers from the Discovery II. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117634
    An explorer from the Discovery II having a beer while holding a long neck bottle of Melbourne Bitter Ale. He could be 'Babe' Marr. There is another man in the background to the left. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117635
    117635 is the same image as 114939.
    Two explorers on the Ross Ice Barrier looking out towards the Discovery II at the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117636
    117636 is the same image as 114940.
    The Motor Boat parked along the icy shore near 'Little America' with three explorers on board with one explorer standing alongside the boat. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117637
    Six Airmen of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) search party with their leader Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas who is pictured third from the right. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117638
    A Portrait of the Canadian based pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon smoking a pipe on the Discovery II in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. He returned to the United States on the Wyatt Earp, together with the aeroplane the 'Polar Star' which is in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. Two explorers on board a motor boat belonging to the Discovery II. Eric Douglas could be the man on the left. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117639
    Lincoln Ellsworth's expedition ship the Wyatt Earp with the Texaco 20 aeroplane sitting on board. On the side of the ship it states 'Wyatt Earp- Ellsworth Expedition'. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117640
    Flying Officer Alister Murdoch is standing beside the part wing of aircraft 331-N which was protruding out of the ice. It was a wing remnant from Admiral Richard Byrd's flying at 'Little America'. The wing came from Byrd's single engine Fokker monoplane F-14 NC-331-N called Blue Blade. (At the time of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition Eric Douglas did not think that it belonged to Admiral Richard Byrd as he had heard that Byrd had removed all his aircraft from 'Little America').This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936

    117641
    Two explorers on board a motor boat belonging to the Discovery II. They are probably the RAAF pilots getting ready for a flight. It is likely to be Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas on the left. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117642
    Wyatt Earp and explorers in a motor boat on the left. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117643
    117643 is the same image as 114940.
    Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) flag in the foreground and the ship Wyatt Earp in the distance. This was at the time of the meeting up of the Discovery II and the Wyatt Earp in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. It was on 20th January, 1936. The RAAF had adopted the RAF flag. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117644
    117644 is the same image as 114941.
    Whales are blowing near the Wyatt Earp which is at the icy shoreline. The Discovery II can be seen in the distance. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117645
    117645 is the same image as 114939.
    Four members of the Discovery II search party are at 'Little America'. Eric Douglas called this the 'Ice party'. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117646
    117646 is the same image as 114940.
    The de Havilland DH 60X Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 is on the lifting hook on the Discovery II. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas is in the cockpit. There was pack ice around the ship. This was the 1st Reconnaissance flight from the Discovery II after entering the Ross Sea and it took place in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117647
    Ross Island coastline, Ross Sea. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117648
    The Discovery II in heavy pack ice. Eric Douglas said 'Research Ship Discovery II in heavy pack ice en route to the Bay of Whales to search for the American Explorer Mr Lincoln Ellsworth and Mr Herbert Hollick-Kenyon, January, 1936'. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117649
    An explorer is on the ice wearing skis and another pair of skis nearby. The Wyatt Earp is in the background at the ice edge. This was in January, 1936. Photograph taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936.

    117650
    A Portrait of the King of England who bestowed an OBE on the Captain of the Discovery II, Lieutenant Leonard Charles Hill on 15th February, 1936. This is a copy of a print. Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935-1936.

    117651
    A Portrait of Lincoln Ellsworth. Photograph likey taken when Ellsworth was on the Discovery II. Ellsworth Relief Expedition 1935-1936.

    Item details for the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two paintings and Photographic Prints. Many of these items double up with the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) but here I am using what I regard as a more 'formal' description. The order follows the Melbourne Museum's database spreadsheets -

    114907 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photo is of a superimposed image created by Frank Hurley of the SY Discovery 'pushing' through pack ice. It is included with Hurley's BANZARE Voyage 1 photos of 1929-1930. Eric Douglas said the purpose was to give some reality as to what the Discovery would look like with its full sailing rig in solid pack ice and he added 'don't get too alarmed for the safety of the ship'. Photograph taken during the British BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The bottom one is of a Gentoo Penguin Colony on Macquarie Island. Eric Douglas said 'Rookeries are situated in the foot hills some distance from the foreshore. A mountain stream connects the Rookery to the foreshore. Penguins go by the water way to and from the Rookery...' Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 2 - 1930-1931. The top image is the same as 112801 and the bottom image as the same as 117502.

    114906 Glass Negative.
    'Coast of Enderby Land', Antarctica. Mount Biscoe is on the left, Cape Ann in the centre and Mount Hurley on the right. (The three closest images). Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. This is a copy of a printed version. The same as 117565.

    114902 Glass Negative.
    Two photographs. 'Leaning on the Wind' & 'The Blizzard'. The setting is at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay, Antarctica. Photographs taken during the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911- 1914. Both are copies of a printed version. The top image is the same as 112881.

    114905 Glass Negative
    'Peaks of Enderby Land'. Nunataks as seen from the Ship Discovery in January, 1930. They were Mount Codrington, Simmers Peaks and Mount Johnston. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. This is a copy of a printed version. The same as 117562.

    114904 Glass Negative.
    Frank Hurley said on this 'Margin of the Ice-Caped Land'. An explorer at Lands End, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. Photograph taken during the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 1911- 1914. This is a copy of a printed version. The same as 117568.

    117213 Photographic Print.
    The Discovery in loose pack ice near Enderby Land. The ship's doctor, Dr Wlliam Wilson Ingram, stands looking out to sea. He is holding a whale marking gun. Eric Douglas has said of the image: 'SY Discovery near Enderby Land - Time approximately 10pm with the sun low in the sky...' Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as 112811 and 117065 Photographic Print.

    117065 Photographic Print.
    The Discovery in loose pack ice near Enderby Land. The ship's doctor, Dr Wlliam Wilson Ingram, stands looking out to sea. He is holding a whale marking gun. Eric Douglas has said of the image: 'SY Discovery near Enderby Land - Time approximately 10pm with the sun low in the sky...' Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same as image as 112811 and 117213 Photographic Print.

    28028 Oil Painting.
    A framed oil based colour painting of the steamship RRS Discovery II in 1936, by a Crew Member of the ship. The style could be described as impressionistic.The painting was presented by the artist to Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas, leader of the RAAF party on the Discovery II during the time of the search for the American Polar Explorer Lincoln Ellsworth and his Canadian based pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon. Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936.

    28062 Water Colour Painting.
    A framed water colour painting in soft hues, of Lincoln Ellsworth's Northrop Gamma aeroplane the 'Polar Star' flying over the Antarctic plateau. The painting was made in December, 1935 by Sydney Austin Bainbridge a Crew Member and the Pursar on the Discovery II. It was signed by Lincoln Ellsworth in January, 1936. It was presented by the artist to Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas, leader of the RAAF party on the Discovery II during the time of the search for the American Polar Explorer Lincoln Ellsworth and his Canadian based pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon. Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936.

    114913 Glass Negative.
    Looking out to sea from ice engulfed Cape Denison, with the Mackellar Islets showing up in the distance. Eric Douglas captioned this image 'Boat Harbour at Commonwealth Bay Adelie Land'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 2 - 1930-31. The same as 117535.

    114909 Glass Negative.
    A vertically split negative. On the left it shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man on the deck wearing a sailor's hat. On the right it shows the 'SY Discovery' with a man climbing up the rigging of the ship's mast. Eric Douglas said 'Left - The Bridge looking aft and Right - A view from the foreyard looking aft'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same as 112854 and 112855.

    114908 Glass Negative.
    A barrrel view of the de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth VH-ULD housed on board the ship Discovery. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'A view showing the housing of Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same as 112840.

    114912 Glass Negative.
    A Wandering Albatross getting ready to land. Eric Douglas said 'Albatross getting ready to alight'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same as 117583.

    114903 Glass Negative.
    The Antarctic coastline and Proclamation Island as seen at an altitude of 1500 feet, from the de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD. Eric Douglas' caption 'Close up view Antarctic Coast and Proclamation Rock - Open water near the coast - taken from 1500 ft altitude'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same as 112822.

    114974 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of the RAAF Wapiti A5-37 being loaded onto the RRS Discovery II at Williamstown, Victoria in December, 1935. Flight Lieut Eric Douglas is in the cockpit. The bottom photograph shows search party from Discovery II. Lincoln Ellsworth is pictured in the middle. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 114724 and the bottom image is the same as 117631.

    114975 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of the RAAF DH 60X Gipsy Moth A7-55 seaplane taking off. Eric Douglas' caption 'Solo Reconnaissance Flight in open water in the Ross Sea - January, 1936. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas - Care has to be taken to avoid contact with brash ice during take off'. Eric Douglas' log of 12th January, 1936 'At about 8.30AM this morning we entered a pool of fairly clear water which seemed to me to have possibilities in regard to a reconnaissance flight. So the Skipper was in agreement we got the moth ready. At about 10.30AM I was lowered over the side and after a bit of manoeuvring I took off solo and climbed to 1100 feet (I could not go higher owing to clouds) and noticed that to the south (true) it appeared to offer the best path for the ship. About 30 to 35 miles away appeared to be clear water. I then alighted and was safely hoisted on board again'. The bottom photograph is of Lincoln Ellsworth at the left and Herbert Herbert Hollick-Kenyon right, on deck of the Discovery II in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 114730 and the bottom image is the same as 117628.

    114941 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of Lincoln Ellsworth's ship 'Wyatt Earp'. Whales are blowing near the Wyatt Earp which is at the icy shoreline. The Discovery II can be seen in the distance. The photograph below is a group photo of the RAAF Party on board the ship Discovery II on the return journey to Melbourne. Lincoln Ellsworth is in the middle of the front row. Lieutenent Leonard Charles Hill, the Captain of the Discovery II is on Ellsworth's right and Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas leader of the RAAF contingent is on Ellsworth's left side. The other six men are members of the RAAF party of seven. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 117644 and the bottom image is the same as 114708.

    114919 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of 'Discovery II' in the pack ice. Eric Douglas said 'A view from the pack ice of the Discovery II cutting through the ice floes, January 1936'. The bottom photograph is of RAAF Personnel Flight Lieutenant Douglas right and Sergeant Cottee left, binding a sledge. This sledge was loaned by Sir Douglas Mawson. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The bottom image is the same as 114705.

    114938 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph shows two of the crew from the Discovery II who are 'poling off' standing on ice near the bow of the ship. Other crew members are assisting from the ship's deck above. The bottom photograph is of Lincoln Ellsworth's expedition ship the Wyatt Earp in sea ice. In the background is the Discovery II. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 114729 and the bottom image is the same as 117615.

    114940 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of de Havilland DH 60X Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55 on the lifting hook on the Discovery II. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas is in the cockpit. There was pack ice around the ship. This was the 1st Reconnaissance flight from the Discovery II after entering the Ross Sea and it took place in January, 1936. The photograph below is of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) flag in the foreground and the ship Wyatt Earp in the distance. (The RAAF were at that time using the RAF flag). This was at the time of the meeting up of the Discovery II and the Wyatt Earp in the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. It was on 20th January, 1936. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 117646 and the bottom image is the same as 117643.

    114939 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of four members of the Discovery II search party at 'Little America'. The bottom photograph is of two explorers on the Ross Ice Barrier looking out towards the Discovery II at the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 117645 and the bottom image is the same as 117635.

    114937 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph is of RAAF DH 60X Gipsy Moth A7-55 seaplane in the distance in the air. This was at the commencement of the Reconnaissance flight in the Ross Sea. Eric Douglas said 'Start of the Reconnaissance flight in the Ross Sea, F/Lt Douglas and F/o Murdoch - from the Discovery II. The search for Explorers Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon'. The bottom photograph is of five members of the Discovery II search party at 'Little America' which is defined by the masts and poles. Access to the radio and accomodation hut was through a hole in the ice near the figure on the left. Eric Douglas called the search party the 'Ice party'. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 117588 and bottom is the same as 117627.

    114918 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy of two photographs. The top photograph shows the Discovery II search party at 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier. The hole leading to the underground hut is near the man standing on the left. The bottom photograph is of the the bow of the vessel Discovery II entering a lead in sea ice. The Latitude was 72 degrees South. Eric Douglas called the search party the 'Ice party'. Photographs taken during the Ellsworth Relief Expedition, 1935-1936. The top image is the same as 114718 and the bottom the same as 117625.

    114916 Glass Negative.
    A negative made from a copy two photographs. The top photograph is of the de Havilland DH 60G Gipsy Moth seaplane VH-ULD on the aeroplane hoist on the Discovery. The two RAAF Pilots with BANZARE are standing on the plane. Pilot Officer Eric Douglas on the left and Flying Officer Stuart Campbell on the right. This was at the completion of the historic flight of 31st December, 1929. Mac-Robertson land was sighted for the first time on this flight. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The bottom photograph is a composite photo of a roaring Bull Sea Elephant leaning towards a nesting bird. The roaring sound emitted by the Bull Sea Elephant is through his large proboscis (nose). Below the image is a caption which reads 'Southward Ho! with Mawson'. This was also the name for Frank Hurley's movie released after this voyage, but it was not considered a commercial success. Some of this film was reworked by Frank Hurley for his next Antarctic film 'Siege of the South' which was released to mainstream movie-goers after Voyage 2 of 1930-1931. The film premiered at Brisbane's Majestic Theatre in October, 1931, with Frank Hurley introducing the program. Screen Australia states that the 'Siege of the South' is a great achievement in Antarctic actuality filmaking'. Frank Hurley took many risks for his reality photographs and film making, such as being strapped to the ship and hanging over the Discovery's side or even diving into an icy sea. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 2 - 1930-1931.The top image is the same as 117559 and the bottom image is the same as 112746.

    114911 Glass Negative.
    A vertically split negative. The left image is an aerial view of the ship Discovery with Frank Hurley, looking up at the camera lens from within the ship's barrel. The right image shows the bow of the Discovery in open water. Eric Douglas said 'Left - Captain Hurley in the Barrel - A Bird's Eye View and Right - Heading South'. Photographs taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The images are the same as in 112832.

    114917 Glass Negative.
    Kerguelen cabbage growing wild. The Kerguelen cabbage was plentiful - Eric Douglas said 'Kerguelen Cabbage grows in great numbers on all these islands...We motored about two miles up against the wind and went ashore on a fairly large island called Sukur... Wonderful vegetation, numerous Kerguelen Cabbages and plenty of duck'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The image is the same as 112755.

    114914 Glass Negative.
    'Mac-Robertson Land' in the distance. (It is now spelt Mac.Robertson).The Masson and David Ranges are shown and they are part of the Framnes Mountains. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 2 - 1930-1931. The image is the same as 117563.

    114901 Glass Negative.
    A Portrait of Pilot Officer Eric Douglas. Eric has a beard so the Voyage is underway. He is dressed in typical Antarctic attire at the time which was nothing too special - a dark woollen jumper and a dark woollen beanie. This photograph was taken in November or December, 1929 on BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930.

    114915 Glass Negative.
    Sir Douglas Mawson and some of the 'Scientific party' at Proclamation Island where they carried out a Proclamation ceremony and flag raising of the British Flag. This photo was taken after the reading of a Proclamation by Sir Douglas Mawson on the summit of this 'new' Island on 13th January, 1930. RAAF pilots Eric Douglas and Stuart Campbell were not present as they were working on the Gipsy Moth VH-ULD. Eric Douglas' log of 13th January, 1930 '...9AM. A party left in the motor boat (ten of them) their main job being to hoist the flag. At 12 noon we saw them on top of this rock and observed the flag was hoisted. Stu and I spent the morning working on our machine...The party returned at 3PM with specimens of rock, penguins, birds etc'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The image is the same as 114748.

    114910 Glass Negative.
    A vertically split negative. Eric Douglas said 'Southward Ho!'. Two pictures showing sail settings of the Discovery. Photographs taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The images are the same as in 117579.

    117078 Photographic Print.
    Heard Island looking west from Atlas Cove. Sea elephants are in the foreground lazing on the shorline. Eric Douglas captioned the image. 'Typical day at Heard Island- View from Atlas Cove looking Westward'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as112760 and 117076 Photographic Print.

    117075 Photographic Print.
    Crabeater Seals and Adelie Penguins drifting on an ice floe. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Crabeater Seals and Adelie Penguins drifting on their frozen raft'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as 112857.

    117068 Photographic Print.
    Photo of Eric Douglas on the left, and Frank Hurley on the Discovery circa 1930. Photograph taken by the Press. BANZARE 1929-1931.

    117077 Photographic Print.
    A family portrait of the Eric Douglas family in February, 1936. From left to right is Eric's wife Ella, then Eric and their son Ian. This photograph was taken after Eric Douglas's return from the Ellsworth Relief Expedition (1935-1936) in the search for Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon. Eric Douglas is holding an Admiral Richard Byrd flag from 'Little America' (Little America II) on the Ross Ice Barrier in the Antarctic. It was signed by Lincoln Ellsworth and presented to him by Lincoln Ellsworth. Ian was to have Ellsworth as his second name and Lincoln Ellsworth gave him a silver Christening mug. A press photograph by the Star Newspaper.

    117072 Photographic Print.
    A large cathedral type iceberg seen near Enderby Land. Eric Douglas said of the taller berg in this image 'A Cathedral Type Berg, 320 ft above sea level'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The image is the same as in 112797

    117073 Photographic Print.
    Typical tabular iceberg in the distance with the sun reflected on its surface. Eric Douglas said 'A Typical Berg - 200 ft above sea level and 1000 ft below - it is heavily crevassed'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The image is the same as in 117575.

    117074 Photographic Print.
    The Crozet Group, with Gentoo Penguins and Sea Elephants basking on the shore. Eric Douglas captioned the image 'Sea Elephants and Gentoo Penguins, Crozet Islands'. Crozet Islands by Eric Douglas 'Twelve of us went ashore in the motor boat, anchored same about 100 yards offshore then did short trips in the dinghy we towed, bit of a surf running and a few of us got water down our sea boots'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as 112768.

    117076 Photographic Print
    Heard Island looking west from Atlas Cove. Sea elephants are in the foreground lazing on the shorline. Eric Douglas captioned the image. 'Typical day at Heard Island- View from Atlas Cove looking Westward'. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as112760 and 117078 Photographic Print.

    117070 Photographic Print.
    SY Discovery. Eric Douglas said 'Under full sail'. It shows the Discovery with a Barque or Bark rig. This photo was taken before the official start of BANZARE Voyage 1 in 1929-1930. Frank Hurley included it with his Voyage 1 Photography. The same image as 117506.

    117069 Photographic Print.
    SY Discovery. A side view of the Discovery rigged as a Barque or Bark. This was taken before the official start of BANZARE Voyage 1 in 1929 - 1930.

    134407 Photographic Print.
    Of a glacier in South Georgia. This was a favoured photograph of Frank Hurley's and a copy was sitting on his desk about a week before he passed away. This photograph was taken in South Georgia in 1916-1917 when Frank Hurley was on the ‘Endurance’ Expedition under the leadership of Sir Ernest Shackleton. Frank Hurley called it 'The Crystal Canoe'. It is of the Fortuna or Degeer Glacier in South Georgia. The image is missing from the web.

    117071 Photographic Print
    Adelie Penguins at Proclamation Island. Icebergs can be seen in the far distance. Eric Douglas said 'Adelie Penguins sun baking on the slopes of Proclamation Rock'. Although this land feature became 'Proclamation Island' it had just been discovered and at this early stage to call it Proclamation Rock was quite acceptable. Photograph taken during BANZARE, Voyage 1 - 1929-1930. The same image as 112834.

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-14
    User data
  51. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 5)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 5

    THIS IS A ROUGH INDICATION OF THE VOYAGE ORDER OF BANZARE VOYAGE I - 1929-1930.

    Lantern Slides or Glass Slides. These glass slide numbers starting with 656E on the left are in the order from the front to the back of the box.

    From a wooden box made by Eric Douglas to contain the slides. (73 slides).This box was labelled - Start of Voyage 1. It is BANZARE. I used the numbers on the left when I scanned the Lantern Slides or Glass Slides at the Australian Antarctic Division as it fitted in with their numbering at the time. I was asked to use those numbers by the - Multi-Media Section of the AAD. 658E refers to a print which the AAD wanted me to try out and compare with the slides. The numbers on the right are the initial Melbourne Museum numbers used by them when they scanned or photographed the slides some years later. I worked out the Museum's numbers from deduction by comparing my original scans and the Museum's scans or photographs of the same images -
    656E 57976
    657E 58086
    658E Print only so not valid
    659E 58087
    660E 58085
    661E 57977
    662E 58084
    663E 58083
    664E 57978
    665E 57979
    666E 58082
    667E 58081
    668E 57980
    669E 58080
    670E 58079
    671E 58078
    672E 57981
    673E 58077
    674E 58076
    675E 58075
    676E 57982
    677E 58074
    678E 58073
    679E 58072
    680E 57983
    681E 58071
    682E 58070
    683E 58069
    684E 58068
    685E 57984
    686E 57985
    687E 58067
    688E 58066
    689E 58065
    690E 57986
    691E 58064
    692E 58063
    693E 58062
    694E 58061
    695E 57987
    696E 58060
    697E 57483
    698E 57594
    699E 57484
    700E 57485
    701E 57593
    702E 57486
    703E 57592
    704E 57591
    705E 57590
    706E 57589
    707E 57487
    708E 57488
    709E 57489
    710E 57588
    711E 57587
    712E 57490
    713E 57585
    714E 57586
    715E 57584
    716E 57491
    717E 57583
    718E 57582
    719E 57581
    720E 57492
    721E 57580
    722E 57579
    723E 57578
    724E 57493
    725E 57576
    726E 57577
    727E 57575
    728E 57494
    729E 57574 (With BANZARE - but is AAE 1911 to 1914).

    A bit later the Melbourne Museum re-allocated new numbers. These new numbers were provided to me verbally one by one from the Museum and many remaining items were matched by me by deduction. The items can be found at Trove with or without the MM prefixes -
    MM112743 = 57976
    MM112745 = 58086
    MM112744 = 58087
    MM112746 = 58085
    MM112747 = 57977
    MM112748 = 58084
    MM112749 = 58083
    MM112750 = 57978
    MM112751 = 57979
    MM112752 = 58082
    MM112753 = 58081
    MM112754 = 57980
    MM112755 = 58080
    MM112756 = 58079
    MM112757 = 58078
    MM112758 = 57981
    MM112759 = 58077
    MM112760 = 58076
    MM112761 = 58075
    MM112762 = 57982
    MM112763 = 58074
    MM112764 = 58073
    MM112765 = 58072
    MM112766 = 57983
    MM112767 = 58071
    MM112768 = 58070
    MM112769 = 58069
    MM112770 = 58068
    MM112771 = 57984
    MM112772 = 57985
    MM112773 = 58067
    MM112774 = 58066
    MM112780 = 58065
    MM112781 = 57986
    MM112782 = 58064
    MM112783 = 58063
    MM112784 = 58062
    MM112785 = 58061
    MM112791 = 57987
    MM112797 = 58060
    MM112798 = 57483
    MM112800 = 57594
    MM112801 = 57484
    MM112809 = 57485
    MM112810 = 57593
    MM112811 = 57486
    MM112812 = 57592
    MM112813 = 57591
    MM112814 = 57590
    MM112822 = 57589
    MM112825 = 57487
    MM112829 = 57488
    MM112830 = 57489
    MM112831 = 57588
    MM112832 = 57587
    MM112833 = 57490
    MM112835 = 57585
    MM112834 = 57586
    MM112836 = 57584
    MM112837 = 57491
    MM112838 = 57583
    MM112839 = 57582
    MM112840 = 57581
    MM112841 = 57492
    MM112842 = 57580
    MM112843 = 57579
    MM112844 = 57578
    MM112845 = 57493
    MM112855 = 57576
    MM112854 = 57577
    MM112857 = 57575
    MM112880 = 57494
    MM112881 = 57574

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    2 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-05
    User data
  52. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 6)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 6

    THIS GIVES A ROUGH INDICATION OF THE VOYAGE ORDER OF BANZARE VOYAGE 2 - 1930-1931.

    Lantern Slides or Glass Slides. These glass slide numbers on the left starting with 730E are in the order from the front to the back of the box.

    From a wooden box made by Eric Douglas to contain the slides. (97 slides). This box was labelled Start Voyage 2. This box was second box containing BANZARE slides. I used the numbers on the left when I scanned the Lantern Slides or Glass Slides at the Australian Antarctic Division as it fitted in with their numbering at the time. I was asked to use those numbers by the - Multi-Media Section of the AAD. The numbers on the right are the initial Melbourne Museum numbers used by them when they scanned or photographed the slides some years later. I worked out the Museum's numbers from deduction by comparing my original scans and the Museum's scans or photographs of the same images -
    730E 57573
    731E 57572
    732E 57495
    733E 57571
    734E 57570
    735E 57569
    736E 57496
    737E 57568
    738E 57567
    739E 57566
    740E 57497
    741E 57565
    742E 57564
    743E 57563
    744E 57498
    745E 57499
    746E 57500
    747E 57562
    748E 57561
    749E 57560
    750E 57501
    751E 57559
    752E 57558
    753E 58059
    754E 58058
    755E 57988
    756E 58057
    757E 58056
    758E 58055
    759E 58054
    760E 57989
    761E 58053
    762E 57990
    763E 58052
    764E 58051
    765E 58050
    766E 60223
    767E 60357
    768E 60216
    769E 60360
    770E 60502
    771E 60501
    772E 60500
    773E 60224
    774E 60499
    775E 60217
    776E 60498
    777E 60497
    778E 60496
    779E 60225
    780E 60495
    781E 60221
    782E 60218
    783E 60220
    784E 57557 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    785E 60219
    786E 60361
    787E 60226
    788E 60494
    789E 60493
    790E 57502 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    791E 60492
    792E 60491
    793E 60362
    794E 60490
    795E 58238
    796E 58237
    797E 58236
    798E 58235
    799E 58234
    800E 58233
    801E 58232
    802E 58231
    803E 57556 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    804E 58230
    805E 58229
    806E 58228
    807E 58227
    808E 58226
    809E 57555 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    810E 57554 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    811E 57503 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    812E 57553 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    813E 58224 & 58225 (duplicated by the Melbourne Museum)
    814E 58223
    815E 60227 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    816E 58222
    817E 58221
    818E 58220
    819E 58219
    820E 58218
    821E 58217
    822E 58216
    823E 60228 (Is not BANZARE but it belongs to the Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936)
    824E 58215
    825E 58214
    826E 58213

    A bit later the Melbourne Museum re-allocated new numbers. These new numbers were provided to me verbally one by one from the Museum and many remaining items were matched by me by deduction. The items can be found at Trove with or without the MM prefixes -
    MM117500 = 57573
    MM117501 = 57572
    MM117502 = 57495
    MM117503 = 57571
    MM117504 = 57570
    MM117505 = 57569
    MM117506 = 57496
    MM117507 = 57568
    MM117508 = 57567
    MM117509 = 57566
    MM117510 = 57497
    MM117511 = 57565
    MM117512 = 57564
    MM117513 = 57563
    MM117514 = 57498
    MM117515 = 57499
    MM117516 = 57500
    MM117517 = 57562
    MM117518 = 57561
    MM117519 = 57560
    MM117520 = 57501
    MM117521 = 57559
    MM117522 = 57558
    MM117523 = 58059
    MM117524 = 58058
    MM117525 = 57988
    MM117526 = 58057
    MM117527 = 56056
    MM117528 = 58055
    MM117529 = 58054
    MM117530 = 57989
    MM117531 = 58053
    MM117532 = 57990
    MM117533 = 58052
    MM117534 = 58051
    MM117535 = 58050
    MM117536 = 60223
    MM117537 = 60357
    MM117538 = 60216
    MM117539 = 60360
    MM117540 = 60502
    MM117541 = 60501
    MM117542 = 60500
    MM117543 = 60224
    MM117544 = 60499
    MM117545 = 60217
    MM117546 = 60498
    MM117547 = 60497
    MM117548 = 60496
    MM117549 = 60225
    MM117550 = 60495
    MM117551 = 60221
    MM117552 = 60218
    MM117553 = 60220
    MM117588 = 57557
    MM117554 = 60219
    MM117555 = 60361
    MM117556 = 60226
    MM117557 = 60494
    MM117558 = 60493
    MM117589 = 57502
    MM117559 = 60492
    MM117560 = 60491
    MM117561 = 60362
    MM117562 = 60490
    MM117563 = 58238
    MM117564 = 58237
    MM117565 = 58236
    MM117566 = 58235
    MM117567 = 58234
    MM117568 = 58233
    MM117569 = 58232
    MM117570 = 58231
    MM117590 = 57556
    MM117571 = 58230
    MM117572 = 58229
    MM117573 = 58228
    MM117574 = 58227
    MM117575 = 58226
    MM117591 = 57555
    MM117592 = 57554
    MM117593 = 57503
    MM117594 = 57553
    MM117576 = 58224 & MM117576 = 58225
    MM117577 = 58223
    MM117595 = 60227
    MM117578 = 58222
    MM117579 = 58221
    MM117580 = 58220
    MM117581 = 58219
    MM117582 = 58218
    MM117583 = 58217
    MM117584 = 58216
    MM117596 = 60228
    MM117585 = 58215
    MM117586 = 58214
    MM117587 = 28213

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-05
    User data
  53. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 7)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 7

    BANZARE slides (6 slides) and BANZARE coloured advertisement slides (7 slides).

    There was a small overflow of BANZARE images that were not in wooden boxes. These Lantern Slides or Glass Slides were scanned by me at home rather than at the Australian Antarctic Division and with my numbering on the left. The numbers on the right are the Melbourne Museum numbers assigned when they later scanned or photographed the images some years later. I worked out the Museum's numbers from deduction by comparing my original scans and the Museum's scans or photographs of the same images. The images 1ED to 6ED inclusive are black and white Lantern Slides or Glass Slides which actually belong with the BANZARE slides and 7ED to 13ED inclusive are the seven professionally crafted coloured advertisement Lantern Slides or Glass Slides relevant to the BANZARE Voyages -
    1ED 111098
    2ED 111099
    3ED 111100
    4ED 111101
    5ED 111102
    6ED 111108
    7ED 110049
    8ED 111050
    9ED 111103
    10ED 111106
    11ED 111105
    12ED 111104
    13ED 111107

    A bit later the Melbourne Museum re-allocated new numbers. These new numbers were provided to me verbally one by one from the Museum and many remaining items were matched by me by deduction. The items can be found at Trove with or without the MM prefixes -
    MM114736 = 111098
    MM114737 = 111099
    MM114738 = 111100
    MM114739 = 111101
    MM114740 = 111102
    MM114748 = 111108
    MM114741 = 110049
    MM114742 = 111050
    MM114743 = 111103
    MM114744 = 111104
    MM114745 = 111105
    MM114746 = 111106
    MM114747 = 111107

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-06
    User data
  54. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 8)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION.

    PART 8

    The Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936. (The search for Lincoln Ellsworth from the RRS Discovery II and a RAAF Party onboard that ship). These Lantern Slides or Glass Slides were in a wooden box to hold the slides. (56 slides). The slides numbers on the left are in the order from the front to the back of the box - giving a rough indication of the journey order.

    I used these numbers on the left when I scanned the Lantern Slides or Glass Slides at the Australian Antarctic Division (Multi-Media Section) as they fitted in with their numbering at the time. The numbers on the right are the initial Melbourne Museum numbers used by them when they scanned or photographed the slides some time later on. I worked out the Museum's numbers from deduction by comparing my original scans and the Museum's scans or photographs of the same images -
    883E 60489
    884E 60488
    885E 60363
    886E 60487
    887E 60486
    888E 60485
    889E 60229
    890E 60484
    891E 60483
    892E 60364
    893E 60482
    894E 60481
    895E 60230
    896E 60480
    897E 60479
    898E 60478
    899E 60365
    900E (60477 &) 111093 (Two slides with the same image - these two are counted here - there was one in the wooden box and one in a small box.
    901E 60476
    902E 60231
    903E 60232
    904E 60475
    905E 60474
    906E 60366
    907E 60473
    908E 60472
    909E 60233
    910E 60471
    911E 60470
    912E 60469
    913E 60367
    914E 60235
    915E 60234
    916E 60468
    917E 60467
    918E 60368
    919E 60466
    920E 60465
    921E 57552
    922E 57504
    923E 57551
    924E 57550
    925E 58212
    926E 58211
    927E 58210
    928E 58209
    929E 58208
    930E 58207
    931E 58206
    932E 58205
    933E 58204
    934E 58203
    935E 58202
    936E 58201
    937E 58200

    A bit later the Melbourne Museum re-allocated new numbers. These new numbers were provided to me verbally one by one from the Museum and many remaining items were matched by me by deduction. The items can be found at Trove with or without the MM prefixes -
    MM117597 = 60489
    MM117598 = 60488
    MM117599 = 60363
    MM117600 = 60487
    MM117601 = 60486
    MM117602 = 60485
    MM117603 = 60229
    MM117604 = 60484
    MM117605 = 60483
    MM117606 = 60364
    MM117607 = 60482
    MM117608 = 60481
    MM117609 = 60230
    MM117610 = 60480
    MM117611 = 60479
    MM117612 = 60478
    MM117613 = 60365
    MM117614 = (60477 &) MM114731 = 111093
    MM117615 = 60476
    MM117616 = 60231
    MM117617 = 60232
    MM117618 = 60475
    MM117619 = 60474
    MM117620 = 60366
    MM117621 = 60473
    MM117622 = 60472
    MM117623 = 60233
    MM117624 = 60471
    MM117625 = 60470
    MM117626 = 60469
    MM117627 = 60367
    MM117628 = 60235
    MM117629 = 60234
    MM117630 = 60468
    MM117631 = 60467
    MM117632 = 60368
    MM117633 = 60466
    MM117634 = 60465
    MM117635 = 57552
    MM117636 = 57504
    MM117637 = 57551
    MM117638 = 57550
    MM117639 = 58212
    MM117640 = 58211
    MM117641 = 58210
    MM117642 = 58209
    MM117643 = 58208
    MM117644 = 58207
    MM117645 = 58206
    MM117646 = 58205
    MM117647 = 58204
    MM117648 = 58203
    MM117649 = 58202
    MM117650 = 58201
    MM117651 = 58200

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-06
    User data
  55. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Antarctic images donated to the Melbourne Museum (PART 9)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION.

    PART 9

    The Ellsworth Relief Expedition of 1935-1936. (The search for Lincoln Ellsworth from the RRS Discovery II and a RAAF Party onboard that ship). There was an overflow of Ellsworth Relief Expedition Lantern Slides or Glass Slides that were not in a specially made wooden box. These slides are not in the journey order. (There are 35 slides).

    I used these numbers on the left when I scanned the Lantern Slides or Glass Slides at the Australian Antarctic Division (Multi-Media Section) as they fitted in with their numbering at the time. The numbers on the right are the initial Melbourne Museum numbers used by then when they scanned or photographed the slides some time later on. I worked out the Museum's numbers from deduction by comparing my original scans and the Museum's scans or photographs of the same images.

    In a small box -
    847E 111058
    848E 111063
    849E 111064
    850E 111065
    851E 111066
    852E 111067
    853E 111068
    854E 111069
    855E 111070
    856E 111071
    857E 111072
    858E 111073
    859E 111074
    860E 111075
    In another small box -
    861E 111076
    862E 111077
    863E 111078
    864E 111079
    865E 111080
    866E 111081
    In a further small box -
    867E 111082
    868E 111084
    869E 111083
    870E 111085
    871E 111086
    872E 111087
    873E 111091
    874E 111089
    875E 111090
    876E 111088
    877E 111092
    878E 60477 (& 111093), Two slides with the same image. These two are already listed in Part 8. There was one in the wooden box and one in this small box.
    879E 111094
    880E 111095
    881E 111096
    882E 111097

    A bit later on the Melbourne Museum re-allocated new numbers.These new numbers were provided to me verbally one by one from the Museum and many remaining items were matched by me by deduction. The items can be found at Trove with or without the MM prefixes -
    MM114700 = 111058
    MM114701 = 111063
    MM114702 = 111064
    MM114703 = 111065
    MM114704 = 111066
    MM114705 = 111067
    MM114706 = 111068
    MM114707 = 111069
    MM114708 = 111070
    MM114709 = 111071
    MM114710 = 111072
    MM114711 = 111073
    MM114712 = 111074
    MM114713 = 111075
    MM114714 = 111076
    MM114715 = 111077
    MM114716 = 111078
    MM114717 = 111079
    MM114718 = 111080
    MM114719 = 111081
    MM114720 = 111082
    MM114722 = 111084
    MM114721 = 111083
    MM114723 = 111085
    MM114724 = 111086
    MM114725 = 111087
    MM114729 = 111091
    MM114727 = 111089
    MM114728 = 111090
    MM114726 = 111088
    MM114730 = 111092
    MM114731 = 111093 Already counted in Part 8.
    MM114732 = 111094
    MM114733 = 111095
    MM114734 = 111096
    MM114735 = 111097

    Part 1 is the PREAMBLE.

    In Parts 2, 3 and 4 - I will look at the 316 items in consecutive number order. There are 274 items covering the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides) and 42 items covering the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and Photographic Prints. Therefore 274 plus 42 equals 316 items in total.

    In Parts 5, 6, 7, 8 and I will detail the numbering used for the Lantern Slides (Glass Slides). In Part 5 - there are 73 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 1, in Part 6 - 97 items mainly of BANZARE Voyage 2, in Part 7 - 13 items of BANZARE, including the 7 coloured advertisement slides, in Part 8 - 56 items of the Ellsworth Relief Expedition and in Part 9 - 35 items of Ellsworth Relief Expedition. These total 274 items.

    In Part 10 I will look of the numbering at the Glass Negatives (Glass Plate Negatives), Two Paintings and the Photographic Prints in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection at the Melbourne Museum. These total 42 items.

    In Part 11 I will endeavour to identify the photographer for each item and in the case of the two paintings, the artist.

    Part 12 will be a SUMMARY.

    June 2017

    Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-07
    User data
  56. Group Captain Eric Douglas - Melbourne Museum (Part 12)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS ANTARCTIC COLLECTION

    PART 12

    SUMMARY

    * All item 316 descriptions will be re-checked by me for the purposes of Parts 1 to 12 inclusive, in the relevant lists at Trove web sites
    * All items 316 items (328 images) will be re-checked by me on the Museums Victoria, Melbourne Museum (nothing there yet) and Trove, in terms of the image.
    * Hoping this project can be totally completed soon.
    * For anyone using this besides me, then list the items under BANZARE, and BANZARE Voyages 1 and 2; and the Ellsworth Relief Expedition.
    * Sub Headings suggested for BANZARE - The Discovery or SY Discovery; Sir Douglas Mawson, Ship's Crew, Scientific Staff, Sailors etc; Cape Town; The Crozets; Kerguelen, Heard Island, Macquarie Island, The Antarctic Mainland, Icebergs and Ice conditions, Penguins and other wildlife, the de Havilland Gipsy Moth VH - ULD and seaplane operations, Meeting the Norwegians and Whaling Operations etc.
    * Sub Headings suggested for the 'Ellsworth Relief Expedition' - The Discovery II, Discovery II personnel, RAAF party, Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon etc, Loading the Discovery II with provisions, New Zealand, Heading South and Ice conditions, the RAAF de Havilland Gipsy Moth A7-55 and RAAF Westland Wapiti A5-37 (the Wapiti did not fly in the Antarctic), the Ross Ice Barrier (now Shelf), the Wyatt Earp, Little America, Ross Island and Cape Crozier, Balleny Group and other Antarctic Islands, Melbourne - departure of the Discovery II and the return of the Discovery II


    Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-21
    User data
  57. GROUP CAPTAIN ERIC DOUGLAS - RAAF - (Gilbert) Eric Douglas 1902 -1970
    List
    Public

    Eric Douglas joined the Port Phillip Yacht Club by 1922, the Royal Yacht Club of Victoria in 1940 and the Royal Brighton Yacht Club in 1920 and remained a member there till at least 1949. His most favoured yacht was "the Vendetta" - B Class [no 18 in 1921] (also known as the Ven) which was bought by Eric and his younger brother Gill (Leslie Gilbert) in equal half shares in 1921 - Eric and Gill raced this yacht in regattas from 1922 to 1936 - sailing from the Royal Brighton Yacht Club.

    On one of Eric's yachts - 1920's to 1940's had a rich ochre coloured sail.

    In 1937 Eric owned a ‘Snipe Class’ yacht – he sold it in about that year.

    Other boats owned by Eric included - "Beetle" (12 foot yacht), "Katinka" (18 foot half decker), "Iris" (yacht), "Roslyn" (yacht), "Hinemoa" (motor boat) - possibly owned; yacht "Kestrel" (c1939 at Point Cook/Laverton) and "the Myth" (Idle Along yacht), snub nose dinghies and other boats built by Eric - eg yachts and speedboats; Canoeist - teenage years, until at least his mid 30's - one canoe being called "Ludine"; Motor and Speed boat enthusiast with "Hartford Atom","Douglas Bullet", "Douglas Cruiser", "Nautical Nymph" and "Rover" the fishing dinghy.

    Moreover in about 1918/1919 Eric and his older brother Cliff and younger brother Gill had their own business in Hampton Street, Brighton simply called 'Douglas Brothers' - they were Motor Mechanics with a Service Station and workshop. Yet they were more than that and were quite innovative, but young, taking a keen interest in motor cars, motor bikes, marine engines and building dinghies and boats, plus model boats. If they sold a pint of oil or fixed a puncture along the way, well and good. Motoring was a new method of travel in Australia with the launch of the Model T Ford in Geelong in 1915 and so it was a new learning curve for all.

    Sailing was introduced as a recreational activity to the air cadets at Point Cook through the suggestion of Flight Lieutenant Douglas - [1937 - The Third Brother - The Royal Australian Air Force 1921-39 C D Coulthard-Clark - page 203]. The RAAF 'Point Cook' class raced in regattas in Port Phillip Bay in the late 1930's and Eric was in charge of this class.

    Downhill and Cross country skier - Ski Club of Victoria - Mt Buller; Mt Hotham, Mt Feathertop, Mt St Bernard, Mt Buffalo and Mt Donna Buang (as a Sergeant Pilot Eric went skiing with other members of the RAAF at Mt St Bernard); Motor Cyclist [owned eight - three examples are the Rudge Multi (1921), the Abigndon King Dick (1922) and the AJS and sidecar (c1929 to mid 1930’s)] - and of course doing such acrobatics as riding doing handstands on the handle - bars; Motor Car enthusiast eg Chrysler - 1928 model bought in May, 1930, Pontiac - bought in the mid 1940’s, Jeep - 1946, Chevrolet - 1936 and Toyota c1965; Bass drum player in the RAAF Amberley band; Carpentry and Woodwork - boats and dinghies, paper planes, model aeroplanes - motor and gliders, model yachts, and kites of many types such as triangle and box. Amateur photographer including on the search for Anderson and Hitchcock and in the Antarctic; Parachutist, tug of war champion, jogger, amateur boxer, rifleman, water-skier, fisherman, ocean beach - body and board surfer, swimmer and an early member of life saving in Port Phillip Bay (likely belonged to the Brighton Lifesaving Club); Civil Pilot’s Licence - flying member of the Victorian Aero Club - and flying examiner and safety pilot; also took part in aeroplane gliding trials eg Koroit in Western Victoria. He was an avid reader of - boat and plane manuals, histories, biographies, philososophy and philosophical poetry - Omar Khayyam and Khalil Gibran, travelogs, (true) exploration and frontier stories, cowboy stories based on real heroes; while favourite music tastes included Enrico Caruso and Richard Tauber.

    Brief Outline of Eric’s Flying and RAAF Career –
    • Senior Cadets c1916 to c1919 – in the period 1917 to c1919 Eric was a day student at Swinburne Senior Technical College ‘on a course of mechanical engineering'. Before that he had spent two years as a day student as Swinburne Junior Technical College ‘to Intermediate standard’ in 1916.
    • Australian Air Corps in November, 1920 - joined as an Air Mechanic (Aero Fitter and a little later he was also an Aero Rigger). Started work at the Central Flying School, Laverton, Victoria on 12th December, 1920.
    • In 1921 Eric did some correspondence subjects with ‘International Correspondence Schools (Colonial) Limited – the Head Office was at Finsbury Square, London with a branch Head Office in Australia at 399-401 George Street, Sydney. Two of the subjects were – Internal Combustion Motors – result 94% (Motor Mechanics course) and Arithmetic Part 3.
    • When the RAAF was formed in 1921 he transferred as an Aero Fitter (AC1). Eric’s number was FG252928 at the Central Flying School, Laverton as at June and November, 1921. On 1st April, 1921 it was Eric’s intention to ‘sign on for 6 years Australian Air Force’.
    • From 7th November, 1921 to 26th February, 1922 (time off for Christmas) Eric attended a training Camp at Liverpool, New South Wales.
    • On 27th February, 1922 commenced working at the Machine Shop at Point Cook - part of the Aero work was on Seaplanes
    • On 18th September, 1922 he was transferred to the No1 Flight (Flying) Training School, Point Cook, to work on 'B Flight Aeros’.
    • In the period from 1920 to when he learnt to fly in 1927, Eric was an Aero Fitter and Rigger, AC1, LAC, Corporal and Sergeant and he gained valuable experience as crew (motor and air mechanic and aero fitter and rigger) on a substantial number of RAAF Cross Country Flights.
    • 'After 6 years in the Workshop and on Flight aero fitting and maintenance duties underwent a Flying Training Course at Point Cook in 1927 and graduated as a Sergeant Pilot'.
    • Overall - in the RAAF 1921 to 1948 - Pilot and Administrator, Motor Mechanic - 'Douglas Brothers'; Air Mechanic, Aero Fitter, Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Pilot plus Test pilot and A1 Flying Instructor (A1 for four years) and attained A1 for Gunnery, Aircraft Engineer and Administrator.

    RAAF ranks held by Eric - AC1 in 1921 on formation of the RAAF; LAC in 1922; Corporal in 1925 (passed all subjects); Sergeant in 1926; Sergeant Pilot in 1927; Pilot Officer in July 1929; Flying Officer in February, 1930; Flight Lieutenant in July 1934; Squadron Leader in March 1939; Wing Commander in June, 1940; posted to Amberley June 1942 - No 3 Aircraft Depot and in Oct 1947 was the Station Commander on formation of Station Headquarters, acting Group Captain in 1942 and temporary Group Captain in December 1943. Honorary Group Captain in 1956 and in 1958 this was amended 'Temporary Group Captain G. E. Douglas (39) is granted the rank of Group Captain, 1st July, 1948, with seniority as from 1st December, 1943.' [Page 2556, column 2 of the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, No.43. of 07-Aug-1958]. In his RAAF career Eric was also assigned the number 126.

    On 9th June, 1925 at St Kilda, Melbourne there was a reception for around the world Italian flyers – Pilot Francesco de Pinedo and Mechanic Ernesto Campanelli who had flown from Rome to Melbourne (with stops at other cities) in their seaplane a Savoia-Marchetti S16 called "Gennariello”. (Eric Douglas is depicted in a formal photograph at that reception). The plane was serviced at RAAF Point Cook - Eric Douglas was one of the air mechanics who worked on the plane under the leadership of Squadron Leader Wackett together with the involvement of Ernesto Campanelli who was apparently a car mechanic. An image of RAAF boat 2 and and three images of the Savoia in an album confirm this involvement by Eric working on "Gennariello” which appears to have had a full engine replacement. The Italian Aeronauts then left from near Point Cook for their return journey to Rome via Tokyo and it was a successful return and welcome homecoming for them.

    1922 - The Third Brother - The Royal Australian Air Force 1921-39 C D Coulthard-Clark - page 252 - 253
    "When Flying Officer Loris Balderson took the plane (AVRO 504K) up at Mascot on 22 November 1922, he took with him AC1 Eric Douglas as front-seat passenger. The Aircraft had reached an altitude of about 1500 feet when Douglas signalled that there was a problem with the throttle control, and Balderston decided to land to have this fault rectified...Witnesses to the crash provided a ...colourful description of the event, recalling that Douglas foresaw the impending collision and stood up in his seat moments before the Avro demolished six panels of fence: 'the engine was thrust back into the front cockpit; the plane momentarily rose - the pilot had switched on his engine - and then subsided in an integrated mass of wreckage, none of it more than two feet above the ground. A truly comprehensive crash.' Douglas's quick reaction had saved his life (and the life of the pilot), although he (Eric) suffered severe cuts to the forehead from broken wires and the crash had propelled him forward so that he now sat astride the crankshaft, unconscious and bleeding. Stumbling from the wreckage, the pilot noticed his companion's plight and reached into his pockets to produce a small camera, prying away rescuers rushing to Douglas's assistance 'until I take this ruddy picture'. Given the trouble that he went to, it was a shame that Balderston's own unsteady state resulted in the spoiling of these photographs" (Note Eric was a passenger on this flight)

    1928 - The Third Brother - The Royal Australian Air Force 1921-39 C D Coulthard-Clark - page 268
    Air Commodore 'Paddy' Heffernan recalls: "From what I heard later, I learnt that it was most unpopular (Warrigal 1), being under-powered and overweight. It also had most peculiar spinning habits. On one occasion it was being flown by Squadron Leader Charles Eaton with Sergeant Eric Douglas as passenger and was deliberately placed in a spin. After several turns Eaton attempted recovery, but nothing happened. As the aircraft was still in an uncontrolled spin at 2000 feet, he called on Douglas to abandon ship. Douglas undid his belt and stood up and his action apparently varied the air flow over the tail surfaces and the spin stopped at 1000 feet. As the spin had stopped, Douglas did not jump, but two frightened pilots got out of the aircraft after landing" (Note Eric was a passenger on this flight)

    Eric learnt to fly on the AVRO Trainer 504k - this type was the famous World War 1 British 2-seater trainer powered with either an 80 H.P. Le Rhone or 110 H.P. Clerget Rotary Engine which used castor oil as an engine lubricant.

    RAAF A Pilot's Course 1927, A1 Flying Instructor 1928.

    “A” Pilot’s Course at Point Cooke (Cook) - Flying Training School – Commenced 18th May, 1927 - Avro, DH9, DH9A, DH50, DH Moth, SE5A, Fairy Seaplane, Gipsy Moth Seaplane, Spartan, Wapiti & Warrigal. On this course flying skills included - take offs and landings, approaches, gliding turns, spins, steep turns, stalling and regaining engine, figure of 8 turns, climbing turns, right hand circuit and land, gentle turns with engine cut off, side-slipping, aerobatics, cloud flying, formation flying, instruction, solo (1st solo 12/9/1927), gunnery, camera gun target, bombing, dummy parachute dropping, rigging test and engine test.

    Eric topped his A course in marks for flying and came third in theory.

    By June, 1928 Eric's flying now included inspecting landing grounds, dual instruction, back seat approaches and landings, forced landings, engine cut out, back seat flying, instruction flying, level flying, photography (as observer), Air Pilotage test (as observer), cross country landings, taxying, travel flights, blind flying, night flying, instrument flying, test flights, to scene of crash and return, windspeed and direction, air observation, high altitude bombing, live bombing, and use of signalling lamp, air pageants and fly pasts.

    As an A1 Flying Instructor from June, 1928 planes flown included -
    • Anson, Avro 504K, Cirrus Moth, DH9, DH9A, Demon, Gipsy Moth & Wapiti.
    • Other –
    DA Moth
    • Planes flown both as an Officer and Test Pilot –
    Anson, Avro Trainer, Battle, Beaufort, Beechcraft, Boeing B-17, Bulldog, CAC Trainer, Dakota C47, DH9A, DH Moth, DH Moth Minor, DH Moth Seaplane, Demon, Empire Flying Boat, Gipsy Moth, Hudson, Lodestar, Liberator, Lancaster (Lancastar), Seagull, Magister, Tiger Moth, Oxford, Wapiti, Wirraway & Vengeance (Vengance) .
    {In addition Eric was often the second pilot sometimes with dual controls; and more rarely as a passenger}.
    • As a Passenger –
    Bristol Tourer, Sopwith GNU, Southhampton, Lincoln, DC2 (C-39 Commercial), DC3 (TAA) and DC4 (TAA).

    Eric fully taught 44 pupils to fly (which was the British Empire record at that time) including their Service flying training such as navigation, gunnery, bombing and cross country flying. Some of these pupils became Battle of Britain Pilots. He also taught many other RAAF student Pilots some of their flying skills, the details of which are in his Flying Logs (Nos 1 to 6).

    1928 Eric successfully completed the course on parachute folding and maintenance.

    Early April 1929 - Special Qualifications - Air Pilotage Course (aerial navigation by visible identification of landmarks)

    RAAF search (DH9A - A1-20) for Flight Lieut Keith Anderson and Mr Henry Smith (Bobbie) Hitchcock in 1929 (NT - Wave Hill and the Tanami desert - RAAF land search party of Flight Lieut Charles Eaton - leader, Sergeant Pilot Eric Douglas, Mr Moray of Vesteys, Aboriginal trackers - Daylight, Sambo and Jimmy, 1927 Buick car and 26 horses). Eric's skills as a motor mechanic - attended to the Buick, and air mechanic - checked out the flying condition of the "Kookaburra" - all in the Tanami desert.

    An Air Force Medal citation was made 'As an airman pilot and a fitter-aero ... displayed devotion to duty and rendered valuable assistance to Flight Lieut Eaton, both in the air search operation and as a member of the ground expedition' - not awarded.

    BANZARE (Antarctic) with Sir Douglas Mawson in 1929-31 on the SY Discovery (Gipsy Moth Seaplane VH-ULD) - other responsibilities (fitter/rigger) - running and maintenance of the Moth Seaplane and the SY Discovery's motor boat - in his capacity as an Air and Motor mechanic and onshore semaphore (also knew morse code); Polar Medal and Bar 1934, Douglas Peak and Douglas Bay - Antarctica, named after Eric. [See SCAR maps].

    Posted to ‘B’ Flight (Wapitis) May 1931 to 30th June, 1932

    Posted to ‘A’ Flight (Gipsy Moths) 1st July, 1932

    Posted to ‘B’ Flight on 1st July, 1934

    January, 1935 - Gazetted as a Flight Lieutenant - promotion dating back to July, 1934.

    With RRS Discovery 2 for RAAF search for Lincoln Ellsworth and Herbert Hollick-Kenyon 1935/36 (Antarctic) (Wapiti A5-37 fitted with floats and Gipsy Moth Seaplane A7-55); Eric was the leader of the RAAF search party - 'Flying operations'.

    1934 Secretary Officers' Mess for 2½ years.

    1934 - 1938 Lecturer on Aero Engines to flying cadet courses in the Royal Australian Air Force

    1937 Officer in Charge Aircraft Repair Section No 1 Aircraft Depot Laverton and Test Pilot. (Transferred to the technical side of General duties at his own request after completing 2,200 hours of flying).

    In the period from 1928 to 1937 (inclusive) when Eric was an A1 Instructor he was also an Aerobatic Pilot including performing loop the loop, rolling and aircraft towing of another aircraft; and Formation flying - at Air pageants and Air displays eg – at Point Cooke, Laverton and Nhill in Victoria plus at Richmond and Sydney in NSW; and he was involved in Fly pasts eg the Melbourne Cup and for Royalty.

    In 1928 Eric took part in the RAAF Flying formation escort for Bert Hinkler and also the one for Charles Kingsford-Smith in the same year.

    In June 1930 Eric took part in the greeting for Amy Johnson at Geelong (flying from Point Cook to Queenscliff in Southhampton Flying Boat A11-2).

    1938 Staff Recruiting Officer.

    In 1939 Eric successfully undertook a 'Conversion course'.

    1938-40 Officer in Charge of Workshops at Point Cook and Test Pilot – testing aeroplanes for Workshop, Depot and Trade.

    1940-42 Commanding Officer No 1 Aircraft Depot, Laverton.

    1942-45 ‘CO No 3 Aircraft Depot, RAAF, Amberley, Queensland’

    1945-46 A brief period at Laverton and Point Cook, Victoria (Heidelberg - with health problems)

    1945-48 ‘CO No 3 Aircraft Depot, RAAF, Amberley, Queensland’ (Station Headquarters formed in October 1947).

    1948 – ‘Retired from RAAF after serving the last six years with rank of Group Captain and completing 10 years in charge of RAAF Workshops.’ Eric personally supervised ‘the Test and Ferry Section of No 3 Aircraft Depot…and was instrumental in introducing several improvements in the acceptance flying of service aircraft…’

    Group Captain at RAAF Amberley - June 1942 to November 1948 (with seniority from 1943 - gazetted in 1958) - Engineering facilities for the RAAF were expanded after the outbreak of War with Japan, and [No 3 Aircraft Depot] was established - ie Amberley - the then Wing Commander Eric Douglas was appointed as Commanding Officer. Eric's prime duty was the formation of No 3 Aircraft Depot, Amberley and its build up of Workshops and Ancillary sections to a self contained unit of 1600 RAAF personnel. Amberley ancillary locations (in 1946 and 1947) included Archerfield, Charleville, Kingaroy, Strathpine, Lowood, Oakey, Toogoolawah and Coominya (these last two were Relief Landing Fields for Lowood during WW2) and Goolman (Relief Landing Ground for Amberley during WW2); and when the Americans vacated Victoria Park, Spring Hill became a RAAF depot. Oakey [6AD] was of interest to Eric at least from 1943 and Lowood at least from 1944). At Amberley also were the 82 Bomber Wing and AD HQ - all these topics were included in Eric's duties. Also control of all Flight fields in Queensland was another important duty.

    There was also a close tie between RAAF Amberley and what was known then as the WAAF (WAAF - appears to be initially known in Australia as the Women's Auxiliary Air Force - 1946; but was later known as WAAAF ie Women's Australian Auxiliary Air Force). In 1943 there were WAAF fabric workers at RAAF Amberley - one of their jobs was to 'fold parachutes' and there was an certainly a skill and need to fold them correctly for lives were at stake. In March 1946 the WAAF's held Fifth Anniversary Celebrations at Amberley, Sandgate and Toowoomba in Queensland by means of dinners accompanied by dancing - over 100 persons attended the celebrations at Amberley.

    Besides, Amberley was the terminal of the Trans Pacific air route and an erection and overhaul base for the American Air Force for a considerable period. [RAAF history - National Archives of Australia].

    By 1942 there were up to 1,000 American service personnel stationed at Amberley and by 1943 the numbers totalled approximately 2,300 - scaled back to about 500 after the War. [Australia at War website]

    Amberley as at 30/9/1946 -
    Strength of 3AD - 240 Airmen and 40 Officers; 82 Wing 95 Airmen and 60 Officers and ADHQ - 11 Airmen and 3 Officers. Of these persons - 30 Absent on duty, 10 Detatched, 5 in Hospital and 10 on Recreation leave.
    Plus 53 Labourers, 9 Accounts Clerks, 3 Store Clerks, 3 Headquarters Clerks, 2 Female Typists at Headquarters, I Female Typist at Stores, 6 Storemen, 2 Watchmen and 1 Watchman at Strathpine and 3 Temporary Labourers at Charleville. I Watchman required for Charleville and 1 Civilian required for Canteen. (Eric's notes)

    Amberley Aircraft Storage as at 30/9/1946 -
    • Mosquito - 3AD - 32; Lowood - 24 and Kingaroy - 7. Of these 43 were Category B Storage and 20 were Category E Storage.
    Total Storages Category B • Dakota 5, Mosquito 43, Mustang 9, Liberator 7 and Spitfire 6.
    Total Storages Category C • Liberator 33 and Dakota 5.
    Total Storages Category E • Anson 10, Beaufighter 2, Beaufort 4, Ventura 1, Mosquito 20, Mustang 53, Wirraway 1, Boomerang 1, Vengeance 41, Mitchell 33, Spitfire 43 and Liberator 23.
    Total Storages Category D • Beechcraft 1.
    • Other - 3 AD Armament is at Kingaroy. (Eric's notes)

    Civilian Employees at 3AD as as 31/3/1947 -
    • 4 Typists D HQ, 3 Clerks 8 Squadron, 3 Clerks D HQ, 9 Clerks Accounts Section, 2 Telephonists - Main switch, 12 Storemen 8 Squadron, 1 Assistant Storeman 8 Squadron, 6 Transport, 39 Labourers, 19 General hands, 12 Stewards, 8 Cooks Assistants, 4 Watchmen at Archerfield, 2 Watchmen at Amberley, I Caretaker at Lowood, 1 Caretaker at Charleville, Nil at Kingaroy and 7 Labourers at Archerfield. (Eric's notes)

    Other activities at Amberley which involved Eric included food distribution in Queensland by RAAF aeroplanes; RAAF Amberley planes searching for lost aeroplanes, yachts, fishing boats and launches; dealing with the consequences and investigations of RAAF Air crashes at and in the vicinity of Amberley; Mock wars off the coast of New South Wales - Bomber input from Amberley; RAAF charitable (fund-raising) marches through Brisbane, high level RAAF and other meetings. RAAF entertainment - Theatre (live) - including visits by Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Gracie Fields, Gary Cooper, the Glen Millar band, the Mills Brothers, Will Mahoney, Evie Hayes and Rita Hayworth; and movies - examples - Charlie Chaplin, Laurel and Hardy and the Marx Brothers; the Officers' Mess, Sergeants' Mess and the Airmens' Mess (included parties, dances, Christmas dinners and even Weddings); Sporting - including cricket, tennis, table tennis, baseball (American), football - rugby and gridiron. There were also boxing and gymnastics and all the basic facilities that were necessary for all these sports.

    Besides, there were RAAF ceremonies, marches, parades, and inspections with and by dignitaries eg Chief of the Air Staff, HRH the Duke of Gloucester, General Douglas MacArthur, General George C Kenney, Lord Bernard Montgomery, the Prime Minister, the Minister for Defence, the Governor of Queensland, the Premier and Lord Mayor of Brisbane; RAAF Pageants and Air displays - open to the Public. Part of the small Courier Mail Committee judging sponsored flying scholarships. Flying School; Logistics involved with the training Air Training Corps Cadets; Welcoming home via Amberley to Australian ex-prisoners of War. Welcome to Gracie Fields as an entertainer and singer at Amberley and in 1946 a welcome to Miss Australia to Amberley. Housing visiting personnel from other nations beside America eg Royal Navy visitors from British Aircraft carriers. In 1948 responsible for organizing the patrol of all Queesland aerodromes - Eric was the Senior RAAF Officer stationed in Queensland.

    On a more personal level meeting with, and providing financial and moral support for local organizations in Brisbane, Ipswich, Boonah and Amberley such as Railway workshops, the Australian Citizen Forces, local schools, pre school children, rugby and cricket teams, the Red Cross, churches - including Debutante Balls; and the boy scouts; plus local families and individuals especially those associated with RAAF Amberley.

    RAAF (and other) Aircraft at Amberley during the period 1942 to 1948 included – The Anson, Beaufighter, Beaufort, Beechcraft, Boomerang, Dakota C47, Gipsy Major, Hellcat, Liberator, Lincoln Bomber (including Aries II in 1947), Lodestar, Maurauder, Mitchell, Mosquito, Moth Minor, Mustang, Oxford, Scout Fighter, Spitfire, Tiger Moth, Vampire, Vengeance, Ventura and Wirraway (Eric's notes). Other aircraft in the skies over Amberley in that same period included – the Airacobra (Aerocobra), Black Widow, Boston, Catalina, Commando, Corsair, Dauntless, Flying Fortress, Hudson, Kingcobra, Kittyhawk, Lancer, Lancaster, Lancastrian, Lightning, Lincoln Bomber, Mustang, Percival Gull, Rapide, Skymaster, Superfortress, Taylor Craft, Vampire, York, Waco Glider and Wapiti. A family member who was an older child at the time, lists the following aeroplanes types as being some that he remembers at Amberley - Airacobra, Anson, Beaufighter, Beaufort, Boomerang, Black Widow, Boston, Buffalo, Catalina, Commando, Corsair, Dakota, Dauntless, Flying Fortress, Hudson, Kingcobra, Kittyhawk, Lancaster (G for George and and Queenie VI), Lancastrian, Liberator, Lightning, Lincoln (short and long nose), Maurauder, Mitchell, Mosquito, Mustang, Oxford, Percival Gull, Rapide, Skymaster, Superfortress, Spitfire, Tiger Moth, Thunderbolt, Vultee Vengence, Ventura, Wapiti, Waco Glider, Wirraway, York and Vampire (public demonstration flight).

    Eric Douglas - Flying Log No 6 - Amberley - June 23, 1942 to end 1943 -

    June 23, 1942 – C47 Pilot Capt Taylor & Eric Douglas – observation around Amberley

    August 4, 1942 - Vengeance A27- 6 Pilot Capt Kelly & Eric Douglas – test flight

    August 4, 1942 – Tiger Moth A17- Pilot Eric Douglas & F/Lt Mac Gill - observation around Amberley

    August 5, 1942 - Vengeance A27-6 Pilot Eric Douglas & one A/C – general practice

    August 21, 1942 – Tiger Moth AA-19 Pilot Eric Douglas & one A/C - general practice

    August 24, 1942 - Tiger Moth AA-19 Pilot Eric Douglas & S/L Nicholson – observation local

    Sept 10, 1942 – Tiger Moth N 6906 Pilot Eric Douglas – engine test

    Sept 24, 1942 - Tiger Moth A17-426 Pilot Eric Douglas & F/Lt Appleby - observation local

    Oct 12, 1942 – Tiger Moth A17-355 Pilot Eric Douglas & Mr Patts – Amberley – Maryborough – Bundaberg

    Oct 13, 1942 – Tiger Moth A17-355 Pilot Eric Douglas & Mr Patts – Bundaberg – Maryborough – Gympie – Amberley

    Oct 24, 1942 – Beechcraft A 39 Pilot F/Lt Wood & Eric Douglas – general flying

    Nov 11, 1942 - Moth Minor A21-25 Pilot Eric Douglas & P/O Sleeman – general flying and machine test

    Nov 13, 1942 - Moth Minor A21-25 Pilot Eric Douglas & P/O Sleeman – Inst to P/O Sleeman

    April 1943 – Lodestar - Pilot Eric Douglas – Archerfield – Townsville

    April 1943 – Lodestar - Pilot Eric Douglas – Townsville – Archerfield

    July 1943 – DC2- C39 – Eric Douglas Passenger – Mascot to Essendon

    July 1943 – DC2- C39 – Eric Douglas Passenger – Essendon to Archerfield

    Sep 1943 – DC2- C39 – Eric Douglas Passenger – Archerfield to Mascot

    Sep 1943 – DC2- C39 - Eric Douglas Passenger – Essendon to Mascot

    Oct 27, 1943 – Anson EF 922 – Pilot Eric Douglas – Crew F/O Hilford & W/C Nicholson – Amberley to Evans Head

    Oct 27, 1943 – Anson EF 922 – Pilot Eric Douglas – Crew F/O Hilford,

    W/C Nicholson & F/Lt Isaacson – Evans Head to Amberley

    Oct 28, 1943 – Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas & F/O Moss – Local m/c and engine test

    Oct 29, 1943 – Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas & Sgt Wittaker – To Goolman and return

    Oct 29, 1943 – Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas & Sgt Allen – Local test

    Oct 30, 1943 - Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas & W/C Adler – To Oakey [6AD] from Amberley

    Oct 30, 1943 - Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas – solo – From Oakey [6AD] to Amberley

    Nov 30, 1943 – Gipsy Moth A7-44 – Pilot Eric Douglas – solo – To Coominya (11RSU - ie Repair and Salvage Unit), solo - From Coominya

    Dec 8, 1943 – Oxford – Pilot W/C Adler & Eric Douglas – To Oakey, From Oakey

    Plane Speaking (RAAF Amberley) December, 1942 -

    A Christmas Message to all Personnel of No 3 Aircraft Depot "Providemus" is the motto of an Aircraft Depot, meaning 'We shall Provide.' This is the reason for our existence, this is our aim. This Aircraft Depot is in its infancy, but is advancing rapidly both in output and personnel. We are fast gaining a reputation for efficiency and co-operation, which must be proudly upheld. The majority of personnel of this Depot have entered the Service since war began. Their reason for doing so is the desire to serve their country by helping to win this war. This will be achieved only by placing the Service before self. And the Service demands unremitting toil by all. Whatever our job may be, it is most important that we be of good cheer and endeavour, at all times, to carry it out to the best of our ability. For some months, we have worked adjacent to our American comrades who are playing an equivalent part. Their co-operation and good fellowship are greatly appreciated. Trusting that all personnel of this Depot will stick to our motto until we have successtully finished this job. Season's Greetings to all. Signed G E Douglas, Group Captain, Commanding No 3 Aircraft Depot, Amberley.

    In 1944 – Inventor - Airwash Spray mask (Patented on 4th November, 1946) - for painting and industrial usages. Another idea that Eric had was for a 'boltless undercarriage' but did not pursue it as far as a Patent as he felt that it was a RAAF perogative.

    Some special Aeroplanes/Visitors at RAAF Amberley –

    • General George C Kenney's plane landed at Amberley in August, 1942. (General Kenney - Reports). General Kenney also said that he formed the P38 group (Lightnings) and 'started training out of Amberley Field'.
    • There was an Official visit of American Senators to Amberley in September, 1942 (John Oxley Library - State Library of Queensland - web blog from the Library). However 'Trove' newspapers show that 5 US Senators visited Brisbane in September, 1943.
    • Flying Ace, Clive 'Killer' Caldwell arrived at RAAF Amberley on 14 September 1942.
    • On 25th October, 1942 General Hap Arnold, Major General Street and Colonel Bill Ritchie landed at Amberley Field. They were from the SWPA (South West Pacific Area) - US - War Department. (General Kenney - Reports).
    • On 3rd June, 1943 RAF Lancaster Four-Engined Bomber ‘Queenie VI' landed at RAAF Amberley. This aeroplane was flown to Australia by RAAF Flight Lieutenant Peter Isaacson and an all RAAF crew. It was taken on RAAF charge as A66-1.
    • On 13th September, 1943 Mrs Eleanor Rooseveldt landed at Amberley and among those greeting her was Mrs Douglas MacArthur. (Ref Roger Marks QAWW2 - NARA (US National Archives and Records Administration) - SC250309 (7567).
    • 3rd November, 1943 and Mr (Arthur) Calwell addressed the 'Loan Rally' at the Amberley Picture Theatre.
    • In 1943 United States Air Force Liberator B24 ‘Crosby's Curse’ was on the tarmac at Amberley.
    • It was on 8th February, 1944 that General Kenney 'received a message to meet General MacArthur at Amberley Field in an hour.' (General Kenney - Reports).
    • On 7th July, 1944, VIP Consolidated Liberator C-87 arrived at Amberley. This plane had been allotted to Admiral Sir Bruce Fraser, Commander of the British Fleet.
    • On 20th August, 1944 the famous aviator Charles Augustus Lindbergh arrived on Aircraft 975 at Amberley (called Amberley Field by the Americans). [Item details held at the National Archives in Brisbane].
    • On 7th October, 1944 Bob Dyer entertained at Amberley.
    • 8th November, 1944 was the day that ‘G for George’ arrived at Amberley. This Lancaster Bomber was flown from the UK by RAAF Flight Lieutenant K A Hudson a 22 year old DFC and Bar winner of Rockhampton; and a RAAF crew. The famous plane of 90 operational flights arrived for its final destiny at the Australian War Memorial. The young Captain taxied to a stop after flying out of 'a cloud of dust storm' and was warmly welcomed by Group Captain Eric Douglas. (G for George is now on permanent display at the AWM in Canberra).
    • On 1st June, 1945 Gracie Fields arrived at Amberley Aerodrome - she entertained in the RAAF theatre there.
    * In July, 1945 No 1 Squadron RAAF Mosquito ‘Bondi Blonde’ A52-518 was at Amberley. Mosquito A52-500 was also based at Amberley.
    • In July, 1945 a ‘test and ferry flight’ was carried out on Mitchell A47-44 by Flight Lieutenant A Egan from No 3 Depot at Amberley.
    • The Duke and Dutchess of Gloucester touched down at Amberley on the 8th August, 1945 in the Duke's plane 'Endeavour'. They lunched at the Amberley Mess as guests of the Commanding Officer, Group Captain Eric Douglas after which the Duke carried out an inspection of No 3 AD with Group Captain Douglas as his host.
    • Newspaper report of 17th September, 1945 - 45 Army and 3 RAAF liberated POW's "will arrive at Amberley...after an all-night flight from Darwin in two Liberators...A third Liberator will be in the flight convoy carrying 20 wounded soldiers from Borneo..."
    • On 31st January, 1946 it was reported that 600 US Airmen making a mass goodwill tour of Australia were due to land at Amberley in 42 planes. The planes were to be 30 B29s (Superforts) and 12 C54s (four motored Douglas bombers of the 'Sky Master' type). At Amberley they were due to stay for 48 hours and after refuelling will go on to Sydney - the B29s to Mascot and the C54s to Schofield. Group Captain Douglas said that 'he did not know when the planes would arrive, but he expected three weeks notice before their landing at Amberley'. He would like to see the men given 'a grand welcome' and had already approached the Premier, Mr Hanlon on the matter. He had reason to believe that suitable arrangements would be made.
    • On 30th October, 1946 Group Captain and Mrs Gordon Savage were guests at a cocktail party at Amberley Aerodrome.
    • 13th June, 1947 saw the arrival at Amberley of Avro Lincoln B2 Aircraft Serial No Re-364 (The AWM shows this aeroplane as an Avro Lincoln) ‘Aries II’ of the RAF Empire Air Navigation School. From Group Captain E E Vielle of ‘Aries II’ dated 13th November, 1947 from Whenuapai, Royal New Zealand Air Force to Eric “Dear Douglas, Thank you very much indeed for your hospitality and the way you looked after all of us at Amberley…Many thanks for the assistance we received on the Aircraft…”
    • On 26th September, 1947 Group Captain and Mrs Douglas were to receive 80 guests at a cocktail party and were to give the party at the RAAF Officers Mess, Amberley.
    • 26th November, 1947 "About 140 guests will attend an at home which the Governor (Sir John Lavarack) and Lady Lavarack will hold at Government House tonight. Members of the Indian Cricket Team will be present. Among the invited guests will be...Group Captain and Mrs Douglas..."
    * In early December, 1947 it was reported in the papers that No 82 Wing of RAAF Amberley was to be flying Prime Minister Benjamin Chifley to New Zealand. Group Captain Douglas C.O. of Amberley stated that 'the plane was one of three in Australia converted for very important personages and known as VIP Liberators. Another is in Japan while the third is being overhauled. The planes have luxurious accommodation including upholstered chairs, a bed above the command deck and a kitchen fitted with the latest electrical appliances'.
    • On 22nd December, 1947 Group Captain Eric Douglas represented the RAAF at the Funeral or Memorial Service of the 'Unknown US Soldier' in Brisbane.
    • On 4th March, 1948 a RAF Lincoln bomber landed at Amberley. Group Captain Douglas stated that '...the crew will lecture RAAF air mustering, to keep them informed of the latest developments incorporated in the construction of the Lincoln bomber and it's equipment.'
    • 5th April, 1948 "The Pathfinder Vickers Vimy aircraft carrying the insignia of the King's Flight landed at Amberley from Darwin this evening...In command is the Captain of the King's Flight Air Commodore E Fielden...Accompanying him are three RAF Officers and five ground crew..." (Townsville Daily Bulletin - Tuesday 6th April, 1948).

    The Cairns Post reported on 14th July, 1947 that Field Marshall Montgomery was due 'to arrive at Eagle Farm...'and that 'he will be met by...and the RAAF Senior Officer (Group Captain Douglas)...' Amongst others Eric was accompanied by his young son Ian Ellsworth Douglas. Then on 15th July, 1947 Group Captain and Mrs E Douglas were among 700 Guests who attended a Civic Reception at the Brisbane City Hall hosted by the Vice Lord Mayor of Brisbane - Alderman Moon. "Group Captain and Mrs Douglas motored down from Amberley. Mrs Douglas wore a tabac brown frock, matching coat ...She added brown felt and daffodil accessories."

    Debutants - on 22 June, 1945 it was reported that 17 Debutants were presented to the Catholic Archbishop at a Catholic Ball at St Mary's Hall...At 9 o'clock Archbishop Duhig and the guests arrived. They included...Group Captain and Mrs Douglas... On 5th June, 1947 Group Captain and Mrs E Douglas also attended the Catholic Ball. Besides, on 14th August, 1947 - 12 Debutants were presented to the Governor General (Mr McKell) and Mrs McKell and the State Governor (Sir John Lavarack) and Mrs Lavarack at the Church of England Ball at City Hall (Brisbane). The official party included...Group Captain and Mrs Douglas...

    The Fleet Air Arm (Navy) - Directorate of Aircraft Maintenance and Repair - role of Aircraft Engineer (member RAS; and Dip ME and Dip EE) and Division Head (Civilian) 1949 to 1964. Duties - The immediate control and overseeing of all technical work performed by the technical section of the Aircraft Maintenance and Repair – Directorate of the Fleet Air Arm (DAMR). The technical division consisted of the following – airframe, engine, component repair, materials and inspection; ground equipment and plant, aircraft modifications, drawing office and technical library.

    Included was the maintenance of ‘helicopter aircraft’, a ‘working knowledge of jet turbine aircraft and their maintenance requirements’ and co-ordinating ‘Technical Conferences’ and the overseeing of special projects such as the - ‘conversion of a Dakota aircraft to a Flying classroom’

    Eric had initially joined the Civilian Technical Staff of DAMR, Navy Office in 1949 as ‘a Technical Officer on Airframes’.

    From the Royal Australian Navy site – Nowra, NSW - Aircraft operated by the Royal Australian Navy – Fleet Air Arm in Eric's time at Navy Office -

    Auster J5-G Autocar – communications aircraft
    Bell UH-1B/1C Iroquois – search and rescue/training helicopter
    Bristol Sycamore HR50/51 – rescue and training helicopter
    CAC Aermacchi MB-326H (Macchi) – land based jet trainer
    CAC CA-16 Wirraway – fighter/training aircraft
    CAC CA-22 Winjeel prototype – basic trainer
    De Havilland Sea Vampire Mk T.22 (Vampire 873) – land based pilot trainer
    De Havilland Sea Venom F.A.W. Mk 53 – carrier borne fighter bomber
    De Havilland Tiger Moth – land based trainer
    Douglas C-47A Dakota – land based navigational trainer and transport aircraft
    Fairey Firefly AS.5/AS.6 – carrier borne fighter, anti-submarine and reconnaissance aircraft
    Fairey Gannet AS1/4 – carrier borne anti-submarine aircraft
    Fairey Gannet T.2/T.5 – carrier borne anti-submarine aircraft
    GAF Jindivik pilotless target aircraft – pilotless target drone
    Hawker Sea Fury Mark 11 – carrier borne fighter bomber
    Millicer Air Tourer - Prototype – trainer aircraft
    Westland Scout AH-1 – survey utility helicopter
    Westland Wessex 31A – carrier borne submarine search and rescue helicopter
    and Westland Wessex Mk31B – carrier borne submarine search and rescue helicopter

    Member of the Antarctic Club of 1929 - Australian Section commenced in 1940; Hon Secretary of the Royal Aeronautical Society (Victoria) - incorporated as the Institution of Australian Engineers (Eric Douglas was accepted and recognized as an Aeronautical Engineer by this prestigious body);President of the pre-War (WW2) Air Force Association 'Old Permos' for many years until his death in 1970 (his old RAAF mates would not let him resign). Other memberships included - the Royal Brighton Yacht Club, Royal Yacht Club of Victoria, Ski Club of Victoria (early member), Victorian Aero Club, Aircraft Industries, Adastral Lodge (Werribee), the RAAF Fidelity Club (when at 3 AD Amberley), the Naval and Military Club, the Kelvin Club and the Melbourne Cricket Club. War Medal 1939-45, Australian Services Medal 1939-45 and General Services Badge.

    Eligible for Returned from Active Services Badge [RAAF history July 1948 - National Archives of Australia].

    Some of the RAAF persons and friends who Eric spoke about with respect over the years included - Al Murdoch - Eric's Best Man; Stu Campbell, Sherg, 'Snow' Lachal, Dal Charlton, Donny Summers, Carroll, Cobby, Gerard, Garrat, Knox-Knight, Lascelle, Leo Ryan, Max Allen, McColl, McNamara, Lavarck, Keenan, Berry, Bates, Berg, Stewart, Draper, Lancaster, McKay, Chapman, Walker, Carr, Chalmers, Mann, Tuttleby, Glen, Hely, Edgerton, Spencer, Mullholland, Graham, Balmer, McCutcheon, Wood, Horne, McKenzie, Ashton-Shorter, Walsh, Fowler, Good, Dillon, Charles Probert, 'Barney' Creswell, 'King' Cole, Charles Eaton, Bladin, Daley, Wally Rae, Ned Allen, Regie Wood, Colin McK Henry, Darcy Power, Littlejohn, Wrigley, Hitchcock (son), Hal Harding, Collopy, Heffernan, Chadwick, Knox, 'Kanga' De la Rue, Dickie Williams, Val Hancock, Curnow, Candy, Jones, Ray Brownell, Cottee, Easterbrook, Walter Nicholson, Jimmy Melrose, Parry, Lukis, Headlam, Lerew, Truscott, Hannah, Ridley, Wackett, Scascheqini, Appleby, Nankerville, Charlie Matheson, Peter Isaacson, Ingulfsen, Seekamp, Waddy, Hampshire, Fred Thomas, Luxton, Lerew, Ham, Kingwell, Beaurepaire and Whalley; also Tavener (RAF) and C P Jones, Major H Ray Millard, Lt Colonel Claude F Gilchrist and Colonel Leo B Reid (last four from the US Army USAAF/USAF).

    The 22nd Service Group of the Fifth Air Force (American) arrived in Brisbane and located to 'Camp Ascot' on 6th March 1942 to 15th March, 1942; and on 15th March 1942 they relocated to Archerfield Airfield and then on 6th June 1942 they relotated to Amberley Airfield - the 22nd Service Group's Commanding Offiicer was Lt Colonel Claude F Gilchrist or in the recent words (October 2012) of the Deputy Director of American Air Force History at the Pentagon "...the 22nd Service Group assigned to the Fifth Air Force was responsible for the American portion of Amberley Field from 15th June 1942 until the group's disbandment on 9 January 1944. Before that time, it was at Camp Ascot near Brisbane from 6 to 15 March and at Archerfield from 15 March through 14 June 1942. At Amberley the Unit operated a post headquarters and it's mission was to service aircraft received from the US and those returned from forward areas. The group commander was Lt Col Claude F Gilchrist..."

    Major H R Millard was with Air Transport Command (American) at Amberley and in October 1943 he is listed as the Chief Executive.

    25th December, 1943 - Major Millard and Lt Colonel Gilchrist were at RAAF Amberley as they had Christmas dinner with Eric Douglas and his family.

    Information obtained from the RAAF Museum at Point Cook in October, 2012 lists the following involvement at Amberley -
    RAAF - 23 Sqn 1942, 85 OBU 1945, 3 Aircraft Depot 1942 -, 3 Central Recovery Depot 1944-46, 10 RSU 1942, 3 Recruit Depot 1942, 6 Recruit Depot 1942 and 3 SFTS 1940-42.
    USAAF - 3BG 1942, 35 Air Base G & 2 Material S 1942, 22 Service Group 1942-45 and the US Air Transport Command - 1943-1945 (Pacific Wing Station 3).

    United States Army Air Force at Amberley during World War II - from Wikipedia - The airfield became a major American Air Force base during 1942 and 1943. ''Known Fifth Air Force units assigned to 'Amberley Field' were -
    • 22nd Bombardment Group B-26 Marauder (7 March - 7 April 1942) • 38th Bombardment Group B-25 Mitchell (Headquarters 30 April -10 June 1942) • 69th Bombardment Squadron (30 April -20 May 1942) • 70th Bombardment Squadron (11 May -15 August 1942) • 475th Fighter Group P-38 Lightening (Headquarters 14 May - 14 August 1943) • 431st Fighter Squadron (I July - 14 August 1943) • 432nd Fighter Squadron (11 June - 14 August 1943) • 433rd Fighter Squadron (17 June - 14 August 1943). In 1943, with the Allies advancing against the Empire of Japan in the southwest Pacific, American units moved north to forward airfields".

    From the - Royal Australian Air Force - RAAF Base Amberley facts site (for students) -

    • '...From October (1941) until July 1942 the base was...home to No 3 Service Flying Training School, operating a fleet of 54 Wirraways. • Throughout 1942 there was a considerable American presence at the base, as newly-arrived US Army Air Force bomber and fighter squadrons assembled their aircraft before moving north. • After the formation of No 3 Aircraft Depot (3AD) in March 1942, Amberley was also an important aircraft assembly and engineering base for the RAAF. 3AD remained there until June 1992. • After the end of World War II, Amberley became the base for No 82 Bomber Wing, which then formed the RAAF's main strike element...'

    Also seek out Dunn's excellent pages on RAAF Amberley in World War II (web).

    Some Inward letters –
    • 30th August, 1939 from Colin McK H (Group Captain Colin McK Henry) living in Herts, England “This…course is too hard & too much work…Wally Kyle and I went to London to meet Watson & Hely…Trouble with this course is never have anything to do with aircraft…I fly a Magister for 1½ hours in 2 weeks, one flip 5 miles from Henlow…There are 10 service Aerodromes within a radius of 15 miles. Am only allowed 20 hours flying in a year…Saw a Blenheim once on Aerodrome otherwise have seen no new stuff at all…For goodness sake take ½ hour off one day & write me a note…Cheers Eric…"
    • Note from Wilfrid R Jackson of Amberley - 24/12/1943 "...my appreciation of the happy conditions experienced under your command..."
    • Letter from a former Airman residing at the St Laurence Club, Sydney on 2 April, 1944 “… I aver that the spirit of harmony and team-work for which Amberley is known throughout the Service is due solely to the atmosphere, which you yourself have created…a 3AD posting is universally hailed with feelings of pleasurable anticipation…A Great Bloke …” (name supplied).
    • On 14th April 1946 from George R Snaddon of Mosman, NSW - he was an LAC at Amberley "...I find I'm kept much busier (if that is possible) than when at Amberley...I believe W/C Connolly has left for pastures new...I'd be interested to know where he was sent to. Even after having left the RAAF I find myself wondering what the fate of this & that will be (Aircraft I mean)..."
    • 2nd July 1946 from L Bowling of Ipswich - Hon Sec of the 'Ipswich and District Motor Cycle Club' "...I would like, on behalf of the Club, to request permission to use...portion of the Airfield. I refer to the part known as the Eastern Taxiway...At no time would the event encroach on any actual landing strip..."
    • Dated August 12th, 1946 from J Wild the Hon Sec of the Railway Workshops - Ipswich 'Ipswich Workshops Educational Assocation' "...our very sincere thanks & appreciation for your most interesting & educational address...Many appreciative remarks have been made by members re your talk & all hope that someday in the future we will meet again...Re your proposed invitation to members...to inspect RAAF Station Amberley may I suggest that Saturday Sept 14th (if it is) be suitable for you...Mr Jackson working on the hearing machine was very pleased to know that Mr Hall would accept your donation of a 'Respirator'..."
    • 26th August 1948 from Victor Turnbull of 7 Mile, Rosewood “…I go to the Aerodrome each week, generally on my way to town, the good people there like to get our eggs, cream etc…”
    • A letter from the Lowrys of North Rockhampton in December, 1950 “…I have had several inquiries here from some of his (Douglas's) friends who were at Amberley and always ask if he is still in the RAAF, he was held in the highest esteem at Amberley and was very much liked…I often look back at Amberley and think of the many friends I made there and the good station it was…”
    • From a fisherman and marine navigator at Victoria Point in April, 1951 “…Dear Captain…life at Victoria Point is moving along very smoothly and we are gradually becoming a name in its history. You would not know the old spitfire box (his home - old aeroplane packing boxes or cases were considered a prime possession at the time)...We now have a bedroom on its back plus a shower room and also a bedroom on the front…the place is admired by every one who sees it, not only inside but outside…” (name supplied).
    • A letter from Arthur Middleton residing at Hermanus South Africa in 1960 “…I was at Point Cook as a Rigger in 1926 to 1928. Left there to return to South Africa in 1928….Well Eric lots of water has flowed under the bridge since Point Cook days…Have had several trips back to Aussie, in fact went back to Sydney in 1946…Did meet a few of the old Point Cook boys in 1946 with ANA at Essendon. Smith & Snowy Cooper & a couple of others...Still have my old discharge signed by Cole…”

    [Sources - Published records, Trove - newspapers and images, files from the National Archives of Australia, information held at the RAAF Museum at Point Cook, notes and logs by Eric, letters from Eric's contemporaries and recollections by the writer].

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    1,024 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  58. GROUP CAPTAIN ERIC DOUGLAS - RAAF - Supplementary information.
    List
    Public

    In about July, 1929 - to Eric Douglas from Charlie Matheson "...Ballina, NSW, Dear old Eric, Was immensely pleased to get your note...Was very pleased when you were picked for the job (Banzare - Antarctic pilot) & if everything comes to a successful end you should be home & dried. I sincerely trust you have the maximum of luck on the trip to assist your good old common sense & flying & only wish I were accompanying you but somehow or other these great old trips seem to escape me. Yes Eric, The Gypsys should do the job but don't let any one force you into trying to do something with them that your own common sense tells you shouldn't be done. I mean, find out the petrol range etc oil consumption for various weights & lifting distances yourself and adhere to your own judgement in all things...While I seem to be on the advising subject old son. I may as well give you some more. You very probably know & have tried to do what I'm going to tell you, but that doesn't matter anyway.

    I don't know what type of forced landing country or ice bergs etc exist where you are going but recently I tried out both the unslotted & the slotted wing Gypsy to see if the machine could be brought down in timbered or mountainous country without injury to pilot or passengers.

    Well on with it. In the event of engine failure & absolutely no hope of a cleared space, immediately stall. Hold stick back into stomach just sufficiently to prevent nose from doing a drop. Use ailerons coarsely and freely to stop spinning tendency. Rudder needs coarse usage also for straight running. Its best to start this floating stall from the height where the engine failed as it gives you plenty of time to make sure you are doing the controlling. Keep floating until within about 20 feet of the objects (trees or anything else) & then finally hold stick hard back. Machine has then not enough forward impetus to do more than longerons & without shock to anyone. During the last 20 feet the tendency was to push the stick forward owing to the natural horror of stalling near the ground, but don't. Hold it back...

    I have started a private flying school up here & doing well & am teaching any other club trained pilots this method of getting down without injury at 10 pounds each. Don't bother sending the tenner. We will drink it when you return if the hint is handy.

    By ginger I'd love to have been at your send off. Another headache I'll bet. Poor old Reg. Tell him I bet every Bristol Jupiter has forced landings with him looking after them. Of course a simple engine like a Puma is nothing to Reg...Violet & kiddies send their love...Your sincere friend Charlie Matheson..."

    When in South Africa in late 1929 to meet the Discovery in Cape Town and await the ship's departure Eric Douglas went for two flights in a Gipsy Moth (The same or two different Moths) - one flight was with a Mr Blake as passenger over Muizenberg on 18th October, 1929. The other flight was recorded as solo in Eric's general log but it is not recorded in Eric's Flying Log Book. Moreover, Eric had recorded in his notes at the time the name of Mr Stanley Halse, who was a famous Aviator from South Africa. So perhaps that meant that he had contact of some sort with him? Earlier when the ship SS Nestor taking him and other explorers including Sir Douglas Mawson to South Africa Eric had visited the Aero and Sailing Clubs in Durban.

    In April 1931 Flying Officer Eric Douglas was touring Western Victoria by car on a holiday with Flight Sergeant Reg Wood of No 1 Air Squadron. They went to the Gliding Trials at Koroit and the Air Show at Mt Gambier. Eric gave talks to the Pageant organizers and to the Mt Gambier High School at the invitation of the Headmaster.

    On 14th December, 1932, Eric Douglas of the RAAF landed at Echuca after flying from Hay and then Mildura.

    At the St Andrew's Society at Williamstown in October, 1934, Flying Officer Douglas gave a talk on the Antarctic.

    Eric Douglas married in January, 1934 and his best man was Flying Officer Alister Murdoch and his Groomsman was Flight Lieutenant 'Wig' White.

    In November, 1934 at the Air Pageant at RAAF Richmond a Gipsy Moth piloted by Squadron Leader G Jones was towed by a Wapiti flown by Flying Officer G E Douglas.

    In 1934 also Jimmy Melrose's plane was at RAAF Laverton.

    In about 1937 - Group Captain Brian 'Black Jack' Walker in February, 1993 "...I'd be twenty-two...when we left Echuca there were Wapitis doing all sorts of terrible things. I can still remember the flight lieutenant in charge of the Deniliquin end was Eric Douglas, Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas, and he was racing around firing off red Very lights and Wapitis were screaming down at him and attempting to flatten him...it was just jolly stupid, and we'd only had a couple of beers..." Eric Douglas was in charge of the no 7 Service Flight Training School at Deniliquin at least to 1941 and maybe till mid 1942 before he moved to RAAF Amberley. (When in charge of this Flight School Eric was based at RAAF Point Cook and made flights to Deniliquin.)

    January 1938 and Eric and his wife Ella went as guests onboard the Imperial Airways, Empire Flying Boat 'Centaurus' G-ADUT when the Centaurus was on an a world goodwill visit. When in Melbourne between the 13th to 16th January, 1938 the seaplane was at Hobson's Bay at the mouth of the Yarra River with moorings at Williamstown. Eric took images of the 'Centaurus' including an image of the inside of the cockpit, and there are images of Eric and Ella and a few other guests standing on a wing of the plane. (Reference - silver gelatin negatives and black and white album prints, plus one larger print of the 'Centaurus').

    In Melbourne as in other cities, the arrival, presence and departure of the Centaurus created a large amount of local interest with people making use of vantage points in streets and on the roofs of buildings (in the case of Melbourne and other cities). It was also reported that thousands of people made their way to Hobson's Bay, and many went by motor car. Invitation flights were offered for VIP guests - in this case the flying route was over the City of Melbourne - and the plane was open for Public Inspection. The Commander of the Flying Boat at this time was Captain J W Burgess. In addition this plane was used by the RAAF as A18-10 in c1939/42.

    The Centaurus was unfortunately destroyed during a Japanese air raid in Broome in March, 1942 (Museum Victoria - on the web).

    Eric Douglas flew from Melbourne (Essendon Airport) to Launceston (airport was at Western Junction) on 21st June, 1938 on the ANA aeroplane DC3 VH-UZK called 'Kurana' returning to Melbourne on the same plane on 24th June, 1938. About that time or little later the Kurana was also labelled 'Royal Mail'. Four silver gelatin negatives by Eric Douglas and the same four as album prints verify this fact about it being labelled 'Royal Mail'. Also this plane became RAAF A30-2 for a brief period on 11th September, 1939. Eric possibly flew on it to Launceston and return to assess its performance or perhaps it had something to do with a RAAF air training facility that was set up at Western Junction by 1941.

    This plane crashed at Mt Macedon in 1948 when the Pilot deviated from his approved Flight Plan.

    On 2nd March, 1939 'Flight Lieutenant G E Douglas was piloting a RAAF Seagull accompanied by an observer searching between San Remo and Flinders Island, without finding any trace of the launch Cynara which with a crew of three, is four days overdue at Flinders Island. The plane returned to Laverton after completing a zig-zag course as far as the Tasmanian coast'. This flight was not recorded in Eric's Flying Log probably due to the fact that it was an emergency flight. The next day the launch was found to be safe - it had been sheltering at Deal Island. The RAAF flight was possibly made in Seagull V - A2-6.

    In July, 1940 Eric gave a lecture to the Women's Air Training Corps which was based at Capital House in Swanston Street, Melbourne. He was accompanied by Flight Lieut Stevens.

    December, 1940 – extract from RAAFERS – an unofficial publication of …Members of No 1 Aircraft Depot, Laverton – a copy was given to Wing Commander G E Douglas who was the Commanding Officer of the Depot “…Gone with Wind (accompanied by a sketch of a Gipsy Moth flying over the South Pole) –
    We seek him here, we seek him there
    In fact we seek him everywhere,
    If he’s in Depot, it’s a great revelation
    We chase him all over the ruddy Station.
    He hides behind hangars, he hides behind doors
    And when he goes flying there must be a cause
    When taking up passengers he seems quite reserved
    But Orderly Room members don’t ever get served.
    At modifications he’s got them all beat
    He fixed up an Anson with a soft office seat
    The Anson he flew for hours on end
    And the Vent Pipe he modified with a single small bend.
    We know how to get him and ask for a dime
    For he’s always in when it comes tea time
    We peep’s through the key hole to see if he’s there
    But damned if he hasn’t vanished in thin Hair".
    Eric Douglas was in charge of the No 1 Aircraft Depot from May 1940 till early 1942.
    From memory the Commanding Officer's office was at the far end of the Amberley station village in a complex, which also housed the control tower for the air base. One of the chairs in Eric's office and perhaps his main chair was a steel swivel chair with a cushion on the seat. Files were kept in steel cabinets and on Eric's desk writing materials and papers were set on in an orderly way in a large wooden desk and there was carpet on the floor. On the wall somewhere, there were diagrams and maps decorated with pins with coloured heads, depicting I presume places of strategic interest.

    Somewhere else, perhaps within the complex a very large table level area portrayed housings for aeroplanes such as hangars and dedicated areas with camouflaged vegetation ie grass and trees, or net coverings, or seemingly natural mounds and undulations; and landing strips and numerous metal 'aircraft recognition art' aeroplanes and even more numerous camouflaged wooden 'trench art' aeroplanes - set out in an impressive reality display. The wooden aeroplanes were of various sizes from about 6 to 18 inches in length - the most outstanding being aeroplanes such as Catalina Flying Boats and Super Flying Fortresses. (Re: Group Captain Eric Douglas was C/O at Amberley from June 1942 to June 1948 with a brief period away in Melbourne in 1945 due to illness - gall bladder attacks).

    On Eric's arrival at Amberley in mid 1942 planning and action quickly took place to strengthen and lengthen the main runway to cater for heavy aircraft and both runways had to cater for what was to become extremely busy aeroplane activity at Amberley during World War 2. (There is a lengthy and detailed illustrated RAAF Report dedicated to this project, bound with a reddish brown cloth cover - the copy that I had was mislaid about 17 years ago).

    The Bunker Facility at "Frogs Hollow" Gully in the southern area of RAAF 3 AD, Amberley Air Force Base was used for a three month period by General MacArthur during World War 2 (Reference - Parliament of Australia 2011).

    There were approximately 2,000 American Air Corps (USAAF/USAF) personnel stationed at Amberley during the 1940's (Reference - Department of Defence, Australian Government 2010).

    Some snippets from the - Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works - Report on the Redevelopment of Facilities at RAAF Base Amberley...Fifth Report of 1998 -

    * 'In 1938 Defence acquired a 320 (or 330 from some reports) hectare site for the development (of RAAF Amberley).' (Besides some land in the early stages of the base was obtained by compulsory acquisition, and more in particular in the 1970's - See the National Australian Archives for individuals affected).
    * "...It was not until 1942 that the Base assumed its principal support role (for the RAAF) with the formation of No 3 Aircraft Depot. This had the responsibility for the assembly and repair of a wide range of Aircraft. During the Second World War, numerous operational units used Amberley for refitting and as a staging area before moving to forward bases. Several United States squadrons were also based at Amberley during this period."
    * 'In the wartime there were at least two (Waddingtons) igloo type hangars at Amberley.'
    * 'The No 82 Wing Headquarters constructed during the Second World War were originally a series of huts placed together and reclad in brick.'

    Five types of wooden model aeroplanes have been identified as being made by Eric in the late 1930's and early 1940's (and there were more). Balsa and thin plywood were his favoured woods for model making - accompanied by thin pins, tarzan's grip, aeroplane dope and excellent quality white or coloured tissue paper. Tools and equipment necessary seemed to be chisels, woodplanes, plyers, hammers, screw drivers, grinders, spikes, elastic bands, small clamps, scissors and razor blades, good quality string and bees wax; measuring tapes and rulers, sketches of aeroplanes and parts, sometimes plans of models and a soldering iron to be heated on the stove or primus, and of course the solder.

    We used to go Archerfield and Warwick and Eric flew his model planes and gliders in one or both places - Warwick in particular stays in my mind for this activity.

    Features added to the models included wooden pilots and passengers, wooden life boats and self-made metal and wooden fittings. Where it was considered appropriate coloured paper aeroplane labels were stuck onto the wood or tissue coverings. Besides much use was made of bright coloured enamel paints that came in small tins and together with the glue and aeroplane dope the scent of model making filled the air. Some of the planes had small engines and 'much testing' was carried out on the kitchen bench and that left no doubt that this hobby was in full flight! If none of that was happening well perhaps a box or triangle kite was being made, or the small model/toy donkey steam engine was puffing away to keep us interested and amused. (Memories of Amberley 1942 to 1948).

    The five types of planes (mentioned above) were the Heron competition duration model, the Red Wing low wing Cabin Monoplane, Moth Seaplanes - one of each of the latter given to Frank Hurley and to Lincoln Ellsworth, Flying Boats and Gliders.

    On March 5, 1947 'certain air navigation, air communication and weather facilities at Eagle Farm and Amberley' were transferred from the Government of the United States of America to the Government of Australia, with certain considerations to be met by Australia (Agreement signed by H Evatt - Australia, and Robert Butler - America).

    From the Australian Government site - Australian Heritage Database - as at 20/11/2012 - RAAF Amberley is registered on the National Estate and listed on the Commonwealth Heritage List.

    RAAF Amberley is also listed on the Defence Heritage Register (this Register listing the Commonwealth Heritage List of the Australian Heritage Database) along with other related facilities such as - RAAF Williams Laverton - Eastern Hangers and West Workshop; RAAF Williams Point Cook - Air Base, Museum and Heritage Precincts and College and Training area; RAAF Richmond - Air Base and North Base Trig-Station and Victoria Barracks Melbourne. (I selected my places of interest only).

    The Department of Sustainability...advised in November, 2012, that what the condition of places listed for heritage values 'may change over time' but they do not consist 'just of facades'.

    Further from the Defence Heritage Register site - Amberley served "...as the major departure point for traffic to and from the United States and major ports, to theatres of war in the Pacific and as a major depot for the maintenance, salvage and assembly of new aircraft...Amberley RAAF Base is one of the few surviving examples of pre World War Air Force planning and construction under British influence...A key planning feature is the diamond-shaped command and administration area, which is linked to the Guardhouse, by the original access road, which separated the hangars and airstrip(s) from other areas of the base...” Within the diamond-shaped precinct were the Air Base HQ, the Air Base support building and the parade ground. “Hanger 76, the largest hangar of the period, is closely linked to the Air Base HQ...” (Defence Heritage Register).

    “Other structures important in illustrating the wartime functional layout of the Base” included the Emergency Power Generator building...the Cinema...Airmens Mess...Sergeants Mess...“ (and the Guardhouse). The Guardhouse identifying the original base structure, illustrates the operational context of the base during World War 2 and is linked both visually and by road with the command precinct. Individual structures within the pre and early World War 2 facilities important for their ability to demonstrate the principal characteristics of their type include …the Air Base HQ…the Air Base support building…Hangar 76 and the Guardhouse”. (Defence Heritage Register).

    Other features which illustrate the context of the base...during World War 2 - The 13 Bellman Hangars that remain were prefabricated and “illustrate the primary function of maintenance and repair during World War 2 and the operational layout of the base...” By 1943 17 Bellman hangars had been built and 13 of those were in place by 1941 “flanking the runway” (Defence Heritage Register).

    In these same times, Bellman hangars were also in the production line for Archerfield, Kingaroy, Lowood and Oakey and a number of other establishments, with at least 283 on order. "The advantages of the Bellman hanger (prefabricated) designs were that they were lightweight, portable, low cost and easily erected..." (Comeng - A History of Commonwealth Engineering Vol. 1 1921-1955 Rosenberg NSW - John C Dunn 2006). Moreover there are 14 Bellman Hangars at Point Cook which are on the National Heritage List and 5 at Laverton which are on the Commonwealth Heritage List with a further 2 exised from the site (Laverton) on the other side of the Geelong Road. Fortunately too for Australian history many other examples of Bellman hangars remain. (Wikipedia).

    The “former subterranean operation building of May 1942 (likely Frogs Hollow) “illustrates the need to separate strategic command during wartime operations ..." (Also it says here that this concrete facility in a dry quarry appears to have been shared by US and RAAF commands and that it is on the Ipswich Heritage Register). (Defence Heritage Register).

    Perhaps it was also a wireless communications facility? Eric for one was tops with morse code. (Also semaphore). We had home demonstrations of morse code - a small flat wired-up board with a short flexible handle which had a metal button on top at the end (transmitter) - so many dots and dashes to spell out key letters or words accompanied by the appropriate 'dit dit dit' or 'dat' sounds.

    Safety trenches were built on the Air Station. (I imagine at the start of the War). [Defence Heritage Register]. As well there were reinforced concrete air raid shelters close to the Base - I went down steps to at least one near the old Toowoomba Road in the company of my father Eric and others just to have a look. Also my brother and I and another boy went down a muddy slit trench in the jeep in about 1944/45 as we rounded the corner past the school in the grounds of the school and schoolhouse. My brother was driving and bragging, the other boy was next to him and I was in the back - I lent forward and put my hands over my brother's eyes. We were not injured but the power lines came down and a tractor and crane were necessary to extract the jeep. Needless to say we got covered in mud and the boy in the front had his glasses caked in it.

    “In September 1942 the USAFIA advance party commenced operations". [USFA/USAFA or USFIA/USAFIA - standing for United States Forces in Australia]. (United States - Pentagon advice in October 2012 is that it was on 6th June 1942 that the US arrived at Amberley). "At about the same time the USAFIA Ferry Division of Air Transport arrived at the base as well as the US Army Airways Communications Service and the 22nd Service Group of the 5th Air Force”. (Defence Heritage Register). 'Willobank became the site of the clubhouse for Officers of the US Air Force'. (City of Ipswich - on the web). I wonder where at Willowbank?

    “Amberley became a major base for the assembly, repair, salvage and servicing of operational aircraft. Work included major inspections of Wirraway and Hudson aircraft and the assembly of Martin Marauder and Kittyhawk aircraft. By the end of 1942 No 3 Aircraft Depot was also assembling Vultee Vengeance aircraft as well as conducting major inspections of Aerocobra (Airacobra), Kittyhawk, Lancer and Boston aircraft. The Engine Repair Section worked on Hamilton, De Havilland and Curtis Electric units. New aircraft appeared on the base by May 1944 with the arrival of the RAF Spitfires and the first new B24J Liberator series…The veteran Lancaster bomber, G for George…was overhauled at Amberley in 1944”. (Defence Heritage Register).

    The C/O's family homes at RAAF Amberley from mid 1942 to mid 1948 -

    * First Home - From June 1942 to about the end of 1945 it was the "schoolhouse" next to the Amberley school on the base (not being used as a school) and was outside the then fenced off boundaries of the base. There was a school and a head teacher's house and we lived in the latter. Both the school and the schoolhouse were painted a light pink on the outside. Inside the school my recollection is of a large hall. The were a few flowers and bushes growing near the front veranda of the schoolhouse which was a 'typical Queenslander' - wooden, with a veranda with railings and of course a corrugated iron roof - and there were also large areas covered in grass. There was primitive outside loo at the back of the house where I kept my pet calf who liked to specialize in chasing individuals when they emerged to go back into the house! Over the fence at the back there were trees and a longer grass covered vacant area. Both the school and schoolhouse were to be found on the old Toowoomba Road (Rosewood Road).

    The short straight path from the front of the house to the front gate led to the popular privately run corner store at the junction of Rosewood and other roads. This store was not on the Air Base. It is where we saw the Americans, and many of them were American negroes pulling up in their heavy army convoy trucks up to buy coke, sarsparilla, passiona, lemonade, dixies, wafers, malted milks, milkshakes, pies, hamburgers and hot dogs - while we competed with our billy-carts for a place to park. One day our billy-cart ended in splinters when I was 'parked' - I was in it, run over by an eight tonner. I ducked and ended in the Air Force base hospital - my brother predicted to our father that I had an hour left! Luckily for me the kerbside wheels of the truck crunched the billy-cart but I survived without a scratch but that was the end of billy-carts for us. I regarded my role as being that of a 'test pilot'. This is the home too were we hosted Major Ray H Millard and Lieut Colonel Claude F Gilchrist of the United States Services, on Christmas Day 1943.

    Also in December, 1943 Brigadier General William Ord Ryan was the Commanding General Pacific Wing, Air Transport Command, United States Services, which was then based at Station No 3 - which was presumably No 3 Aircraft Depot, RAAF Amberley.

    * Second Home - From about the beginning of 1946 to June 1948 it consisted of two-prefabricated homes pushed together joined by a small outside alcove (opened kegs of beer were kept in this alcove at Adult's party time). This was fairly basic and modest accommodation by any standards. Moreover this home was just about on the tarmac towards the north end of the main and longest runway which ran NW to SE; and not that far from where the Ipswich to Rosewood road crossed this runway. Part of the fenced in area around our house was bitumen. At the far end of the main runway there were a series of hills. Hangars and workshops; and parked and taxying aeroplanes were part of the mix where this home was situated and there was plenty of action in the sky above and we had to get used to the fact that we were in the midst of all this activity. It appears from aerial views of Amberley in that period that the two (Waddingtons) Igloo hangars were just to the back of us and I certainly remember hangars as I used to ride my push bike around them. The redeeming feature of this home was that it had a ballroom for entertaining. There was a copper for boiling the washing and clothers were hung out to dry on wires strung between wooden cross supports. It was here too that I copped plenty of fully clothed hosings by my brother.

    My brother and I used a daisy air rifle to fire at old jam tins lined up on the back fence. We showed movie reels upside down and looked bent over through our legs to watch them. School text books were covered in brown paper with birds or other colourful jam tin labels being pasted on the covers. It was a ritual to throw out our home made sandwiches through the open bus window as we crossed the creek on the way from Amberley to the Ipswich State Schools (mixed and one for older boys). Life size parachute dummys were covered in bright red tomato sauce by my brother and hung up a tree (or set up in the long grass) and the rumour was that 'the C/O had hung himself' or other such mischief!

    RAAF Amberley troops and bands often passed the side gates, coming to attention in that precinct. I used to hang over the fence to see who was out of step and tell them so - some as they passed had sly glances at me or poked their tongues out - it was just a game! I was suitably attired I thought in my brother's (hand-me-down) small child size RAAF navy coloured 'winter uniform', complete with cap. It was in this period too or even earlier (from c1944) that absolutely dozens of similar types of aircraft started to be lined up nearby in blocks and rows on the tarmacs and grass verges looking 'used and worn out' and waiting to be 'written off' for scrap. Their final ending was not obvious to me at the time - they were just sitting there. My brother and I got onboard and we had seemingly endless planes just to ourselves. I can still smell the musty aroma and that it was very exhilarating to sit in the pilots' tattered seats in the various cockpits and wonder what it would have felt like and sounded like to take to the skies in these old warplanes.

    As well it was 'an obligation' at Amberley for us to chew gum - from our father down (our mother did not catch onto this habit) - it was Wrigleys peppermint, PK and juicy fruit and we had supplies by the box-full. Old habits die hard and even in recent times my brother has offered me chewing gum and I too keep some handy. Plus there was highly coloured and scented bubble gum, sherbert in triangular paper packets with small licorice straws, licorice blocks, aniseed balls, humbugs, all day suckers and musk sticks. So we had plenty to chew on.

    On the Station there were Fairs with 'punch and judy' and toffee apples; and at Christmas time Santa arrived by plane much to the excitement of all the children, with bags of presents and giant Xmas stockings (for those more in need) and not just for the children of Service men and women for other children came along. Eric also used to visit local families and take presents for families and children who were having unhappy times. I know as I went with him on some visits.

    Halloween was celebrated by the wearing of cut out water melons as faces and we covered our bodies in white sheets and all including the C/O, then proceeded to outside the Officers' Mess where we made some ghostly noises of 'whoooo' 'whoooo'. This was the same Mess that held a legendary circular gold fish pond, which doubled-up on 'official ' occasions if it got raucous, as the Officers' 'swimming pool'. Some Officers went 'for a swim' fully dressed in uniform and even with their tight elastic-sided long-legged mess boots still on! I imagine that there was much singing and music as an accompaniment.

    There is a Douglas Street, RAAF Amberley which could be named for Eric Douglas.

    A newspaper report of 13th May, 1943 'A large crowd witnessed some very interesting fights at the boxing tournament held at St Mary's Hall, last night. Among those present were Mayor Ald J C Minnis, Mr Jos Francis MP and Group Captain Douglas RAAF'.

    It was reported on 3rd November, 1943 that on that day 'the (Commonwealth) Information Minister, Mr Calwell '...will address a loan rally at the Amberley Picture Theatre'.

    It was scheduled that on 8th November, 1943 at 8pm, there would be a special screening at the Teviot Theatre in Boonah and the presentation of Proficiency Certificates to Boonah Cadets by Group Captain Douglas, RAAF (Amberley).

    A parade was held over the long weekend at 3AD, RAAF Amberley commencing on Saturday 30th June, 1945 'Group Captain Eric Douglas took the salute and later addressed the parade, congratulating cadets on their appearance and efficiency. The C/O also gave prospective RAAF personnal excellent advice'. The cadets included those from Headquarters and the 'Gatton Flight'.

    On 7th August, 1945 the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester flew into Amberley in their Avro York 'Endeavour' and lunched at the RAAF Mess with Group Captain Douglas, before a tour of country areas of Queensland. I imagine that Mrs Eric Douglas was also present. There was an official RAAF party with their wives at the airstrip ready to greet the Gloucesters.

    At the end of August, 1945 an Air Race of three planes was held out of Amberley with the planes flying over Boonah. The race was to raise funds for the Boonah branches of the Red Cross Society and the ACF. The official guests, Group Captain and Mrs Douglas were welcomed by Cr Richter of Boonah. Group Captain Douglas congratulated the three committes involved for their wonderful efforts and reminded those present that although hostilities had ceased there was still more to be done for the boys by the Red Cross and ACF. As part of the ceremony for the winning plane the Boonah Band led a small procession comprising a decorated truck carrying local Airmen and a minature plane and three decorated trucks representing the three planes which took part in the competition.

    For 6th April, 1946 Eric was invited to an Official Reception at King George Square in Brisbane, for Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten.

    It was reported that the 8th Ipswich Scout and Club Pack have a new den (9th September, 1946). It was officially opened by Group Captain G E Douglas, Commanding Officer at Amberley RAAF station. Eric Douglas said "This has been erected through the good will and work of people who have the movement at heart...A very worthy movement it is. It brings out the best in us and subdues the bad. Little can be done in the world to-day without the team spirit, and the Scout movement has this spirit in no small way".

    At a regular meeting of the Ipswich Branch of the Air Force Association held on 28th November, 1946, Mr R G Andrew representing Ipswich Commerce paid Eric Douglas a tribute by saying "...Group Captain Douglas has more time for the 'under dog' than any other man I have seen in a C O's position anywhere in Australia". Just before, Eric Douglas had said after detailing the functions of the Association that he was there for two reasons "...Firstly, because he regarded it as his duty and secondly, because he knew he would have a great time amongst a lot of good chaps".

    On 10th December, 1946 Group Captain Eric Douglas was elected Patron of the Ipswich branch of the Air Force Association.

    In early April, 1947 Group Captain G E Douglas accepted the position of Patron of the Ipswich branch of the Air Force Association.

    The Morning Bulletin, Rockhampton reported on 22nd October, 1947 that - 500 (sic 503) RAAF aeroplanes at Oakey and 163 (sic 160) at Amberley "...were to be sold as scrap...Those to be sold at Oakey for scrap include 38 Boomerangs, 225 Spitfires and 240 Kittyhawks; and at Amberley 26 Liberators, 2 Beaufighters, 42 Mitchells, 47 Spitfires, 42 Vultee Vengeances and 1 Ventura. There are also 10 Mosquito and 1 Douglas Dakota at Amberley regarding which no decision has yet been made." A total of 674 planes for scrap disposal. I think that there is a good chance that this particular Douglas Dakota was given to the RAN - Fleet Air Arm, and used as 'a Flying Classroom' and Eric was involved in lecturing or instructing on this simulation model in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Adding too, for those who are curious - yes I think that the Spitfires did arrive in boxes or packing cases and were assembled at Eagle Farm or Amberley.

    Open Day at Amberley on 23 May, 1948 - it was reported in the Queensland Times of 13th May, 1948 that Group Captain Douglas, CO at Amberley said the previous day that "The public will be given the run of the station...The gates will be open between 10am and 4pm, and the public will be able to see every aspect of Air Force life. The public will see, a Helicopter, Lincolns, Liberators, Mosquitoes, Spitfires and Mustangs on display. Aircraft will be taking off from Amberley every half hour in the afternoon. Aircraft and engine repair units will be open to inspection..."

    RAAF and I imagine USAAF/USAF seaplanes/flying boats eg Catalinas operated out of Moreton Bay and in the general region of Redland Bay, Cleveland, Victoria Point and Coochiemudlo and North Stradbroke Islands and were supported by RAAF motor launches and Fairmile boat 015-5 may have been one of them. The RAAF Catalina Squadrons were apparently part of a 'silent service'. We spent many happy hours crabbing, prawning, fishing - from boats and night fishing for flounder - and prizing oysters from rocks in and around Moreton Bay.

    Eric's first cousin was Percy (Percival Francis) Douglas of Canberra - son of George Douglas; whereas Eric was the son of Gabriel (Gilbert) Douglas. Both George Douglas and Gabriel Douglas were Watchmakers and Jewellers - the 4th Generation of Douglas - Master Watchmakers, Watchmakers and Clockmakers - commencing with John Douglas a Master Watch and Clock Maker in Jedburgh, Roxburghshire in the late 1700's and in Galston and Loudoun Kirk, Ayrshire in the early 1800's.

    (Details from Trove, the writer's early childhood memories and the Eric Douglas Collection)

    Note: As at October/November, 2014 - 38 of the Heritage Listed buildings at RAAF Amberley are going to be sold - demolished/relocated to make way for runway expansion and further development at the Air Base

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    1,038 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-11-04
    User data
  59. GROUP CAPTAIN STUART CAMPBELL - BANZARE
    List
    Public

    Pencil notes -
    With The Discovery 1929-30
    by F/Lt S. Campbell

    The British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition was organized by Sir Douglas Mawson for the purpose of carrying out exploration and scientific investigation of that area of the Antarctic Continent and adjacent seas lying immediately south of Australia and South Africa. The expedition was to be divided into two cruises extending over the summer months of 1929-30 and 1930-31 respectively and it is with the first cruise that this article proposes to deal. At the outset it must be realized that this expedition differed considerably from the previous well known expeditions of Scott, Shackleton and Mawson in as much as it was intended from the outset that no party should winter in the Antarctic nor were any extensive land operations to be carried out.
    The Discovery left Cape Town on Oct 19th 1930 [sic 1929] with the intention of filling in the existing gaps in the coastline of Antarctica from the 40th to the 180th meridian of east longitude, investigating the sub-Antarctic islands in this area and carrying out an extensive geographical programme. From Cape Town the ship was headed SE to Possession Is the largest of the Crozet Group. There the scientific party spent two days ashore carrying out magnetic observations, making a rough survey of the anchorage in American Bay and studying the flora and fauna.
    Leaving the Crozets we made with a fair wind and soon came in sight of Kerguelen Island. Here we met with our first taste of the Roaring Forties. When within half a days steam of the entrance to Royal Sound a strong westerly gale sprang up and drove us relentlessly out to sea and it was not until a week later after hard battling with mountainous seas that we at last made fast to the ricketty wharf of the abandoned whaling station on the shores of Jeanne D’Arc, in Royal Sound. There all hands turned to and we replenished our bunkers from the supply of Cardiff briquettes left for us by a South African Whaling ship on the way south. Coaling over we put to sea again and shaped a course for Heard Island the last outpost of the sub-Antarctic and a few days later dropped anchor in the roadstead of Corinthian Bay.
    Few members of the expedition will forget our first glimpse of this little known island, the black cliffs rising 150 feet out of a restless grey sea, the ledges packed with snow and on top a cap of snow through which here and there protruded rugged masses of black rock leaving great gashes in the gleaming white. Further to the east these cliffs gave place to a surf pounded beach of black sand and rock from the eastern end of which rose the majestic peak of Big Ben, a dome shaped mountain rising abruptly from the sea to 7000 feet. Round the top of the mountain hovered a permanent blanket of white mist while down the lower slopes cascaded heavily crevassed glaciers pushing out to the sea and ending in vertical cliffs of blue ice from which came a continuous roar as blocks were carved off by marine erosion.
    Owing to the difficulty landing and bad anchorage for the ship only half the scientific staff went ashore intending to survey the immediate vicinity of the anchorage and investigate the bird and animal life. The weather however was against us and soon the wind swung round to the north and put the ship on a lee shore with both anchors dragging. Steam was immediately ordered and we put to sea and for a week remained hove to in one of the roughest seas experienced during the voyage.
    As soon as the weather cleared we steamed back to Corinthian Bay and signalled the shore party to return on board as quickly as possible as there were signs of another storm approaching. There was still a high sea running but they had no option but to make the attempt and shortly the heavily laden motor boat appeared round the adjacent headland white with frozen spray and containing the sorriest looking collection of sick and wet scientists that it would be possible to imagine. The motor boat was hoisted and we waved good bye to the inhospitable shores of Heard Island and turned our bows at last to the Great White South.
    On the third day out from Heard Island the echo soundings which were taken regularly every 4 hours showed that the depth was beginning to decrease and soon there was only 250 fathoms beneath our keel instead of the more usual 1700 fathoms. In these little frequented seas there is still a possibility of meeting a hitherto undiscovered island and there was a continuous stream of ships company and scientists up to the Crows nest all anxious to be the first to sight the new land. However no new island loomed in sight and soon the echo sounder showed the sea bed to have sloped away again to over 1000 fathoms.
    We were now in the region of icebergs and for several days there were always some half dozen or more in sight from the mast head and finally we entered the fringes of the pack ice. Here the ship was hove to and we ran our first oceanographical station, a procedure which we were to repeat every 200-300 miles throughout the remainder of the voyage. The depth is ascertained and the fine steel cable wires are lowered over the side to as much as 5000 metres below the surface carrying a varied assortment of nets, water bottles and thermometers. When these are all in position at the correct depths a weight is dropped down the wire and by means of trigger mechanisms the nets and water bottles are closed and the mercury column in the thermometer broken. Thus we obtain the temperature at various depths and samples of the sea water and marine life. In deep water these stations occupy upwards of 3 hours and monopolize the services of about 8 of the scientific staff. In the meantime others take advantage of the reduced motion of the ship, the meteorologist releases pilot balloons or sets up the complicated pyroheliometer on its enormous gimbal table on the f”o’castle; the photographer returns to his dark room and develops plates and the medical officer and bacteriologist work at the microscope.
    From now onwards we are amongst the pack ice twisting and turning, following open leads for a short distance only to be held up by heavy ice, retracing our steps and trying again in some other lead or pushing through thin floes but ever working slowly southwards towards the well guarded coastline of Antarctica. A few days before Christmas in Lat. 66 29 S we came to an impasse. We had reached a pool of open water inside the pack and before us as far as the eye could reach stretched heavy almost unbroken ice. To the South nothing but a glaring white, no sign of ‘water sky’ that heavy dark clouded appearance in the sky beckoning a lead of open water in the pack and luring the Antarctic navigator ever onward.
    It was decided that the aeroplane should be sent out on a reconnaissance flight and for three days the ship lay in the calm ice bound pool whilst the moth seaplane was unpacked from its cases and assembled. By the time the aircraft was ready the drifting ice had closed in the pool and the ship had to work her way through the ice 10 miles to the westward before more suitable water could be found.
    All was now ready, the great moment was at hand. It came and went and was succeeded by countless other moments but nothing happened. The engine refused to start. For hours the aviators (Stuart Campbell and Eric Douglas) ‘tickled’ ‘sucked in’ ‘doped’, switched on and off and swung the propeller but all to no purpose. The long sea voyage had allowed the magnetos to get damp and there was nothing to do but take them to pieces and dry them in the oven for hours.
    In the meantime the ship made slowly westward in the hope of striking a south trending lead of open water. By Christmas time the magnetos had been dried out and replaced and the engine run up and all was ready for an ascent next morning. But it was not to be. Shortly after midnight the wind began to freshen and by 4 AM it was blowing a whole gale. For four days the blizzard howled through the rigging and covered the ship with a coating of ice. Being well inside the pack we encountered very little sea and were able to maintain our position in the lee of some large icebergs and when the storm abated we found to our joy that we were able to make some southing into a huge indentation in the pack.
    After a few miles however our progress was again blocked by a closely packed ice field extending to the Southern Horizon. The water being calm and free from ice it was decided to put the aeroplane up and carry out a reconnaissance ahead of the ship. The lifting tackle was rigged and the engine started up and in a short time the two aviators (Stuart Campbell and Eric Douglas) were lowered over the side for the first flight. The seaplane took off and flew splendidly and climbed in the vicinity of the ship to 6000 feet. To the south lay the unbroken pack stretching as far as the eye could reach with its monotonous flat surface broken here and there by the towering mass of some imprisoned iceberg. To the south west were darker shapes standing out boldly against the deadly whiteness. They were too big for icebergs, islands probably or perhaps rocky outcrops on the coast itself. Their nature cannot of course be definitely established at this great distance but it is well worth reporting as ‘Appearance of Land’. What appeared from the ship to be an open lead running away to the SW is now seen to extend only for about 20 miles and then end in a cul-de-sac in the heavy pack ice. The aeroplane alights close to the ship and is soon hoisted on board again with its report of ‘Probable Land’ and a sketch of the ice conditions in the immediate vicinity of the ship.
    Since pushing through 40-50 miles of this heavy pack would be far too wasteful both of coal and valuable time we reluctantly turned NW again hoping to find an easier way south in some other place.
    Within a few days we found to our delight that the edge of the pack was again trending to the SW and following this on the evening of Jan 5th, 1930 land was reported from the mast head. As soon as reasonably clear water was reached the aeroplane was hoisted over the side and took off with Sir Douglas Mawson on board to reconnoitre. From a height of 2000 feet a long line of bare black mountain peaks could be seen projecting through the ice covered slopes of what was undoubtedly the Antarctic Continent. A strip of pack ice about 15 miles wide separated the ship from the open water along the coast and though this pack offered no difficulty to our progress no places where a landing could be effected were observed as the coastline consisted of precipitous ice cliffs so common in Antarctica.
    Once again the seaplane returned to the ship bearing the good news that the long looked for goal was in sight and arrangements were made for another flight early the next morning to try and locate a suitable landing place where the Union Jack could be raised and British Sovereignty proclaimed over this new land. But not yet were we to penetrate the secrets of Antarctica and by 4 AM another raging blizzard had set in and for three days anxious eyes were focussed on the frail seaplane which with its air speed indicator standing steadily at 65 M.P.H. threatened every moment to be torn from the deck and disappear in the driving snows.
    It was as if the Antarctic was doing its utmost to wreck the frail example of man’s handiwork which had dared to probe her secrets. At length the wind abated and all on board breathed a sigh of relief. But the forces of nature were not yet baffled!
    During the blizzard the wind driven snow had collected all over the masts and rigging and coated them with a shell of ice an inch or more in thickness and with the first appearance of the sun this ice thawed and came crashing down from aloft onto the unprotected surfaces of the wings and tail unit and wrought havoc with the fabric and ribs.
    Also sights showed that the ship had been driven many miles out of its position and the wind had sent down the pack from the eastward so that now between the ship and the coast were many miles of closely packed ice all heaving and grinding in the ocean swell. To attempt to push through this heaving mass was courting disaster and so whilst the aviators (Stuart Campbell and Eric Douglas) worked feverishly to repair their damaged charge the ship steamed slowly westward again.
    Gradually the swell decreased and the ice became less congested allowing the ship to make southing and in a few days we again heard the welcome cry of ‘Land’. For 18 hours we coasted along inhospitable ice cliffs 100 feet high and offering no possibility of a landing. At last however we were rewarded with the sight of a dark patch against the dazzling white and as we drew nearer this resolved itself into a steep rocky island 800 feet high separated from the mainland by a narrow gutter practically frozen over. The ship was pushed through the surrounding pack into the sheltered water on the lee side of this island and soon the motor boat with its party of scientists was chugging its way across the narrow strip of intervening water. The day was spent ashore investigating the bird and animal life, taking pictures and carrying out the ceremony associated with the hoisting of the Union Jack and proclaiming British Sovereignty over new lands.
    Getting under weigh again we steamed along the coast first charted in 1831 by Captain Biscoe in a British whaling ship from the Falkland Islands. Our observations showed Biscoe’s positions to err by as much as 30 minutes of Longitude but considering the crude navigating instruments of that period and the fact that he was six weeks battling against adverse winds, short on provisions and with his crew depleted by the ravages of scurvy one realizes that here was a man fit to be ranked with the England’s foremost seamen.
    The weather now treated us kindly and in sparkling sunshine we pursued our westerly course within a few miles of the coast whilst on our starboard hand stretched lines of stranded tabular icebergs forming an effective breakwater from the long swell of the Southern Ocean.
    Gliding silently through this maze of bergs it seemed almost incredible that these mighty islands of ice seemingly so solid, so permanent and so unchanging could be carried northwards by the current to melt and disappear in a few short months back into the sea from which they came.
    We passed the westerly limit of Enderby Land and were working a tedious passage towards a great double range of mountains to the SW when the next blizzard caught us. Again we were driven irresistibly to the NW for several days and again when the weather cleared we found ourselves well out in the open sea with an extensive ice field between us and the coast.
    In order to complete our programme it was necessary to investigate the ice conditions as far west as the 40th Meridian of East longitude so we continued our Westerly course along the fringe of the pack which in this vicinity was uniformly thick and extended probably 100 miles from the land. In this area it was not possible to make use of the aeroplane for reconnaissance owing to the heavy ocean swell.
    Two days before reaching the westerly limit of our cruise we were amazed to see another ship ahead, the first we had seen since leaving Kerguelen. As we drew together we identified her as the Norvegia, a small vessel of about 180 tons carrying two aeroplanes. This ship belonging to the Christiansen whaling interests of Norway is sent down to the Antarctic each season to carry out exploration and whaling research and to find new whaling grounds for the floating factories. The leader of this expedition is Commander Riiser Larsen of the Norwegian Navy who had already achieved fame in Arctic aviation as Nobile’s navigator. He then returned to the Norvegia, one could not help thinking that Commander Larsen and his gallant crew of 18 were truly imbued with the spirit of their Viking forefathers in this venturing into the stormy Antarctic in their heavily overloaded little ship and operating two long range seaplanes over what is probably the most dangerous flying ground on the face of the earth.
    Shortly after this meeting we turned eastward again without having been able to approach the coast and retraced our steps along the border of the ever changing pack and though our course was considerably south of our outward track we were unable to make any landfalls until we reached Enderby land again.
    Here the coast was again free from ice and we were able to carry out a running survey supplemented by aeroplane flights from sheltered water in the lee of ice bergs and projecting tongues of the pack.
    Our coal supply was now running short and before long the day arrived when discretion forced us to reluctantly say good bye to Antarctica and turn our bows northwards on a course for Kerguelen Is where we were to replenish our bunkers for the long trip back to Australia. Fair weather favoured us an in a fortnight we were once again alongside the wharf at Port Jeanne D’Arc. Three enjoyable weeks were spent in and about Royal Sound, coaling, making scientific collections and charting some of the dozens of unexplored fiords and waterways both from the motor boat and by means of aeroplane photographs.
    From Kerguelen it was originally intended to make a sweep down the pack ice on our homeward track and carry out a line of oceanographical stations but bad weather set in and we realised that if we attempted to carry out our programme in the stormy seas of the south we would probably loose a considerable amount of our valuable gear whereas in the lower latitudes of the Great Circle track to Australia we were more likely to meet better weather conditions and at the same time would be able to carry out an equally valuable line of stations. Accordingly we set a course straight back to Australia and were favoured with light winds and smooth seas which enabled us to successfully complete our programme of deep water stations and dredgings. Finally on April 2nd 1931 [sic 1930] we arrived back in Adelaide where the expedition was disbanded until the next spring when we were to meet again to carry out the second cruise.

    (These notes are in the Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    100 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  60. HEARD ISLAND - Banzare - Log by Eric Douglas in 1929
    List
    Public

    We should be at Heard Is tomorrow morning if this fine weather holds. Had teal duck for lunch today, very fine. Not much doing this afternoon.

    Tuesday 26th Nov. 1929

    Corinthian Bay - Heard Island

    Arrived at Heard Is, anchored at Corinthian Bay. LAT 53 04 LONG 73 25. 87 miles. 10AM. Not very good shelter from North or North West. Went ashore after lunch to Atlas Cove 3 miles away. Party consisted of Sir Douglas Mawson, Com Moyes, Capt Hurley, Babe Marr, The Doc, Falla, Fletcher, Harvey Johnson and myself. Did two trips to get the gear ashore. Fine day. We are camped in a wooden hut just near the shore. This hut is hexagon shape 6 ft 6 in. a side and has eight bunks and a stove.

    Wednesday 27th Nov. 1929

    Spent the morning adjusting things in the hut, the others went for walks to observe the nature of the land. In the afternoon I went for walks with Hurley along the coast to a large ‘Macaroni’ penguin rookery. He managed to get some good snaps.

    Thursday 28th Nov. 1929

    To day the weather is rotten, rain and sleet coming down and the wind in the N.W. with the barometer falling, cant do much today. We went out in the motor boat to do some trawling but the swell is too big. We will not get to the ship today.

    Friday 29th Nov. 1929

    Barometer still falling and the wind coming in strong from the N.W. I signalled the ship yesterday that we could not get off, and about noon she has pulled up her anchor and is steaming slowly out to sea. Late in the afternoon she was out of sight. We will have to remain here until we get some better weather.

    Saturday 30th Nov. 1929

    Barometer down to 28.4, wind from the N.W. and occasional snow squalls, now and then one obtains a view of the magnificent crevassed ice glaciers that terminate at the sea. We are camped on a peninsular and the ground is basalt lava covered largely with moss and vegetation. Ships position LAT 53 02 LONG 73 21.

    Sunday 1st Dec. 1929

    Weather is still much the same, but we are thoroughly enjoying this life ashore, so much to see and do. Hundreds of Skua gulls and Dominion gulls nests and eggs. These skua gulls are like a big hawk and they prey on small birds, mostly prions that come home just at dusk from the sea.

    Monday 2nd Dec. 1929

    The glass has risen and the morning is fairly fine. In the morning I went with the Doc over to the glacier foot, it was very interesting. On our way home we sighted the ship making for Corinthian Bay. Later I went with Sir Douglas Mawson and signalled the ship by Semaphore. They replied ‘come of right away’. We returned to the hut about a mile away and then went aboard the launch, with us came Prof Johnson and Babe. A fair sea was running and we had to be careful when off the head land, to keep clear of the breakers. We reached the ship OK, but the wind started to freshen and they decided to delay the return trip for the others until the next day.

    Tuesday 3rd Dec. 1929

    Left ship by motor boat with Sir D. Mawson to go around to Atlas Cove to pick up remaining chaps and gear, snowing slightly and fair swell running. Off the head land the engine cut out, due to water in the pipe line, we had an anxious ten minutes because we were close into the breakers and rugged coast. However we got her going again, proceeded to the cove and picked all the gear and people up. Then against a freshening wind and rising sea we had a slow trip out to sea, this time towing the dingy as well, the boat rode the seas well and in an hour we sighted the ship through the thickening snow fall and were soon along side, and unloaded the boat safely.

    The boat was then hauled aboard, our anchor weighed and the old ship plugged out to sea against a strong north wind. Later that afternoon we were well out to sea and running south before a northerly gale.

    Wednesday 4th Dec. 1929

    The wind has gone to the west and eased down, but there is still a big swell running. We all had one hour trecks on the wheel last night, the idea being to give the helmsman a hand to hold the wheel and keep the ship steady on her course. 7PM. Fresh wind from the west, but we are steaming along OK and doing about 6 knots, no sail set, except one staysail and the spanker. Our position at noon today is LAT 54 28 LONG 75 29 and distance run 120 miles. It is becoming a little colder today. The air temperature is round 34 F and the water temp 32.5 F and 50F below decks.

    Heard Island

    This island appears to be about 20 miles long by 8 miles wide. It has several peninsulars and generally speaking the land slopes up from all sides to terminate in a huge mountain 7000 ft high. I only had one clear view of the peak for a few minutes and at all other times the last 1000 ft was covered with perpetual mist. There are several heavily crevassed ice glaciers running down for miles to terminate at the sea. The sea breaks heavily on this ice and every now and then large pieces of ice break away and fall into the sea with a deep roar. The origin of this island appears to be volcanic, near our were two volcanic craters and several square miles of lava. The types of penguins were, Gentoo, Rockhopper, Macaroni and a few stray Kings. This King Penguin is a large bird standing about three feet six inches high and beautifully marked. Plenty of Sea Elephants were seen, especially on inaccessible beaches. Also a few Sea Leopards. We shot two of the latter and have their skins. The birds were Cape pidgeons, Dominican and Skua gulls, Giant petrels (Stinkers), Prions and Diving petrels. We had several meals of Rockhopper eggs and they were very good and quite fresh. The weather seems to be continual mists, snow and sleet with the north east to north west winds prevailing, and now and then a ray of sunshine. I have a Rockhopper Penguin skin to bring home. (This penguin fell overboard from the dingy when it was being hauled aboard. I will get another later on).

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection)

    PS - I never saw or heard about the penguin skin. I don't think another Rockhopper was
    actually viewed by Eric as being a potential 'skin'. I think that was the end of it.

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    23 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-06-15
    User data
  61. HIGH SHERIFF - By RED DEER - Out of MISS JULIA BENNETT
    List
    Public

    On 28th May, 1857 'a fine blood horse' High Sheriff was 'landed in good order' on the ship Avon. The stud owner was George Allan Esq. It was said he was 'glad to be given the opportunity to have a horse with a dash of Venison blood'.

    'Blood Horse' is the subject of various definitions today. Plus to complicate matters there even appear to be three categories of blood horse - cold, warm and hot. In 1857/58 a 'Blood Horse' was probably a thoroughbred with at least fifty percent Arabian and/or Barbs and/or Turks blood. Additionally a blood horse had to have the appearance of, and to act like a blood horse. Moreover, the terms of blood horse and pedigree horse seem to be roughly interchangeable. Is a thoroughbred horse really the equivalent of a blood horse? It appears that hot blooded horses are thoroughbreds but that the term has also been applied more loosely to mean pure bred.

    Some of the mares who were paired with High Sheriff when Mr Allan was the owner, and who produced foals in 1858, were - Beeswing, Mincemeat, Quincey, Maid of Islay, Kiss Me Quick, Lapwing, Little Browny (owner John Sevior), Lucretia, Wild Bird, Flight, Jenny Lind, Margravine, Pilot, Romp, and Jeannette/Jeanette.

    By September, 1857 the blood stock horse High Sheriff was for sale. In February 1858 it was reported that Mr Allan had sold High Sheriff to Robert Sevior for £600. (In todays value that was nearly $48,000). Robert Sevior was 21. His brother John was 23.

    An Advertisement by John and Robert Sevior in Bell's Life in July, 1858 - THE IMPORTED THOROUGH-BRED HORSE - HIGH SHERIFF
    High Sheriff will stand at Mount Eccersley near Portland Bay at the rate of ten guineas per mare. The paddock contains a thousand acres, well grassed and watered. Grass three shillings per week. Every attention paid; no responsibility. The Sheriff is a sure foal-getter, 8 years old, rich dark brown, stands at sixteen hands and one inch, with immense bone and substance. (No unbroken mares will be received). The High Sheriff gained the first prize at the Melbourne Cattle Show in September, 1857.
    The High Sheriff is by Red Deer out of Miss Julia Bennett, by Muley Moloch. the dam Patty by Laurel, her dam Brandy Ann by Eryx, out of Misery by Camerton.
    Red Deer is by Venison out of Soldier's Daughter by the Colonel, dam by Oscar out of the dam Rubens Mare (Aka Camerine's Dam) by Rubens by Tippitywitchet by Waxy.
    Muley Moloch is out of Nancy by Dick Andrews, her dam Spitfire by Beningbrough.

    Thoroughbred horse pedigrees can be found here - http://www.pedigreequery.com/red+deer2

    High Sheriff had six starts winning three races in England at York, Lincoln and Stamford, he came second at Manchester and third at Radcliffe where he had a bad start. There are no comments about the sixth race.

    It was reported at the time of the Hamilton show in July 1859, that Mr Sevior's High Sheriff was much admired in that the horse had won first prize in 1858 at Hamilton. High Sheriff was considered as one of the finest horses in the district.

    From Bell's Life of 8th October, 1859 one reporter on horses gave his opinion of High Sheriff '...he is an exceedingly showy graceful animal, admirably adapted for a park horse or a review day charger, but although sixteen hands high, he is ... deficient in pace and substance; there is too much daylight under him. In fact he is unfurnished as a colt, but his head and neck are a study for a painting'.

    At one stage High Sheriff was kept at Dooling Dooling a property near Hamilton which was rented by the Sevior brothers. In this regard advertisements in the daily papers said that High Sheriff was at Hamilton in July, 1859.

    By May, 1862 High Sheriff was up for sale.

    By September 1862 a Mr McPherson was the owner of High Sheriff.

    At the eighth Annual Horse Show in Melbourne in September, 1863 High Sheriff was one of two horses who captured the most public attention.

    Some of the progeny of High Sheriff who were racing in the 1860's in Victoria were - Miss Jessie, Young Sheriff, Fireaway, Waverley, Grannie/Granny (owned and raced by the Seviors), Cyclone, Lady Mornington, Shenandoah (Dozey/Dosy) - a grey mare, she raced in the Melbourne, Australian, Ballarat and Sandhurst Cups, Lady Constance and Medora. One of Medora's offspring was Grey Dawn (This could be by the Skeleton 'Medora', and out of Grey Dawn was Light of Day. Was this the Medora from High Sheriff? There was more than one horse called Medora - in fact quite a few of the horses had 'doubles'. For some of the horses there were a few with the same name. Besides, many of the early racehorses in Australia were named after earlier horses in England. Some reports say that Skeleton was the sire of Medora, while other reports say that it was High Sheriff. Nevertheless, there was a Medora from High Sheriff).

    Other progeny by High Sheriff were Sheriff and a filly Grisette by Annette. There was also Miss Constance who had Orphan and The Marquis, she was a daughter of High Sheriff and Lady Constance. The latter was said to be a handsome mare. Further offspring of High Sheriff were First Love, Impudence, Lucy Ashton and Guy Fawkes.

    High Sheriff was also the ancestor of Herod, Topper, Blink Bonny/Blinkbonnie (a Caulfield Cup Winner) and Liberty - all were winners. Herod especially, seems to have a good reputation. As well, Miss Constance was also a winner, she was a daughter of Lady Constance.

    Some other descendants of High Sheriff were Ben Arnold, Vandamme, Antler, Tradition, Ostra, Ladybird, Eugenie, Erin's Isle, Belle, General Hamilton, After Dark (Petrel), Peter Parr, San Toy, Turnkey, The Fop, Dewhurst, Saffron, Nocturne, Lady Hurst, Mary Hurst, Kure, Georgette, Queenette, Solemnity, Coquette, Reindeer, King of the Ring, Gazelle, Baanya, Australian, Annie, Papatune, Yattendon, Heiress, Patchwork, Patchwork II, Queen Eliza, Lesbia, Fireball, Fireworks, Queen of Hearts, Queen of Diamonds, Brazen Nose, Brazen Lad, Druid, Baroness (a Sevior horse in 1861), Medea, Lilish, Spark, Orithlamme, Folly, Feu d'Artifice, Royal Highlander, Seaforth Highlander, Coolgardie, Sunbeam, Pioneer, Tara, Peerless, Red Deer, Legend, Opal, Merrimu, Newminster, Bismarck, Minette, Para List, Brownie, Brilliant, Phoebe, Job (or JC), and Noonday.

    The first Melbourne Cup was in 1861 and there were 17 starters - these included The Moor (Darkie), Medora and Grey Dawn (this last horse could be by the Skeleton 'Medora' ?) At least two horses then were likely descendants of High Sheriff. Medora was the first of High Sheriff's offspring to race in Australia and she had an accident and did not survive beyond this day. Earlier in 1861 she had successful races. She was known as a speedy filly. Archer was in this Melbourne Cup.

    In the 1870's in Melbourne, there was Prince Alfred by King Alfred and Lucy. Lucy was by High Sheriff. There was also Darkie (The Moor), a well made horse by Young Sheriff and Othello a handsome black horse also by Young Sheriff.

    In 1870 Darkie was sent to India to race and 'beat all the horses of India in the Madras races'. In September, 1878 Darkie as The Moor was standing at the Millewa Stud Farm. At the time it was said that this horse was a beautiful black horse with fine flat bone and splendid action. He had immense staying powers, standing at 16 hands high. In October, 1879 The Moor was at the Millewa Stud Farm and at the Niagra Hotel in Echuca.

    In late 1872 and 1874 and presumably in 1873 Prince Alfred was 'standing' at the Governor Grey Hotel, Harrisville, New Zealand as a sire, and travelling in the surrounding districts.

    Winners at the Williamstown Races in June,1914 were Kure (by Mikado II) and Georgette or Queenette (by George Frederick) and they were from Coquette by Coup d'Etat (son of Maribyrnong), by Maribyrnong, by Brown Girl, by Australian, by Mr Martin, by a mare by High Sheriff (1849).

    George Frederick a son of Carbine had Salatis a descendant of High Sheriff by Georgette or Queenette, also a descendant of High Sheriff.

    Another line for High Sheriff; Reindeer - King of the Ring - Gazelle descended from High Sheriff.

    High Sheriff was still being mentioned in newspapers in June, 1934 in regard to the breeding history of specific racehorses.

    Descendants of High Sheriff gradually made there way to the other States of Australia, New Zealand and to other overseas destinations.

    Stud Books and/or Thoroughbred Pedigrees need to be checked for relationships as I have only taken information from newspapers of the times, which can be correct but can alternatively be subject to errors. One could draw up an excel spreadsheet to trace relevant ancestry back to High Sheriff.

    Sally Douglas

    292 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-11-06
    User data
  62. JOHN and ROBERT SEVIOR or SEVIOUR
    List
    Public



    Brothers John (William) Sevior 1834 Launceston and Robert Sevior 1836 Launceston, were Jockeys, Horse Breeders, Horse Trainers, Freeholders and Farmers. In John Sevior's case he was also a Ploughing Match Judge, Race Course Clerk, a Racing Steward and a Horse Racing Judge (at Newstead in 1860). John was also a Publican in Portland Bay - John Sevior at the Builders' Arms, and John had a Stud Farm there too. In Hamilton at the Prince of Wales Hotel - both John and Robert had turns at being the Publican and they were also Butchers (Wholesale and Retail) in Hamilton. In 1874 and 1875 Robert Sevior was the Publican at the Newmarket Hotel on the Flemington Racecourse in Melbourne. In John Sevior's case he was a Grain Store owner, Farm Produce Merchant and Dealer in Hamilton and had Racing Stables and was a Farm Producer at South Muckleford. Robert Sevior was also equally involved with the Racing Stables and ancillaries at South Muckleford. Moreover, early in their racing careers, John and Robert were both Racehorse Breeders and Racehorse Trainers at Hamilton, Castlemaine and South Muckleford. Robert Sevior had separate interests in his land at Strangways situated between Newstead and Guildford and likewise John Sevior had separate interest in his land in the Castlemaine district. Later in their careers and lives they were Race Horse Breeders and Race Horse Trainers at Flemington - Melbourne Cup and Moonee Valley and Caulfield - Caulfield Cup; and in Robert Sevior's case at Randwick in Sydney.

    An early racing experience 1856 -
    Mount Alexander Mail Vol 1 p 64 (Castlemaine Archives) North Muckleford Races - Result of Ploughman's Purse 22/7/1856 - Drawn "Hotspur" and "Maid of Erin". There was contention (Paper editorial) "...a good deal of dissatisfaction was expressed by the owners of Maid of Erin and Hotspur at the handicap. Now this to the Stewards was most unfair, and if any one was to blame it was decidedly the Messers Seviors themselves. They know they are possessed of two crack horses in any company, Hotspur and Maid of Erin, and they are satisfied with carrying off previous prizes, but must enter each horse as these for the Ploughman's Purse of £13 and the Maid of Erin (better known as Becky Sharp) for a £ Consulation Stake. The stewards as trustees of public money, very properly conceived that if people would persist in entering their crack horses for such trifling stakes, and thereby spoil the sport of a meeting by frightening the owners of second-rate horses from the enterprise, that they must weight their horses accordingly; and the result, it is to be hoped, will teach that class of persons one fact, viz. that the public give the money to be run for, and that they do not give it to A, or B, because he happens to have a first-rate horse. They want fair sport and the stewards fail in their duty if they do not as far as possible promote it..." John and Robert were also racing Becky Sharp and Hotspur in Melbourne in 1856 when they were very young men. (In 1857 Newspapers reported said that the colours for Hotspur were green and black and for Becky Sharp they were crimson and chequered)

    Other snippets from the Mount Alexander Mail (Castlemaine Archives) -
    1856 - Vol 1 p 60 North Muckleford Races - John Sevior Esq - Racing Steward - 27/6/1856.
    1856 - Vol 1 p76 - Castlemaine Spring Meeting - 7/11/1856. Tradesman's Purse - for 30 sovs - Weight for age, one mile and a half. Result 1 Mr Sevior's Becky Sharp (Mitchell) "...Dr Lisle offered to back Maradoo for a large stake against Mr Sevior's (Robert) Hotspur, provided the latter would give him odds but Mr Sevior declined..." "...Becky Sharp was the favorite at anything asked, 3 and even 4 to one being freely laid on her... At the first time past the stand Becky who was pulling double was let out a little, when she challenged the horse (Maradoo), who however maintained his lead to the road, where Becky led by half a length. She kept increasing her lead and won eventually with the greatest ease..." Member’s Purse - for 30 sovs - Two miles, Handicap. Result 1 Mr Sevior's Becky Sharp (Mitchell) "...Becky rather the favorite... A splendid race ensued, not more than a length and a half dividing the horses till the last turn second time around, when Becky shot ahead..."
    1857 - Vol 1 p 88 - Oats For Sale - Mr John and Mr Robert Sevior - 22/4/1857. Inquire at John and Robert Sevior's Muckleford Creek Training Stables.
    1858 - Vol 1 p 108 Request To Send Mares To Sheriff - High Sheriff - John Sevior - 1/7/1858. "Notice to persons desirous of sending mares to High Sheriff, are requested to send them to our residence, South Muckleford. For further particulars see Bell's Life... John and Robert Sevior"
    1859 - Vol 4 p 12 Letter Re Muckleford Ploughing Match - Mr John Sevior - 30/5/1859 "... The Muckleford Ploughing Match ... Sir, I beg you will insert in your paper the following paragraph, concerning the matter in which the late North Muckleford Ploughing Match was conducted. The decision the judges arrived at was, they considered the ploughing of Mr Marshall worthy of the first prize - the second Mr Short - upon this decision a frivolous objection was raised by two of the committee, Mr Howell and Mr Kenedy, each having a plough to contest for the prizes, on the grounds that the above parties had not ploughed their ground according to the rules; this being carried, the two prizes were awarded to the above parties (Mr Howell and Mr Kenedy) absolutely the worst ploughing in the field, which, every one present will acknowledge. Without throwing any slur upon those gentlemen who acted as judges in the affair, and merely as a caution to parties who have supported the North Muckleford Ploughing Match in future - Yours obediently ... John Sevior."
    1859 - Vol 1 p 128 Farm For Sale - 7/10/1859. Mr John Sevior. "Notice for sale, a farm at Muckleford, containing 44 acres, 28 under crop, looking well, a four roomed brick house, stabling for 30 horses, also front garden etc. Price £950, half cash, if preferred , remainder at 3 or 6 months... Apply to John Sevior Muckleford"
    1867 - Vol 3 p 95 2 Horse Race, Muckleford - 8/4/1867. "A match for £ a side is to come off on Muckleford race course on Tuesday the 16th instant, between Mr Sevior's 'Big Cousin Jack' aged, 8st 7lb and Mr Polson's chum 'Moss Rose' 5 years, 8 st..."
    1867 - Vol 3 p 100 Request To Settle Accounts - Mr Robert Sevior - 6/7/1867. "The undersigned requests that all parties indebted to him will settle their accounts before Saturday next 13th inst. All having claims, please send for liquidation... Robert Sevior Muckleford."

    From the Tarrangower Times (Castlemaine Archives) -
    1859 - Vol 1 p 122 Ploughing Match, Muckleford - 11 or 19/4/1859. "Muckleford Ploughing Match, at a Public meeting held at the Orville Hotel on Saturday April 9. It was proposed and carried that a public ploughing match should take place on Easter Monday, April 25, in Mr John Brunts paddock, opposite the Orville Hotel, the following gentlemen were appointed to the committee ... {included Mr John Sevior}... Horse Teams & Bullock Teams... Muckleford 11/4/1859"

    From the Hamilton History Centre - Business -
    From 4 May 1861 to 8 August, 1868 - J and R Sevior were Wholesale & Retail Butchers (c62 - near the old PO) Gray Street, Hamilton (from the Hamilton Spectator). They advertised in the Hamilton Spectator (15/6/1861) 'J & R Sevior Butchers - Wholesale & Retail - Monthly Payments - No Second Price! ... Prime Beef 3d per lb, Neck 2 & 1/2d per lb, Steaks 4d per lb, Mutton fore-quarter 3d, hind-quarter 3 & 1/2d, Mutton Chops 4d and Pork 7d.'
    On 20 June, 1863 Robert Sevior was a Publican at the Prince of Wales Hotel (Stone hotel and stables) at 123 to 125 Thompson Street, Hamilton and on 1 Sept 1863 John Sevior was also a Publican at the Prince of Wales Hotel (Stone hotel and stables) at 123 to 125 Thompson Street, Hamilton. (Donald Wadley site owner). There is a photo of the Hotel in the Hamilton Spectator about that time. The Hamilton Spectator (3/7/1863 "The hotel is a very fine building...appears to be finished is a superior manner") reported that the Prince of Wales Hotel was built in 1863, and on 26/6/1863 the hotel was completed and about to commence business in the name of Sevior. On 28/7/1863 Hamilton Court granted Robert Sevior six weeks leave of absence and on 1/9/1863 the license was transferred from Robert to John Sevior (reported in the Hamilton Spectator on 31/7/1863).
    In 1865 the hotel is listed in the Victorian Gazetter under Senior (should be Sevior).
    From 1866 to 1867 John Sevior was a Produce Merchant at 106 Gray Street, Hamilton (Brick shop - owners John H Clough and J W Blogg).
    In 1866 to 1868 John Sevior - Crown Grant - Allot 10 Sect 17a, at McIntyre Street, South Hamilton - Produce Merchant (owner of House and Premises).
    In 1868 John Sevior was a Farmer at 112-114 and also 116 Gray Street, Hamilton (Shop & Premises) (executor M P Grant) [112-116 later destroyed by fire]
    In 1870 John Sevior had a business (shop) as a Dealer at 136 Thompson Street, Hamilton (Thomas Finn site owner)

    In 1862 R Sevior had leased Government Land at Warrnambool - Victorian Government Gazette.

    The Sevior brothers had Horse Race winners and place getters in Country Victoria - including Apsley, Baringhup, Ballarat (likely also in the Dowling Forest), Bacchus Marsh, Melton, Creswick, Forester (near Creswick?), Bendigo/Sandhurst, Dunolly, Portland, Talbot, Daylesford, Trentham, Tallaroop, Kyneton, Lauriston (near Kyneton), Sunbury, Donnybrook (near Cragieburn), North Muckleford, Muckleford, Newstead (near Muckleford), Tarrangower, Malmsbury, Guildford, Fryer's Creek, Tarilta, Campbell's Creek, Casterton, Hamilton, Great Western, Castlemaine, Ingelwood, Loddon, Tahara, Maryborough, Horsham, Carisbrook, Avoca, Elphinstone, Boort, Kilmore, Winchelsea, Wangaratta, Moama, Echuca, Sale, Koroit, Melton, Cranbourne, Baxter, Wyndham, Geelong, Queenscliff, Yarra Glen and Sherwood Park (near Warrnambool); Metroplitan Melbourne - White Horse (near Kew - a first win for Jockey Ramage and it was on a Robert Sevior trained horse Zillah - the jockey's real name was Ramadge), Elsternwick Park, Hurlingham Park (Brighton area), Brighton Park, Oakleigh Park, Mentone, Aspendale Park, Mordialloc (Richfield Course), Newport, Williamstown, Maribrynong, Sandown Park, Springvale, Dandenong, Flemington, Moonee Valley and Caulfield; Interstate including Country New South Wales - Hawkesbury, Bathurst, Deniliquin, Wagga Wagga and Murrumbidgee; Metropolitan Sydney - at Randwick eg Randwick Plate, Epsom Handicap, Sydney Handicap and Sydney Cup; and Tasmania - Hobart (1st in both the Champagne and Chichester Stakes), Launceston (1st with Warrior in the Launceston Cup) and Elwick (a Launceston racetrack); South Australia - Auburn and Kensington Park. The Melbourne Cup Winner of 1869 'Warrior' was trained by Robert Sevior and part of the training was at his stables at Muckleford (his older brother John Sevior was the first of the two brothers to have land and farm interest at Muckleford). Robert Sevior also had wins in the Australian Cup - Warrior 1873 and Sybil in 1877

    The Melbourne Cup in 1869 -
    "...Warrior in front of everything when the flag dropped, cut out the running for a quarter of a mile, when he was joined on the outside by Sheet Anchor, Bishopebourne being on the left, Traverton and Circasasian figuring conspicuously amongst the next half-dozen. Approaching the carriage paddock, Morrison took a light pull at his horse and Bishopebourne, Sheet Anchor and Traverton led the field past the stand, Palmerston, who ran off the course at starting and thereby lost at least 50 yards, bringing up the rear. Rounding the turn Bishopebourne held an advantage of about a length over the ruck, which was headed by Traverston, Warrior going well within himself, Strop, Phoebe, the Monk, and Circasasian, closing up as they neared the spot where the old stand once stood; Sheet Anchor, Bishopebourne, Salem Scudder, and several others fell back beaten. In the next hundred yards Circasasian made his run, but the effort proved a fruitless one, and Morrison, taking advantage of an opening, brought Warrior to the head of affairs; and from this point the race was never in doubt, for though the Monk came with a rush in the straight and got on terms with Warrior, it was on sufferance only, for upon Morrison shaking his horse up, he shot ahead without any perceptible effort, and coming on at his own pace won easily by a couple of lengths, the Monk second, Phoebe a good third, Sir John fourth, Freetrader fifth, and Palmerston, who made up a great deal of ground in the last half mile, sixth; Paddy's Land galloping home without his rider, and Strop, Circasasian, Albany, Charon, and Aurora finishing in a heap. Time, 3m.40s." (The Empire, Sydney 10 November, 1869).

    In early June, 1872 it was reported that Mr Fred Woodhouse had "just completed a painting of the well-known racehorse Warrior...Morrison is in the pigskin...and of the many portraits that Mr Woodhouse has painted of the Victorian jockey, this is the best. The portraits of Saqui and Sevior, are equally striking..." (Australasian of 8 June, 1872).

    Arsenal and the Melbourne Cup in 1886 - a tale from the Turf "...William Gannon and Harry Rayner thoroughly deserved their win with Arsenal...Arsenal had shelly feet and was a shy feeder. He did a good trial at Randwick...But the train journey across to Melbourne upset him, and for several days he wouldn't eat...Rayner was at his wit's ends when that shrewd old battler Bob Sevior, was called into the conservation. Now, Bob had a pony that would eat a goat out of tucker, and his pony was put into Arsenal's box. The sight of the intruder tucking in was too much for the Cup horse, and with teeth and heels he drove him out, and finished the crib himself. After that he ate heartily...And Arsenal won the Cup..."

    Horses bred and/or trained and often raced by the Seviors as jockeys, were in the early years bred and trained with John taking the lead. However in the later years Robert was out in front (he lived longer too) and so well over ninety percent of the horses listed here were horses in the Robert Sevior stable although John was involved as a Horse Trainer for over twenty years.

    The horses found so far are - High Sheriff an imported champion (by Red Deer and Miss Julia Bennett), Becky Sharp (a bay mare of quality and power who also went by the name of Maid of Erin), Hotspur (a chestnut Gelding by Romeo), Woodlark, Modesty, Stargazer, Maid of Morven, Big Cousin Jack, Cousin Jack (late Hector), Hector, Hector O'Halloran, Young Jack, Peddlington, Freeholder, Minnie, Dauntless (brown Gelding), Mustang, St Albert, Monk, Yerna, Midnight, Darkie, Misty Morn (reported as a rakish-looking horse of higher stature than Warrior), Lady Charlotte, Sambour, Cervantes, Cigar (late Cervantes), Concertina, Kaled, Maid of the Mist, Colleen Dawn, Fanny, Rambler, Nine o'clock, Barney, Marigold, Cracker, Calamia, Fernhill, Adelaide, Patchwork, Tower Hill, Pilgrim (black gelding), Precious Stone (a gelding), Town Moor, Tyronnell, Surprise, Zambesi (a little mare), Boatman, My Leah (a beautiful filly by Fireworks out of Art Union), Miss Julia, Sir Robert (black gelding), Albelard, The Deer, Wickliffe, Vowles, Cuba, Caulfield, Woonooke, Cronstadt, Albanns, Planter, Plausible, Mabel (a Trotting Mare), Pharmigan, Kanoota, Angler (broken in by Robert Sevior - Angler was from Ace of Hearts), The Prophet (by New Warrior, dam Pauline), Palestine, Westbury, The Actress, Tramp, The Nigger, Tyropean, Gloom, Silverfox, Sycophant, Impulse (by Hamlet), Her Majesty, Straight Shot, Master, Partner, Sign (by Dunlop from Symbol - a good looking mare), La Cigale, Vandyke, Greenwich (by Sunrise), Lady Superior, King Tom, Barwon (late Barwon Park), Silverlocks (Silver Locks), Topthorn, Henrietta, East Lynne (by Don Giovanni), Whirligig, Woodpecker, Timberoo, Cyclops, Jennie, Clodhopper, Barmaid, Ernest, Jessie, Fred Archer, St Andrew, St John, Magnus, Stranger, Samboar, Adele (a mare), Mary, Stationer, Pan, Protector, Albert, Analogy, Lord Wilton, Ballarat, Albanus, Augur, Moonraker, Playboy, Fountain, Teddington, Stranger, Wild Rose, Dam named Little Browny, Zambesi, Sandglass, Ariosto, Aconite, Trowbird (by Tim Whiffler), Sybil 1873 (daughter of the imported or English Tim Whiffler - 'from Jessica by Fisherman'...Jessica being three generations back...it was said that Sybil was a wily little filly of great gameness - main reference is tbhertitage.com), Salisbury (full brother of Sybil), Scarpia (son of Neckersgat and Tarpeia), Brocky, Forester, Mercury, Belladrum, Panmure, Childe Harold, Aruma (Colt), Woodland, Happy Jack, Gay Lad or Gaylad, Savannah, Wild Irishman, General Lincoln, H Bright, Ellis, Timotheus, Widow, Kate Dalrymple, Trowbridge or Troubridge, Zilla, Samson, Sandglass, Real Jam, Little King, Exchange or Xchange, Margrave, Majestic (filly daughter of Neckersgat, by Promise), Fusilier, Calumny, Chester, Conservative (a stylish chestnut colt), John Bull (a colt), Daydream (Day Dream), Aime, Calabria, Annie, Panshanger, Stoneberry, Lardy Dardy, Star of the West, Winifred (mare), Skipper (a brown colt, by Boatman), Dorinda, Major, Lena, Snip (by Boatman - Elizabeth), Wick, Caller Ou, The Deacon, Artemus Ward, Liberty, Black Peg, Charlie, Topsy Brown, Violet, Major, A.T., Faugh-a-Ballagh, King of the Vale (a good looking chesnut two-year-old colt, by King of the Ring from Amethyst), Richworth, The Frenchman, Hebron, Diamond, Romp, Quack, Proverb, Aime, Apology, Doctor, Lara, Gauntlet, Tilboroo, Tamleugh, Sarawak, Union Jack, Elis, Gauntlet, Puzzler, Zebra, Snowdon or Snowden, Kohinoor, Reformation, Nerissa (by Hercules and Jessica, the dam of Sybil), Grasshopper, Fisherman, Lady Rosebery (a brilliant sprinter), Islander (Robert Sevior was disqualified and this disqualification was later revoked), Whitefoot (late Polly), Sheriff, Fireaway, Lady Constance, Lucy, Grannie or Granny (the last five by High Sheriff) and of course Warrior. This same Warrior sired by New Warrior from Annie Laurie by Waverley was purchased by Robert Sevior in September 1871. Warrior was a brown horse foaled in 1863 and he raced as a gelding. Misty Morn was also purchased at the about the same time - both were originally Mr Austin Saqui's horses which Robert Sevior had trained. Possibly also to be included in this list are - Neckersgat (a Blood stallion - by Talk o' the Hill from Miss Giraffe, by King Tom - both Talk o' the Hill and Miss Giraffe were imported), Napoleon, Rapidity, Southern Cross, Crumb, El Moro, Neotsfield, Don Alphonso and Trent. Note that Sybil was often spelt as Sibyl in the Racing programs, guides and results etc.

    A Blood Horse - a general meaning from about the 1790's - a horse with a substantial amount of Eastern horse blood but not necessarily a 'Thoroughbred'. With regard to Neckersgat - at the time the possession of Neckersgat blood by any racehorse was regarded as 'a glorious quality'. Scarpia and Majestic both ridden by Master Sevior were two such horses.

    By the end of May 1874 Robert Sevior was in the midst of a move from Muckleford to Melbourne. He had already sold his farm and stables near the Muckleford Racecourse and the final sell up was of his first class furniture (listed separately); and trotting horses, brood mares and draught horses - included was his fast trotting mare 'Lightfoot', trotting horse 'John Brown', favourite buggy pony 'Billy' and 'Miss Barwon'' a brood mare in foal to 'Poet'. Plus other horse and racing gear was up for sale, such as harnesses, bridles, saddles, racing saddles, a lady's saddle, a buggy and spring cart. The reason for the sale was 'said to be a consequence of his giving up horse racing'. Moreover, was the move a direct consequence of the fatal accident of one of his young jockeys (aged about 16 years) by the name of Swannell, at Muckleford in February, 1874?

    During July, 1876 a Horse racing partnership between Mr Austin Saqui and Mr Robert Sevior was dissolved with the Deacon, Reformation, Aruma (Colt) and Grasshopper being immediately placed on the market for sale. Austin Saqui was a prominent Racehorse owner and successful Bookmaker of those times and he and Robert had successes together in winning horse races. At this period the training of Saqui horses by Robert Sevior was often took place at Sevior's property at Muckleford (Muckleford Creek).

    In 1883 Robert Sevior was made a Director of the Flemington and Kensington Hall Company. In that same year Robert loaned his piano on the occasion of the opening of the New Hall at Flemington, so perhaps he had a musical streak. Robert had a musically talented daughter referred to as 'Miss Sevior' when she played piano forte and sang at the St Brendans Concert in 1886 and 'little Miss Sevior' when she played the piano and sang for the Bulli Mine Disaster in 1887 at the New Hall at Newmarket.

    At least from the period of 1871 to 1875 and in 1884, Robert Sevior had stables at Newmarket. In 1884 Robert sold his racing stables at Flemington, but by 1894 he was well and truly back at Flemington as his racing stables were completely burnt in October of that year (no losses of horses) and yet by 1895 the stables had been rebuilt. By 1878 Robert had racing stables at Randwick and in 1887 his Randwick racing stables were at Vauxhall Gardens.

    An anecdote is that Robert Sevior taught Robert (Bob) Ramage to ride - he was the jockey of Carbine who won the Melbourne Cup in 1890 and it is also said that Ramage rode his first winning race in 'Sevior Colours.' (The race was in the 1880's and thought to have been at Moonee Valley).

    Robert Sevior is not to be confused with Robert (Bob) Sevior/Sevier or Sutton etc (likely born in South Africa) the London Bookmaker and Racehorse owner who spent a considerable time in Melbourne on the racing scene.

    There was a John Sevior 1836 Montacute, Somerset who married Elizabeth Park in 1858 at Yeovil, Somerset and they both migrated to Victoria, then proceeding to Castlemaine and on to Ballarat but they have not been proved by me, to be of the immediate family of John and Robert Sevior. I have been in touch with a family member working on their family history and at this stage although there are some similar first names and close locations in Victoria eg Castlemaine we have agreed that they are separate entities. Nevertheless, I have no doubt now that they are very closely linked as John Sevior c1799/1800 (father of John 1834 and Robert 1836) had a fall-back clause in his Will directing his estate to John Hodder of Thorn Coffin, Yeovil, Somerset, who married Pinninah Beaton in 1806 at Martock, Somerset; and after that to the sister of John Hodder 1777 ie Mary (Hodder) Trask 1780 - who I have found to have married Thomas Trask a Musician in 1809 at Yeovil, Somerset. I have discovered that John Hodder and Mary (Hodder) Trask were two of the children of Eli Hodder of Odcome, Lufton and Montacute and his wife Mary Drew - they were Sojourners. Eli was a son of Thomas Hodder of Lufton and Ann Lewis of Montacute - there is a chest tomb in St Catherine Churchyard, Montacute which commemorates the life of Ann (Lewis) Hodder (britishlistedbuildings.co.uk Ref ST4916). The original Hodders came from Dorset (and Devon ?). In fact this particular family still had land interests in Dorset where they held the Manor of Langbridy and other estates. Besides being found in Somerset later members of this Hodder family can be found in Hampshire and Berkshire.

    This Hodder family were tenants of the Phelips family of Montacute House (still standing) and Montacute estate and other lands, in the period 1595 to 1789. The Hodders were tenants in the period 1595-1698 DD\PH/63 and the Hodders of Lufton were tenants in the period 1776-1789 DD\PH/69 (National Archives of the UK; and the Somerset Record Office online catalogue). At some stages over this period of 1595 -1698 and/or 1776-1789 Trask, Beaton and Trim are some of the other names of tenants on the Montacute lands. At British History online there is reference to some of the Hodder family members being Innkeepers in the 1600's and 1700's at Montacute - Richard Hodder in 1649 and William Hodder and his family held the Red Lion from 1697 continuously till 1750. There is also a reference to the George Inn in 1755 and 1782.

    It has been proposed by some authorities that the name Hodder is a corruption of Odda from the Earl of Devon in the time of Alfred the Great.

    John Hodder was a Yeoman (Farmer) of Odcombe, Thorne Coffin/Thorne Coffin, (now Thorne) Yeovil, Stapleton in Martock, Kingsbury Episcopi and Montacute - all in Somerset. (Members of this particular Hodder family had been born in Thorne Coffin as early as 1739 and moreover, there is a Will dated 1720, at the National Archives of the UK for a John Hodder 'Gentleman of Yeovil'). John Hodder the son of Eli and Mary (Drew) Hodder was born in March 1777 and baptised in April, 1777 at the Parish of Sts Peter and Paul at Odcombe. (Is the parish church of Sts Peter and Paul, Odcombe one and the same as the parish church of Sts Peter and Paul, Lufton?) There is also a September 1788 baptism date for him but I am taking the first one as more correct as that was the date when his twin sister Elizabeth was also baptised (April, 1777) rather than the date of September 1788 when his sister Mary was baptised. Mary was born in September, 1780 but was not baptised near that date as her father Eli was ill - he died in 1781.

    John Hodder, firstly married Pinninah and they had about 8 children - Pinninah died in 1836. In 1840, John married Elizabeth Trimm/Trim at Martock. John contracted a marriage settlement with Elizabeth which included Kingsbury Episcopi and other closes. The Trustees for this settlement was the Warry family. Elizabeth Trim was born in c1824, at Martock whereas her siblings - Susan 1828 and James 1833 were born in Kingsbury. There was also another brother William Trim. These four were children of Henry Trim and his wife Prudence. In 1828 Henry Trim was a workman in the Tobacco Industry and in 1833, 1840 and 1841 he was a Servant to Mr Warry of Tintonnell (likely William Robert Warry who died in 1873). Henry Trim married Prudence Shore on 19th February 1820 at All Saints, Martock; the abode for both of them was Martock. Their daughter Elizabeth Trim would have only been 16 or 17 when she married John Hodder who was 63 or 64. John Hodder and Elizabeth Trim had a daughter Elizabeth Susan Hodder who was baptised at Sts Peter and Paul, Odcombe on 13th August, 1843 a month after her father John died in July, 1843, at the age of 67. John Hodder was at that time a resident of Montacute and he was buried on 14th July, 1843 at St Andrews, Thorne Coffin.

    The 1841 Census shows John Hodder 45 of independent means and Elizabeth Hodder 20 at Peter Street, KIngston, Yeovil, Somerset. Plus Prudence Trim is also there aged 40. While, also in 1841 Henry Trim 50, Servant is listed at North Street, Yeovil, (born outside the County) together with his children - William 15, Susan 12 and James 9 - all born in Somerset. From the Free Census of 1861 at Church Street, Yeovil, Somerset - Elizabeth T Hodder was 37 a Milliner born at Martock, Somerset, her daughter Elizabeth S Hodder was 18 and born at Yeovil, Somerset and her mother Prudence Trim was 62 and born at Stoke, Somerset. The 1861 Census at Ancestry shows Elizabeth S Hodder or Elizabeth S Trim as being born in 1824 and Elizabeth S Hodder, her daughter as being born in 1843 - both in Somerset.

    On 14th September, 1905 a US paper - the Johnstown NY Fulton County Republican (NY State Digital Library) - filed a report from a London newspaper source - looking for the child or grand children of John Hodder with his wife Elizabeth Trimm - indications were that there was a fortune to inherit and the contact Solicitors were the same ones who acted for John Hodder concerning his marriage settlement with Elizabeth Trimm.

    There was also a Robert Hodder Sevior/Sever baptised on 17th May,1798 at Sts Peter and Paul, Odcombe, Somerset (to a James and Ann) and he was possibly closely related to John Sevior c1799/1800. I had thought till recently that James Sevior may have married Ann Hodder 1774, a sister of John Hodder and Mary Hodder but a published family history has her dying and unmarried in 1803, but this is not conclusive as the same history makes no mention of Mary Hodder and there are other omissions. Moreover, I think that this James Sevior had a brother John Hodder Sevior so the Hodder connection may have come in earlier (as well). In 1842 Robert Hodder Sevior was at Petticoat Lane, Portsoken, London. While in 1850 Robert Hodder Sevior married Margaret Stewart in Epsom, Surrey. Then in 1873 he died at Whitechapel (Tower Hamlets), his age was given as 73 but he was more likely about 75.

    The elder brother of John Sevior 1834 and Robert Sevior 1836 was a James Sevior c1819 or c1820. He was at Nile Rivulet/Pigeons Plains in northern Tasmania in April, 1836 and in Launceston in November, 1837. (Newspapers at Trove). He appears to have came across to Melbourne in 1845. (Trove newspapers). He seems to have spelt his surname as Seviour or Sivier. He was most likely to have been born in Sydney. At this stage his mother is unknown. Whereas the mother of both John and Robert Sevior was Mary (Ann) Lucas - stated as such by their father John in his Will. (Tasmanian Archives - I have a copy on A3 size paper and the hand writing is difficult to read. It is now online but no easier to read). The name of Stansbury has also been connected to Mary by her sons John and Robert - stating that she was formerly Stansbury. I think that is more likely that Stansbury was the Maiden name of Mary's mother, in Hampshire, England. Moreover, in records attributed to Robert Sevior his mother is listed as Margaret Stansbury but I think that Margaret is a misspelling or incorrect reading of Mary Ann. The mother of James was not Mary (Ann) Lucas.

    Sevior 1834 and Robert Sevior 1836 worked together co-operatively in their entrepreneurial endeavours - in the beginning of their working lives John had the success in breeding and training their race horses and later in their lives Robert was the successful brother in terms of winning horse races. As well John and Robert also always had their separate endeavours - eg they owned some land in common and some land by themselves, and they owned horses together or as individuals.

    Further regarding the race horse colours used by Robert Sevior the VRC (from their Archives) advise that Robert Sevior used the colours of green and white with a white V on the front of the jockey's shirt. In December 1855, the colours of scarlet and blue were worn by John Sevior on his racehorse 'Hotspur' when he won the Ladies Purse at Bendigo (Bendigo Advertiser of 20th December, 1855). Whereas, in March, 1857 the colours for the same 'Hotspur' owned by John Sevior were green and scarlet (The Argus of 28th March, 1857). While the Perth 'Inquirer and Commercial' Newspaper of 6th November, 1896 referred to Sevior colours as being yellow and black. In the Victorian Ruff or Pocket Companion Racing Companion for 1962 William Levey wrote that the racing colour of Mr Sevior the Jockey was a 'Black' cap. The jacket was reported as being amber. The Jockey's Silks for Warrior in 1869 may have been a red cap with a long sleeve vertical striped black and grey top? (I have just found some detail on the silks - that the jockey's cap was scarlet and his top was a long sleeved black top with vertical silver stripes - 10/8/2014).

    John's old farm at Muckleford - built up with parcels of land obtained by Crown Land Grants is heritage listed (known as Bassetts Farm - taking the name of a later owner) as is the Builders' Inn in Gawler Street, Portland heritage listed - this Inn was built by John Sevior's father-in-law John Sample Leahy c1810 Cork - likely Kinsale where he married Ellen McCarthy in 1831.The Builders' Arms at Portland, where John Sevior was the Publican in 1862 was also built by John Leahy. John Leahy was a Mason, Plasterer, Architect, Publican and property owner in Portland.

    After John Leahy's death in 1856 his widow Ellen Leahy applied successfully to be a Publican and also applied for Crown Land Grants in her name.

    John Sevior 1836 died on 13th March 1883 at his home at 'Rose Cottage' in Flemington Road, Flemington. Robert Sevior was the witness on John's death certificate and at this time Robert was living in Newmarket nearby. The Mount Alexander Mail - 1883 Mar. 26 - Items of News "Old residents of the district who remember Mr John Sevior, who resided at Muckleford, and under whose training Becky Sharp, & Hotspur scored for him numerous victories over our racecourses, will be sorry to learn that he died at Flemington last week."

    John Sevior is buried with his wife Rebecca Leahy and Robert Sevior is buried with his wife Mary Ann Edwards and their graves are only about 100 yards apart at the Melbourne General Cemetery.

    It has been reported that Robert Sevior was 'a fine specimen of a man who stood at about 6 feet'.

    John Sevior leased two farms in the Hamilton district - the one leased by John in 1867 was at Warrabkook, Warrabkook near Macarthur (it was Government Lands and Water Land), and together with Robert he leased the stud farm ‘Dooling Dooling’ at North Hamilton. From the Caperdown Chronicle reprint on 31 December, 1914 it reported under the heading of "Sport in the Early Days ...Robert and John Sevior rented from the late Mr Patrick Burgin 640 acres, situated at Dooling Dooling, for a stud farm, having the imported English thoroughbred High Sheriff located there. They arranged to capture a large kangaroo, and take him to Hamilton for a hunt...I saw the kangaroo in a loose box prior to the hunt, at the old Hamilton Inn stables. He was taken in a spring cart with rope netting at the top. The huntsmen met where Mr Robert Drummond had a garden in at his private residence in Thomson Street. The kangaroo was let loose where the big gate entrance to the botanical gardens stands, opposite Dr Laidlaw’s residence. He started on getting his freedom at a merry pace round Mount Craig, turned towards the east and jumped a stiff, high, three rail fence, which enclosed a small ploughed paddock, owned by Mr Thos. Butler, the present site of Mr Officer’s residence, Oakdene. Being in the month of July, and the ploughed ground soft, the kangaroo stopped in the centre of the paddock. The fence being high and the ground slippery, several of the crack horses refused to negotiate the fence until Mr James Wilson, sen., now of Queenscliff, mounted on a dapple grey, Dayspring, winner of the Great Western Steeplechase, Coleraine, and owned by the late Mr Henry Cox, one of Hamiltons solicitors, jumped into the paddock and started the kangaroo, which made straight across the Hamilton racecourse, past where the railway station now stands. He crossed the creek, and made up the hill, jumped the fence at the Old Church of England parsonage, across where the present golf links are, and through Henty’s paddock, going over several good fences, and ran out at the three chain road above the German church, ending the hunt thus. I may mention that the gentlemen that took part in the hunt were: Messrs. Jas Wilson, Robert and John Sevior, P Grant, Walter Grant, Donald and John Cameron (Violet Creek) , Dick Donelan (commonly called “Dick the Devil,” being a daring rider and good horseman) Robt. Younger, Jim Roberts, Robt. M’Cann, Clem. M’Cann, and several young station hands. On returning, refreshments were provided by the lesee of the Hamilton Inn, Mr M P Grant – a fine fellow, good sport, and fond of racing. He used to own a good racehorse called Mustang, a Premier horse, bred by the late Mr Richard Garton...”

    A Sevior Benefit Race Meeting was held for Robert 'Bob' Sevior at the Moonee Valley Racecourse in on 30th September or 1st October of 1896. Races at this Benefit Meeting included the Sevior Handicap, the Becky Sharp Welter Handicap, the Hotspur Handicap and the Warrior Stakes.

    Robert Sevior died of stomach cancer on the 29th October, 1896 reportedly at his home in Flemington Road, Flemington.

    Otago Witness of 12 November, 1896, page 31 - Talk of the Day by Mazeppa - "...the old-time Victorian trainer Robert Sevior died last Wednesday after a lengthy illness...Sevior never seems to have been thoroughly prosperous. His best time was when he had the late Austin Saqui's horses...Sevior was a man well liked among his brother trainers, whom he was always glad to assist with advice when a horse was in Queer street..."

    From the Inquirer and Commercial News (Perth) of 6th November, 1896 - by Pegasus - "...All old sportsmen in Australia will learn with regret of the death of Robert...or Bob Sevior...The old trainer expired at his residence, Flemington road, Melbourne, yesterday morning. Poor old Robert Sevior was one of the most popular trainers in the colonies...Mr Joe Thompson always said that it was the 'Sevior polish' that saved the ring in 1877...There was no more regular attendant during the last quarter of a century on the race-courses in Victoria than the genial and amiable Robert Sevior, who never made an enemy..."

    Re John Sevior 1834 Launceston –
    John's one son John William Sevior was born in 1871 in Otway Street, Portland (it incorrectly states on his Marriage Certificate that he was born at Cape Nelson), worked for the Victorian Railways initially as a Porter (1901). From his early youth he was a breeder and exhibitor of Bulldogs at dog shows and events in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Country shows. Many times in about forty seven years of this work, interest and passion - John won Australian Championships (1st Prizes) for his Bulldogs - dogs, bitches, novices and puppies. He was first appointed as a Bulldog Judge in 1897 at the age of about 25 and was still a judge in 1926. At some of the annual Championships and other events he took out many championships for the one bulldog - the best bulldog, the best dog and the best in special sections. John won championship first prizes for his dogs and other prizes - mainly for his Bulldogs - Bull bitches, Bull novices and Bull puppies in 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897, 1898, 1899, 1900, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1911, 1912, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1930, 1933 and 1936. For his champion bulldogs - open, special and champion - John won many 'Blue' ribbons and champion's certificates. He even won a small gold medallion for Miss Billy from the South African Bulldog Club. In 1918, 1922, 1923 and 1924 Mulga King Billy won the championship as Australia's best bred dog, plus a string of other prizes - Maiden, Novice, Dog section Winner, Winner of the Special Limit, Winner of the Limit, Open and Championship classes, Best dog, Special, other First prizes, the Best head and Best bodied and the Best dog in the show parade. However John Sevior did not own Mulga King Billy in 1918 but did in the other years mentioned.

    The names of some of John's dogs (mostly champions) were - Mulga King Billy, Miss Billy, Palmyra Tempe or Tempe, Badger, Datham - a bridle and white puppy, Palmyra Cybele or Cybele, King Offa, Java, Hesper, Hesper 4, Pyrrho, Pyrrhus, Leda, Louie Cerberus, Lady Nelson, Reaper, Downshire Lassie, Last Charge, Up Guards, Bruce VI, Nada, Niger or Nigrene, La Cigale, Wee Jean, Palmyra Veda, Palmyra Ida, Young Australia, Pride of Australia, Micky Australia, Myola Fusilier (Won a Special Puppy prize - was a Bulldog) and Jan Ridd (imported). John also had success with his Brindle Mastiffs - Wee Jean and Ben Jonathan. As at 1915 Jan Ridd had sired at least 30 puppies, many of who were prize winners, including Pride of Australia, and the young Australian winner of the 'Iredell Cup' - Young Australia, and the Australian Winner of the "Lever Cup' - All Australia. John also bred prize winning Airedale Terriers - Snider in 1896 and Aerial Gunner or Gunner from about January 1921 to January, 1924.

    Jim and Jess were two more of John's Bulldogs. Besides his numerous dogs he obviously enjoyed his wide contacts in the dog world, and he was well respected.

    In 1933 Mrs John Sevior won a Novice prize for her small dog Teddy, who was a Wolf Sable Pomeranian.

    Some variations of this old name of English or French origin include Sevior, Seviour, Sevier, Sever, Sevyer, Seyvior, Sevyr, Svyr, Syfer, Seeviour, Seeveir, Seeviar, Seevier, Seevior, Seiveier, Severie, Seviar, Sevier, Sevour, Seveor, Sevear, Seuvior, Seavier, Sievier, Seviere, Shevier, Siveyer, Sivier, Siver, Sivyer, Siviere, Sivior, Sivour, Siviour, Siveor, Sieviere, Sievior, Seiviour, Saviour, Savier, Savior, Saver, Saveries, Soovier, Sceviour, Scievor, Scivier, Sifviour and it is even mispelt as Swier and Senior.

    (Trove and Family History research)

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne and Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    1,000 items tagged here is the limit but there are probably another 2,000 on Robert Sevior at Trove.

    1,004 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-22
    User data
    Rating: r5/5
  63. JOHN BROOMFIELD - 1829 Edinburgh - Master Baker & Bakery Owner, Potato Farmer & Gold Mining Investor
    List
    Public

    Family History records indicate that John Broomfield, a Master Baker and Bakery owner in Ballarat and later in Collingwood was supposedly born on 26th March, 1829 in Edinburgh. John Broomfield was also a Potato Farmer and Gold Mining Investor (Speculator) in Ballarat. There is even a supposed authentic story in which a large piece of gold was found outside his Bakery store on the goldfields in Ballarat.

    John Broomfield's father was Richard Broomfield, a Baker, likely born around 1790 in Greenlaw, Berwickshire, Scotland (a baptism of Richard Bromfield on 16th February, 1790 is relevant) to James Broomfield/Bromfield (Brownfield/Brunfield) c1750 and Margaret Neill/Neill bap. April, 1751 Longformacus, Berwickshire, Scotland. John's mother was Catharine/Kathrine Stevenson born 6th July, 1793 at Canongate, the Royal Mile (Holyrood) Edinburgh to John Stevenson/Stivenson a Smith (worker in metal) born 29th June 1759 at Canongate and Catherine/Katherine/Kaithren Naiper/Napier bap. 4th March 1768 at Abernethie (Abernethy), Perthshire or Fifeshire (the early Barony of Abernethy was partly in each) Scotland - daughter of John Naiper/Napier c1744 a Weaver in Abernethie/Abernethy, who married c1766. John Stevenson/Stivenson and Catherine/Katherine Naiper/Napier married on 18th February, 1786 at Canongate (Holyrood), Edinburgh, Midlothian - Witness was William Bell an Upholsterer.

    John Broomfield's parents - Richard Broomfield and Catharine/Kathrine Stevenson married on 22/10/1812 at St Andrews, Edinburgh Parish, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.

    Some more about John Broomfield's ancestors from Canongate - John Stevenson/Stivenson - John's grandfather shows up on UK Edinburgh Directories as being in Dickson's Close, (south end of the High Street) Royal Mile, Canongate, Edinburgh from 1813 to 1821 inclusive. In February, 1830 John Stevenson died from palsy at 299 Canongate (site of the Royal Mile Grocers), Royal Mile while his wife Catherine/Katherine Naiper/Napier had died in June, 1828 at 199 Canongate, Canongate. Both John and Catherine/Katherine are buried in the Canongate graveyard or kirkyard [Scottish Record Society]. While Catharine/Kathrine Stevenson their daughter died in February, 1830 in the Infirmary at Canongate of fever - and she was buried in the Canongate graveyard on the 10th February,1830 - her age is recorded as 32 but it was more likely 36. Moreover, Catherine was one of ten children and three of her siblings also died at Canongate - David (1) Stevenson 1787 to c1809, Robert Stevenson 1798 to 1840 - died at the Royal Infirmary and Archibald Stevenson 1800 to 1832 - died at Jacks Lodge - all three are buried at Canongate [Scottish Record Society].

    No family connection made yet but Robert Louis Stevenson the famous novelist and poet, is buried in the Canongate kirkyard (he could be related) as is the equally famous author, economist and moral philosopher Adam Smith, also buried at Canongate.

    What is quite puzzling is that Richard Broomfield (Brownfield - a valid variation) a Baker, died in December, 1825 at St Marys Wynd (alternative name is Darnley Street, Cowgate - from the CANMORE site) the Royal Mile, Canongate of asthma and was buried in the Canongate graveyard on the 4th December, 1825 age 37. The age fits in as Richard Broomfield could have been born a year or two before the baptism date of 1790. However this Richard Broomfield buried at Canongate in 1825 was the husband of Catharine/Kathrine Stevenson! So either Richard Broomfield was not John Broomfield's biological father or John Broomfield was born before about mid 1826 at the latest - I'm working on the fact that the specific record on Richard Broomfield's death in the Scottish Record Society document is correct.

    Scotland - Censuses -
    * 1841 a Broomfield Household with Bakers as Occupations - is listed at 7 West Newington, Newington, St Cuthberts, Midlothian - Adam Broomfield 58 a Baker (born outside the County); James Broomfield 26 a Baker, Journeyman; John Broomfield 18 a Baker Apprentice, born c1823 St Cuthberts, Edinburgh, Midlothian; James Broomfield 15; Jane Broomfield 47 and Agnes Broomfield 16. Two questions arise - 1. Is this possibly John Broomfield born c1823/1824 and not in 1829? 2. Is James Broomfield 26 an older brother to John Broomfield c1823/1824?
    * In 1851 at Sibbald Place, St Cuthberts, Midlothian - Adam Broomfield 69 Retired Baker; James Broomfield 24 a Mercantile Clerk and Agnes Broomfield 27 Housekeeper (part of the family from the 1841 Census).
    * While in 1851 at 73 Pleasance Street, Barony of Canongate, St Cuthberts, Midlothian there are two people - John Broomfield 27, Head a Baker Unmarried, born in Edinburgh, Barony of Canongate, Midlothian - employing 2 Men. (Once again - is this possibly John Broomfield born c1823/1824 and not 1829?) and his sister Elizabeth Broomfield 23 Unmarried born Edinburgh, Barony of Canongate, Midlothian (this throws things out as Elizabeth Broomfield would have been born c1828). However a person's age as recorded in these Censuses is only approximate, and Elizabeth may have been say 25. A conclusion I could draw [in the absence of birth or baptism records which remain elusive] is that John Broomfield was more likely born c1824 and not 1829.

    An Elizabeth Broomfied married James Mackenzie on 6th August, 1853 at Edinburgh Parish, Edinburgh, Midlothian - (likely the same Parish where Richard Broomfield 1790 and Catharine/Kathrine Stevenson had married on 22 October, 1812). Besides, the father of this Elizabeth Broomfield was Richard Broomfield, and by deduction he was also the father of her brother John Broomfield.

    Moreover, it appears that Adam Broomfield listed in these 1841 and 1851 Censuses is in fact a brother of Richard Broomfield c1790 and was likely born 1781 Greenlaw, Berwickshire and his wife Jane is his second wife Jean/Jane Fairbairn born c1794 - they married on 7th August, 1819 at St Cuthberts, Midlothian. Adam's first wife was Elizabeth Field 1790 Colinton, Midlothian and they married on 18th December, 1812 at Edinburgh Parish, Edinburgh, Midlothian (once again likely the same Parish where Richard Broomfield 1790 and Catharine/Kathrine Stevenson had married on 22 October, 1812).

    A recent find on the internet is Grave Monument Number 163772 at Old Calton Cemetery, Edinburgh, Lothian, Scotland which shows Adam Broomfield - Born 1782 - age 74 - buried 13/4/1856 and his daughter Agnes Broomfield - Born 1824 - age 34 - buried 2/8/1858.

    From Pigot and Co 1837 - Broomfield a Baker was at 39 Water Lane, Leith; Adam Broomfield, a Baker was at 1 Arniston Place, Newington, Edinburgh; James Broomfield a Baker was at 29 Kirkgate Lane, Edinburgh and William Broomfield a Baker was at 1 Calton Place, Edinburgh.

    From the Post Office Annual Directories of Edinburgh and Leith - John Broomfield a Baker is listed at 71 Pleasance, Edinburgh - 1849/50 to 1854/55, inclusive. This would indeed be the John Broomfield age 27 of the 1851 Census, living at 73 Pleasance Street, Edinburgh with his sister Elizabeth 23. [An interesting point for me is that St Marys Wynd, Canongate where Richard Broomfield (Brownfield) died was an access point to the area of Pleasance in Edinburgh]. So it is quite likely to be the John Broomfield of this Trove List, and this appears to fit in well with John's likely arrival in Sydney near the end of 1855.

    The Sydney Morning Herald of 28th November 1855 reports that ' "The Waterloo" sailed from Plymouth on 14th August and arrived in Sydney on 27th November, 1855.' The Waterloo was a Duncan Dunbar A1 Clipper Ship, possibly built in Sunderland. I think that there is a very strong likelihood that John Broomfield from Edinburgh was the Mr Broomfield a passenger on this voyage. John Broomfield died on 13th August, 1885 at 59 Wellington Street, Collingwood and on his Death Certificate it states that he was in Victoria for 30 years which would make it 1855. On this Certificate John's age is given as 56 and his parents are recorded as Richard Broomfield a Baker and Catherine (Stevenson) Broomfield.

    The Age Newspaper of 14th August, 1885 at Trove reports that John Broomfield died on 13th August,1885 at his residence at the Cnr of Derby and Wellington Streets, Collingwood, The address was 59 Wellington Street, Collingwood and John's bakery was also here. At the time of his death he had necessary items to do with his bakery such as flour, bread and a horse for deliveries. He was a Baker 'late of Ballarat' and his age was given as 58. (It could read 56 but the story is still the same).

    From PRO Victoria - John Broomfield and his brother-in-law Richard Haylock Brooks owned the property at the Cnr of Derby and Wellington Streets in some partnership from 1881. I have yet to research the papers held at the Probate Office and Victorian Archives, presently located in North Melbourne.

    On "The Waterloo" see - http://www.searlecanada.org/sunderland/sunderland097.html then number 6.

    Within a very short period (days rather than weeks) John moved on quite possibly to Buninyong before or at the same time that he settled in Ballarat. A Crown Grant's reference shows that in 1855 a John Broomfield was granted land in Buninyong - Por 22, Lot 31 No 38261 'the Grant was made on 6th December, 1855 to a John Broomfield 20a 3r 26p, at Buninyong' [Crown Land Deeds - PRO VIC land records]. Response from the Buninyong and District Historical Society on 20th January, 2012 "I checked our records and the only reference I found was in the 1856 Electoral Roll for John Bromfield, farmer, Mount Buninyong. He would have been one of the very early purchases of land in that very beautiful and fertile area near Mount Buninyong. It would appear he soon sold the land, because his name does not appear in any other directories or rate records in Buninyong."

    From the Star, Ballarat of 20 April, 1857 - a gold claim was made by Messrs Broomfield, Petet and Co at Nuggety Reef which was one of the Quartz Reefs at Tarrangower. It was reported in this paper that "The same parties crushed some time since two tons of picked stone, yielding 492 ounces, this week the refuse was crushed at Mr Edward's machine - with the following result - 453 ounces. I believe this to be the largest yield of refuse quartz ever crushed in the colony." (possibly the Broomfield was John Broomfield).

    An interesting connection could be a Mr Pettett and the Dowling Forest - a Mr Pettett was an early Settler of Little River and the Dowling Forest and Samuel Walsh and John Broomfield had land in the Dowling Forest by 1858.

    From the Mount Alexander Mail of 2 April, 1858 "TEN SHILLINGS REWARD
    "...Lost on 1st April, 1858, a cheque on the Bank of New South Wales, Castlemaine, for Twenty Pounds sterling...Drawn...in favour of Broomfield..." for John Broomfield ?

    In the Age on 3 June, 1858, from a report "...I have seen ore crushed in Tarrangower, Mr Broomfield's two tons yielding 512 oz..." Re John Broomfield?

    By December, 1858 John Broomfield was one of the two partners of the Bakery firm of 'Walsh and Broomfield' in Ballarat from that year to mid, 1861 -
    * The Star, Ballarat of 23rd and 27th December, 1858 "Farm To let - To let a farm in Dowling Forest, 132 acres. Apply to Walsh & Broomfield, Bakers, Red Streak." [Dowling Forest - area of present Ballarat horserace course; and regarding Red Streak - the settlement appeared to be part of Poverty Point]. Poverty Point is in the White Horse Range in Ballarat East where there is a Monument (Ballarat Historical Society).
    The Red Streak Lead was discovered in March, 1855 (Federation University) - so it is likely that this is connected to or is the same as Red Streak? A copy of a William Dunce oil painting of c1853, was referred to by the Geological Survey of Victoria in 1994 in papers on the Ballarat Gold diggings. The painting is apparently of East Ballarat and West Ballarat and for Ballarat East details the locations of the Red Streak Lead, the Gravel Pits Lead, Gum Tree Flat diggings, the Golden Point diggings (the main diggings), the Golden Point Lead, the Bakery Hill Lead at Black Hill and White Flat; as all being within the same vicinity. Thus the painting indicates that the Read Streak Lead was discovered before 1855.
    Besides, an earlier date of November, 1852 is given by W B Withers c1870 ("The following table, compiled from various sources, including the compiler's own knowledge of several items, will give, as it were, a bird's-eye view of the opening of the several portions of the Ballarat field during the period ending December, 1854:
    Clunes 1st July 1851 | | Dead Horse Gullies Early in 1853
    Hiscock's Gully August 1851 | | Prince Regent February 1853
    Golden Point August 1851 | | Sailors' Gully Early in 1853
    Canadian Gully September 1851 | | White Flat Early in 1853
    Brown Hill September 1851 | | Scotchman's Gully Early in 1853
    Black Hill October 1851 | | New Chum Gully End of 1853
    Little Bendigo Gullies End of 1851 | | Black Hill Lead Early in 1854
    Eureka Lead August 1852 | | Gravel Pits Lead Early in 1854
    Red Hill Lead November 1852 | | Bakery Hill Lead Early in 1854
    Black Hill Flat November 1852 | | Gum Tree Flat End of 1854
    Creswick End of 1852 | |
    Excepting the Dead Horse Gullies all the Ballarat proper leads mentioned in the table above came from the eastern side of the ranges into the Ballarat basin. In the year 1855 the western side gave out the Golden Point, Nightingale, Malakoff, Redan, Whitehorse, Frenchman's, and Cobbler's leads, all of which flowed under the basaltic plateau of western Ballarat and Sebastopol. The Golden Point was the name given to the earlier confluent streams as they issued from Eastern Ballarat in one lead and passed under the plateau, and into that lead all the others flowed that had come down from the western side of the range..."
    The History of Ballarat...WB Withers - first published in the Ballarat Star from 1870 - at Gutenberg online ).
    Moreover, there was a Red Streak Mining Company at Creswick in about the mid 1850's. This was apparently related to the original Red Streak (Lead)?
    * The Star, Ballarat of 13th January, 1859, in the Eastern Police Court - the case of Welsh (Walsh) and Broomfield v Roe was scheduled - no appearance.
    * The Star, Ballarat of 24th February, 1859 in the Eastern Police Court - the case "McKenzie v Welsh (Walsh) and Broomfield, £49 19s 6d, wages; order with costs."
    * The Star, Ballarat of 26th February and 1st, 3rd, 5th, 8th, 10th, 12th, 15th and 17th March, 1859 "For Sale or To Let, - A Farm of 132 acres, situated in Dowling Forest (five miles from Ballarat). Terms liberal. Apply to Walsh & Broomfield, Poverty Point, Ballarat." [Poverty Point is in the vicinity of Golden Point]
    * The Star, Ballarat of 4th and 6th August, 1859 "Wanted, Tenders for Fencing 132 acres with a log fence. Apply Walsh & Broomfield, bakers, Golden Point Bakery." [Vicinity of the present Gold Museum and Sovereign Hill]
    * The Star, Ballarat of 2nd September, 1859 in the District Police Court - Walsh and Broomfield v Wilson - ordered to be paid in weekly instalments of 10s.
    * The Star, Ballarat of 7th February, 1860 "Quartz mining and crushing in the vicinity of the Black Hill is now looking up. A few days ago 25 tons of quartz, taken from Broomfield's claim, we are informed, yielded 55 ounces." Which Broomfield - possibly John? [Bakery Hill is near Black Hill]
    * The Star, Ballarat of 21st and 22nd March, 1860 "Wanted, three Men to Dig Potatoes. Apply, Walsh and Broomfield, Golden Point Bakery, Esmond street." [This Esmond Street is likely the present York Street at Golden Point].
    The City of Ballarat Roads 1998 indicates that Esmond Street at Golden Point became the present York Street - http://www.ballarat.vic.gov.au/media/2253695/roads_and_open_space_historical_index.pdf
    There is still an Esmond Street in Ballarat East near Black Hill.
    * District Police Court on the 7th January, 1861, the Star reported about "Samuel Walsh for not having his name on his cart..."
    * "The Star, Ballarat of 8th, 9th and 10th July 1861 "Dissolution of Partnership.The partnership hitherto existing between Walsh and Broomfield, carrying on business at Ballarat as Bakers, has been dissolved by mutual consent. Dated 1st July, 1861, John Broomfield, Samuel Walsh. Witness -Tom Woodhead."

    A description of the Golden Point Bakery when it was for sale on 22 December, 1859 as reported in the Star (Walsh and/or Broomfield were not the owners) - 'Golden Point Bakery and Produce Store "...contains six rooms, consisting of a large store, 30 x 17 bakehouse with two large ovens in good repair, parlor, three bedrooms, kitchen and seven-stalled stable, outhouses..." also for sale "1 dray 1 spring-cart, and 5 large water casks...apply to Alex. D Laing, Junction Produce Store, Main Road, Ballarat..." '

    The Ballarat Historical Society has an early photograph of the Golden Point Bakery, which is lodged with the Gold Museum in Ballarat. It is an old sepia photograph of Golden Point Bakery and Golden Point Store Store and is now depicted online at ehive.com as item 436.79.

    In August, 1859 John Broomfield and his partner Samuel Walsh were Bakers at the Golden Point Bakery - The Star newspaper of Ballarat. I imagine that these Bakers when at the Golden Point Bakery cooked their bread in wood fired brick ovens and that the bread was like damper. They also likely cooked scones, pastries, biscuits and specialty cakes. Perhaps a cup of tea was also available for the tired and hungry miners of the district. There would have been much 'hustle and bustle' in the peak of the mining rushes and the chance to 'strike it lucky' and 'get rich'.

    On 20th, 21st, 22nd and 24th February, 1862 the Star newspaper of Ballarat, reported that John Broomfield and Samuel Walsh were both Shareholders in the Essex Gold Mining Company or Essex Company at Swamp Land (Yuille's Swamp), Ballarat, as at 9th January, 1862. John Broomfield of Ballarat held 8 shares and Samuel Walsh of Ballarat held 6 shares.

    In July, 1862 J Broomfield gave 10s to the Lancashire Relief Committee Fund, by the way of a Subscription. John's old partner Samuel Walsh donated 2.2.0 as a Subscription to the Fund.[The Star].

    The Star of 24th October, 1862 reported on the Shareholders of the Great North West Gold Mining Company at Dead Horse and Suburban Leads in Ballarat - John Broomfield and Samuel Walsh had 2 shares each.

    From the Ballarat Archives, Birtchnell's Index of 1862 - John Broomfield is listed as a Baker in Esmond Street, Ballarat. [The Archives in Ballarat hold the Rate Books for early Ballarat].

    May, 1863 - Stevens and others v Broomfield and others at the Warden's Court. 'These disputes related to ground north of the Swamp.' [The Star]

    On 5th June 1863 the Star reported that John Broomfield of Ballarat had 8 shares in the Essex Gold Mining Company at Swamp Land (Yuille's Swamp), and that Samuel Walsh of Ballarat had 5 shares.

    The Star, Ballarat of 3rd June, 1864 "At a meeting of Master-Bakers, held at the Union Hotel, it was unanimously agreed that on Friday, 3rd June, and, until further notice, the price of bread will be 1s 2d per loaf." J Broomfield was one of the 20 Master Bakers who attended the meeting.

    Reporting in the Star, Ballarat of 26th and 27th October, 1864 on the Essex Gold Mining Company showed that John Broomfield and Samuel Walsh, both of Ballarat had 20 shares each.

    On 5th December, 1864 the Star, Ballarat reported that John Broomfield of Ballarat had 20 shares in the South Grenville Gold Mining Company operating at Durham Lead, Bardie's Hill, near Buninyong.

    The Ballarat Star of 19th July, 1865 shows that John Broomfield had shares in the Shamrock Gold Mining Company of Scotchman's Lead, Buninyong (Delhi Gold Mining Company - Registered). Other Shareholders were - Richard Allan, Andrew Anderson, Alexander Brown, William Horn, Charles Leafong, Andrew McLellan, William Miller, Andrew Morrison, David Morrison, Thomas Phillips, William Reid, Solomon Samuels and William Welsh. The Manager was William Reid of Lydiard Street, Ballarat (his Office) and the Solicitor was William Welsh of Ballarat. John Broomfield of Ballarat had 100 shares in the Company.

    On 18th November, 1866 the Ballarat Star reported that J Broomfield of Ballarat was one of the Shareholders in the Newington Estate Gold Mining Company of Ballarat West.

    In February, 1868 John and Susan Broomfield were living at Golden Point.

    The Ballarat East, Post Office Directory of 1869 lists John Broomfield as a Baker, living off Durham Street.

    The Victorian Post Office Directory of 1869 lists J Broomfield as a Baker in Ballarat. The number 27 is in brackets alongside his name.

    At the time of his Marriage to Susan Brooks born 14th February, 1839 at Hounslow (Brentford) Isleworth, Middlesex on 24th August 1865 at the Yuille Street, Baptist Church in Ballarat (demolished) - John was living at Golden Point, Ballarat East. John's wife Susan also became a Baker.

    Children of John Broomfield and Susan Brooks all born in Ballarat were - John Broomfield, 1867, Adamina Susan Broomfield 1868, Agnes Elizabeth Broomfield 1870, Susan Haylock Broomfield 1872, Unnamed son Broomfield 1874, Georgina Caroline Broomfield 1875, Richard Stevenson Broomfield 1877 and Elina Leisette Brooks Broomfield 1879. However four of the children died as infants - John, Susan Haylock, Unnamed son and Elina Leisette Brooks.

    The Ballarat Historical Society advised in April, 2009; that the Yuille Street Chapel is depicted in William Bardwell's panorama of Ballarat photographed in 1872 and reproduced at room size in the Gold Museum at Ballarat. I have been to the Gold Museum at Ballarat in recent times and found the panorama but there was nothing to tell me where the Yuille Street Chapel was and more importantly there was no one present who I could ask.

    In August, 1859 John Broomfield was at the Golden Point Bakery. Besides, John was at Golden Point in March 1868 and in December, 1870. While in August, 1874 John Broomfield was at the Golden Point Bakery - he advertised for a lad to deliver bread. On 11th March, 1875 the Golden Point Bakery was baking 'Passover bread' under the supervision of the Rev. Isaac Stone and the Bakery was stated to be in Barkly Street, Ballarat East - Bendigo Advertiser. So did the Golden Point Bakery business move? It seems so. In December, 1875 John Broomfield's Bakery shop was at Ballarat East and Mrs Broomfield was working in the shop. John was in Ballarat in December, 1879.

    In 1880 John Broomfield, Baker, was at Rae Street, North Fitzroy and in 1882 and 1883 at 59 Wellington Street, Collingwood [Sands and McDougall]. John and Susan Broomfield were also at 59 Wellington Street when John died in 1885.

    On the day of her death on 11th July, 1905 Susan (Brooks) Broomfield was living at 12 Gore Street, Fitzroy.

    Some variations of the name of Broomfield are - Bromfield, Broomsfield, Bromefield, Brownfield, Brownsfield, Brownfeild, Brounfield, Brunfield, Bruntfield and Bruntsfield.

    [Trove and Family History research]

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    121 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-02-20
    User data
  64. JOHN SAMPLE LEAHY c1810 of Kinsale, Cork - Stonemason, Plasterer, Builder, Architect & Publican
    List
    Public

    JOHN LEAHY AND FAMILY -
    John Sample (Semple) Leahy c1810 and his wife Ellen McCarthy c1813 were married on 23rd April, 1831 in Kinsale (RC), County of Cork, Ireland. Their witnesses were James White and Cath McCarthy (the latter person is obviously a close family member). My belief is that John's father was John Leahy c1780 an Architect, and his mother was Ann (Semple ?) c1782 (one record so far about John's parents being John an Architect, and Ann) and her surname could have been Sample or Semple.

    KINSALE LOYALTY PETITION -
    The 1792 Kinsale, Cork 'Loyalty Petition' to John, Earl of Westmoreland dated 2nd December, 1792; lists both a Richard Leahy and a John Leahy and the John could quite easily have been John Sample Leahy's grandfather, with Richard being a close family member? Ref for the Petition - http://homepage.tinet.ie/~jbhall/1792_kinsale_petition.htm

    ANNALS OF KINSALE -
    In 1796 a Francis Leahy and a Richard Leahy were Masons in Kinsale - likely family members? From the Annals of Kinsale -
    * On 14th November, 1796 Francis Leahy and Richard Leahy, Masons gave securities to the local parish church for 'the rebuilding of pews, galleries, pulpit and desk, flooring and new modelling' (of) the church.
    * In September, 1745 a Richard Leahy of Kinsale was appointed as the Deputy Constable of Cork Street, Kinsale.
    * While as early as 1664 a John Lehay of Kinsale was mentioned as having sailed in the Ship 'Vergine'.
    * Ref for the Annals of Kinsale - http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/places/southcork/kinsalecouncilbook/annalsofkinsalepagesix-cii/

    COURT BOOK OF KINSALE
    For more early history of Kinsale. See - http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/places/southcork/kinsalecouncilbook/courtbookofthetownofkinsalepages1-300/

    CORPORATION OF KINSALE - SELECT COMMITTEE - KINSALE ELECTION PETITION - MINUTES OF EVIDENCE - MARCH AND APRIL 1838 (1837/1838) - At the time the Corporation of Kinsale consisted of the sovereign, burgesses, freemen and the common speaker and there were no guilds.
    It was mentioned that -
    * On 14th September, 1818 a John Leahy was sworn in as a freeman of the Corporation of Kinsale.
    * While on 9th April, 1838, it was pronounced that Francis Leahy a Mason was to be admitted and sworn in as a freeman of the Corporation of Kinsale at the next or on any future court of the D'Oyer Hundred - Charter and By-Laws of the City of Cork (Select Committee on the Kinsale Election Petition - Minutes of Evidence. Found at EPPI - Enhanced Parliamentary Papers of Ireland - digitized by the University of Southampton Library).

    A Francis Leahy lived in Main Street, Kinsale in 1841,1842 and 1843 (Kinsale Election Petition).

    In other sections of the same Kinsale Election Petition - minutes of evidence (the main purpose of the petition being for 'scrutiny' of the Election Poll) -
    * On 31st March, and 3rd and 6th April, 1838 John Leahy was called as a 'witness' as he was considered a professional
    * John Leahy said that he was a Mason, Builder, House - Surveyor, Measurer and Valuer; also sometimes (at one time) a Journeyman and sometimes (now) a 'Master Workman' - he had been a Builder for forty years.
    * John Leahy who lived in Kinsale, said that he had 'four houses' in Kinsale - one in Cork Street, one in the centre of the town by the Post Office - (Pearse Street?) but he did not own one at 'World's End'.
    * John Leahy said that and knew Dennis McCarthy - of Rose-abbey, Kinsale - who was also a Mason and he said that Dennis has 'frequently worked for me'. He had known Dennis for 25 years.
    * A James Leahy, also a Mason, of Lower Fisher Street (now Lower O'Connell Street) Kinsale, was also mentioned, and John Leahy said that he was a not too distant relative, about the same age and that he knew him 'as well as he knew himself'.
    * John Leahy stated that he was employed by a Mr Green to survey, measure and value the Lower Fisher (O'Connell) Street (the home where James Leahy lived; and he agreed he was to survey, measure and value 'as many as 40 or 50' homes in Kinsale).
    * John Leahy commented that Lower Fisher Street (also known as Lower Street or Main Street) was where the fishing boats came in, and properties here had a lower value than at World's End, Kinsale which was a complete contrast! Fishing and summer tourism being the main industries, and Kinsale fishermen were widely regarded as having excellent fishing skills. [At this time Kinsale was considered as an old but not a flourishing town. Potatoes were the chief source of food and people kept pigs which they fed on the potato peelings, and water was scarce].
    * John Leahy also said that he had a son (in Kinsale c1838 - mentioned in reference to the construction of a specific building) who was a Mason.
    * From the discussions an the hearings in 1838, an inference can be drawn that John Leahy had visited London.
    * John Leahy was also a witness at the Kinsale Election Petition of February, 1848. On 18th February, 1848 he said that he was a Mason and Builder and a Voter in Kinsale. He said that he was mostly a working man, and was sometimes an Inspector (of buildings). He also responded that he had a son. By this stage John Leahy would have been a Mason for 50 years - so he would have been about 65 to 70.

    From the 1852 Griffith's Index a John Leahy of Kinsale was the Occupier of 4 Fisher Street, Kinsale and Mr I Heard was the Lessor.

    Could this John Leahy, Mason, Builder, House - Surveyor, Measurer and Valuer and 'Master Workman' and somtimes an Inspector, be the 'Architect' father of John Sample Leahy? There is a very good chance of that being so. Moreover John Leahy and John Sample Leahy seemed to be diverse in their building and architectural skills and interest in property ownership! Both perhaps, partial to a drink of whisky. When John Leahy of Kinsale was a witness the Committee tried to trip him up a couple of times by throwing in red herring questions about drinking which of course he was smart enough to deny. While there is proof from his Inquest that John Sample Leahy did enjoy a drink, or two!

    I had been told nearly 50 years ago that our Leahy ancestors came from the township of Kinsale, 'it was where the Blarney Stone is'.

    CORK AND KINSALE -
    ** From the Cork, Past and Present site - Phillimore - Irish Wills - Indexes - Cork and Ross, Cloyne - * 1730 William Lehy, Cork...* 1735 Thomas Lehy, Cork...1740 Thomas Lehy, Cork...1798 John Leahy, Cork...1798 Thomas Leahy, Cork...1800 Patrick Leahy, Cork.

    ** Also from the Cork, Past and Present site, but jumping to the 1921 Postal Directory for the County of Cork, Kinsale - there was a Daniel Leahy in Fisher Street, a Jeremiah Leahy in Higher Street, a John Leahy in Hogans Row and a William Leahy in Cork Street.

    ** On 17th October, 1800 at Dublin, Ireland - a William Leahy from Kinsale, Cork had qualified as an Apothecary - Ref. EPPI

    ** A Francis Leahy in Kinsale had a daughter Jane Leahy who married Andrew Ruddick in Kinsale, Cork in 1800. (Ruddock or Ruddick family of Saint John, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia). Moreover, www.eneclann.ie in a sample study report - list the following in their study on Ruddock - Cork and Ross Marriage Licences 1751 to 1845 - * Andrew Ruddock married Jane Leahy in 1800 - * Rebecca Ruddock married John Leahy in 1806. Also in the Marriage Licence Bonds from the Diocesan Consistorial Courts - Ruddock, Andrew and Leahy, Jane 1800 - eneclann.ie

    ** Other useful references from the Eneclann site include - Betham's Prerogative Will Abstracts; the Council Book of the Corporation of Kinsale 1652 to 1800 edited by Richard Caulfield and the Calendar(s) of Kinsale which are unpublished documents held at the Berkeley Library, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. (Also now known as the BLU Libraries complex and it also holds 'the book of Kells). The Kinsale Book which includes the Annals of Kinsale and the Court Book can be found online at the Cork Past and Present site.

    ** It appears that the children of Andrew Ruddock (Ruddick) and Jane Leahy were - Noble Ruddock, Francis Leahy Ruddock, Mary Ruddock, Andrew Ruddock, Jane Ruddock, George Ruddock, Joseph Ruddock and Thomas Ruddock - all likely born in Kinsale. Jane and Andrew Ruddock died at St John, New Brunswick, Canada as did their children Francis Leahy, Jane, George and Joseph Ruddock. While Thomas Ruddock died at Digby, Nova Scotia, Canada and Noble Ruddock died in New South Wales, Australia.

    ** Andrew Ruddock (senior) and his brothers Thomas and William were shipbuilders at St John, New Brunswick. A sister Alice (Ruddock) Lawton also migrated to St John, New Brunswick http://www.newirelandnb.ca/Genealogies-R/Ruddick.html

    ** Cork Past and Present on the web is an outstanding source for History and Genealogy of the City and County of Cork, and that includes Kinsale in the County of Cork and Province of Munster.

    ** Another outstanding web site for my purposes was the Irish Genealogy site where Baptism and Marriage original records in particular, can be viewed and downloaded.

    ** In the Griffiths Index, commencing in 1848 and ending in 1853 for Cork - Cornelius Leahy and Nicholas Leahy lived at World's End, Kinsale; Francis and Honoria Leahy were in Cork Street, Kinsale; a John Leahy was in Fisher Street and a John Leahy lived in Market Street, Kinsale and Jeremiah Leahy was at Rose Abbey, Kinsale.

    ** From the Irish Genealogy, Church Records some first names for Leahy family members in Kinsale, Cork for the period 1816 to 1839 included - Andrew, Patrick, Francis, John, Joanna, Ann, Ellen, Denis, William, Elizabeth, Elizab, Thomas, Phillip, Jane, Mary, Nicholas, James, Bessy, Kitty, Jos, Bridget, Honor, Margaret, Charlotte, Hannah, Stephen and Bess.

    ** The 1911 Ireland Census (National Archives of Ireland) covering Fisher Street, Kinsale, Cork lists a Daniel Leahy 50 (Head) his wife Minnie 40 and their children Margaret 14 and Thomas 10 and in laws William Farran 73 and his wife Catherin Farran 65. While in Higher Street, Kinsale there was Jeremiah Leahy (Head) and his wife Ellen 36. There are also records for 'Leahy' in other streets in Kinsale.

    ** In 1914 Mrs M Leahy of Long Quay, Kinsale was a Boarding-house Keeper - Guy's Postal Directory.

    ** From Kinsale, Cork Genealogy on the web (Nov. 2013) - In 1801 A Mr Francis Leahy was an Architect in Kinsale and in 1824 an Andrew Leahy and a John Leahy were Carpenters and Joiners in Kinsale.

    ** On 2nd January, 1813 Andrew Leahy an Architect of Kinsale married Miss Curran of Kinsale at St Finbar's, Cork (From the Dictionary of Irish Architects).

    In 1846 a Francis Leahy was a Publican and Carpenter, living at 43 Main Street, Kinsale (Slater's Directory).

    ** From the Cork Evening Post of 24/3/1800 - Certificates Issued in the County of Cork with respect to the 'Killing of Game' from May 1799 to October, 1799 - James Leahy of Baltybahalla, David Leahy of Newtown, James Leahy of Sebullen and Dan and Francis Leahy of Macromp. These Leahys may or may not be connected to the Leahy family that I am researching.

    FREEMAN OF THE CITY OF CORK
    William Leahy, Comment - On the ACT, 7/5/1711; Daniel Leahy, Gentleman; Daniel Francis Leahy; David Leahy, Esquire; James Leahy, Merchant; John Thomas Leahy, Major 7th Fuzileers - afterwards Lieut Col. 21st Fuzileers. http://www.corkarchives.ie/media/freemen1710-1841.pdf

    KINSALE, LAUNCESTON AND PORTLAND BAY -
    Siblings for John Sample Leahy may have been James, Richard and Francis Leahy - going by past names and the names of three of his four sons; his eldest son being John Henry Leahy.

    Some of the siblings of Ellen McCarthy could have been Cath, Denis, Michael and Timothy McCarthy. Denis, Michael and Timothy were linked somehow to a Cath McCarthy in Kinsale?

    John and Ellen Leahy had their first child Ann (Sarah Anne Maria) baptised on 19th November 1832 in Kinsale (RC). The sponsor for Ann Leahy was Mary Arundell. Their religion in important for the fact that when at Portland John and Ellen and their family were followers of the Church of England - St Stephens, Portland, Victoria.

    An extract from the British Parliamentary Papers [1833 XXVI279] indicates that John Leahy a Stonemason - 3 people in total (obviously his wife Ellen and daughter Ann) migrated to Australia on the Bounty Scheme in c1832/33 - their loan grant was £20. Their destination was to be Sydney, New South Wales but they ended up in Launceston, Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania). John's Death Certificate for 13th August, 1856 (spelt Lehy on his DC); and the Portland Area Cemeteries Record (1191/30582) indicate that John was nine years in Tasmania and fourteen in Victoria (at Portland or Portland Bay). In Launceston John and Ellen Leahy had - Margaret Leahy 1834 - married William Leary, Rebecca Leahy 1836 - married John Sevior, John Henry Leahy 1838 married Bridget Edwards; and James Leahy in 1840 - married Margaret Hill. The family moved across to Portland in 1841and the last three children were born in Portland - Richard Leahy c1842, Ellen or Helen Leahy in 1844 - married David Thompson Hay; and Francis (Frank) Leahy in 1847 - married Elizabeth Arnott.

    When John Leahy died in 1856 his children were listed as - Ann Maria 24, Margaret 22, Rebecca 20, John 18, James 16, Richard 14, Ellen 12 and Francis 9; and when Ellen (McCarthy) Leahy died in January 1879 at Portland her children were listed as - Annie was dead, Margaret was 45, Rebecca was 43, John was 39, James was 37, Richard was 36, Ellen was dead and Francis was dead (informant was her son John Leahy). However, records from Portland History House in the first instance indicated that Richard was dead and Francis was alive. Moreover, Rebecca Leahy (4201) and her brother Richard Leahy (4202) were baptized on 1st November, 1857 at Portland - Portland Area Baptisms. That is the last record I have about Richard Leahy. While Francis Leahy died aged 75 in 1922 at Hamilton, Victoria.

    When John Leahy died in 1856 an Inquest (see Form 1956/551 at PRO Vic) was held (spelt Lehey).

    John and Ellen Leahy are both buried in the North Portland Cemetery but the likely wooden markers have long since disappeared.

    BUILDERS’ INN & BUILDERS’ ARMS -
    From "Watering Holes in the West" [by Gwen Bennett 1997] John Leahy is mentioned re the Builders' Inn at 25 Gawler Street , Victoria [Heritage Listed Victorian Heritage Register (VHR) Number: H0659]. On page 56 of her book Gwen Bennett says 'The date of the construction of this early inn, the central two rooms only is not known. The Portland Licensing Court issued John Leahy with a License to operate from May 1st 1848. Leahy's stay in Gawler Street was short as he soon commenced the erection of the Builders' Arms in Percy Street....' There is an historic plaque on the side of the front entrance to the Builders' Inn [2010].

    Re the Builders' Arms (page 55 of the same book) ' This hotel, erected in 1850 by John Leahy from the Builders' Inn, stood on the north east corner of Percy and Henty Streets. Leahy's first license, issued in April 1850 was conditional on his finishing the house to the court's satisfaction. He leased the building to William Gough in 1851 and a five year contract between the two, (was) dated January 30, 1854...A later contract was between John Leahy and James Doueal (James married Ann Leahy 1832 - daughter of John)...' The Builders' Arms was demolished and on the site today stands a Commonwealth Bank. (1997). [For an image of the Builders' Arms see Museum, Victoria - http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/769692/negative-portland-victoria-circa-1880]

    From PRO Vic - The Police Magistrates Report 1840-53, John Leahy is referred to on 1/7/1847 as applying for a Publican's License (page 62 - note in pdf format). While on pages 83, 87 and 121 there are references to him as holding a Publican's License for the Builders' Inn (as Builder) and later the Builders' Arms on 24/12/1848.

    Portland Guardian of 6th May, 1929 - Early Portland - Taken from the files of 'the Guardian' of 1848 "...John Leahy, Builder's (Builders') Arms."

    History of Portland, reported in the Portland Guardian of 10th June, 1929 "...Builders' Inn, Gawler street - John Leahy 1849 (Builders' Arms in 1850)."

    Domestic Intelligence - The Argus of 27th April, 1849 - Portland. "At the annual licensing session of the Portland branch publican's general licenses were granted to ...John Leahy, Builders’ Inn, Portland...”

    DOUEAL -
    The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser reported on 19th April 1855 - re Publican’s Licenses - that James Doueal was granted a license “but approval was cautioned by the bench against allowing improper characters about the house.” On 16th April the paper reported that “James Doueal, Builders Arms Portland. Surities, James Trangmar and Thomas Finn. Granted.” The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser newspaper reported on 22nd April, 1857 that James Doueal was the Publican at the Builders’ Arms and the house needed some repairs and the Inspector was returning in two weeks. While this paper reported on 21st April, 1858 that J Doueal was granted the license. On 8th September 1858 this same paper reported that “James Doueal, Builder’s Arms applied for a night license. Granted.” In the 1859 Victorian Government Gazette James Doueal (spelt Doneal) is listed at the Builders Arms, Portland. In 1862 another son-in-law to John Leahy, John Sevior was the Publican at the Builders Arms in Portland.

    The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser of 31st January and 7th February, 1863 - The Bush Inn at Heywood was to be sold or let and the Proprietor was Mrs Doueal [Ann (Leahy) Doueal - her husband James Doueal had died at Hewood on the 15th May, 1862.

    ELLEN (Mc CARTHY) LEAHY -
    It was reported on 25th April, 1860, in the Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser that Ellen Leahy had been granted a Publican's License at the Builders' Arms, Portland. Mr Scott supported the application.

    JOHN LEAHY AS AN ELECTOR -
    The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser of 4th February - John Leahy was a signatory to an open letter to Stephen George Henty Esq., JP asking him to stand as a representative of the Legislative Council pledging their votes and support - the date was Jan 30, 1843.

    Portland Guardian of 17th January, 1921 - Glimpses Into the Past - No 4 - 1848. Re Portland "...There were 58 electors in the Police District; the list including the names of T Must, T Adamson and J Leahy..."

    The Argus Melbourne of 29th June, 1849 reported that John Leahy was on the 'List of Electors for the District of Port Phillip.'

    The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser of 21st September, 1854 reported John Lehey (Leahy) was on the 'List of Electors...for the Town of Portland, in the Colony of Victoria.

    'The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser of 19th May, 1856 listed the electors for the 'Western Province, Legislative Council...John Lehey (Leahy) of Henty-street, out of business' and just above him his son-in-law 'William Leary (husband of Margaret Leahy) Percy-street, joiner.'

    UNCLAIMED LETTERS FOR JOHN LEAHY -
    On 2nd July and 2nd August, 1841 there was a letter at the Launceston Post Office for John Leahy of Portland Bay.

    The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser reported on 27th and 30th March, 1854, that there was an unclaimed letter at Portland Post Office for Lehey (Leahy) John.

    CROWN GRANTS - TITLE DEEDS - PORT PHILLIP LANDS -
    Crown Grants to John Leahy - Portland Allot 19 Sect 12 Lot 8 Year No 930 of 1848; and Allot 10 Sect 32 No 617 Year 1847. There were also Crown Grants at Merrimu in 1847 and 1855 for a John Leahy - I think that this was another John Leahy and not John Sample Leahy? A notice in the Melbourne Argus of 7th September, 1847 "Deeds of Grant ...for land purchased from the Crown...Egan and Leahy...” The Argus of 8th, 11th, 15th and 22nd June, 1847 - Title Deeds - Port Phillip Lands - ‘John Egan, Michael Egan and John Leahy, as tenants in common, 160 acres, Bourke, Lot 34.’ Besides John Egan and Michael had been granted land at Merrimu in 1846 -the Argus of 13th November, 1846. As at 11th August, 1848 there was an unclaimed letter at the Melbourne Post Office for Egan and Leahy; and on 8th August, 1849 also.

    The Argus 8th, 11th, 15th, 18th and 22nd June, 1847 - Title Deeds - Port Phillip Lands - Town Allotments - Proclamation of 29th September, 1847- Deeds dated 23rd January, 1847 -' no 27 - John Leahy, 2 roods (Portland) lot 32.'

    Colonial Secretary's Office, Sydney, 1848 (the Argus) "Title Deeds - Port Phillip Lands...Town Lots. Proclamation of 22nd January, 1848. Deed dated 21st August, 1848...no 5 John Leahy, 2 roods...(Portland)...lot 8."

    The Town of Portland, Parish of Portland, County of Normanby - the parish map shows - John Leahy with land on both sides of Henty Street - Allot 10 Sect 13 Area 0.2.0 as at 11/11/1846; Allot 10 Sect 32 No 16 of 1847 and Allot 19 Sect 12 Area 0.2.0 No 930 of 1848.

    The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser of 18th February, 1869 reported a Crown Grant to E Leahy of Portland; and on 3rd February, 1873 reported under Crown Grant, Portland - under Sec 12 E Leahy (both likely Ellen Leahy)

    SALES OF LANDS AND PROPERTIES –
    On 15th March, 1848 it was reported in the Sydney Morning Herald (from late Australasian papers) that John Leahy had sold Crown land Lot 8, at Portland for £65 10s.

    The Melbourne Argus of 13th November, 1849 - Government Land Sales - Town Lots - ' no 32 Portland, 2 roods, allotment No 10 of section 13, John Leahy £51.'

    On 14th, 19th, 21st, 26th, 28th May and 16th June, 1856, The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser - ran an ad from John Leahy (spelt Lehey twice) for the sale of the ' Builders' Arms public house at the corner of Henty and Percy-streets, 3 comfortable four roomed cottages in Henty Street and 4 good shops in Percy Street...the proprietor is about to move from Portland. John Lehey, Proprietor, Henty-street, Portland, 12th May, 1856.'

    The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser of 7th and 22nd January, 1862 - Case in the Supreme Court of Victoria - Leary v Leahy - 'auction of the Builders' Arms, and its several Cottages and other buildings and appurtenances.' This seems to be about William and/or Margaret (Leahy) Leary against Ellen Leahy.

    CHURCH OF ENGLAND - PORTLAND -
    Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser of 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th April 1843; 6th,13th, 20th and 27th May; 3rd and 10th June, 1843 - Church of England - 'Subscription List for the erection of a School House at Portland...John Leahy 5.0.0 (John's contribution was in the next highest lot after Governor La Trobe, Edward Henty and S G Henty who donated 5.5.0 each)...The Henty Brothers were the Treasurers - dated 29th March, 1843.'

    The Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser of 2nd and 5th October, 1854 - United Church of England and Ireland...erection of a Church in Portland, the present building being altogether inadequate...John Leahy contributed 2.0.0.

    St Stephen's Church - 97th Anniversary Celebrated (Portland Guardian of 14th May, 1953) "...The first church of England Register Book is stored in the Titles Office, Melbourne, and from that source is learnt that those baptised by Rev. Thomson were...John, the son of John Sample and Elleen (Ellen) Leahy born November 10, 1838... " (born in Launceston). [The Baptism record for John Leahy states that he was baptized by James Yelverton Wileth, Chaplain on 5th July, 1842]

    OTHER -
    From http://ship47.site88.net/l/l07.html -
    * John Leahy and Ellen, were in Port Phillip when John was born in 1838, NSW Reference number V18382118 26A/1838 - records of Belfast; Port Fairy; Portland, Church of England - their 4th child. [I think it likely that John Henry Leahy was born 10/11/1838 in Launceston, (Van Diemen’s Land) Tasmania - Tasmania was initally under the jurisdiction of New South Wales as were Victoria and Queensland. John's birth entry above does not show a district other than New South Wales. Moreover as mentioned above; on both the Death Certificate and Portland Area Cemeteries record for John Sample Leahy it states that he had been in Tasmania for nine years (from c1832/33)].
    * John Sample Leahy, and Ellen had John Leahy in 1838 and he is recorded as being baptised on 5/7/1842 at St Stephens Church of England, Portland Rec 7691 Portland Area Baptisms. # Rebecca Leahy was said to have been baptised on the same day. However, John was actually baptised on 26th September, 1841 in Henty's Woolstore, Portland with a few others by the Rev Thomson. It was before St Stephens Portland had been established. The Rev Thomson was the second Church of England Minister in Victoria. (later newspaper reports). Moreover, # Rebecca Leahy and her brother Richard Leahy were baptized on 1st November, 1857 at Portland - Portland Area Baptisms.
    * John Lehey - Portland, Surety for John Crinin, Gawler St Golden Fleece, 1 year from 1 July 1842. Source:- Portland Police Magistrate Book, Page 53, 19 Apr 1842.
    *Mrs Leahey arrived 11 Aug 1844 at Melbourne from Portland and Port Fairy on the Sally Ann
    * John Leahey, one of 469 voters who qualified by Dwelling house in Henty St Portland Electors List District of Bourke. Source - Melbourne Courier 8 Aug 1845.
    * John Leahy, voted in Portland for Mr Blac, but Mr Curr was returned as Member of Council to succeed Mr B Boyd. Source - Port Phillip Herald 7 Oct 1845.
    * John Leary - Portland, Surety for Thomas Field, Henty St Lamb Inn, 1 July 1846 - 1 July 1847. Source:- Portland Police Magistrate Book, Page 63, 5 May 1846.
    * John Lehay - Portland, Surety for Thomas Field, Henty St, Portland Lamb Inn, 1 July 1847 to 30 June 1848. Source:- Portland Police Magistrate Book, Page 69, 20 May 1847.
    * John Leahy as tenants in common 160 acres Bourke lot 34., Deeds, 23 Jan 1847 2 roods Portland, lot 32., Deeds dated, 23rd January 1847 [likely with Egan].
    * John Leahey - new License holder for Britannia Inn, formerly belonged to Robert Herbertson Julia St Name of Sureties Thomas Finn and Joshua Black. Source:- Portland Police Magistrate Book, Page 73, 18 Apr 1848. [Records indicate that the Britannia Inn in Julia Street was established in 1847].
    * A sale of Crown Lands came off at Portland on the 1st instant,with the following results... "...Lot 8, Mr. John Leahy, £65'10s..." Source Sydney Morning Herald 15 March 1848 - page 3

    The spelling of Leahy includes O'Leahy, O'Lay, Leahey, Lehey, Lehy and Lahy (actually a separate name) and apparently derives from the old Gaelic word of O'Laochdha or Laochda meaning heroic one. The Manor of Kinsale existed by June, 1226; and if not before, Kinsale was firmly placed into history through the Siege or Battle of Kinsale in 1601 where defeat was the fate of the Irish and it meant the end of hopes for self rule for three Centuries.

    Irish Genealogy states that these are the alternative spellings for Leahy - Leahy, Laghey, Lahey, Lahy, Leaghey, Leah, Leahey, Leehe, Leehee, Leehey, Leehy, Lehee, Lehy, Leighy, Leihy and Liahy.

    [From Trove and Family History research]

    Bachelor of Commerce and Diploma of Public Policy (Hons - Arts) - the University of Melbourne; Deakin University Hons Art Subjects under the History of Ideas.

    Sally E Douglas

    105 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-02-26
    User data
  65. JOHN SEVIOR 1834 - and the racing horse Hotspur
    List
    Public

    HOTSPUR - A CHESTNUT GELDING - BY ROMEO.

    Hotspur (chestnut gelging) and Becky Sharp (a bay mare, also known as the Maid of Erin) were considered two 'crack' horses of their time in Victoria, Australia. They were each often ridden by John Sevior born 1834 and his brother Robert Sevior born 1836 as Amateur Jockeys, in horse races particularly around country Victoria. Their horses were also ridden by other jockeys, such as Mitchell and Neep.

    John and Robert Sevior were also young horse trainers, breeders and owners who had their own racing stables. They were therefore two of the pioneers of the Horse Racing Industry in Victoria and Australia. What follows is a short list of some of the story of John Sevior's experiences as a jockey, trainer and owner of Hotspur. As was his brother Robert, he was also involved in the endeavours of Becky Sharp and many other horses of those early days. John and Robert often alternated as 'owners' of Hotspur and Becky Sharp and as with every venture they undertook they also had their separate interests as well as shared interests. Their seeming co-operation and support worked throughout their lives - proof in a sense being that Robert was the witness on John's death certificate.

    A short account of Hotspur as a racehorse for John Sevior -

    1855
    In December 1855 - at Bendigo, Hotspur ridden by John Sevior comes first in the Ladies' Purse a race of two heats, winning both heats. John Sevior's Cervantes comes third in the Sandhurst Town Plate. The racing colours for both horses were scarlet and blue.

    It was reported in the Australasian of 17th December,1921 about the first race meeting at Bendigo, the date was given as 1858 by an observer but it must have been 1855."...Then for the first time in Bendigo I saw the horses in clothing...Some of the horses were from Castlemaine and other places and some from Melbourne. They did not arrive by train, but were walked the whole distance from Melbourne on very bad roads. The accomodation on the journey was very tough for man and horse. At the end of 1858, about November, after the heat and bush fires, snakes were plentiful. Then there was a great storm and a heavy downpour of rain...Such a storm I have not seen since...The tents and verandahs at Bendigo suffered most.The terrific wind and the rushing torrents of water brought down the sludge from the puddling machines (machines used in the panning for gold) and overflowed the creek...To vary (avoid) the monotony of things a kangaroo hunt was organized...The Ladies' Purse...weight for age, two miles was next...Mr Sevior's Hotspur and two others started...So ended the first day's racing (of four), but not the fun..."

    1856
    At the Avoca Races in May, 1856 Mr Sevior's Hotspur came first in the Publicans' Purse while his horse Cervantes came third in the Ladies' Purse.

    At the Castlemaine Races of June, 1856 - on 5th June, Mr Sevior's Hotspur ridden by the owner came second in the Castlemaine Town Plate.

    The Melbourne Spring Race Meeting - 19th November, 1856 - Sevior's Hotspur came second in the Victoria Plate. While Mr Sevior's Becky Sharp ridden by Mitchell won the Spring Stakes. Additionally the Victoria Turf Club Sweepstakes was won by Becky Sharp and the Steeplechase, Open Handicap and Sweepstakes were won by Hotspur. At this meeting the tables are turned for Becky Sharp is entered under the name of John Sevior and Hotspur is entered under the name Robert Sevior. The jockey's silks for Hotspur were crimson and puce.

    Race call of the Open Handicap - Melbourne Races - November, 1856 - The Open Handicap was a Mile and a half and Mr Sevior's Hotspur ridden by Mitchell came first "...Mystery jumped off with the lead with Sinbad and Hotspur in close writing. Haphazard lying well up. Hotspur, followed by Haphazard, went to the front when half way round the course, the latter being first to the straight running. The race home was well contested by the two, but Mitchell at length, when within a few strides of the judge's chair, got his horse's head in advance, and landed a winner by about three quarters of a length, Sinbad a good third, and Will of the Wisp fourth. Time 3 min 54 sec." At this same race meeting Mr Sevior's Becky Sharp also ridden by Mitchell won the Handicap Plate. As well, Mr Sevior's Becky Sharp ridden by Mitchell won the Balaclava Stakes, while in the Victoria Turf Club Cup Hotspur was not placed.

    Race detail - Melbourne - The Sweepstakes of November, 1856 - Sevior's Hotspur ridden by Mitchell wins - "...Haphazard went off with the lead to a good but not strong pace; and made the running for the first round. Samson holding the second place. Hotspur lying third, Jeannette fourth, very handy, and Buckley last, in which unassuming position he remained throughout. Haphazard led sailing past the stand the second time, but having now had 'quantum suf' he retired, leaving Samson with (a) slight lead of the impetuous Hotspur, both going easily, and as quietly as if they had a ten mile race before them. Immediately after rounding the next turn Hotspur obtained the lead, and improved the pace...For the last mile Hotspur maintained a lead of nearly a length...Hotspur just won by a short half head. The winner and his jockey were loudly and heartily cheered. Time 6 mins."

    During December, 1856 at the Bendigo Spring Races - Mr J Sevior's Hotspur won the Sandhurst Town Plate and Mr R Sevior's Becky Sharp came second. In the Miners' Gift of two miles, Mr R Sevior's Becky Sharp came first and Mr J Sevior's Hotspur was second.

    At the Ballarat and Creswick Races of December, 1856, Sevior's Hotspur came second in the Publican's or Publicans' Purse. While the Creswick Cup was won by Hotspur.

    1857
    Melbourne Races - February, 1857 - Hotspur was scratched in the City of Melbourne Plate, while in the American Cup, the race was in four heats and Hotspur won heat two. In this Cup Hotspur was 'declared to carry 8 lbs extra.'

    In the Jockey Club Races of 19 February, 1857 R Sevior's Becky Sharp with 'crimson chequered' colours came second and J Sevior's Hotspur came third in the colours of green and black. Besides in the Jockey Club races of February, 1857 Mr J Sevior's Hotspur came first in the Forced Handicap (ridden by Mitchell) and Mr R Sevior's Becky Sharp came first in the Consultation Handicap. Both horses were ridden by Jockey Mitchell. Also in the Jockey Club races of mid February, 1857 - Mr J Sevior's Hotspur ridden by the owner came second and in the Free Handicap Mr R Sevior's Becky Sharp ridden by Mitchell, came second. It was reported on 28 February, 1857 that Hotspur came 'a bad' third in the Victoria Jockey Club Cup.

    In the Melbourne Races - March, 1857 - the Town Plate, Hotspur ridden by Mitchell comes second.

    Mr Sevior's Hotspur came second in the Geelong Western Cup at the Geelong Races in early March, 1857.

    The Victoria Turf Club - Annual March Meeting in 1857 - "...The racing was good...the run for the Town Plate between Van Tromp and Hotspur being certainly about the best thing that has been witnessed this meeting..." In the Town Plate Mr J Sevior's Hotspur ridden by Mitchell came second to Van Tromp and in the Welter Stakes Hotspur was scratched. Hotspur's colours were green and scarlet.

    At the Castlemaine Annual Races in March, 1857 J Sevior's Hotspur ridden by Neep came second in the Town Plate.

    In October, 1857 the Jockey's silks for John Sevior's Hotspur and Sir Robert were black.

    At the Castlemaine Spring Meeting of December, 1857 John Sevior's Hotspur started in the Castlemaine Handicap but was not placed. However, in the Selling Stakes his horses Teddington and Dauntless came first and second, respectively.

    At the Castlemaine Annual Races in April, 1857, the Publicans' Purse was taken by J Sevior's Becky Sharp. At the same meeting the Ladys' Purse was won by Mr Sevior's Freeholder.

    Mr Sevior's Hotspur came third in the Great Ballarat and Creswick Handicap in December, 1857 and his racehorse Woodpecker came fourth.

    More on the Seviors -
    Both John and Robert Sevior could be classified as Entrepreneurs in today's language. John had a stud farm at Portland and was a Publican there too. In Hamilton, both John and Robert Sevior were Wholesale and Retail Butchers and they took turns in being the Publican at the Prince of Wales Hotel.

    In both South Muckleford and Hamilton, John Sevior was a Farmer growing Farm Produce and he also owned Racing Stables shared with his brother Robert. John Sevior was the first owner of the now heritage listed 'Bassetts Farm' at South Muckleford. When living in Hamilton John was a also Grain Store owner, Farm Produce Merchant and Dealer.

    John and Robert Sevior were horse breeders too when they were residing in North Hamilton at their rented horse stud 'Dooling Dooling'. One of their more renowned racehorses for those days, was the imported thoroughbred racehorse 'High Sheriff' (from Red Deer the sire who descended from Venison and Miss Julia Bennett as the dam) who they advertised as being a breeding match for local mares. From the Portland and Normandby Advertiser of 2nd November, 1859 "To Stand this season, near Hamilton, the Imported thorough bred horse HIGH SHERIFF - Terms £10 10s...NB A Plate of 50 sovs will be given for the produce of Mares covered by High Sheriff to be run in 1862, further particulars will be given - John and R Sevior - Hamilton Sept 22st 1859."

    Previous to that, High Sheriff was already with the Sevior brothers in 1858 when they were living at South Muckleford.

    In 1858 High Sheriff won a first prize at the Hamilton Agricultural show. In 1859 High Sheriff was regarded one of the finest horses in the Hamilton district and Becky Sharp was also considered first class.

    Bell's Life of 6th June, 1857 reported "Imported Stock in Victoria... A very fine blood horse, High Sheriff, by Red Deer was landed from her yesterday in good order. Our stud owners will be glad of the opportunity of getting a dash of the 'Vension blood'..."

    John Sevior also became a Ploughing Match Judge, a Race Course Clerk, a Racing Steward and a Horse Racing Judge (at Newstead in 1860).

    John Sevior was also an athlete - in the 1860's he belonged to Bochara Athletics near Hamilton where he was a Footracer (he had earlier run in Footraces when he was at Muckleford eg 1858), he was in the Hamilton Football Team and ran in Footraces sometimes on the same day and he was in the Hamilton Cricket Team and on the Hamilton Cricket Club Committee. Robert Sevior also played in the Hamilton Football Team - 1866 to 1868.

    In 1867 John Sevior leased property at Warrabkook, Warrabkook near Macarthur. It was Government Lands and Water Land - Victorian Government Gazette of 28 May, 1867.

    John Sevior died at the age of 48, so his life and career in Horse Racing was unfortunately cut short by providence. From the Mount Alexander Mail - 1883 Mar. 26 - Items of News "Old residents of the district who remember Mr John Sevior, who resided at Muckleford, and under whose training Becky Sharp, and Hotspur scored for him numerous victories over our racecourses, will be sorry to learn that he died at Flemington last week".

    From the Otago Times, New Zealand on 7th April, 1883 "Mr John Sevior, who years ago was well known in Victoria as an owner of horses and an athlete of no mean pretentions, died at his residence, Flemington-road, a few days ago".

    Probate for the Will of John Sevior in May, 1890 was £720.

    The nine wins listed here for Hotspur are only part of the story as there would have been more. Becky Sharp too was a Sevior horse with many wins. Moreover, these two horses were only the starting out horses in the now legendary racing careers of each of the Sevior brothers.

    (Trove and Family History research).

    Sally E Douglas

    517 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-06-24
    User data
  66. JOHN SEVIOR of SOMERSET - born 1799/1800.
    List
    Public

    John Sevior was an Englishman from Somerset, having been born there c1799/1800 John was likely born in the vicinity of Chard, Odcombe (Lufton), Montacute, Thorn Coffin or Yeovil. His actual birth location has not yet been pinpointed but he appears to have had fairly close family members (cousins) who came from this area of Somerset.

    From British History online a William Sevior was a Linen Weaver in Ilchester, Somerset in the 1760's and William had a son John Sevior. This John Sevior was into large (linen) production between 1780 and 1805, and a flax house perhaps owned by him was burnt in 1803. I wonder if these were earlier members of the family of John c1799/1800?

    John Sevior c1799/1800 was in Tasmania by 1826 where he was a Farmer/Settler, having moved on from New South Wales where he was a Labourer in Bringelly and Liverpool. How he got there is another story.

    In 1828 when in Tasmania John Sevior applied for a land grant which was to become his property of 500 acres which he appears to have called 'Nile Rivulet'. It was at Morven (later Evandale), in the county of Ashford, near the base of Ben Lomond and was about half-way between Deddington and Blessington.

    It can be located when going over the Nile River at the Lilyburn (Lilybourne) Bridge along the Deddington Road (away from Deddington). On the Blessington side of the Nile River the road forks at English Town Road – John Sevior’s property on the east side goes about half way to that fork from the Nile River, running back to and including part or all of a tree covered hill. On the west side the property started from the Nile River, running back parallel to and perhaps beyond the tree covered hill.

    The boundary at the Nile ran partly along a boundary in common with Patterdale, Deddington (was Mills Plains) which was the property of John Glover the artist who was there at the same time.

    John Sevior died on 18th November 1836 at the age of 36 or 37 - John Glover lived till 1849. John Sevior died of ill health and he added a codicil to his Will only few weeks before his death. (Adding in his baby son Robert who was 11 moths old. While his other young son John was just 2 years old). He did not mention a further son James in his Will, partly I suppose because James was a young man?

    For John Sevior also had an older son James Sevior (Sevior) who was still around Nile Rivulet/Pigeons Plains in April 1836 and in Launceston in November, 1837. As a witness to a murder in the nearby district he stated that he was a son of John Sevior. James was born in about 1819 or 1820 and likely in Sydney. Shipping records show that James Sevior (Seviour/Sivier) went from George Town to Port Phillip in October,1845 on the ship Swan. He would have been about 25 or 26 at the time. I have not found him returning to Van Diemens Land. In February, May and July of 1846 there was mail in Launceston awaiting James Sivier of Port Phillip.

    In 1856 a James Seviour was living in Kilmore (Australian Electoral Roll) and in 1871 a James Sevior was living in Kennedy's Lane, Kilmore and in 1877 there was a Thomas Sevior in Kilmore. In 1862 a Jane Seviour was born to a James Seviour and Catherine Eldham in Kilmore. In February, 1916 a Mrs Sevior died at Tamleugh (which is near Violet Town). Her death was reported in the Benalla Ensign. James Sevior and his wife were in Tamleugh from 1874 (Benalla Family Research Group) and they appear to have been farmers. This Mrs Sevior was aged 90 and a relict of James Sevior of Kilmore. The notice about Mrs Sevior's death said that she was a farmer and had been in Tamleugh for over 40 years. A Cathrine and James Sevior are buried together in the Violet Town Cemetery. The Benalla Family Research group shows a J Sevior in the Benalla Riding 3 South West in 1874 and a James Sevior in the Benalla Riding 3 South West in 1875 and 1876 and in the Benalla Riding 3 in 1877. However, I have not established yet whether this is about the same James Sevior of Launceston.

    Next to John Sevior's 'Nile Rivulet' on one length was 'Lilybourne' owned by Alexander Bankier and along the other length was Lot 430 of 640 acres owned by Matthew Ralston.

    Gazette - Commissioner's Office - 19th February, 1841 "...James Corbett, 2560a., Ashford, Cornwall, originally Alexander Bankier, whose heir-at-law sold to the applicant; claim dated 26th January, 1811- Bounded on the south west by 235 chains 80 links commencing on the River Nile opposite to a location to John Glover and extending north westerly along a location to John Sevior along Lot 528 and along crown land, on the north west by 100 chains along crown land north east early, on the north cast by 276 chains 20 links south easterly along crown land to the River Nile, and on the south eastern side by that river to the point of commencement..."

    The Launceston Examiner - 20th August, 1842 "...PURSUANT to the proviso for that purpose contained in a certain indenture of release, bearing date the 23rd day of January, 1841, and made between James Lambert, of Buffalo Plains, in Van Diemen's Land, farmer of the one part, and James Corbett and Thomas Corbett of Launceston, in Van Diemen's Land aforesaid, ironmongers, of the other part, notice is hereby given, that default having been made in the payment of the interest money, due under the said indenture, the land and hereditaments thereby mortgaged will be sold by PUBLIC AUCTION, on TUESDAY, the thirtieth day of August next, by Mr. JOHN CHRISTOPHER UNDERWOOD, at his Sale Room, in Charles-street, Launceston, at one o'clock in the afternoon precisely,— and notice is hereby further given, that in case the said land and premises shall not be sold at such auction, the mortgagee will thereupon proceed to sell the same by private contract. The land and premises thus to be sold are described in the said indenture, as follows (that is to say):— All that tract, piece, or parcel of land, containing two thousand five hundred and sixty acres, or thereabouts, situate lying and being in Morven District, in Van Diemen's Land aforesaid bounded on the front by the Nile Rivulet at the back and on one side unlocated land, and on the other side partly by unlocated land and partly towards the point of a location to Mr. Sevior of 500 acres, the same 2560 acres being an original location to Alexander Bankier. Dated this twenty-eighth day of July,1842. GLEADOW & HENTY, Attornies for the Mortgagee..."

    Two away from Lot 430 owned by Matthew Ralston on the other length of John Sevior's property was Lot 428 of 719 acres owned by Robert Pitcairn. He also had other substantial land holdings in the vicinity. Robert Pitcairn was a Solicitor and had some fame in the Deddington vicinity and in Hobart, and beyond.

    Other landholders in the region included - A Kaye, E J Colgrave, J Hamilton, E Davey (lessee), H Davey, Daniel Small, M McCormack, D R Falkiner, John Williat, Henry Reid, J P Jones and Thomas Pitcairn.

    John Sevior endeavoured to sell 'Nile Rivulet' just before he died in 1836 - from the Launceston Advertiser of 3rd November, 1836 "ESTATE ON THE NILE - To be Sold by Private Contract (the declining health of the Proprietor not suffering him to continue agricultural pursuits), a very valuable Farm containing 500 acres of the richest land in the Island on the River Nile, 25 miles from Launceston, having a frontage of three-quarters of a mile on the river, and being bounded on one side and behind by Crown Land, and on the other side by the Farm of Mr Jas Corbett. There are 60 acres now in crop, and substantially enclosed by a 4-rail fence, as is also a paddock of 70 acres, not yet broken up. The Garden contains an acre and a half, and is well stocked with the choicest fruit trees, and is to a high state of cultivation. The Buildings consist of an excellent Barn, Granary, Stable, small Dwelling, &c., &c., - The Terms, which are exceedingly favorable, may be known upon application at the office of EDDIE, WELSH & Co - St. John-street, Oct. 19, 1836." At about the same time John tried to call in debts - " NOTICE.— All persons to whom Mr. Sevior, of Pigeon's Plains is indebted, are requested to send in their claims without delay to the undersigned for adjustment. EDDIE, WELSH & Co - October 26, 1836."

    Even going back before this, in early 1836 an 'up for sale' property of 500 acres at Nile Rivulet fits the description of being John Seviors. The Launceston Advertiser of 25 February, 1836 etc - "For Sale by Private Contract - A Farm of 500 acres of land in a high state of cultivation, more delightfully situated at Nile Rivulet, within 25 miles of Launceston. There are 60 acres in crop this year, also 10 acres of English grasses, and a paddock of 70 acres not broken up - the whole well fenced in and subdivided by substantial 4 rail and post fences, except a small portion of one boundary line (for which fencing is split and ready for erection,) with a front of about 3-quarters of a mile on the Nile Rivulet, together with the Dwelling-house, and Garden well stocked with choice fruit trees, Stable, Granary, Poultry House, Pig Stye, Dairy Room, Servants' House, and Bake Oven - with about 40 head of Cattle, consisting of - 8 working Bullocks, 2 Bulls, 10 Cows, 10 Calves, 10 Steers and Heifers, 1 Mare with foal at her feet and stinted to CZAR, 1 Colt. The Farming implements can also be taken at a fair valuation, if required by the purchaser...Mr George Hamilton's Commission and Auction Mart, Charles-street, Launceston - February 22, 1836". This indicates that John Sevior was versatile and an ideas man. It also indicates that he was ill for some months before he died on 18th November, 1836. In Ads online at the time it said that he was ill and he tried to sell up.

    In 1833 John Sevior submitted a hand written application for a road to go through to his property of Pigeon's Plains through a property of Robert Pitcairns.

    Pigeon's Plains or Pidgeons Plains was probably within a short distance of John Sevior's property of Nile Rivulet. But was it the one and the same farm property ie Nile Rivulet and Pigeon's Plains - I think YES. Wherever it was, in 1833 the Inhabitants of the District were discussing setting up a craftworks. Moreover, Mr and Mrs Robert Pitcairn were living there as close neighbours and may even have lived next door to John Sevior. In 1833 Robert Pitcairn was based in Hobart Town and on the Nile River at Morven. In 1856 Robert Pitcairn was a Freeholder at Nile and Hobart Town and was on the Electoral Roll for the District of North Esk. It all points to only one farm property being owned by John Sevior.

    An Information e-mail response from the Launceston Reference Library a few moments after I decided this, confirms that John Sevior was granted land in 1828 in the vicinity of the Nile River at Deddington and that Pidgeons Plains (spelt that way on the map) ran from Alexander Bankier's land next door on the Ben Lomond side, and spilt over to John's allocation along the Nile River!

    Nile Rivulet and Pidgeons Plains are one and the same property granted to J (John) Sevior as land - it is as J Sevor on a J H Hughes Map online at the site of the State Library of Tasmania. From the Launceston Reference Library "...The Name Index gives a name as S. Sevor, and the map grid is 6J. On the map, this land is next to the area Pidgeons Plains. To confirm this was John Sevior’s land, we used Land Districts map, Cornwall 3B, that states that land of 500 acres is located to John Sevior and this is exactly in the same position as indicated on Hughes Map..."

    John Sevior's Pidgeons Plains (or Nile Rivulet) was not sold off till at least 1856.

    John Sevior also was a Manager of the Union Bank (family record) in Van Diemen's Land, was on Jury lists in 1935 and was a Publican from about 1831 to 1833, in Charles Street, Launceston; with the Pub being known by the 'sign of the Falcon'.

    John also had a 5 room brick cottage in Upton Street, Launceston with a nice garden; and some nearby land, and the latter slipped from being accounted for in his John's Will and Letters of Administration. (The details of John Sevior's Will were obtained from the Tasmanian Archives and the London Gazette online provided a summary by the Supreme Court of Tasmania). So the result of this anomaly was that in June 1901 other citizens placed bids for the land, and it is unlikely that John's descendants would have heard about this land which was obviously sold off by the Government, as unclaimed land.

    There is a gully called 'Seviors Gully' in close proximity to 'Nile Rivulet'. It is to the north and outside the Nile Rivulet boundary. Seviors Gully, Blessington, Tasmania - Latitude:-41.5462 Longitude:147.4281. Seviors Gully appears to be on Crown Land.

    It has been reported with authority, that John Sevior was 5 feet 3 inches in height and was of a dark ruddy complexion with black hair and brown eyes. John was buried at St John's, Launceston on 23rd November, 1836. I checked with St John's Parish some years ago and they confirmed that he is buried there. Further to this, I discovered from trove newspapers that John Sevior did have a gravestone but it was knocked over by cattle rubbing against it!

    Some records in Tasmania in his day recorded this John Sevior by mistake as having the surname of Sevor or SenIor rather than Sevior. Spelt as Seviour is an acceptable alternative.

    John Sevior was my second great grandfather.

    (1. Family history research 2. NLA Trove newspapers online 3. Evandale Historical Society 4. The Tasmanian Archives 5. Mitchell Library - State Library of New South Wales 6. State Archives Collection - State Records of New South Wales and 7. The Launceston Reference Library - State Library of Tasmania.)

    Sally E Douglas

    108 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-05-24
    User data
  67. JOHN WILLIAM SEVIOR 1871
    List
    Public

    Champion Bulldog Owner, Prominent Breeder, Exhibitor, Trainer and ultimately a Bulldog Judge. John Sevior was well known in his time as a Bulldog 'Fancier'. He was also a bit of a Mastiff, Airedale Terrier Fancier and a Fancier of other Terrier breeds.

    He was born as John William Sevior in 1871 in Otway Street, Portland Bay or Portland. (In those times Portland was often referred to as Portland Bay). John worked for the Victorian Railways initially as a Porter (he was a Porter in Transportation in 1901 - entered the service sometime after 19/19/01 - 18711905 - No 9760). He was also listed as being with the Railways in 1912, likely after re-joining - No 17067 - Signals and Telegraph - Skilled Labourer. Over the years John remained with the Railways in the Accounts section so I was to believe. A. newspaper article at the time of John's death in April, 1937 stated that he just retired from the (Vic.) Railways and indicated that he was looking forward to getting back to breeding 'the dog of his dreams' as he was never fully satisfied with any dog that he had bred.

    From his early youth he was a breeder (some imported), and exhibitor of British (or English - subject to debate) Bulldogs (which were a small dog of the Mastiff type) at dog shows and events in Melbourne - Royal Showgrounds, Amateur Sports Ground, Engineers' Depot, Guild Hall, Exhibition Building and Wirth's Hippodrome, the Scotch College grounds in Batman Avenue, South Yarra - Brander's Ferry Tea Gardens in Alexander Avenue, Djin Djin Tea Gardens in Alexander Avenue (the latter Djin Djin being a change of name for the same tea gardens) and the old Skatingrink near the South Yarra Railway Station, Prahran (Society's Rooms in Chapel Street), Richmond - Cremorne Street, Footscray, Yarraville, Essendon, Williamstown, Heidelberg, Brighton and Ringwood; Sydney - Royal Agricultural Society, Exhibition Building and the 'New' Masonic Hall; Brisbane and Country shows in Victoria (Geelong, Euroa, Ballarat and Bendigo). Many times in about forty of this interest and passion John won Australian Championships (1st Prizes) for his Bulldogs - dogs, bitches, novices and puppies. At some of the annual Championships and other events he took out many championships for the one bulldog - best bulldog, the best dog and the best in special sections, Champion of the Show and other First prizes. Of course John often had more than one bulldog entered in the competitions and they mainly seemed to be champions.

    John won championship first prizes and other prizes for his dogs - mainly for his Bulldogs, Bull bitches, Bull novices and Bull puppies in 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897, 1898, 1899, 1900, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1911, 1912, 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927,1928, 1930, 1933 and 1936. For his champion bulldogs - open, special and champion - John received many 'Blue' ribbons and champion's certificates. He also won prizes for his Brindle Mastiffs. Until all the available Newspapers come online at NLA it is not possible to be that accurate as to the number of prizes that John won for his dogs (they were mainly first prizes) but I estimate that in his involvement over 44 years the number may have been in the vicinity of 600.

    It has been said in current times that the life expectancy of a bulldog is eight to twelve years with the average life being from six and a half to eight years. So the window of opportunity for a bulldog being a winning show dog is really limited to the times when he or she is at his or her prime. Of course the puppy stage is also counted as being an opportunity for show.

    I have yet to see a form used by a judge of British Bulldogs of the times but it likely allowed for the allocation of numerical scores for most of the following features - general appearance, temperament and personality, head and skull, stop (degree of angle change between the skull and the nostral bone near the eyes), eyes, ears, chop (fleshy covering of the jaws), mouth, neck, chest, body, forequarters, hindquarters, feet, tail, gait and movement, colour, coat - quality and markings, and size (weight). Also of course there is dog training and dog handling and the behaviour of the dog in the show ring - but the outcomes here I think depend largely on the dog trainer or dog handler.

    In 1902 at the time when the Queen entered her bulldog 'Sandringham Pansy' (awarded first prize in her class and was highly commended) in the Bulldog show at Westminster, 'it was said that the exhibitors were making a return to the type bred in 1876 when the Bulldog Club's first show was held at Alexandra Palace. The ideal bulldog was said to have a big square jaw for grip...so that the animal can breathe when gripping, sloping shoulders and light loins for activity in springing. The business of the original bulldog was to fight bulls in the arena and the face that evolved was not beautiful except to the expert'. Perhaps a face that only a mother could love.

    John Sevior preferred his bulldogs, as a dog of fair size and substance, with ears that were not too small. While a good sweep, turn-up and width of the underjaw were essential. Plus the expression must be sour, not soft and with goggled eyes.

    In 1893 and 1894 John Sevior was replying to 'Answers to Correspondents' in the Australasian on how to deal with some of the irritating health problems of Bulldogs, such as sores, eczema and ear problems.

    In November, 1895 John Sevior's Tempe was for 'Exhibition only' (from Ch. Bruce IV and Ch. Gipsy).

    March, 1896..."Mr. J. Sevior, of Prahran, reports that his bull bitch Tempe has whelped five puppies (four dogs and one bitch) to Mr. H. Roebuck's imported Champion Bruce IV." Moreover, in July, 1896 John Sevior's bitches Tempe and Jaba won the 1st and 2nd prizes in the bulldog class.

    In 1904 John Sevior had two bulldog bitches who were the latest imported of the English Bulldog 'Woodcote/Smasher' strain (The bulldog 'Woodcote Smasher' was alive in England in 1905. The Kennels of Mr W J Pegg of Woodcote, Epsom, England are relevant).

    A newspaper report of March, 1915 stated that Mr and Mrs John Sevior made "a flying visit to Sydney" to the Bulldog Club of New South Wales. "Amongst the Kennels they visited were those of Messrs. Wilkins, Rich and Ekin, and they expressed themselves in laudatory terms of the dogs they saw. His (John's) opinion of the (Bulldog) Khaki Lubra is an extremely high one ..." John was referred to in the paper as a prominent breeder, exhibitor and judge of Bulldogs.

    In that same March, 1915 article it said that "The Board of Control has arranged for the various bulldog clubs to obtain a complete register by exchange. The register of the Bulldog Club of New South Wales is a very large order, some 600 or 700 dogs having been registered with the club. To be added to these there will now be the registrations of South Australia and Victoria... " On this topic Bulldogs in Victoria could be registered with the Victorian Poultry and Kennel Club at least by April, 1909.

    John Sevior also had winning Airedale Terriers from 1896-1898, in 1903, in 1918, and from 1921-1924 and in 1926. (In 1923 John had puppies by Gunner or Aerial Gunner and in 1924 he had a number of Airedale puppies, and in 1926 John owned 3 bitch Airedale puppies by Gunner and 2 bitch Airedale puppies by Strachur Wallace. John also had a prize bulldog for sale in 1926). This indicates that although John's first passion as a 'Fancier' was Bulldogs, he never really moved away from having an on-going interest in the Airedale. One of his winning Airedales was Snider who won three prizes as at July 1896. Snider was a champion pedigree Airedale up for sale by John in 1896 and in the advertisement it stated that Snider was 'partly broken to gun'. Snider was actually Queensbury/Queensberry Snider whelped in November, 1894. Snider was the winner in Puppies and the winner in the Sixth Produce Stakes in Melbourne in August 1895, at the Victorian Poultry and Kennel Society Annual Show at the Exhibition Building. Snider was also a winner at Essendon. The sire of Snider was the champion Spring (imported) and Queensbury Belle - both unbeaten. At the time of the August 1895 Victorian Poultry and Kennel Society Show, Queensbury/Queensberry Snider was owned by W W King, who also owned Queensbury/Queensberry Duchess who won the Open Class Bitches.

    For the Annual Show of June 1896 it was stated that 'some eight entries faced the judge in the three classes of Airedale Terriers, of which Queensberry Spring and Queensberry Belle were the winners in Open Class Dogs and Open Class Bitches' respectively, for owner W W King. While Thunder III owned by Mr T K Steanes, came second in Dogs and Queensbury/Queensberry Snider owned by John Sevior at the time was placed third in Dogs.

    In 1903 John advertised that he had imported Airedales. Additionally, a further winning Airedale Terrier owned by John Sevior from about April, 1821 to at least January 1924, was the champion Gunner or Aerial Gunner.

    The Bendigo Agricultural show of October 1897 was opened by the Governor, Lord Brassey. At that show John Sevior won first prize for his Bulldog bitch 'Palmyra Cybele'.

    At the end of 1920 for a brief period John Sevior 'owned' a black Dane dog. As it turned out it was a lost dog which had been sold and at the end of 1920 the Prahran Court ruled that it be returned to it's rightful owner.

    John Sevior was first appointed as a Bulldog Judge by 1897 (in his own words in June 1913 he said that he had been a Bulldog Judge for 16 years). John was still a Bulldog Judge in 1926. John of course did not judge when his own Bulldogs competed, and his judging was likely more often at Interstate dog shows in Sydney and Brisbane.

    From about 1876 in Victoria, poultry and dogs were aligned in the Victorian Poultry and Dog Society which became the Victorian Poultry and Kennel Club - changing its name in about 1896. In August, 1893 the Victorian Poultry and Dog Society held its 17th Annual Show. While in contrast it was not till June, 1898 that the NSW Kennel Club held its 4th Annual show.

    A Victorian Bulldog Club was discussed in early 1907. It had been formed at least by May 1907 and by June of that year it had 25 members. However it appears that it was not till January, 1918 that the Victorian Bulldog Club was officially or legally founded under that name. John Sevior was appointed as an inaugural committee member of the Club at its formation in 1918.

    Moreover, in January, 1913 papers refer to the newly formed Bulldog Society of Victoria. While in June,1913 there are references to a bulldog club called the British Bulldog Club of Victoria (in June, 1918 it held its 6th Annual Show). This British Bulldog Club of Victoria was the former Victorian Bulldog Society - Adelaide Chronicle of 7th June, 1913 refers. It is reported that in July,1913 the British Bulldog Club of Victoria had 90 financial members.

    The Victorian Bulldog Club thus became an alternative or rival club to the British Bulldog Club of Victoria. (Re the two opposing bulldog clubs - see the Weekly Times of 26th January, 1918). Although John Sevior was on the Committee of the new club it appears that he still remained strongly involved as well with the British Bulldog Club of Victoria.

    In April and May 1914 papers reported that the Victorian Poultry and Kennel Club of Victoria had disqualified the British Bulldog Club as being an affiliated club, as the latter had entered into an alliance with the Bulldog Clubs of New South Wales and South Australia against its ruling and wishes. In response the British Bulldog Club of Victoria broke away from its affiliation with the Victorian Poultry and Kennel Club. I suppose it was inevitable that the relationship would eventually be severed between these two organizations. Poultry and dogs, although both categories lent themselves as show contenders they really have nothing in common except some sort of obscure historical connection. Nevertheless John Sevior continued to exhibit his bulldogs with the Victorian Poultry and Kennel Club after this period of disruption.

    In terms of winnings, John even won a small gold medallion for Miss Billy from the South African Bulldog Club at a bulldog meeting held at the Royal Melbourne showgrounds or Wirth's Park in 1924. In November, 1924 Miss Billy won first prize in the Australian bred section.

    In 1922, 1923 and 1924 John's Mulga King Billy won the Australian championship for the best bred Australian dog. However she had already won that award and a whole string of others in 1918 when she was with a previous owner. Mulga King Billy won numerous awards - Maiden, Novice, Special, winner of the dog section, Limit and Open classes, Best head and Best bodied, Champion of the show, other First prizes and the Best dog in the Parade.

    In July, 1918 ...Mr. J. Sevior 'annexed the laurels' in the Limit and Australian bred section with Louie Cerbus.

    The names of some of John's Bulldog and Brindle Mastiff dogs (mostly champions) were - Mulga King Billy/Mulga King Billie (a show and stud Bulldog - best headed and bodied dog in 1923), Miss Billy (Best Australian bred - a little Bitch of good type), Badger (Champion Pedigree Bulldog - Nelson II and ex Empress), Palmyra Cebele/Cybele or Cebele/Cybele (Bullbitch), Ben Jonathan - a brindle, grand skull, good bone and length of body, but lacks under the jaw (1897), Palmyra Tempe or Tempe (Champion Bullbitch in 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897 and 1898) by Champion Bruce IV an imported pure bred, and Champion Gipsy V. (Pedigree Bruce IV was by Bruce II and ex Silver Queen). In August, 1894 Tempe came first in 'Puppies, Dogs and Bitches.' As at December, 1897 Tempe had won 36 first prizes and was undefeated; she was Australian bred and had won the prize for the best bred dog in Australia), Palmyra Veda (Bullbitch alive in 1897- by Champion Bruce [does this mean Bruce IV?] and Champion Tempe), Palmyra Ida (1900), Hesper (an imported Bullbitch by Gamester and Ida and her siblings were Alaric and Paul Clifford; a very fair bitch - purchased by John Sevior in October, 1892 from Tom Meadows, while she was still in fact in quarantine. Hesper did not have any progeny. [purchase info from Jane dogs and Trove newspapers online]), Hesper 4 (Bullbitch), Pyrrho/Pyrro (1st in Puppies in 1896), Pyrrhus - 1895 (ex Tempe; and Bruce - with Bruce being by Bruce IV ex Yabba Fury. [However it could mean ex Tempe and Bruce IV rather than Bruce?]. Pyrrhus had the same name as one of Robert Sevior's many racehorses and up for sale by John in 1895), Leda (John owned two by this name -1898 and 1916 [Novice Bitch] - obviously they had different prefixes), Beckie (a Puppy Class Bitch in July,1907), Louie Cerberus (Bullbitch), Downshire Lassie (Bullbitch), Jaba (Bullbitch - July, 1896), Pathfinder - a Maiden Bulldog winner in 1919, Java (Bulldog puppy in November, 1930), Admiral Togo and what appears to be his little sister Trafalgar (Brindle Bitch who John advertised 'to give away to a good home' in June, 1913), Micky Australia (Bulldog - best non-sporting dog in 1918), Lady Nelson (Bullbitch), Reaper (Champion Bullbitch) and Ginger Mulga came first as the Special Bulldog puppy bitch and the Bulldog puppy bitch in 1924.

    Datham needs a special mention - in July 1925 Datham won the Limit, Special Limit, Intermediate and Australian Bred prizes as well as the Junior prize. Moreover in November 1926 and April 1927 this bulldog won the Puppy and Junior Bulldog prizes. Besides, in May 1926 Datham won a trophy for being the Best Bulldog and in April 1927 won the Limit prize. The sire of Datham was the Champion Fusilier and his dam was the Champion Myola Morveen. Datham was a white puppy with brindle markings - a hefty dog and a winner of many prizes. Page 20, of the Australasian of 27th February, 1926 provides an article about John Sevior and an image of Mrs John (Agnes) Sevior holding onto her pet Datham - I have a negative of the same picture which also shows Mrs Sevior in the picture. She looks as pleased 'as punch' with her pet Datham.

    Besides there was Nigel (listed as a brindle Bullbitch sired in England and up for sale by John in 1907 - this name may be incorrect and it could be about Niger or Nigrene - see the next para.). Two more Bulldogs were Bruce VI and Nada (Bullbitch).

    Also John owned the imported Chippenham Last Charge [from Jane dogs] or Last Charge, Up Guards (a brindle Stud Bulldog whelped in November, 1903 [birth date from Jane dogs] from the imported Niger or Nigrene and the imported Chippenham Last Charge or Last Charge), Niger [or Nigrene] - a Bullbitch - Dam of the stud Bulldog Up Guards (just referred to). Niger or Nigrene was imported from the Pegg Kennels in England. Besides, Niger or Nigrene was a daughter of Woodcote Smasher and Her Excellency [from Jane dogs] and purchased by John Sevior in 1901 from O P Thomas [from Jane dogs].

    In 1906 the puppies of Last Charge and Niger or Nigrene were owned by Dr Furnival and John Sevior. Dr Francis Henry Furnival was a Medical Practitioner, being one of the founders of St Joseph's Hospital - his work there was Honorary and covered a period of nearly 50 years. He also became an Alderman of the first Auburn Council in New South Wales in 1892 and was Mayor of the Council in 1908. He was apparently a great charitable contributor to both the medical and civic fields. He also happened to become a Bulldog expert and Bulldog breeder. It appears that prior to his interest in Bulldogs he was an enthusiast of Homing Pigeons in Auburn. In 1904 Dr Furnival resigned as the Returning Officer of the Federal Electorate of Parkes. He had been a Returning Officer for about nine years. In 1895 he had been the Returning Officer for Grantville. At the time of his resignation in 1904 he was critical of the shortcomings of the Electoral Office - economies in funding and the confused Electoral Act which urgently needed re-drafting etc. Dr Furnival died in April, 1942.

    Additionally John owned - La Cigale (Bullbitch - owned with Miss Jacka. La Cigale was the same name as for one of Robert Sevior's racehorses), Wee Jean (was whelped in August, 1894 - a brown brindle ... a good hard coat, capital head and ears), Australian Boomerang (as a stud bulldog in 1920), Myola Fusilier (won a Special Puppy prize - was a Bulldog. In November, 1924 Myola Fusilier won First Prize as a Novice Dog and Puppy), Jan Ridd (imported Pedigree Bulldog) and Jan Ridd's puppies such as Young Australia (a Grand Champion Bullbitch - described as a fine rich brindle, a beautiful brindle and a brindle of rare type and quality) who in 1918 was an Australian record prize winner, even by September 1917 Young Australia had won 100 prizes (also mentioned below). Plus there was All Australia and Pride of Australia. John may have even bred Lady Nigg the mother of some of sire Jan Ridd's puppies. Another dam with Jan Ridd was Princess Patricia.

    In about November, 1930 there was also King Offa (Bulldog) and Java - a promising Bull pup. Java had won first prize in a British British Bulldog Club of Victoria show, before he was was sent to Mr Roelof of Tamerang where he had some local success; and a further Bull pup was sent to Mr Roelof by John Sevior. At that time too, John had a letter from Mr Chu Sem of Honolulu expressing an interest in his Bulldogs.

    Morover many of John's dogs won numerous championship prizes.

    Besides all the winning dogs there were obviously some in John's kennels who were not winners. That is part of any success story.

    As at 1915 John's beloved Jan Ridd had sired at least 30 puppies and many were prize winners, including Young Australia (just mentioned) winner of the 'Iredell Cup' in 1917 and All Australia, the Australian Winner of the 'Lever Cup'. In 1918 John had puppies for sale by Jan Ridd (imported - Pedigree Bulldog) and also by Aldridge Ambassador (a bridle heavyweight - imported. From Aldridge Ambassador's Bulldog Pedigree online, he was born on 5th December, 1913).

    In August, 1915 Young Australia came 1st as Junior Dog and 1st in the Special Limit Class. In September, 1916 Young Australia won the Limit Class, the Colonial Bred Class, the Open Class and was the Champion. In August, 1917 besides the Iredell Cup, Young Australia was best dog in the show for the third year running. At the Royal Melbourne Show in September, 1917 Young Australia came First and also won the Challenge prize, taking her to the total of 100 Winning prizes (also mentioned above). Then in March 1918 Young Australia was the Champion in the Bulldog Parade, among a string of other prizes. While in July, 1918 Young Australia won easily in the Australian and Open Classes and also won the Championship.

    In January 1895 one of John's Bullbitches whelped 8 puppies to Bruce, 4 died as puppies. In March 1896 Tempe whelped 5 puppies - it says to Roebuck's imported Bruce IV and in October, 1896 Palmyra Tempe whelped six puppies to Bruce IV. While in December 1897 Palmyra Veda whelped three Bull Bitch puppies to Nicholson's Kenmore Paddy. (Kenmore Paddy being sired by Bruce IV? and ex Mab IV?). Then in February, 1898 John had puppies whelped by Tempe for sale. In August, 1903 John Sevior had bulldog puppies for sale. While in May, 1906 John advertised an 'excellent pedigree' Bull puppy for sale. During March, 1911 John advertised for sale a bulldog puppy by Admiral Togo. In April, 1920 John was breeding bulldog puppies with Australian Boomerang. Then in November, 1924 John had Bulldog puppies for sale. In February, 1926 John Sevior had two Lone Star Bulldog puppy bulldog bitches for sale and a two year old brindle bullbitch by champion Mulga King Billy and ex Downshire Lass.

    An advertisement by John Sevior in 1928 said that he had 38 years experience in the dog world and indicated that he could assist with the breeding of any type of dog.

    Jim and Jess were two more of John's Bulldogs. Those names could however have been nicknames for two of John's Kennel dogs (I am presuming that all his dogs had Pedigrees).

    In January, 1936 the Kennel Control Council reported on current dog Registrations, and one dog was Jean a Silky Haired Terrier. Jean was a bitch bred by John Sevior of South Yarra, her owner was Mrs J Patterson. Jean was blue and tan, whelped on 30th September, 1933. Her sire was given as Harrietville Bully and dam was Wyndarra Sally. At the Centenary Dog Club - Open Parade in February, 1936 at Wirth's Park, Mrs J Patterson's Jean came second in the Novice. In March, 1936 at the Melbourne Dog Club's Open Parade the Silky Terrier Jean, won the Novice bitches and Limit - for Miss J Patterson (Mrs). Also Jean won the Novice and the Limit for Mrs J Patterson in July, 1936. At the Heidelberg Kennel Club Show at the Royal Agricultural Society venue in August, 1936 Mrs J Patterson's Jean won the Limit and the Open. At the Australian Ladies Kennel Club show later in August, 1936 Mrs J Patterson's Jean came second in the Open. Then at the Whittlesea Agricultural Society's Show in November 1936, Mrs J Patterson's Jean won the Challenge. While another of Mrs Patterson's Silky Terriers Clydeside Binkle won the first prize.

    In 1933 Mrs John Sevior won a Novice dog prize with Teddy in the small dog parade held at the ANA Hall in Toorak Road, South Yarra. Teddy was a Wolf Sable Pomeranian, of over 7lbs.

    Besides his numerous dogs he obviously enjoyed his wide contacts with other people also interested in the dog world. John was liked and well respected.

    In May 1895 John was living at Leila Street, Prahran and in November 1895 he was at 5 Mackay Street, Prahran. In 1896 John was living at 12 Wrights Terrace, Prahran and in 1898 he was living at the corner of Bendigo and High Streets, East Prahran.

    At the time of his marriage in 1902 to Agnes Elizabeth Broomfield, John was living at 12 Irene Place, Prahran, and in February, 1903 John was 'a Fitter' living with his wife at 26 Evelina Road, Toorak. While by the end of September, 1903 John and his wife Agnes had moved to 12 Murray Street, Toorak as their daughter and first born child Ella was born there.

    On the 1903 Australian Electoral Roll (at Ancestry) John William Sevior is listed at North Melbourne as was his mother Rebecca Sevior. I think that it is sort of anomaly John being listed there?

    In 1904 John Sevior lived near the South Yarra station. In 1907 John was living at 42 Airlie Street, South Yarra and in 1911 he was at 43 Airlie Street, South Yarra (the home that he finally bought). In June, 1913 John gave his address as 42 Airlie Street, South Yarra. In 1915 he was at 44 Airlie Street, South Yarra and by 1918 he was back living in the home that he owned at 43 Airlie Street, South Yarra and where he died in 1937. He must have enjoyed living in Airlie Street. At one stage his kennels were called 'Airlie Street Kennels' - 1926. John's wife Agnes was very supportive of his involvement with dogs and often cared for them, especially the puppies and knew all their pedigrees - she had them 'at her fingertips'.

    At the time of John's death newspapers reported that he had over 40 years of experience with the British Bulldog and that he was regarded as the premier National authority. John's involvement and experience with bulldogs was actually about 47 years.

    Tyzack's Annual or Stud book - the first issue by T W Tyzack and G S Turner, of Melbourne was issued in June, 1912. It was the a Dog and Poultry book which concentrated wholly on Victoria and it did not materialize as an annual in 1913.

    I think that it is fairly safe to say that John must have had a dog or dogs as a child. To be so keen the seeds must have been sown early in his life. John lost his father when he was eleven and a half years old, so maybe his love of dogs was some sort of consolation. His mother Rebecca proved to be resourceful in providing the means of supporting John and his sister Ellen who was a bit older, by becoming a Confectioner and then a bit later a Publican.

    John Sevior was an avid reader of the classics and an excellent copybook writer. At some stage he belonged to the Alma Library at the corner of High and Alma Roads, St Kilda. Leather bound books in John's library included - *The Scarlet Letter by Hawthorne, *Hypatia by Charles Kingsley, *Essays by Emerson, *Fishpingle by H A Vachell and *Oliver Twist and Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. John also liked growing flowers and gardening and pottering about with earth. In its heyday his home possessed a display quality garden, including fruit trees and hanging baskets.

    John rowed at Richmond Rowing Club and played for Carlton in a VFL team of some ranking.

    I have a feeling that I was told by my mother - his daughter - that he was a half-decent Billard Player, a bit of a runner and an avid Fast Walker. A discussion of those activities strike a chord in my mind.

    (Trove and family history)

    Sally E Douglas

    543 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-05-29
    User data
  68. KOOKABURRA - Flight Lieutenant Keith Anderson's Aeroplane
    List
    Public

    RAAF SEARCH - DIARY BY (GILBERT) ERIC DOUGLAS

    LOG A1-20 (RAAF - DH9A)

    17-4-29 Wednesday
    Left Point Cooke (Laverton) 1235 Arrived Mildura 1700 {4.30}

    18-4-29 Fitted new Generator. Left Mildura 0700 Arrived Maree 1245 Left Maree 1545 Arrived Oodnadatta 1815 Left Oodnadatta 1130 Arrived Alice Springs 1430

    Saturday 20th Left Alice Springs 0920 Arrived Ryans Well 1025 Left Ryans Well 1235 Arrived Mortons 1440 Left Mortons 1640 Arrived Ryans Well 1805 Left Ryans Well 0650 Arrived Alice Springs 0750

    Sunday 21st Left Alice Springs 1015 Arrived Ryans Well 1115 Left Ryans Well 1545 Arrived Tennants Creek 1810

    Monday 22 Left Tennants Creek 0815 Arrived Newcastle Waters 1010 Left Newcastle Waters 1530 Arrived Wave Hill 1610 (Anderson’s m/c located) (Both apparently dead) 80 miles SSE of Wave Hill. Desert Country.

    Wednesday 24th Temp 98 degrees. Left Wave Hill by car. FLt Eaton, Mr Moray and self. 1600 arrived 30 miles SE by E of Wave Hill. Direction of A m/c [Anderson's machine the 'KOOKABURRA' ] 127 degrees. Direction of Claypan 85 degrees.
    Wednesday night camped 42 miles from Wave Hill

    Thursday morning recurring radiator trouble. Went on by pack horses.
    Thursday night 12 miles from other camp .

    Friday morning Left camp 0800 hours. Dinner 1200 (14 miles approx) 1430 Reached 2 m SE of well. M/c’s brought food
    Friday night camped 4 miles nearer m/c.

    Saturday 27th April 0700 hrs waiting for return of pack horses. 0900 left in direction of lost m/c. 1200 reached locality of m/c but cannot locate it. 1230 Waiting for our m/c’s. Horses very thirsty. 1415 turned back as m/c’s have not turned up. 1615 reached somewhere near waterhole. 1700 m/c’s arrive and show direction of waterhole. No water in hole. Horses sent back by boys to water. Returning tomorrow night.

    Sunday 28th 1100 hours no sign of m/c’s yet. Fixed up message picking up device. 1400 m/c’s arrive (very glad to see them) Direction to Anderson’s m/c 120 degrees. Distance 12 to 14 miles. We will leave first thing in morning.

    Monday Left camp 0730 with 9 horses. M/c 1050 {3.20}. 1300 Found Andersons m/c. 1400 Buried one man. We think that it is Hitchcock. Daylight the blacktracker has gone out after Anderson. Found Anderson. Dead. 400 yards SW of m/c. Buried Anderson 1630. Left 1700 hrs. Arrived waterhole 9.30 PM. Tired out .

    Tuesday Waiting return of horses. They are very thirsty and strayed away last night. We have 20 miles to do to get water. Left 0900. Arrived at water 1330. Had dinner & left 1640. Stopped at 1900 and camped somewhere near the car. We will find it in the morning.

    Wednesday Daylight found the water puddle near the car. We are leaving shortly to find car. Left at 0800 reached car 0850. Left in car at 1100. After rough trip arrived Wave Hill 1630.

    Thursday made sketch map of route.

    Friday changed oil in engine. Adjusted rigging of m/c.

    Saturday sick. Fever & dysentery

    Sunday sick

    Monday getting better. We expect to leave here tomorrow.

    Tuesday Ran engine up but generator not satisfactory. Cylinders loose on crankcase, no... Left leaking water near inlet valves. Front carb dud, casting cracked above throttle barrel. Engine caught fire on ground. Fire put out. The m/c may be put out of commission. Awaiting orders from A/B. (Air Board) M/c washed out.

    Wednesday 1030 left in A1-5 for Tennants Creek.

    A1-20 Repairs to Engine & adjustments to m/c.
    New generator at Mildura. Starb petrol pump & New Generator fitted at Wave Hill. Rigging of m/c adjusted.

    LOG A1-5 (RAAF - DH9A)

    Wed Left Wave Hill 1030. Arrived Tennants Creek 1450.

    Thur Left Tennants Creek 1005. Arrived Alice Springs 1335

    Fri Left Alice Springs 1340. Arrived Oodnadatta 1700

    Sat Left Oodnadatta 0930. Arrived Maree 1150. Left Maree 1300. Forced landed Hawker 1440.

    Sunday Left Hawker 0900. Arrived Mildura 1150. Left Mildura 1350. Arrived Laverton 1650.

    Flying Times -

    4.30 To Mildura from Point Cooke (17/4/1929)
    18/4/1929 fitted new generator
    5.45 To Maree
    2.30 To Oodnadatta
    3.00 To Alice Springs
    1.05 Up to Ryans Well
    1.55 To Mortons
    1.25 From Mortons
    2.25 To Alice Springs
    1.00 To Ryans Well
    2.25 To Alice Springs
    1.55 To Newcastle Waters
    2.40 To Wave Hill
    4.20 To Tennants Creek
    3.35 To Alice Springs
    3.20 To Oodnadatta
    2.20 To Maree
    1.40 To Hawker
    2.50 To Mildura
    3.00 To Laverton
    (Total Flying 50.15 hours).(Eric Douglas Collection)

    The above is all from a short diary kept by Eric at the time of the search for Lieutenant Keith Anderson and Mr H S 'Bobbie' Hitchcock - Mechanic - in 1929. The leader of the RAAF party in the search was Flight Lieutenant Charles Eaton. The desert trek from Wave Hill station into the Tanami desert was made up of Flight Lieutenant Eaton, Sergeant Pilot Eric Douglas, Mr Moray (Lawrence) of Vesteys and his Buick car, Aboriginal trackers Daylight, Sambo and Jimmy and 26 horses)
    m/c (machine ie aeroplane).

    Snippets from the - DH9A flight section of the story - developed by Eric in the late 1950's -

    Point Cook

    “…Flight Lt. Eaton "wired" the Air Board (R.A.A.F. Headquarters) for the immediate assistance of additional aircraft and three more DH9A's were made ready to join his search party.
    I was detailed to fly one of the DH9A's and quickly prepared for departure from R.A.A.F. Point Cook, the following day. I knew my aeroplane well as I had been flying it on instructional duties for several months.
    L.A.C. (Billy) Smith, an experienced rigger, was to accompany me.
    We quickly prepared our aeroplane and loaded on board the usual cross-country kit of emergency rations, water bottles, hand tools, a few engine spares, aeroplane dope and fabric for patching wings, ground to air signalling strips and a first aid outfit. In addition we stowed blankets, a service rifle and ammunition, a spare landing wheel and a spare propeller. The propeller was lashed securely to the fuselage forward of the Pilot's cockpit so that it could readily be seen by us when in flight.
    Great difficulty was found in obtaining suitable maps of our projected route from Mildura onwards, and in fact they did not exist in any detail over most of our subsequent journey and search area…”

    Hawker

    “…As we now had to cross to the small township of Hawker, 300 miles away to the north west in South Australia over more or less uninhabited country before turning to the north above the railway line to Maree, a further 190 miles, we decided to make a dawn take off. If possible we intended to reach Oodnadatta, a distance of 800 miles, in the same day.
    We spent some time that evening plotting our course and making up a series of code signals to be used in case one or more of our aircraft had to make a forced landing. We did not of course intend to delay the flight in case of an aircraft being forced down, but it would be necessary to know the main requirements for the stranded crew in order that this could be relayed to the Air Board and local Authorities.
    No aeronautical strip maps were available for use in our cockpits so we made sketches for use on our knee pads, showing the salient points, bearings and distances, this being worked up from several large maps of Australia which we carried…”

    Snippets from the - ground party section of the story - developed by Eric in the late 1950's -

    The Buick

    “…While Flight Lt. Eaton and myself crouched behind the scuttle, Mr Moray set the car like a tank at the scrub and we moved forward in second gear and ploughed a pathway through it. This continued for several miles when we were forced to halt by a badly holed radiator and flat tyres which had been pierced by broken scrub branches. Two of our aeroplanes then appeared overhead and by dipping, they indicated the direction which we should take; they then flew over to our left and made landings on the nearby clay pan which we could partly see through the scrub, several miles away. Flight Lt. Eaton went across to them on horseback accompanied by the station hand "Sambo" as a guide, and met F/O. Ryan and F/O. Gerrand. Later they returned with a supply of salt beef and Flight Lt. Eaton informed us that he told F/O. Ryan we intended shortly to abandon the car and take to the horses.
    During this interval I removed the radiator and made extensive repairs to it while Mr Moray and Daylight changed the tubes and tyres. From the extent of the damage it was obvious that the car journey was almost at an end. We progressed for about another mile but were forced to halt and abandon the car. It would have to await our return before final repairs could be made. It looked a wreck with radiator and wheels removed surrounded by the wild and desolate country…”

    The Horses

    “…We then headed away to the south east with Daylight breaking trail. We were now entering country never before traversed by white man. The journey was a nightmare; as the horses pushed through the scrub myriads of small flies rose and settled on horse and man alike and soon covered us in a sticky mess. We were unable to give relief to our horses except to our riding horses from this plague of flies.
    I was riding in company with "Sambo" and found his bushcraft of great interest. He explained to me in his halting English, the method of tracking. It became clear to me that the aboriginal art of tracking is learnt through necessity and long practice in the singleness of concentration. He could pick and name a particular horse by looking at its hoof marks…”

    Second Draft of the search by in the late 1950's -

    Early in April 1929 Lieut Keith Anderson and his mechanic Mr R S Hitchcock took off from Sydney N.S.W. in their small Westland Monoplane "Kookaburra" bound for Wyndham at the extreme North West of Western Australia in an attempt to locate Squadron Leader Kingsford Smith and his crew who had apparently been forced down in their Trimotor Fokker Monoplane "Southern Cross" on their attempted trans-continental flight from Sydney to Wyndham.
    All went well with the "Kookaburra" until an engine defect forced them down at Algebuckna just south of Oodnadatta in Central Australia. The engine was quickly put right by Hitchcock and the "Kookaburra" flew on to Alice Springs via Oodnadatta.
    However the failure to make a permanent cure to the defective lock of an exhaust push rod was to cost them their lives within the next few days.
    The hazardous take off with overload fuel tanks for a non stop flight to Wyndham was successfully made by Lieut Anderson on the 10th April at Ryans Well, about 80 miles north of Alice Springs and the little monoplane headed away to the North for a 900 mile flight. Their Aircraft was last seen over Broadford creek some distance North west of Ryans Well and it was thus apparent that they had decided to fly direct to Wyndham rather than follow the usual safer route along the overland telegraph line away to the North. By so doing, if successful they would gain at least half a day in flying time. However their direct route meant flying over at least 500 miles of a waterless and almost featureless desert.
    When the "Kookaburra" became overdue and no news was received of their safe landing north of the desert area, an aerial search was ordered by the Minister for Defence, Sir William Glasgow.
    Within 2 days of their disappearance 2 RAAF D.H.9A 2 seater Biplanes each powered by a 400 H.P. water cooled "Liberty" engine were on their way from RAAF Laverton under the Command of Flight Lieut Charles Eaton, to commence a search in the Ryans Well-Wave Hill area.
    F/Lt Eaton and Flying Officer Gerrand made good time in their machines to Oodnadatta but were delayed for several hours due to a leaking petrol tank in one of the Aircraft.
    While repairs were being made (in the main street) F/Lt Eaton wired the Air Board for the assistance of additional Aircraft and 3 more DH9A's were immediately made ready to form the search. I was detailed off to join the party and made all haste for departure the following day. I knew my Aeroplane well as I had been flying it on instructional duties over several weeks past. Apart from the usual Cross Country kit of emergency rations, tying down gear, tools, spares, blankets, first aid outfit and rifles, I took on board a spare wheel and propeller (The last item being severely lashed to the fuselage of the port side forward of the Pilot's Cockpit) and proceeded to Laverton from Point Cook where I formed up with F/O Ryan and Pilot Officer Allen the Pilots of the other two Aircraft. Our last briefing at Laverton by Group Captain Adrian Cole was to push on at all speed and in the event of one or more of the Aircraft being forced down the remaining Aircraft were not to stop but keep right on as other Aircraft would be sent out to take care of the stranded crews. We got away early in the afternoon and made a good run to Mildura where we arrived at about 5 PM. As we now had to cross to Hawker 300 miles away to the West over more or less uninhabitable country before turning north along the railway line to Maree a further 200 miles we decided to make a dawn take off.
    Some time after was spent that evening plotting our course as no strip maps or aeronautical maps were available for use in our cockpits. I luckily had a page of the area torn from my old School Atlas which proved invaluable over the next few days.
    We took off with full fuel and set a course for Hawker and as the country was practically featureless little map reading could be made at this stage so the course was maintained by compass and dead reckoning. All went well and 3 hours later we sighted Hawker some 8 miles on our port side and then all turned to the north up the railway line for Maree. About half an hour later a fierce looking dust storm was sighted rolling in from slightly ahead and to port. We increased speed and just passed in front of it. Several minutes later the country astern was blotted out with thick dust haze which extended from ground level up to above 6000 feet. By map reading it was observed that our ground speed was decreasing and it was apparent we were now fighting a strong North North west wind which had first commenced to bother us at Hawker, this could prove serious with our depleting fuel. The DH9A had a normal fuel endurance of from 4 ¾ to 5 ¼ hours and already we had been air borne for 4 hours with 90 -110 miles to go.
    As our maximum cruising speed was about 115 M.P.H. we would be cutting things fine on this stage of the trip. When our flying time reached 5 hours all eyes were anxiously peering ahead for signs of Maree. At last the small settlement could be seen right ahead and in a few minutes we were throttling off to make a landing straight ahead into a strong wind on an old oval situated about ¼ mile from the Maree Hotel.
    After successful landings a check revealed that two Aircraft were down to 4 gallons of petrol each and the other Aircraft to 8 gallons (which happened to be mine).
    We all got to work in the heat and pumped petrol from 40 gallon drums into our Aircraft and filled up with water and oil. After a discussion it was decided to fly direct to Oodnadatta across southern Lake Eyre rather than follow the railway line away to the west. A saving of over 50 miles could be made on the 280 mile journey which would give us a chance of landing before dark. (Last light of evening being about 6.15 PM). We took off at about 3.30 PM after a hurried but satisfying lunch of sandwiches and strong tea (supplied free by the Hotel) and pressed on at nearly full speed out over Lake Eyre.
    At times we flew at about 100 feet over the great expanse of featureless flat salt pan and when our engines tended to overheat we climbed to 4000 feet to the cooler air and checked our course. From this altitude Lake Eyre appeared as a great white basin stretching ahead to the horizon. No signs of either animal or bird life were seen. After about 1½ hours we commenced to anxiously search ahead and to port for the railway line and to my intense relief I picked it up as a dark blue line running away to the north west into the distance.
    By this time the sun was getting low so we came down to about 50 feet above the line and opened full out. It was a glorious run with the 3 aircraft belching out red flames from their exhausts as we ate up the miles.
    F/O Ryan who apparently had the fastest machine forged ahead and was first to sight Oodnadatta which he indicated by rocking his Aircraft. F/O Ryan made a hurried landing and put out a landing strip to indicate to us where to touchdown. I came in as number three on the last bit of short twilight and landed without mishap. All had gone well except that F/O Ryan's machine had a broken tail skid, the result of striking a camel pen just before he touched down.
    We were a cheerful party that evening as so far we had made good time without serious mishap. The tail skid was repaired with the help of all crews at the railway workshop and the Aircraft refuelled and engines checked with the light of torches. We all turned in for an early start to Alice Springs another 300 miles ahead.
    We were out early to the Aerodrome and completed our maintenance at about 11 AM after ensuring that camel teams, blacks and dogs were clear of the take off, we started up and made live astern take offs, followed by a pass across the drome in formation.
    After a rather monotonous flight, sitting above the railway line, over the rolling sand hills we sighted the gap at Alice Springs and observed the feverish work of rail gangs laying the last of the line out from the gap to meet the new line from Oodnadatta. We came through the gap and landed on the rather small field where we could see the other two Aircraft.
    We were welcomed by F/Lt Eaton and his party. F/Lt Eaton then gave us a resume of the present progress of the search and his plans for the immediate future search.
    I was detailed off to accompany F/O Gerrand's machine in my machine for a search to the North west of Ryan's Well up to 200 miles while F/O Ryan was to set out for Tennants Creek 280 miles north up the telegraph line with P/O Allen.
    F/Lt Eaton made the rule that where possible two Aircraft were always to fly in company of each other.
    After refuelling and giving our engines and airframes a good maintenance check we went into Alice Springs at about 5 PM. There we saw rather a rip roaring scene with plate layers from the rail crews getting drunk and generally making a whooping it up. They were there in such numbers it was not possible for the few police to control them without resort to violence.
    At the rear of the hotel I was amazed to see 5 or 6 Blacks dressed in dungarees and chained together; chopping wood under an armed guard. I didn't think they appreciated the white mans 'justice'. I was told they were wild blacks who had killed cattle, and were working off their punishment.
    Out to the drome early next morning and F/O Gerrand and myself took off and headed for Ryans Well over mulga studded outskirts of the desert where we landed after about 50 minutes flight. We then topped up our tanks from a stack of 4 gallon tins guarded over by two station blacks who were most helpful.
    After take off we flew away to the North west and then North and proceeded up the dry water course of the Lander river. It was easy to follow as it wound away to the North north west as a great white ribbon in the otherwise featureless ground.
    After following the dry river for about 180 miles we sighted Moretons Homestead the last outpost of civilization in this area. We observed several men run out of the Homestead buildings and wave. F/O Gerrand then flew in low and dropped a message bag asking them to indicate whether they had seen a small monoplane pass that way and if possible to indicate in what direction it was flying and how many days ago.
    This they quickly indicated by means of white cloth spread on the ground, an arrow drawn on the ground and 8 as in persons standing in a row. We knew that they had seen the "Kookaburra" flying north northwest about 8 days ago (actually it was 10 days). I thought F/O Gerrand would then make a turn for home but to my surprise I could see him manoeuvring for a landing which he made in a small elongated clearing close up to the Homestead. However at the end of his landing run his machine swerved to the left towards a large tree and went down on the port wing, on coming lower I could see that the port wheel had blown out. As I had the only spare wheel (which was known to F/O Gerrand) in my machine it became necessary for me to attempt a landing close by. I could not land in the small clearing used by F/O Gerrand as there was the danger of running into his Aircraft at the end of my run. I looked around and decided to try a landing on a small clearing about ½ mile away to the west which appeared about 350 yards long with mulga scrub at the leeward end and many small ant hills at the other.
    I came in on a powered approach (quite new at that time) just above the scrub but decided I would overshoot and opened up again. I then made another approach and came in just a few yards from the ant hills. F/O Gerrand came over with Mr Moreton and several blacks and we all went over to Gerrand's machine and changed the wheel by cranking the Aircraft over on to the good wheel…
    F/O Gerrand got away safely and with Mr Moreton ably swinging our propeller on contact with the aid of several blacks to pull him clear, we got our engine going.
    We took off without trouble and then both set a course for Ryans Well where we again landed on the last of the good light. We set to and refuelled the Aircraft but as darkness had set in we were forced to give away any idea of proceeding to Alice Springs until daylight the next day. We had sufficient drinking water but no food except our emergency rations of milk tablets and biscuits as we had originally intended to return to Alice Springs that day. After a rather unsatisfactory repast we lay down in our flying gear for a rest and some sleep if possible. However by midnight the cold became intense so we made a good fire and lay close to it and dozed. We were all pleased to see the daylight and after a good run around to get our circulation functioning we started the engines and took off. After a refreshing flight of about an hour we landed at the Alice and were met by F/Lt Eaton who had been on the lookout for us.
    F/O Ryan and P/O Allen took off in their Aircraft later in the morning for Tennant's Creek where they were to await F/Lt Eaton, F/O Gerrand and myself on the following day. F/O Gerrand and the remaining crews and myself spent most of the day checking over the 3 remaining Aircraft for the flying ahead of us.
    We spent a comfortable night at the Alice Springs Hotel and I left at about 10 AM for Ryans Well where after refuelling I was to push on to Tennants Creek if either F/Lt Eaton or F/O Gerrand did not show up before 1 PM.
    I took off at about 1 PM and after climbing up 4000 feet around the area I noticed the 2 Aircraft going in to land. I came down again as one Aircraft had apparently run into a patch of bad ground and required assistance. With the assistance of all crews we got the Aircraft out on to better ground and after refuelling and attempting to cure a sticking throttle on F/Lt Eaton's Aircraft, F/O Eaton and F/O Gerrand took off. During this period I had been forced to leave my engine running to avoid the delay and exertion in a fresh start up. I realized when taxying out for the take off that my engine was very hot, however it was running well and I anticipated it would cool down somewhat in the take off run, with the better water circulation. I opened up and after running into the prevailing breeze for about ¼ mile I eased the machine off but quickly realized that it was going to be touch and go, for she responded very sluggishly and the mulga scrub was coming up fast. I had a few most anxious moments as we passed over the mulga with my air speed just about the stall, the engine blowing off steam and water and the machine barely clearing at all. I managed to trim slightly but to the right where the ground dropped away somewhat in a depression, this gave me a chance to build up the Air speed to about 75 MPH and gave me full control of the machine. After juggling with the throttle to strike a balance between the steady climbing and engine boiling I slowly climbed away and after about 20 minutes I got into cooler air and the engine under control. I picked up the other Aircraft about 30 miles up the track and after indicating that all was well I took my station to Port about 1 mile from F/Lt Eaton who was flying centre.
    All went well until we were just within sighting distance of Tennants Creek area (about 20 miles) when I noticed white smoke pouring from the exhaust pipes of F/Lt Eaton's machine. On going alongside I could see a white substance running down the fuselage nose below the engine and suddenly I realized that this was molten aluminium from the pistons of the engine. F/Lt Eaton pointed forward and put the nose of his Aircraft down indicating that he was going to carry out a forced landing.
    I dived down close to the ground from 4000 feet and picked out the most likely looking place close to the telegraph line, then opened up and met F/Lt Eaton's machine at about 800 feet and indicated to him what appeared to be the best place to land. He waved and then manoeuvred his machine so that his flatening out would carry him on to some low mulga scrub. The next I saw was a cloud of red dust which obscured his Aircraft as it ploughed along the top of the scrub. A few seconds later we observed F/Lt Eaton and his passenger standing alongside the wreck and waving to indicate they were more or less uninjured which was a great relief after the past few anxious moments. F/O Gerrand and I quickly flew out to the drome near the Telegraph Station and after landing we were met by the Telegraph Officer who said that he had suspected something had gone wrong when he saw the Aircraft circling around in the far distance. He quickly harnessed up his lone horse in a buggy and set off down the road where after about 8 miles he met F/Lt Eaton and his mechanic walking towards Tennants Creek.
    Later that evening when we were all together and having a good meal and assisting the two members of the Telegraph Station in the celebration of one of members birthday we heard by telegraph that Mr Brain of QANTAS flying a DH 50 Aircraft had sighted a large column of smoke away to the South west when he was at altitude in the vicinity of Newcastle Waters. He flew about 70 miles to the locality of the fire and had located the "Kookaburra" at the windward end of the burnt out scrub. While we felt that Mr Brain had carried out a fine job, a certain disappointment was also felt as we would have located the smoke the next day as we flew up from Tennants Creek to Newcastle Waters where it had been arranged that Mr Brain was to join us.
    F/Lt Eaton decided to leave one Aircraft at Tennants Creek as it had been burning excessive oil and there was no good reason for taking it on over the desert to Wave Hill as he still had 3 serviceable aeroplanes.
    We bedded down on a concrete floor in a hut adjoining the Telegraph Officer and managed to get a few hours sleep, but we rose early and F/O Gerrand, F/O Ryan in their machines and myself with F/Lt Eaton on board my machine we took off for Newcastle Waters where we arrived at about 10 AM and there met Mr Lester Brain and his crew with his DH 50 Biplane.
    After refuelling and a general discussion we all took off for the smoke now seen faintly flaming away to the South West and after about 80 miles we sighted the little "Kookaburra" standing apparently unharmed at the end of a rough runway which it was apparent had been prepared by its crew. We placed this location as 80 miles E.S.E. of Wave Hill Cattle Station right in the heart of waterless desert country. We flew around low down for some time and could see one dead man lying under one of the Aircraft's wings, no signs of the other member could be seen. We dropped water and food in the hopes that the unseen member might be alive and able to reach the water dropped. However after about 20 minutes good search by the 4 Aircraft we swung away for Wave Hill where we landed at about 4.30 PM.
    We were met by the Station Manager and Mr Moray of Vestees Ltd where full assistance with vehicles, station hands and accommodation was placed at our disposal.
    F/Lt Eaton then decided to take a small land party to the scene of the "Kookaburra" and to this end Mr Moray volunteered to lead it. F/Lt Eaton detailed me off to accompany him. We spent the next day preparing his Buick single seater for the trip. Mr Moray sent 3 Black Station hands with 26 horses on ahead with instructions to meet up with us 20 miles or so ahead. It was arranged for an aeroplane to come out daily to check on our course and to drop supplies of food. We intended to carry sufficient drinking water on some of the pack horses.
    We got away by car and had good going for the first 25 miles where we met the Blacks and horses. We then pushed on and by dint of hard driving through scrub and over rough boulder strewn country we made a further 15 miles. We camped for the night and just after dark the horses caught up with us. The following morning we got going again but after a few miles the radiator was badly holed by small saplings and scrub we could not avoid. We removed the radiator and soldered up the damaged areas and pushed on again. However we damaged the radiator several times again and also blew out several tyres without making much distance.
    It was obvious that the car journey was at an end. The car was abandoned and a wreck it looked, with the radiator and bonnet etc strewn around the area. However we intended to repair it on the return journey when we had more time.
    We then took to the horses and made another 10 miles towards the "Kookaburra".

    (Eric Douglas Collection).

    Note: Eric Douglas was the only RAAF person with a camera on the RAAF search for Anderson and Hitchcock and so images of the RAAF search are Eric's photography - including the Kookaburra aeroplane.

    RAAF - DH9A's - note that this was 'Alfresco' or open cockpit or open air flying.

    Also see Northern Territory Stories and search for Kookaburra and also see the Darwin Aviation Museum - Liberty V12 Engine (Both sites are online).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    305 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  69. LETTER FROM FRANK HURLEY - October, 1930
    List
    Public

    From Frank Hurley to Eric Douglas – 12 October 1930 –
    (typed letter)
    Bertune
    New South Head Rd
    Rose Bay 12 Oct/30
    Dear Old Doug,
    I’ve had rather a rotten time, having been laid up for a fortnight, otherwise I should have made it my business to have seen more of you while I was in Melbourne. I am back home again now getting up to working standard for the forthcoming cruise.
    I wonder if you have the time, if you could contrive some sort of bracket (detachable) on which to clamp the cine for further photography in the South? You remember the last one. It was very wobbly and a bit on the uncertain side. With tools at your disposal and your usual inventive faculty you should be able to knock up something that will save all sorts of makeshift in the South.
    Well old laddie, news will keep for a few more weeks until we meet aboard the old hulk again
    Cherrio
    Yours-in haste
    (Signed) Frank Hurley

    [Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection]

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    31 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-02-10
    User data
  70. Lieutenant Belgrave Edward Sutton Ninnis
    List
    Public

    Belgrave Edward Sutton Ninnis (1887 - 1912) was an Englishman. He was a British Army Lieutenant in the Royal Fusiliers and an Antarctic Explorer.
    Ninnis was the son of Belgrave Ninnis who was a Royal Navy Surgeon and Surveyor in the region of the Adelaide River in the Northern Territory and he was also an Arctic Explorer.
    From 1911 to 1912 Belgrave Ninnis junior was a member of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE 1911-1914) under the leadership of Dr Douglas Mawson. Mawson chose Belgrave Ninnis as a member of the three member Far Eastern sledging party. The other two members of this sledging party were Dr Xavier Mertz and Dr Mawson himself. Lieutenant Belgrave Ninnis and Dr Xavier Mertz were each assigned the position of Dog handler for the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, commencing in 1911. In fact Dr Xavier Mertz was initially chosen as a Geologist but the friendship he made with Ninnis when going to the Antarctic caused a career change which obviously met with Mawson’s approval.
    A team of 49 Greenland or Husky dogs were taken south to the Antarctic on the expedition ship Aurora in 1911. The Aurora was the main expedition ship. Mawson did contract an additional ship the Toroa to assist with transporting explorers and equipment to Macquarie Island. A small party of five men were deployed there to operate a radio station and carry out research.
    The Far Eastern sledging party of three left the hut (Mawsons Huts) at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay on 10th November, 1912 to survey King George V Land. After about a month of sledging excellent progress was said to have been made.
    Then unexpectedly Belgrave Ninnis fell through a gap in a snow covered crevasse (in the area now known as the Ninnis Glacier) on 14th December, 1912. Mertz and Mawson were ahead of Ninnis and had passed over this crevasse – Mertz on skis and Mawson on a sledge but Ninnis was jogging behind the second sledge and it is thought that he must have breached the top of the crevasse with his weight. When Mawson and Mertz looked back Ninnis was nowhere to be seen. Mertz and Mawson called for some hours near the top of the crevasse but Ninnis was never sighted again. Also lost into that crevasse were six husky dogs, most of the party’s rations, their tent and other essential supplies.
    Dr Xavier Mertz also lost his life on his sledging journey. He died on 8 January 1913. His death was later thought to be due to Vitamin A poisoning from eating husky livers.
    Ninnis’ name was carved by him onto the side of a bunk in the hut (Mawsons Huts) at Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay and can still be seen clearly (2007).
    Antarctic features named in honour of Ninnis are – the Ninnis Glacier, the Ninnis Glacier Tongue and the Mertz-Ninnis Valley (an undersea valley).
    In November 1913 a ‘Memorial Cross and Plaque’ dedicated to Lieutenant Belgrave Ninnis and Dr Xavier Mertz was erected at Azimuth Hill, Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay. The cross was built by Francis Bickerton of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition. The cross has been blown off its position many times and has had to be repaired and repositioned. The original plaque can now be found in the Australian Antarctic Divison’s Library at Kingston, Tasmania. A replica plaque is on the Memorial Cross.

    Sally Douglas

    6 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-31
    User data
  71. LIEUTENANT JOHN BONUS CHILD
    List
    Public

    John Bonus Child was the 3rd Officer on the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931, under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson. He had previously been with the P & O Steam Navigation Company.
    Captain John King Davis had chosen the Ship’s Company for the BANZARE Expedition and he was particularly keen to have experienced men from the Merchant Navy as he felt that their skills and experiences would be more suitable for the Antarctic than those of Royal Naval or Royal Australian Naval men.
    Sir Douglas Mawson according to A Grenfell Price “...did not leave an intimate diary of the second expedition as he did for the first” (1929-1930). So the ...”Log of the Discovery 1930-1931...is probably in the handwriting of Lieutenant J B Child...”. A Grenfell Price in his Winning of Australian Antarctica 1962 said for Voyage 2 commencing on page 98 that “The narrative which follows is based on this log” (Log of the Discovery 1930-31).
    A photographic collection by John Bonus Child can be found at the Scott Polar Research Institute, at the University of Cambridge. Additionally photographs showing Child can be found at the Dundee Heritage Trust site. These latter images were mainly taken by William Robinson Colbeck the 2nd Officer on the BANZARE Expedition.

    Sally Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-31
    User data
  72. Lieutenant Karl Eric (Erik) Oom - BANZARE Voyage 2
    List
    Public

    Karl Eric (Erik) Oom (1904-1972) was born at Chatswood, New South Wales.

    In 1930 Oom was a RAN cartographer and joined the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition for Voyage 2 in 1930-1931. He replaced Commander Morton Moyes who had been on Voyage 1 in 1929-1930. The BANZARE Expedition was under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson.

    In 1918 Oom entered the Royal Australian Naval College at Jervis Bay as a Cadet Midshipman. He trained at sea and completed courses in England before returning to Australia in March, 1926. He then continued his Naval career in the Hydrographic Branch. In July, 1927 Oom joined the survey vessel HMAS Moresby and was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant.

    In 1932-1934 he was on loan to the Royal Navy serving on HMS Challenger. He spent the next five years either aboard HMAS Moresby or with detached boat parties surveying the Torres Strait and seas off Queensland, the Northern Territory, Papua and New Guinea. In 1939 he was posted to HMS Franklin. From February 1941 to January 1942 he commanded the HMS Gleaner in Anti-Submarine and Escort operations in the North Sea.

    On returning to Australia Oom was posted to command HMAS Whyalla in November, 1942. While off Cape Nelson, Papua in January, 1943 the HMAS Whyalla was repeatedly bombed. In about July, 1943 Oom was appointed Officer in Charge of the Hydrographic Branch and was also responsible for survey operations in the South West Pacific.

    In 1945 he was awarded an OBE and also the USA’s Legion of Merit. Lieutenant Oom was also awarded the USA Bronze medal in 1947.

    After the War Oom helped to formulate a new policy by which the Naval Board became the charting authority for waters around Australia and Papua-New Guinea. From May 1946 he commanded HMAS Warrego. In November, 1947 Lieutenant Oom Commanded HMAS Wyatt Earp and was to take charge of Antarctic surveys. The Wyatt Earp, Lincoln Ellsworth’s old ship was involved in the establishment of Macquarie Island as an Australian Sub Antarctic base in 1948 and Oom was the master of the ship.. On board as leader was Stuart Campbell one of Oom’s contemporaries from BANZARE days. In April, 1948 Oom again headed the Hydrographic Branch. He was invalided from the Navy in 1952.

    (The Eric part of his name was initially spelt as such and later seems to have become Erik).

    Sally Douglas

    4 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-03-27
    User data
  73. LIEUTENANT William Robinson Colbeck - 2nd Officer & Navigator on the DISCOVERY
    List
    Public

    Lieutenant William Robinson Colbeck (known as Bill) (1906-1986) was a son of William Colbeck (1871-1930) an Englishman and an Antarctic Explorer, Seaman and Ship’s Captain. William Colbeck Senior served firstly in the Merchant Navy. However, in 1989 he was awarded a Navy Reserve commission and joined Norwegian Carsten Egeberg Borchgrevink on the ‘Southern Cross Expedition‘ to the Antarctic. Next he went south to the Antarctic in Command on the Morning to resupply Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Discovery trapped in the ice at McMurdo Sound. In 1904 he was again the Captain on the Morning going south to the Antarctic with Scott still trapped in the ice. There was a fortunate result however when the ice conditions shifted and the Discovery was freed.

    Lieutenant William Robinson Colbeck son of the famous William Colbeck was the Second Officer and Navigator on both Voyages of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931, under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson. A Collection of BANZARE photographs by William Robinson Colbeck can be found at the Dundee Heritage Trust at Discovery Point, Dundee, online. Plus some of William’s possessions are shown, such as his drawing instruments. William was obviously a keen and very competent ship's Navigator.

    RAAF Pilot Eric Douglas had a good relationship with William Colbeck Jnr when on the Discovery and that is reflected in many images of Eric Douglas (in groups) or with the seaplane Gipsy Moth VH-ULD. Eric also took pictures with William included.

    Sally Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-23
    User data
  74. LINCOLN ELLSWORTH - RELIEF EXPEDITION - 1935/1936 - Eric Douglas's notes
    List
    Public

    Antarctic Flying Times & Remarks - Jan 1936 - Flight Lt G E Douglas

    DH 60X Gipsy Moth Seaplane A7-55

    12/1/36 Self Solo - 30 mins
    Engine Satisfactory in Air, oil pressure normal, lacks revs for take off.
    Air temperature 30 F, clouds 1200 feet
    Position Lat 71 45 S Long 178 W
    Observations General pack and isolated bergs. Some open water to S.

    13/1/36 Self & F/o Murdoch - 1.00 hour
    Engine Take off revs 1700. Satisfactory in air.
    Air temperature (sea level) 26 F.
    Aircraft Satisfactory except controls somewhat stiff, clouds 1300 feet
    Position Lat 73 S Long 178 W. Wind 20 M.P.H. 80 degrees TRUE
    Observations Heavy pack to east, open water 30 miles to S.W.

    15/1/36 Self & F/o Murdoch - 1.00 hour
    Eng take off revs 1710. Satisfactory in air.
    Aircraft Due to low air temperature 4 F, sea spray froze to floats and underside of fuselage and wings.
    Pos Bay of Whales Lat 78 30 S Long 164 W.
    Ross ice barrier to Little America 7 miles south TRUE.
    Obs One man seen at Little America. Food & letter dropped by parachute. Flying conditions difficult due to snow blind light.

    28/1/36 Self & F/o Murdoch - 1.00 hour (take off time 1000 hrs)
    Eng Take off revs 1725 (This due mainly to better warming)
    Pos Lat 73 20 S Long 175 E
    Obs Light broken clouds 1500 feet. Large ice berg 16 by 4 miles, open water to N.W. - 15 miles distant. Otherwise general pack.

    28/1/36 Self & F/o Murdoch - 1.05 (take off time 1835 hrs)
    Eng Very satisfactory
    Air temp 30 F
    Pos Lat 73 S Long 174 50 E
    Obs General pack in all directions, easiest conditions appeared to be to the north east.

    LINCOLN ELLSWORTH RELIEF EXPEDITION – 1935/36 – ANTARCTICA
    Moth Seaplane A7-55 (As in Flying Log Book 5) –
    • 12/1/1936 Pilot Self Solo – Reco Pack Ice Lat. 71.45 S Long 178 W
    • 13/1/1936 Pilot Self Crew F/O Murdoch – Reco Pack Ice Lat. 73 S Long 178 W
    1300’ Wind 20 MPH. 80 degrees true. Heavy pack to East
    • 15/1/1936 Pilot Self Crew F/O Murdoch – Bay of Whales, Little America and Return. Ross Ice Barrier. Lat 78 S long 164 W. Air Temp 6 degrees F.
    • 28/1/1936 Pilot Self Crew F/O Murdoch – Reco Pack Ice Lat. 73.30 S Long 175 E
    • 28/1/1936 Pilot Self Crew F/O Murdoch – Reco Pack Ice Lat. 73 S Long 174.50 E.

    [Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection].

    In his Flying Log Eric Douglas refers to this as a Cirrus Moth but in his report on the search for Lincoln Ellsworth as a Gipsy Moth 60X.

    The RAAF Museum at Point Cook has the the DH 60G Gipsy Moth and DH 60X Cirrus Moth - all under the main heading of DH 60G Gipsy Moth. Morover, this Moth was the 'one off' built at Cockatoo Island Naval Dockyard under the supervision of Sir Lawrence Wackett and delivered to RAAF Service in 1933.

    The search was known officially as 'The Ellsworth Relief Expedition'. The cost ot the search 'Ellsworth Relief Expedition' was shared equally between the British, Australian and New Zealand Governments with the proviso that if the cost exceeded £6,000 then any excess was to be paid equally by the British and Australian Governments. The cost of aircraft and flying personnel was borne by the Australian Government. The costs to be shared equally were listed under the broad headings of - Oil Fuel, Ships Stores, Equipment and Provisions of Shore Parties and Miscellaneous (Radiograms, maps, freight and other stores etc). The Equipment and Provisions of Shore Parties included items such as - Alpine rope, exploding distress signals, Burberry 'snow coats', 'snow helmets', leather mittens, waterproof sleeping bags, ski boots, sun goggles and pemmican. (from the NAA).

    I was lucky enough to meet up with Mary Louise (Ulmer) Ellsworth in New York on more than one occasion in the mid 1980's; and to meet up with Beekman Pool in Boston in the mid 1980's and in New York in the late 1990's. Mary Louise (Ulmer) Ellsworth was a pioneer Woman pilot - when I met her she was living at the Carlyle Hotel on Madison Avenue, New York. In her suite at the Carlyle, Mary Louise was surrounded by pictures, artefacts, awards and other reminders that her husband a legend of Arctic and Antarctic exploration was on first hand terms with American Presidents. While Beekman Pool was Lincoln Ellsworth's friend and travelling companion across Greenland. I stayed with Beekman and his wife Elizabeth in Vermont, United States in the mid 1980's. Beekman wrote about Lincoln Ellsworth and Elizabeth was an academic history writer. Both Mary Louise Ellsworth and Beekman Pool were keen to talk about Lincoln Ellsworth and Eric Douglas and the adventures that caused their paths to meet up at Little America on the Ross Ice Shelf (Barrier). Mary Louise in particular was keen to ask questions abour Sir Hubert Wilkins who was in charge of Ellsworth's Polar vessel the 'Wyatt Earp'. (Earp having been Ellsworth's hero).

    Note - cockpit or open air flying in the Gipsy Moth seaplane A7-55.

    Press cuttings on the search for Ellsworth and the deck log for the Discovery II are held at the National Oceanography Centre at the University of Southampton. An example of a press cutting - http://viewer.soton.ac.uk/nol/image/2253/282/#head

    Te Papa Collection - http://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/Object/1226884

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    241 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-08
    User data
  75. LINCOLN ELLSWORTH'S EXPEDITION SHIP - WYATT EARP
    List
    Public

    The Wyatt Earp was originally a single deck Norwegian Herring Fishing Vessel the FV Fanefjord built of Baltic pine and English oak in 1919.
    The ship was purchased and modified by Lincoln Ellsworth in 1933 and renamed the Wyatt Earp.
    At this point in time it was named after the Western Marshall Wyatt Earp who was Lincoln Ellsworth's hero. Ellsworth was not related to Wyatt Earp but he did meet Mrs Earp a couple of times. Ellsworth collected Wyatt Earp memorabilia including his gun belt and holster. These facts were related to me personally by Ellsworth's widow Mary Louise (Ulmer) in the mid 1980's.
    The Wyatt Earp was used as Ellsworth’s back up expedition ship to support his trans Antarctic flight of 1935. In charge onboard was Sir Hubert Wilkins, together with a spare aeroplane the Texaco 20.
    When Ellsworth had later finally found no further use in the Antarctic for the Wyatt Earp he gave the ship to Sir Hubert Wilkins. In the end Ellsworth had decided that the ship rolled too much. Wilkins accepted the Wyatt Earp as a gift and sold it to the Australian Government in early 1939.
    In October, 1939 the ship was commissioned by the RAN (Royal Australian Navy) as the HMAS Wongala.
    From January, 1940 the Wongala moved to Port Adelaide, South Australia where it served with the Examination Service to late 1943.
    From November, 1943 to late in March, 1944 the Wongala served as Guard Ship at Whyalla, South Australia.
    In 1945 the ship was made available for sea cadet training.
    From 1947 to 1948 it was a Master vessel recommissioned by the RAN as the HMAS Wyatt Earp. In the period 1947 to 1948 it was in fact used by the Australian Antarctic Division to set up ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition) for the purposes of Antarctic and scientific research on Heard and Macquarie Islands.
    In late 1951 the Wyatt Earp was sold to a commercial operator and renamed the Wongala.
    A later change of ownership and it was renamed the Natone.
    It was wrecked in a storm off Double Island Point, Queensland on the night of 24th January, 1959.
    I went onboard this ship as a child with my parents when it docked in the Yarra River, Melbourne for a couple of days in about 1952. I remember it as being a small ship pulled up against the wharf. It was not impressive but it was instilled in me that it had an important place in Australian Antarctic history.
    Information on the Wyatt Earp at the Australian Antarctic Division site - http://www.antarctica.gov.au/about-antarctica/history/transportation/shipping/hmas-wyatt-earp-1947-48
    At the Royal Australian Navy site - http://www.navy.gov.au/hmas-wyatt-earp

    Also see Australian Screen - http://aso.gov.au/titles/documentaries/antarctica-1948/notes/

    Sally Douglas

    18 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-12-19
    User data
  76. MAWSON, S Y DISCOVERY & Gipsy Moth VH-ULD
    List
    Public

    BANZARE - January 1931 - by Eric Douglas 1902 to 1970

    Among the many occasions when it was my privilege to pilot Sir Douglas Mawson in the small seaplane belonging to the B.A.N.Z.A.R.Expedition 1929 -1931 on reconnaissance flights from the vicinity of the Expedition Ship DISCOVERY 1, when in or close to the pack ice off the unknown sectors of the Antarctic Continent south of Australia and the Indian Ocean, there was one instance when we came close to disaster.

    It was in Latitude 65 - 07 S. Longitude 107 - 22 E on the 27th January,1931 and our leader Sir Douglas Mawson was most anxious to gain a glimpse of the elusive Antarctic Continent which he considered was relatively close by. In rather unfavourable weather conditions we were lowered overboard in the Seaplane and I then taxied the plane down wind. Several times the plane’s floats were buried under the oncoming swells and I was forced to stop. Eventually we gained what appeared to be adequate distance for the take-off run up wind before we would meet the heavy pack ice.

    Early in the take off run it became evident that I would need all my skill to get the plane off safely, for as we picked up speed and rode over the swells the plane was repeatedly thrown into the air without proper flying speed. It was touch and go but we made it with about 100 yards to spare before we met the dangerous pack ice and to my surprise I heard Sir Douglas say to me over our speaking tubes “well done”.

    At 1500 feet altitude we climbed through a mist and at 3000 feet we met a layer of clouds through which we climbed for 600 feet before we broke through above them. I then climbed the plane to 6000 feet and observed that the clouds below us stretched away to the horizon in all directions except to the south where we detected a faint blue showing up in a sector of the sky. It probably was the Antarctic Continent as generally we proved from experience that when clouds prevailed over the pack ice the sky over the continent was clear of clouds. We flew southwards for about 20 minutes before making a sweeping turn to the right. What appeared to be undulating ice covered land showed up to the south but we could not be certain that it was indeed part of the Antarctic Continent. Sir Douglas recorded the sighting as probable land in the vicinity of Wilkes’ Knox Land. After about 3/4 of an hour I throttled the engine down and glided through the clouds and after a short time sighted our ship about 4 miles away to the north west in a pool of water which appeared to be almost black against the glare of the surrounding pack ice and ice bergs. We came in low over ice strewn sea and made an alighting close to the ship.

    Sir Douglas then indicated to the Discovery that we would attempt to hook onto the ship’s lifting tackle with the ship steaming slowly into the swell to decrease the roll of the ship and thus minimize the danger of damaging the plane as it was being lifted on board. I turned the plane alongside but the surge and wash from the ship carried the plane out from the ship’s side and we missed the lifting hook.

    I made another attempt with much the same results but on the third try, Sir Douglas managed to hook our sling over the lifting hook. The next instance the plane was lifted clear of the water with a jerk as the ship rolled and then suddenly the starboard wing of the plane went under the sea and before we could appreciate what had caused this, the plane tilted up vertically and Sir Douglas who had been kneeling on the fuselage decking near the sling, fell towards the water but fortunately managed to grasp a strut and to hang on with only his feet in the sea. I was still strapped in my cockpit but managed to release the strap and clamber up towards the nose of the plane in an effort to weigh the nose down and give some degree of righting to our machine.

    A few seconds later the plane’s lifting sling broke and the aeroplane fell into the water with its tail and the rear part of the fuselage under the sea. We quickly dropped astern of the moving ship and could see and hear that consternation reigned as the crew made efforts to launch a boat to come to our rescue. During this time both Sir Douglas and myself clambered on to the bow of the plane’s floats and apart from our legs escaped a ducking in the cold sea. Several minutes later the boat came along side and took us on board.
    We knew from repute and other incidents that Sir Douglas had always acted with great activity and control in emergencies and although this incident could have had serious consequences, his presence of mind and encouragement given to all, made our difficulties appear far less than they actually were.

    We managed to get the aeroplane on board without further damage and later on made repairs and had the plane ready for further flights.

    I wish to add that we all loved our leader a he was a truly great man and an inspiration to us, at all times.

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection).

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    164 items
    created by: public:beetle 2012-06-14
    User data
  77. MAWSON'S HUTS - Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay (Adelie Land)
    List
    Public

    ERIC DOUGLAS' LOG.

    Cape Denison, Commonwealth Bay -

    Monday 5th Jan. 1931

    We were awakened at 7AM and told that the wind had gone down. What a difference on deck after yesterday, brilliant sunshine, practically no wind and feeling rather warm. We had breakfast then lowered the motor launch over and loaded her up. At 8AM we pushed off, there being twelve of us and all the gear so we had a full load. The run into the boat harbour from the ship is about two miles. When we neared Cape Denison, hundreds of Penguins could be seen on the rocky slopes, we turned a rocky point and a magnificent little harbour unfolded before us, it was about 100 yards wide and 300 yards long with ice clad sides, the tops of which were ten feet or so out of the water. At the top end could be seen the main hut, it appeared to be in good condition externally. Soon we came alongside the ice at the top end and then several scrambled ashore to make the boat fast. Steps were cut in the ice and we then passed all the camping gear and scientific equipment ashore. I returned to the ship with one A.B. to pick up the Skipper and a few of the crew. This was carried out in quick time and on the way back we skirted the foot of the high ice face, it towered above us well over a hundred feet high. When the boat was made fast I went ashore to have a look around. The main hut was well weathered on the outside but still appeared to be strong and holding well together. On looking through a broken window in the smaller extension of the hut it appeared to be full of frozen snow. Frozen snow was loaded into the motor boat and carried off to the ship, this was repeated several times until our tanks were full, roughly four tons were brought off in this way. Stu relieved me in the afternoon from running the launch and I had a good look around. Quite warm ashore tramping around on the frozen snow. I put the skis on and had a play for about an hour in the vicinity of the hut on a nearby slope. We made the last trip to the ship at 8PM, all came off except six, they were Sir Douglas, Hurley, Falla, Cherub, Kennedy and the Doc. We are going ashore at 7AM in the morning

    Tuesday 6th Jan. 1931

    Another glorious day. We were up early, had breakfast and left the ship at 7.30AM. The run in to the old hut is about two miles. When we arrived the two tents were still up, but the chaps on shore had gone about their jobs hours before. They had made an entry in the main hut through a skylight, snow was packed near the roof but the hut was fairly clear and one could walk about. Beautiful snow crystals were attached to old books, bottles, bunks and rafters, somewhat like inside a crystal cave. Hurley took flash light photos of the inside. I found an old Burberry blouse and souvenired several books. I stayed ashore and gave Frank Hurley a hand lumping his gear about and a large party set off to visit the Mackellar Islets (by motor boat) which consist of a group of small islands mostly covered by snow and situated about a mile due north of the boat harbour.
    I forgot to mention that yesterday at noon the Flag was hoisted and the Proclamation read out. Sir Douglas read this and the Skipper hoisted the Flag, after this three cheers were given and the Ceremony was completed.

    The Proclamation Runs As Follows
    Proclamation
    In the name of His Majesty George the Fifth, King of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the seas. Emperor of India.
    By Sir Douglas Mawson “Whereas I have it in Command from His Majesty King George the Fifth to assert the Sovereign rights of his Majesty over British land discoveries met with in Antarctica. Now therefore I Sir Douglas Mawson, do hereby proclaim and declare to all men that from and after the date of these Presents the full sovereignty of the Territory of King George V land and its extension under the name of Oates land, situated between Longitudes 142 and 162 east of Greenwich and between Latitudes 66 South and the South Pole. Included herein are the following Islands; The Curzon Archipelago, May Archipelago, Dixson Island, Mackeller Islets, Hodgeman Islands, vests in his Majesty King George the Fifth, His Heirs and Successors forever.
    Given under my hand at Cape Denison on the Fifth day of January 1931”.
    The Proclamation is signed by Sir Douglas Mawson and is Witnessed by K Mackenzie, Master of the Discovery.

    We brought along a portable H.M.V. gramophone and played it to the Penguins in a nearby rookery, they did not appreciate good music, but kept picking at the instrument in their anger. We also introduced Mickey the mouse (a three ply cutting of Mickey standing about two feet high). In the rookery he was received by pecks and beating flippers from the birds standing on their nests. Later on we planted him in a pathway that the penguins take when walking along the icy foreshore, and here he was an object of great interest.

    There were quite a number of Weddell seals about, and when one came near them they just rolled over on their side and opened their eyes sleepily at the strange human beings, then seeing that they were not hurt they promptly went to sleep again.

    It became so warm walking about, that soon we just had our singlets and trousers on, this warmth is due mainly to the reflection from the snow, and soon causes sunburn to the face and hands.

    At 1PM we made back to the Hut and set the Primus going. For water we scooped up a panfull of clear snow and soon we had delicious tea. Our food ashore consisted of Rex Pie, tinned fruit and bread, and it is surprising the amount one can make disappear after a few hours tramping around.

    After lunch I had a run from the ship at 3PM and the remaining gear and stores were put aboard. I then nailed up the skylight and collected a case of Shell petrol and a tin of Castor oil from the old dump at the rear of the hut.

    As to the condition of these twenty year old stores the surprising thing was the good condition they were in, practically no metal had rusted badly and steel wires were as good as the day they were made. The wood exposed to the blasts were well scoured by the blasting effect of driving snow, but the wood itself was in good condition, this was probably due to the cold dry air that predominates the whole year round

    At 3.30PM we had a final look around then all aboard, good bye was said and we headed out to the ship. It had been a most enjoyable and interesting experience to see Adelie land and also to gaze on the hut and scene of operations of the 1912 -1914 Mawson Expedition.

    At 4PM our anchor was raised and the ship steamed slowly in towards the barrier face. I went with Frank Hurley and Stu in the motor boat, we came along behind the ship so that Frank could obtain cinema of the ship coasting along the ice face.

    At 4.30PM we came along side and were hoisted aboard, then our course was set away to westward. Soon the rocky outcrop (Cape Denison) had faded from view and so our last glimpse of Winter Quarters and Adelie land. LAT 66 58 LONG 142 38.

    Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection (Gilbert Eric Douglas 1902 - 1970) - from the log of the second BANZARE Voyage 1930/31.

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    8 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  78. Mt GAMBIER HIGH SCHOOL - talk or speech by Eric Douglas in April 1931
    List
    Public

    Response by the Mt Gambier High School - May 20th 1931 - to Flying Officer Douglas, RAAF, Point Cook - Victoria

    "Dear Sir ,
    This note will doubtless be a surprise to you. In our recent terminal examination I set a question 'My most interesting hour at school'. Quite a number chose the subject of your discourse when you visited us. This lad's effort so impressed me by its sincerity and appreciation that I asked him to write it again so that I could forward it to you.
    I am sending it to you, just to show that your litte act of kindness was by no means lost and that what little you thought you were doing had an incalculable influence upon our students. Believe me it opened their eyes and stimulated their imagination and desire to know things.
    If ever you pass through here again we will be pleased to welcome you.
    Yours faithfully
    H M Noblett"

    Student - "One Wednesday morning two aviators, one of whom had accompanied Sir Douglas Mawson on his recent polar expedition, visited the school. It was the speech of Flying Officer Douglas one of the gentlemen, that gave me my most interesting hour at the High School.
    Before telling us of the arctic regions, he aptly described to us the 'Discovery' the vessel in which they sailed. He told us of their amount of equipment, their object in the voyage, he then began on the voyage itself, which to me held many wonders, and things of which I had never heard,
    So vividly did he describe the mountanous icebergs, and the wonderful sea life of the antarctic, that I felt as though I was there myself and not a mere listener. His adventures and thrills seemed to be endless. Sometime(s) he would be high above the frozen seas in a moth plane searching for new lands, and another time he would be chasing the monster whale. Again he would tell us of the wonderful whaling factories which often worked for weeks without a night (off). [Eric's views on this were views purely at the time].
    I obtained from his speech new ideas of other lands which I did not know existed. Sometimes one would pity his brave party of explorers living on almost next to nothing but more often did I envy them and wish I was with them, to share their countless thrills and danger.
    To my sorrow Flying Officer Douglas could not talk at great length and at last when he did conclude everybody showed great approval of his fine speech. In the schoolyard, his speech supplied talking material for all, and I think that the school is greatly indebted to Flying Officer Douglas for his fine lecture"

    Another newspaper (cutting) relates that "...His comments on the actual discovery of new land was one of the most interesting features, and no doubt the story of Captain Cook's historic landing in Australia flashed through the minds of the students as they heard Flying Officer Douglas speak of the planting of the Australian flag on new Antarctic land, and the reading of the proclamation.
    He also gave an interesting account of whaling operations in the Antarctic seas...
    Touching on the uses of aircraft for exploration work, the speaker said all their flights were made off the water, nearly always surrounded by ice. There was generally an ocean swell, and it was extremely difficult to take off. The flights were most valuable, however, as they could see about 70 miles from a height of six or seven thousand feet, and many days of useless steaming through pack ice was often saved.
    Bearings and observations were made during flights along the coastline in the Gypsy Moth machine which the expedition carried.
    Flying Officer Douglas was warmly thanked for his interesting and educational lecture, many points about the Antarctic regions having been touched upon"

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection)

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    8 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  79. Officers, Crew and the RAAF Party on the RRS Discovery II - search for Ellsworth
    List
    Public

    The Discovery II was a steel ship built in Glasgow and fully launched in 1929. It was the first purpose built oceanographic research ship and was named after the Discovery or SY Discovery. Moreover, it was a triple oil burning steamship.

    Some of the personnel on the RRS Discovery II or Discovery II at the time of the 'Ellsworth Relief Expedition' in 1935-1936 were as follows - (The Discovery II contingent was said to be 52)

    Deck Officers -
    Lieutenant Leonard Charles Hill - Master
    1st Officer Lieutenant R Walker
    H Kirkwood
    T H B Oates
    Victor A J B Marchesi - He was the 4th Officer during this period. At a later period he was Captain of the famous Cutty Sark
    Surgeon -
    J R Strong
    Engineers -
    W A Horton
    Andrew Nicol Porteous
    R G Gourlay
    Scientists -
    Mr George Raven Deacon - In Charge of the Scientists (later Sir George Deacon).
    Dr Francis (Frank) Downes Ommanney - Marine Biologist
    Dr James William Slessor Marr - Oceanographer, Zoolologist and Marine Biologist and Planktonologist and Krill Specialist
    Ritchie Simmers - Meteorologist.
    Petty Officers -
    CD Buchanan ERA
    Bos'un W E Suffield
    Chief Steward A T Berry
    Telegraphist (Radio Officer) A E Morris
    W F Fry Laboratory Assistant
    B F McCarthy Laboratory Assistant
    Alfred Saunders Laboratory Assistant and Photographer for the Discovery Committee
    G Ayers Netman
    Sydney Austin Bainbridge Writer and Purser. He painted a water colour image of Ellsworth's plane the 'Polar Star' which has been donated to the Melbourne Museum. It was signed by Lincoln Ellsworth and presented to Flight Lieut Eric Douglas, leader of the RAAF contingent on board the Discovery II. A further painting was also presented to Flight Lieut Eric Douglas. It was an oil painting of the Discovery II by a member of the ship's crew. I would love to know who painted it, but probably never will. It has also been donated to the Melbourne Museum. My philosophy being that the long term survival of these two works of art treasured by my family, was paramount in my decision to donate them to a worthy institution.
    T Hawthorne Carpenter
    J Cook Leading Fireman
    F Smedley Cook
    G Irving Cook
    J Matheson Bo'suns Mate
    R E King Assistant Steward
    C Gobart Assistant Steward.
    AB's (Able Seaman) -
    N Cobbett
    J E Dobson - nickname 'Tich' aged 17
    H Jacobs
    C Lashmer or Alfred Lashmar
    J D McKenzie
    A Moore
    A Osgood
    G Patience
    J Reid
    W L or John Warner - nickname 'Plum'.
    George Wright
    Stokers -
    Alfred William Cooper - dismissed in Melbourne on 18th December, 1935
    H Jones
    H L Jones
    J Livermore
    D Wilford
    L H Thomas
    V Vidulich
    Ordinary Seamen -
    C Dundas
    John Harty - Mess Boy
    J Ridoch
    S Sheperd
    Mess Boy and Ordinary Seaman -
    Tommy H Dalton. Tommy Dalton was a Melbourne boy of 16. It was said that when they got into the ice, the ordinary seamen took shifts at standing by the telegraph to ring the Captain's orders for more or less speed in the engine room.

    RAAF Contingent -
    Flight Lieutenant (Gilbert) Eric Douglas 1st Pilot and in Charge of the RAAF Flight
    Flying Officer Alister M Murdoch Navigator and 2nd Pilot
    Flight Sergeant Frank S Spooner Engine Fitter and Emergency Pilot
    Sergeant E Frank Easterbourne Metal Rigger
    Corporal Norman E Cotte Metal Rigger
    AC1 Charles W Gibbs Engine Fitter
    Sergeant James W Reddrop Wireless Operator Mechanic.

    Lincoln Ellsworth who was a famous Polar Explorer came to Melbourne from the Bay of Whales, Ross Sea on the return journey of the Discovery II to that destination. Herbert Hollick-Kenyon, Antarctic Explorer and Ellsworth's pilot at the time returned to the United States on Ellsworth's Expedition ship the Wyatt Earp. Ellsworth's Northrop Gamma the 'Polar Star' of the trans Antarctic flight from Dundee Island to 'Little America' on the Ross Ice Barrier also went back on the Wyatt Earp.

    The Deck Log of the Discovery II is held at the National Oceanographic Centre in the Archives at the University of Southampton. UK. The logbooks are said to contain sea ice observations and a full range of sub-daily Meteoroligical and Oceanographic observations on such topics as Whale populations, Ocean currents, Atmospheric winds, Hydrological surveys and the Topography of some of the Balleny Islands and other Antarctic Islands in the Ross Sea. These were part of the 'Discovery Investigations' and 'Discovery Reports' were published resulting from these Investigations.

    Initially the funding for the Discovery Investigations was largely from Whaling Licences and Permits. From 1924 the Discovery Committee was responsible for the Discovery Investigations and it worked under the Colonial office. Then in 1949 The Committee's functions, together with Scientific staff, ships and other assets was taken over by the Admiralty and ultimately its work formed part of the National Institute of Oceanography at Southampton.

    Discovery Investigations - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discovery_Investigations .

    This was part of the the Fourth Commission of the Discovery II. There were some men on this Commission who were onboard the Discovery II either before or after the 'Ellsworth Relief Expedition' and I have not included their names here. So most the names I obtained were from the records of personnel on the Fourth Commission. Moreover, I already knew about some including their first names.

    The Ship's Report by the Captain, Lieutenant Leonard C Hill, together with the Flight Report by Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas can be viewed at the National Archives of Australia online.

    In the early 1970's I made contact with Dr Deacon and Dr Ommanney and received lovely responses from both of them. Once Dr Deacon posted me some prints relating to the 'Ellsworth Relief Expedition' and the original ownership of those prints was 'Discovery Committee, Colonial Office, London'.

    At least two books were written at the time on the search for Lincoln Ellsworth and the one was by Dr Frank Ommanney was called South Latitude. Two other excellent coverages are - Moments of Terror, The Story of Antarctic Aviation by Dr David Burke and Alfresco Flight, The RAAF Antarctic Experience (pdf online) by David Wilson.

    Also see RFA Historical on the Discovery II - http://historicalrfa.org/rfa-discovery-ii

    Te Papa Collection - http://collections.tepapa.govt.nz/Object/1226884

    Sally Douglas

    27 items
    created by: public:beetle 2016-08-26
    User data
  80. PATRICK RYAN - A Contractor, Carter and Farmer in Geelong
    List
    Public

    Patrick Ryan c1818 and Bridget Gleeson c1815 - both from Ireland. I think that Bridget Gleeson was about 4 to 5 years older than Patrick Ryan. A daughter Mary Ann Ryan was born in Geelong, Victoria c1841/1842? On Mary Ann's death certificate her age on dying in November, 1883 is stated as being 42.

    Mary Ann Ryan married Gabriel Douglas in 1881 in Fitzroy, Victoria and died in 1883 in South Melbourne. Children of Mary Ann and Gabriel Douglas were Eleanora Douglas, George Douglas, Mary Jane Douglas, Jean Douglas (lived in South Africa with her husband 'Norrie' Dallas Forbes - they both died there), Gabriel Walter Douglas, Gabriel Douglas, Frederick Douglas, Mary Ann Douglas, Annie (Nan/Nance) Isabella Ryan Douglas (lived in South Africa with her husband Ernest Edward Maginnity - Ernest Maginnity died on the sea journey from South Africa to Melbourne in 1936 and 'Nan/Nance' nee Douglas, Maginnity died at the Gully Hospital, near Boronia in 1949) and Robert William Arthur Douglas.

    Eleanora Douglas married William H Casbolt, George Douglas married Katherine Mary Egan, Mary Jane Douglas married Walter Gardner, Jean Douglas married Norman (Norrie) Dallas Forbes (born in Jamaica, West Indies), Gabriel Douglas married (1) Elizabeth Thompson and (2) Elma Jean Pryde, Mary Ann Douglas married Martin Danaher, Annie Isabella Ryan Douglas married (1) possibly to Frank Thompson (sons Walter Frank Thompson and David Frank Thompson)? and (2) Lieutenant Ernest Edward Maginnity (born in New Zealand); and Robert William Arthur Douglas married Mary Agnes Williams.

    Patrick Ryan may have been born c1818 in Burr/Birr (Parsontown) Offaly (Kings County) and died on 4/6/1887 in Geelong? (He was listed as age 70 and his wife was Bridget). Bridget (Gleeson?) his wife was born c1815 in Ireland (likely in Tipperary). Children Martin Ryan?, Mary Ann Ryan c1841/1842? in Geelong, Catherine/Katherine Margaret Ryan born 1847 (or a few years earlier) in Geelong (but baptised at St Francis in 1847 Victorian Reg 39737 - on this Patrick Ryan is referred to as Patt Ryan) and Josephine Ryan c1857 in Geelong. On Patrick Ryan's death certificate in 1887 his children are listed as Catherine Margaret Ryan 37 (sic 40) years and Josephine Ryan 20 (sic 30) years. It also states that he came from Kings County in Ireland, was married in Melbourne, that his wife was Bridget (Ryan) and that he was 27 (sic 26) when he married (so he was born c1818 and married c1844)

    The nearest that I can get at the moment for Bridget Gleeson c1815 is that she may been baptised in 1815 or 1816 in the Roman Catholic Ecclesiastical Province of Cashel and Emly (in Tipperary). Geographically most of this Province is in Tipperary with a small eastern section in Limerick.

    Patrick Ryan was a Farmer in Geelong. His father was also a Patrick Ryan (Geelong Heritage Centre - records of Patrick Ryan, the farmer).

    [If his father was not a Patrick then this could be relevant - 1821 Census in King's County - Birr, Post Office Lane - John Ryan a Labourer c1781 age 40, his wife Mary c1781 age 40 and daughter Margaret Ryan c1811 age 10, and son Pat Ryan c1816 age 5.]

    Looking for Patrick Ryan, the father of Patrick Ryan, the farmer - Griffiths Index 1848 to 1864 - Ryan Patrick, Eden Street, (Townparks) Birr Offaly and Ryan Patrick, Town of Crinkill, Grove Street, Birr Offaly.

    From the National Archives (UK) a Patrick Ryan born in Birr, Offaly served in the 12th and 112th Foot Regiments and was discharged aged 69 (1794-1815).

    The Tithe Applotment Books for Birr, Offaly -
    Surname Forename Townland/Street Parish County Year
    Ryan John 'Crinkle' Birr King's 1823
    Ryan John 'Crinkill William Brook' Birr King's 1823
    Ryan Edwd 'Ballindarra' Birr King's 1823
    Ryan John 'Clonoghil' Birr King's 1823
    Ryan Edwd 'Parsonstown Parks' Birr King's 1823
    Note, no Patrick Ryan is listed for the Parish of Birr.

    About Birr - Full text of "The early history of the town of Birr, or Parsonstown : with ...
    www.archive.org/stream/.../earlyhistoryofto00cookuoft_djvu.txt
    Probable visit of St. Patrick to Birr. A battle there. Alleged ascension to heaven of St. Brendan. His successors. The "Codex Rusworthianus." Royal meeting at Birr ..."

    More about Birr - Birr, sources for the history of
    www.offalyhistory.com - "For the history of Birr in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century the reader should look for: N.D. Atkinson: The Plantation of Ely ..."

    A Patrick Ryan age 28 and Bridget Ryan age 20 came to Port Phillip in 1841 on the 'Royal Saxon' - Reel 2143A (Assisted British Immigration to Port Phillip - Probate Office of Victoria).
    Family Name Given Name Age Month Year Ship Book Page
    RYAN BRIDGET 20 JUL 1841 ROYAL SAXON 1 19
    RYAN CATHERINE 29 JUL 1841 ROYAL SAXON 1 19
    RYAN CATHERINE 30 JUL 1841 ROYAL SAXON 1 19
    RYAN JOHN 25 JUL 1841 ROYAL SAXON 1 17
    RYAN PATK 28 JUL 1841 ROYAL SAXON 1 17
    RYAN WILLIAM 22 JUL 1841 ROYAL SAXON 1 16
    The Patrick Ryan here was a single man.

    GLEESON BRIDGET 27 NOV 1841 DIAMOND 1 165 (Assisted British Immigration to Port Phillip - Probate Office of Victoria).
    Family Name Given Name Age Month Year Ship Book Page
    GLEESON BRIDGET 27 NOV 1841 DIAMOND 1 165
    GLEESON CATHERINE 20 NOV 1841 DIAMOND 1 165
    GLEESON MARGT 23 NOV 1841 DIAMOND 1 165
    GLEESON MICHAEL 27 NOV 1841 DIAMOND 1 162
    (These four Gleesons were Bounty Immigrants). Is this the right Bridget Gleeson? (Single, Housemaid, reads, RC from Tipperary). As well, is this Bridget Gleeson and her siblings arriving at Port Phillip on the Diamond - a barque - on 8th November, 1841? Margaret Gleeson married Jeremiah Crowe in 1847 at St Marys (RC) in Geelong. While, Michael Gleeson married Margaret McCarthy in 1846 at St Marys (RC) Geelong.

    There was also a marriage at St Francis Church, Melbourne (RC) 1844 - apparently showing Patrick Ryan who married a Julia Gleeson - they had a daughter Mary Ryan baptised at St Francis in 1842 Victorian Reg 291 and she was seemingly born in Melbourne and not Geelong. A streaming database online "Australia - Victoria - BMD - Historical Index" lists a Mary Ryan (00291) parents Patrick Ryan and Julia Gleeson - baptised at St Francis Church in 1842. (Same record).

    By 1850 Patrick Ryan and Julia (Gleeson) Ryan were living at Saltwater Creek, whereas Patrick and Bridget Ryan were living in Wright Place/Street, Geelong by 1850. So I think that Patrick and Julia Ryan could just about be ruled out as the parents of Mary Ann Ryan c1841/1842?

    From this same database, there as a marriage at St Francis in 1844 where a Patrick Ryan wed a Bridget Ryan (00100 and 35753 - two entries?). This may have been them? Could Bridget have decided to take Ryan rather than Gleeson as her surname for her marriage to Patrick Ryan as they already had a child Mary Ann Ryan in about 1842?

    A Patrick Ryan - single 22 RC Labourer - arrived on the Strathfieldsaye at Geelong on 30 August 1841 - he was born in Kings County and came on the Bounty Scheme. The Strathfieldsaye left London on 1st May 1841, and Plymouth on 16th May 1841 for Port Phillip. It arrived in Port Phillip on 3oth August, 1841. Patrick could read and write. This could be the Patrick Ryan who married Bridget Ryan at St Francis Church in 1844?

    Some points on Shipping -
    Melbourne Shipping - Arrivals 30 August, 1841 - Strathfieldsaye, barque, Warren, from London and Plymouth, 16th May with 259 bounty immigrants - Geelong Advertiser of 4 September, 1841. The Superintendent of the Emigrants was a Dr Thomas Bayston.
    Arrived...the Diamond from Cork to Port Phillip, with immigrants, six days ago in Bass' Straits. She (Diamond) had nine deaths on board during the passage - The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser of 13th November, 1841; and Melbourne Shipping - Arrivals - 4th November, 1841 - Diamond, barque, Taylor, from London 1st July and Cork 23rd July, with 330 immigrants - Geelong Advertiser of 8th November, 1841.

    The same streaming database online lists a Mary Ryan (00053), mother Bridget Ryan, as being baptised at St Francis Church in 1842.

    In January 1853 and December,1854 there were unclaimed letters for a Bridget Gleeson at the Geelong Post Office.

    In May 1855 a Patrick Ryan had two brick cottages up for sale, they were in Government Lane off Corio Street East, at the rear of the Belle Vue Hotel.

    In April 1860 Patrick Ryan was a Carter to Mr Frederick Bauer in Geelong. Mr Frederick Bauer was a Shipping Agent, Importer, Merchant, Storehouse man and Ironmonger in Geelong in the 1850s and 1860s. One of Mr Frederick Bauer's specialties was the importation of pre-fabricated homes, both wooden and galvanized.

    The Patrick Ryan who died at Geelong on 1887 - Victorian Reg 6503 - was a Carter, Contractor and Farmer and his wife was Bridget but I have not yet confirmed her maiden name. This Bridget Ryan died on 23/3/1917 at the age 98, and her residence when she died was in Wright Street, Geelong. The Catholic Press of 5/4/1917 said that Bridget Ryan was the wife of Patrick Ryan a well-known Contractor in the early days, that she was over 100 and had lived at the same address for upwards of 75 years (c1842). Bridget may have even been 101 or 102.

    On 25th and 30th August, 1917, the Brick cottage at Wright's Place, off Little Ryrie Street, Geelong was put up for sale by Walter L Carr as the estate of Bridget Ryan. It was 'a Brick Cottage of 4 rooms with a roof of slate and iron; also a Detatched WB Building containing 2 rooms'. The Certificate of Title was held at the Office of Messrs. Doyle and Kerr, Geelong.

    From Port Phillip Lands - Title Deeds - Town Allotment 296 to a Patrick Ryan - Geelong Advertiser of 11th July, 1851.

    "In 1838, Port Phillip’s senior surveyor, Robert Hoddle, gave instructions for surveyor H.W.H. Smythe to mark out a town and village at Fyansford, and to layout only a few blocks at Corio (Geelong). By 1839, the first suburban allotments in the Geelong and Geelong West areas were sold by the Government. They included the area between the Barwon River and Church Street (North Geelong), and Shannon Avenue and Pakington Street...From the early 1850s, the most intense level of building activity in Geelong West occurred along the streets that had been laid out between Pakington Street and Latrobe Terrace in the area largely comprising the Waterloo precinct today. The primary reason for development in this area was that it was closest to the Geelong town centre...The area comprising the Waterloo precinct witnessed some of the most intense housing development in Geelong West in the 1850s...A number of these earliest dwellings were built in haste and were of poor quality and thus did not last. These early dwellings were modest in scale, single storey and single-fronted, with hipped or gabled roofs having front or no verandahs, built of timber, brick or stone..."
    http://www.geelongaustralia.com.au/library/docs/ashby/Ashby%20-%20HRS2%20-%20Vol01d.pdf

    From the Land Titles Office - Surveyor General - Crown Gants - land granted to 'Patrick Ryan' in the Geelong rural district - from 1856 to 1860 - was (1)1856 - Anakie Por 3 Lot 40 Area 201 No 42711 and (2) 1856 - Anakie Por 52 Lot 12 Area 77/3/6 No 38832 and (3) 1854 - Duneed Allot E Sec 33 Lot 16 Area 129 No 32307. The land at Anakie (the Anakies - which are three volcanic hills) and Duneed was in the county of Grant and the old maps can be viewed or downloaded from PRO Vic - but from memory first of all the specific maps - year, grant and place etc have to be traced through the Indexes at PRO Vic. Possibly all allocated to the Patrick Ryan who I am looking for. The Patrick Ryan who was a Farmer at Anakie was also a Carter and Contractor from Wright Place/Street, Geelong. This Patrick Ryan was a Farmer at Anakie from 1856 till his death in 1887. Patrick Ryan was 70 when he died and he was 45 years in Victoria, This couple is my closest match!

    From Patrick Ryan's last Will and Testament of 26th March, 1887 -
    His wife was Bridget - he had a farm, house and land at Anikie's County of Grant; also he had a house, land, horse and dray, harness and effects at 'Wright Place West of Moorabool, off Little Ryrie St Geelong, Parish of Corio, County of Grant'; and all this was left to Bridget Ryan 'for her own personal use'. After Bridget's death the Anikie (Anakie) property was to go to his daughter Catherine Margaret (Ryan) Kennedy for 'her own use and benefit'; and after her to be equally divided between her children, 'when the youngest attains the age of 21 years' (one child was Patrick James Kennedy). While the second property in Wright Street; after the death of his wife Bridget, was to go to his granddaughter Mary Josephine Ryan 'for her own personal and absolute benefit'. However from death notice records of 1911 it appears that Mary Josephine Ryan or Josephine Ryan was one and the same person and was a daughter and not a granddaughter of Patrick and Bridget Ryan. (I also think that she was the one person 'Josephine Ryan' a daughter of Bridget and Patrick Ryan).

    The existence of Mary Josephine Ryan indicates that Patrick and Bridget Ryan may have had a son, or she could have been the daughter of Josephine Ryan? I do not think that either of these senarios is correct.

    Australian Electoral Rolls - in 1903 a Josephine Ryan a School Teacher was living at Wright Place and in 1909 both a Josephine Ryan and a Mary Josephine Ryan were listed as being at Geelong West, Corio. Josephine Ryan again a School Teacher living at Wright Place and Mary Josephine Ryan was living in Malop Street and with 'Home Duties' as her occupation.

    Also if Mary Ann (Ryan) Douglas c1841/1842 was in fact the daughter of Patrick and Bridget Ryan she had predeceased Patrick Ryan her father by dying in 1883.

    A grandchild of Patrick and Bridget Ryan was Patrick James Kennedy, mentioned above, son of Catherine (Ryan) Kennedy. Five other sons of this Catherine Kennedy (Ryan) with Michael Kennedy were William Kennedy - disappeared and likely died in about 1897, John Kennedy, Joseph Kennedy, Michael Thomas Kennedy and Francis Gerald Kennedy. Two of their daughters were Catherine Kennedy - died in 1900 at the age of 21 and Lucy Kennedy - must have died when she was young. Plus there was one more child. Mostly the details for Catherine Margaret Kennedy (their mother) on their birth records were Kate Margaret or Kate.

    On 7th October, 1911 the Border and Riverina Times reported that "At the Geelong Court...a woman name Bridget Ryan, aged 95, proceeded against Walter L Carr for the recovery of documents of title. The evidence showed that the deeds lodged with the defendant as a security for a loan by Josephine Ryan, granddaughter of the plaintiff, to whom the property was to accrue on the latter's death. Josephine Ryan had recently died, and as she had no authority to use the deeds, his Honour ordered that they should be returned to the plaintiff, though he admitted that the defendant had not done any moral wrong".

    The Argus of 11 May 1927 details that - William Kennedy a grandson of Patrick Ryan left his home at Geelong at the age of 20 in 1895 for the gold rush in Western Australia. He was accompanied to Melbourne by his father " where he boarded the Nemesis for Fremantle. (Newspapers of the time show that his father was Michael Kennedy). He wrote to his brother Patrick Kennedy in December, 1896. Since then the family had known nothing of him...

    William Kennedy's grandfather Patrick Ryan, left a Will dated March 26, 1887. He died on June 4 of the same year. In dispersing of his estate the grandfather left a certain farm, described as situated at 'The Anakies' to his wife for her life, then to his daughter Catherine for her life, and thereafter to be equally divided between Catherine's children who attained the age of 21 years. The daughter Catherine married one (Michael) Kennedy, and they had nine children. Seven of these children became entitled to proceeds of the farm in question. The widow of Patrick Ryan died in 1917 and Mrs Catherine Kennedy died in 1924. William Kennedy's one seventh share is held by the legal representative of Patrick Ryan awaiting distribution. The legal representative of the grandfather is Mr John Patrick McCabe Doyle, of The Exchange, Market square, Geelong. At his instance the originating summons was issued. William Kennedy's brother Patrick Kennedy, of Leura Place, Geelong West, was joined as defendant to the summons in a representative capacity. Mr Justice Lowe was asked to make an order certifying that William Kennedy was dead...Mr Justice Lowe made an order accordingly, so that William Kennedy's share of the proceeds of the property left by his grandfather might be distributed between the brothers and sisters".

    The Marriage of Catherine Ryan and Michael Kennedy took place in May 1874 at St Marys, Geelong.

    Catherine Margaret Kennedy died in August, 1924 and her parents were Patrick and Bridget Ryan - 9993. In newspapers her age was given as 70. However if she was born in about 1847 she was about 77. This is likely to be the correct Catherine Kennedy.

    Michael Kennedy the husband of Kate Margaret Ryan died in July 1907 - Geelong papers.

    Did William Kennedy die on 25 May 1897 in Kalgoorlie? (Family Search)

    Was land at Fyansford, Geelong bought by this Patrick Ryan in 1854? Quite possibly. Moreover, Patrick Ryan a Farmer had 72 acres at Lake Conneware on the Barwon River, Geelong in March of 1866. Was this the same Patrick Ryan? Quite likely.

    From the Geelong and District database (online) - Record ID: 191209
    Index Entry: RION, Patrick
    Date: 1851
    Place: little Ryrie street - Geelong District
    Comment: laborer
    Group ID: 103
    GROUP: Directories DB
    Index Title: Port Phillip Directory.
    This is likely Patrick Ryan of Wright Place/Street, Geelong. This reminds me that I do remember the birth of Mary Ann Ryan being recorded as in Geelong and her surname was spelt alternatively as Rion and she was the daughter of a Patrick Rion (Reference - Latter Day Saints microfiche). The spelling of Rion sometimes occurs against the next generation eg when Eleanora Douglas was born her mother's maiden name was given as Rion.

    From the Geelong Council Index - Patrick Ryan was in Wright Street from 1850 to 1862. From 1850 to 1853 this house was brick with two rooms and by 1853 there was an outhouse. From 1854 to 1861 it was brick with two rooms, plus a weatherboard stable and shed. In 1862 this brick house is also listed as having a kitchen (presumably also a stable and shed).

    Bridget Ryan was buried at the Eastern Cemetery, Geelong and her husband Patrick Ryan is thought to be the same grave. Her informant was a J or P Kennedy, who advised that Bridget was 98, lived in Wright Street, Geelong and was born in Ireland. [Burial record 10003 - Grave Location RCHS-2-83 (Old number RC/2/896) - Eastern Cemetery - Geelong Heritage Centre].

    While Patrick Ryan was a native of Burr, Kings County, Ireland; he was a Carter of Wright Place, Geelong, was married in Melbourne, was the husband of Bridget and was 45 years in Victoria (coming to Victoria at the age of about 25 in about 1842). [Burial record 101399 - Grave Location RCHS-2-83 - Eastern Cemetery - Geelong Heritage Centre].

    Gabriel Douglas 1822 Muirkirk, Ayrshire (Watchmaker) the husband of Mary Ann Ryan c1841/1842 Geelong, had four wives - (1) Agnes Hogg 2/11/1845 Glasgow, Lanarkshire, (2) Mary Ann Ryan 10/12/1881 Gore Street, Fitzroy, Victoria, (3) Isabella Nicol (nee Thomson) Stalley 12/1/1887 Trinity Church, Port Melbourne, Victoria and (4) Mary (nee McConnell) Charlton 16/10/1893 Footscray, Victoria.

    There is conjecture here, as I do not have 'proof' yet that connects Mary Ann Ryan c1841/1842 Geelong, with this particular Patrick and Bridget Ryan!

    (Trove, Geelong Heritage Centre, Justice Vic - bmd, PRO Vic and Family History research)

    Sally E Douglas

    79 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-06-10
    User data
  81. PETTY OFFICER Arthur J Williams - BANZARE 1929-1931
    List
    Public

    Petty Officer Arthur J Williams was a Royal Navy Wireless Officer from the Signalling Division. He was on loan from the Admiralty, Royal Navy and was part of the Discovery’s Company in 1929-1931.

    Williams was the Wireless Operator and Echo Sounding Expert on the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition of 1929-1931 and he was on both Voyages. The expedition was under the leadership of Sir Douglas Mawson.

    His nickname was ‘Sparks’. Eric Douglas wrote in his log of 10th January, 1930 “I spent the morning giving Sparks a hand to fit up a new Short Wave aerial”. (Voyage 1).

    Then 30th November, 1930 Eric Douglas wrote “Sparks has made up a small portable wireless set for shore use to the ship” and on 2nd March, 1931 “Sparks has been trying to raise Sydney for the last week or more, but apparently they cannot hear us, he can hear them calling us every hour and is also able to receive the press news. Tonight we heard Sydney asking all ships to listen in for us, so apparently they are becoming anxious about us. Sparks thinks we are in a dead area for transmitting or that the aerial is leaking at its insulators due to these being covered with salt”. (Voyage 2).

    Petty Officer Williams is depicted in some images at the Dundee Heritage Trust, online.

    Sally Douglas

    6 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-01-22
    User data
  82. PINK, RED, CHOCOLATE & STRIPED SNOW AND AQUA BLUE ICE
    List
    Public

    Australian Alps.
    In late July and early August 1935 it was reported that remarkable snow could be seen in the Alps. At Mt Hotham the showfall was said to be chocolate coloured while at Mt Buller there was a bright red layer of snow cover half an inch thick. Yet the most remarkable fall was at Mt St Bernard Hospice where pink snow fell in two layers of one and a half inches thick, with a six inch strip of white snow sandwiched in between. At the time the coloured snow was attributed to the presence of dust particles.
    Another report said that at Mt Buller and Mt Buffalo the snow was as usual - pure white. The Commonwealth Meteorologist, Mr Barkley, attributed the phenomenon to a high air stream carrying large quantities of mallee red dust and chocolate soil from South or Central Australia.
    It was not the first time that coloured snow had been seen in the Victorian Alps. The dust particles apparently attached themselves to snow flakes and hence the coloured snow that fell. This occurrence of coloured snow - pink, red, chocolate and striped was said to be unusual as 'red' dust storms seldom occur in Winter.
    At the end of July, 1966 pink snow fell throughout the Snowy Mountains in New South Wales. The snow was reported to be a reddish-brown. It remained pink for some hours at Smiggins Holes until the ground was covered by fresh snow. This pink snow fall was also present at Charlotte's Pass, Perisher and Thredbo. (Report by Mr J Govern, the Kosciusko State Park Ranger).
    At Hotham in the Victorian section of the Alps light pink snow fell to a depth of four feet. The Supervising Meteorologist at the Canberra Weather Bureau in the ACT, Mr L R Mitchell said that red dust was widespread and it had originated in the Broken Hill and Wilcannia area (of New South Wales). (Reports from trove newspapers)
    In August, 1977, it was observed that around Kosciusko (Kosciuszko) in mid Summer there were red patches on snowbanks of residual snow and that the snow was covered with a purple tinge. Dr Harvey Marchant of the ANU, ACT, said that 'Red snow' was caused by unicellular algae... in Summer and Autumn 'The microscopic algae live in the soil of the high country in Winter. But at the hottest time of the year they move up through residual snowbanks and actually turn patches deep red or Shiraz-like. Similar algae can be found in the Rocky Mountains ... the European Alps and in the Himalayas'.
    The Antarctic and other places.
    This last phenomenon can be compared with the 'pink' snow that I observed on the Antarctic Continent at Commonwealth Bay in 2007. This pinkness that can be present in Antarctic snow is also generally attributed to the presence of algae in the snow and said to be a sign of 'healthy' conditions.
    Then there is the perhaps much more obvious presence of the deep aqua colour of ice floes, icebergs and glaciers in the Antarctic, parts of South America, Iceland, Greenland and the Arctic. In the Antarctic the aqua ice is a strong visible feature of the Continent itself; the centuries old coverage being of snow and ice. I was told when in the Antarctic that it is the presence of microscopic life, including bacteria and algae which gives this ice it's aqua colour.

    Addendum in January, 2017. In mid 2016 it began to be reported by Scientific authorities that pink snow is a bad sign for the future - http://www.ecowatch.com/pink-snow-a-bad-sign-for-the-future-scientists-say-1891184743.html

    Sally E Douglas

    39 items
    created by: public:beetle 2013-11-17
    User data
  83. POLAR STAR - Lincoln Ellsworth's Aeroplane
    List
    Public

    SEARCH FOR LINCOLN ELLSWORTH AND HERBERT HOLLICK-KENYOON - LITTLE AMERICA - BAY OF WHALES - ROSS SEA - ANTARCTICA 1936 - RELATES TO THE DISCOVERY 2 AND RAAF SEARCH PARTY ONBOARD THIS SHIP

    Snippets from a short version by (Gilbert) Eric Douglas, Leader of the RAAF search party -

    ‘...Later in the afternoon the Ship (Discovery 2) picked up speed in more open pack and at 3AM on the 14th January we broke clear of the ice into the Ross Sea after traversing 380 miles of pack ice.
    We were now about 400 miles from the barrier face of the famous Ross Ice barrier. We continued at full speed and on the morning of 15th January (1936) we saw the ice glare of the barrier, it was observed as a bright white glare over the Southern horizon.
    At about 3PM the barrier face came into view and by 4PM we were close to the ice cliffs and steaming parallel to them to the east towards the Bay of Whales. At this time there was a terrific glare over the ice Barrier, the height of which appeared to be about 100 feet, it was a weird sight.
    The air temperature had dropped to 18 degrees Fahrenheit due to the cold outflow of air from the Barrier. This was also noticeable by the formation of sea smoke over the water caused by the extremely cold air striking the relatively warm water. At 8PM we reached the Bay of Whales and steamed south until we arrived at the edge of the frozen bay ice. The width of the bay appeared to be about 8 miles.
    At 8.20PM the Ships Officers reported that they could see two orange coloured flags fluttering in the breeze on top of the Barrier face to the east. I had a look through the binoculars and agreed with the observation made. We knew that Ellsworth carried orange coloured signal strips in his plane. The ships Officers then fired off half a dozen maroon rockets which exploded with tremendous noise at a height of about 1000 feet over our Ship.
    As no movement was seen on the Barrier ice it was presumed that the missing aviators were either dead or possibly at “Little America” 6 miles due south of the flags. It was decided to carry out a reconnaissance flight in over the Barrier ice as far as “Little America” to see whether there was any indication of life before commencing the search with our Wapiti aeroplane.
    At about 7.30PM Flying Officer Murdoch and myself were lowered overboard in the Moth and towed clear of the Ship. Due to the low temperature (8 F) the sea spray froze on the floats and undersurfaces of the lower wings and it was obvious that we must get off quickly to stop the icing up otherwise the aeroplane would have to be hoisted onboard to clear the ice with hot water.
    After run of about 1/2 mile I managed to get the machine air borne and climbed slowly to 1000 feet. When we levelled out it was noticed that our turn was tail heavy and it was surmised that water in the floats had run aft in the climb and then frozen. I then turned towards the Barrier face and set a course for the location of “Little America” which we knew would be distinguishable by several tall masts or poles rising out of the snow and ice.
    As we progressed in over the Barrier the flying conditions became extremely bad and it was all I could do to keep a steady course. This was due to the snow blind light which we were now experiencing. No horizon was visible due to the extreme glare from the ice Barrier merging with its reflected glare from the clouds and we could see nothing but a yellowish glare.
    Some minutes later Murdoch observed what appeared to be black cracks in the ice below us and to our surprise as we both looked the cracks appeared to “stand up”, we then realised they were poles running out of the snow. We then realized that we were over “Little America”. I carefully circled the area and we then noticed orange coloured strips near the poles.
    Suddenly we saw the figure of a man appear out of a hole and he started to wave his arms. This caused great excitement between us as we realised it must be either Ellsworth or Kenyon. I continued to circle and after a few minutes we threw overboard a small bag attached to a letter from the Captain of the Discovery (Lieutenant RNR Leonard Charles Hill) congratulating Ellsworth and Kenyon on their achievement and asking them that if they were well enough, to start out on the 7 mile hike to the Barrier face where they would be met by a land party from the Discovery.
    We observed the figure pick up the parachute and wave. I then turned to the east to look at an object which appeared to be the wing of an aeroplane. Sure enough it was a wing projecting out of the snow and as we had heard that Admiral Byrd had taken home with him all his aircraft we came to the conclusion that this was Ellsworth’s aeroplane.
    I then headed away to an arc of water sky which appeared black against the glare of the ice and in a few minutes we could pick out the Ship. We continued along the Barrier face looking for a suitable place for a land party to climb to the Barrier from the frozen sea.
    I then flew back to the Ship and made an alighting close by. We shut off our engine and shouted out the startling news to the anxiously awaiting Captain and crew who down to the Ships cook had gathered on the poop.
    After the plane was hoisted onboard congratulations were passed all round and all hands joined in the toast to the happy occasion. Within ten minutes after our arrival the news was flashed to Australia.
    A land party led by the 1st mate then left in the motor boat for the fast edge of the sea ice and after landing commenced to ski towards the Barrier face. At about 11.45PM a man was observed coming down the Barrier face towards the sea ice. Our land party met him just after midnight and they all proceeded back to the motor boat and were soon aboard the Ship.
    This person from “Little America” proved to be Hollick Kenyon and he told us that Ellsworth had a chill and frost bitten feet and was remaining at “Little America” until a party could go over to “Little America”. He said that their aeroplane ran out of petrol when about 20 miles south of “Little America” so they sledged towards the Ross Sea and after a bit of trouble managed to locate “Little America” where they had been ever since.
    The next morning a land party left the Ship for “Little America” to bring in Ellsworth. At about 9PM the shore party was visible coming towards us over the sea ice and were hauling a sledge. About an hour later the party arrived at the Ship and we gave a welcome to Mr Ellsworth. He was a slight built man of less that average height with blue eyes and a sun darkened face. He told us that it took them 7 days tramping to find “Little America” after they abandoned their aeroplane the “Polar Star”...'

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection)

    Gipsy Moth Seaplane - note that this was 'Alfresco' or open cockpit or open air flying.

    Press cuttings on the search for Ellsworth and the deck log for the Discovery II are held at the National Oceanography Centre at the University of Southampton. An example of a press cutting - http://viewer.soton.ac.uk/nol/image/2253/282/#head

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    212 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  84. Professor Thomas Harvey Johnston (known as Harvey)
    List
    Public

    Thomas Harvey Johnston (1881-1951) was born in Balmain, New South Wales.
    On leaving school Johnston joined the Education Department. He attended the University of Sydney – 1906 B. Arts, 1907 - B Sc. and M. Arts, 1911 - Dr Sc.
    Harvey Johnston was appointed as Biologist and Zoologist on the BANZ Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) of 1929-1931. He was also a Parasitologist and a world authority on parasite worms.
    Harvey Johnston was a Professor of Biology and also of Zoology and acting Professor of Botany.
    From 1903-1906 Johnston taught at the Forte Street public school, in 1907- 1908 he lectured in Zoology and Physiology at the Sydney Technical College and in 1908 became the Assistant Director at the Bathurst Technical College. In 1909 he was the Assistant Microbiologist in the New South Wales Health Department. While in 1911 Johnston was the lecturer in charge of the Biology Department at the University of Queensland and was appointed Professor of Biology there in 1919.
    In 1912 he was Chairman of a committee investigating control measures for the prickly pear, which was an invasive plant species introduced into Australia. In 1920 he was appointed controller of the Commonwealth’s prickly pear laboratories.
    He took a keen interest in the marine ecology of Caloundra and the southern Great Barrier Reef Islands. He was a foundation member of the Great Barrier Reef Committee and a member of the Australian Research Council.
    Johnston was appointed Professor of Zoology at the University of Adelaide in 1922 and in 1928-1934 he also acted as Professor of Botany. Johnston added new material to the extensive collection held at the South Australian Museum. He was awarded numerous honours and won fellowships and was the co-author of about 300 ‘Papers’. Johnston was the editor of BANZARE Zoological and Botanical Reports.

    Sally E Douglas

    1 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-06-25
    User data
  85. RAAF - Point Cook Class Sailing Club and Yachts
    List
    Public

    The RAAF Point Cook Class Sailing Club was formed in November, 1937. The yachts in this class were Idle Alongs which was a New Zealand designed yacht. These yachts numbered at least 11 and they sailed in Yacht Races - a Scratch Start - in Port Phillip Bay eg Middle Brighton, Elwood and St Kilda. They also raced from the Williamstown pier to the Point Cook pier. Some of the names of the yachts were - Kestrel, Bustard, Condor, Osprey, Peregrine, Eagle, Hawk, Merlin and Falcon. Three of the Point Cook Cadets who sailed in the Idle Alongs were Read, Kennedy and Sutherland.

    Consideration had to be made when these yachts sailed in races in the Bay that after any race they still had to make their way by sea back to Point Cook. The RAAF Base at Point Cook was a perfect location for yachts and other water craft and seaplanes. The yachts when not being used for sailing exercises or races were well housed in one of the Aircraft Hangers, presumably near the water. Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas had suggested yachting as a recreation for Air Cadets and he was placed in charge of this class on it's establishment. The yachts were constructed in the RAAF Workshops located near the shore at RAAF Point Cook (from the RAAF Point Cook Museum - Registrar - in about 2009, that they were built in those Workshops)

    There is no doubt that Eric Douglas would have researched and chosen the Idle Along as a most suitable yacht for the cadets. Eric had built an Idle Along for himself and that probably occurred before the Point Cook Class was up and running. Besides being an A1 flying instructor and a test and acrobatic pilot Eric Douglas was well qualified in this sport as he had been a keenly competitive yachtsman since his early teenage days, sailing under the burgees of both the Port Phillip and (Royal) Brighton Yacht Clubs.

    Moreover, Eric Douglas had wider sea and oceanic skills. He had been twice to the Antarctic in 1929/30 and 1930/31 with Sir Douglas Mawson on the SY (Steam Yacht) Discovery (also known then as the RRS Discovery and Discovery). Eric Douglas had also led the RAAF Search Party on the Discovery II in 1935/36 when the American Arctic and Antarctic Explorer Lincoln Ellsworth and his English Pilot Herbert Hollick-Kenyon been been lost from radio contact by Ellsworth's Expedition Ship the 'Wyatt Earp". Lincoln Ellsworth and his Canadian based pilot Hollick-Kenyon were on a trans-Antarctic flight in Ellsworth's Northrop Gamma the "Polar Star".

    The start of this flight was from Dundee Island near the Antarctic Peninsula, with the aim of reaching Admiral Richard Byrd's old base of "Little America" (there were various versions of this base over a short period - I suppose due to changing ice conditions as it was on the Ross Ice Barrier now known as the Ross Ice Shelf). "Little America" was situated in the Bay of Whales to be found in the Ross Sea, Antarctica.

    The search by the Discovery II and the RAAF search party was focused on this region in the Antarctic as it was the most logical place to look for the Polar Star and it's occupants. In fact Ellsworth and Hollick-Kenyon were found at "Little America" in a hut located down a hole in the ice. Ellsworth's Expedition ship the "Wyatt Earp" arrived at the Bay of Whales from the other side of the Antarctic after the missing men had been discovered at "Little America". Both Hollick-Kenyon and Ellsworth were in good health when they were found but Eric Douglas noted in his writings that Ellsworth did have a slightly frost bitten foot. The man in charge of Ellsworth's ship was Sir Hubert Wilkins who had called for 'help' for he knew that the "Wyatt Earp" was not in a suitable part of the seas of the vast Antarctic Continent to look for his missing two companions. On board this ship was a spare aeroplane the "Texaco 20".

    It is worth nothing that at this time it was not known whether the Antarctic Peninsula was in fact joined to the Antarctic Continent as it was the referred to on maps as the Antarctic Archipelago. (Archipelago being a group of islands).

    Eric Douglas knew the stars and cloud formations, he could read the winds and the weather and was an extremely methodical and well prepared individual when it came to addressing a problem or a challenge. Eric Douglas was also very practical having made boats of different types, plus numerous model yachts and aeroplanes including seaplanes. For all those reasons he was a most suitable choice to lead RAAF Air Cadets in the skills of constructing, maintaining, handling, sailing and racing a yacht, together with the rules of the sea and safety aspects .

    Eric Douglas had the Marine supply and Sailing making contacts. He knew about such things as suitable woods for boat building in general - the resilience and strength of Huon pine and the versatility of Kauri, he knew about hardwoods, plywood and balsa. With real confidence he could burn off boat paint with a blow torch, use a soldering iron to bind metals, glues to bond wood, and was a walking advertisement for linseed oil and bees wax! He could use a treadle sewing machine and could even knit (woollen mittens)! He enthused about measuring things and distances, anchors, sails and sailcloth, parachute silks, ropes - tying knots and knot formations such as - slicing, the half hitch, clove hitch, cleat hitch, jamming hitch, figure of eight, slip knot and the fool's knot, oilskin coats, japara clothing, life jackets, sea flares, oil based paints, engines, morse code, semaphore, boats, aeroplanes, seaplanes, landing fields, gliders, kites, piers, slipways, fishing tackle - such as rods, sinkers and hooks, flying, sailing and the seas.

    The Third Brother - The Royal Australian Air Force 1921-39 CD Coulthard-Clark – page 203.
    Sailing was a recreational activity introduced for air cadets at Point Cook when Wing Commander (later AVM) Bladin was OC of Cadet Squadron. The suggestion came from Flight Lieutenant Eric Douglas of Antarctic fame, who was a keen yachtsman. He selected the type of sailing dingy used, saw to their construction, and supervised the training of the cadets… (Wing Commander D J French)

    Eric Douglas by these times was - also a very competant fisherman - from boats with rods and lines, including trawling and surf fishing; he was a good swimmer and body surfer; he was a skier, specializing in cross-country skiing in the Victorian Alps; he also aqua-planed (earlier version of water sking); was a motor boat and speedboat enthuiast; a motor car and motor bike enthusiast (he could ride doing a handstand on the handle bars) - owning eight of the latter in his lifetime and he was a motor mechanic and an air mechanic and aero fitter. So he was a very accomplished 'all-rounder'.

    Sally E Douglas

    56 items
    created by: public:beetle 2015-08-16
    User data
  86. RAAF AMBERLEY BAND - mid 1942 to mid 1948
    List
    Public

    Some of the activities of the RAAF Band from Amberley in Ipswich, Brisbane and Amberley.

    Advertising the RAAF Orchestra on Stage, plus others. 'Seats filling rapidly'. Ipswich. Queensland Times of 18 August, 1942.

    In 1943 the RAAF Band was in a march through the streets of Brisbane - see photo. It appears that the event took place on ANZAC Day 1943.

    Advertising the RAAF Band - Swing Music at the Town Hall - Ambulance Auxiliary Social Committee - GRAND DANCE. Ipswich. Queensland Times of 10, 19 and 20 July, 1943

    Advertising the Prisoners of War - GRAND DANCE - Town Hall with the RAAF Band. Ipswich. Queensland Times of 11 October, 1943.

    Big Crowds View Procession
    "Citizens of Ipswich responded well by their presence at the First Victory Loan rally last night, but responses to the appeal for investments still leave a big leeway to make up the city's quota of £160,000. However as a resuit of last night's appeal a further £6000 was invested in the loan. No fewer than 2,340 people, chiefly members of the services, marched in the procession. The footpaths were thronged with people along the route of the procession to Bell-street. The procession, which was marshalled by Mr T. G Andrew from Waghorn-street, got away In good time, headed by the Lines of Communication Band, followed by the Ipswich PIpe Band, A.IF. units, the Amberley R.A.A.F. band, members of the R.A.A.F., V.D.C., V.A.D., Air Training Corps, WA.A.F., A.T.C. bugle band. Boy Scouts and Cubs, and American band. members of the American forces, Salvation Army band, members of the A.R.P. and Fire Brigade personnel. It was problably tile most representative procession that has marched in the city since the outbreak of the war...". from the Queensland Times, Ipswich of 4 May, 1944.

    On 4th October, 1944 the RAAF Band of No 3 Aircraft Depot, Amberley was photographed officially - see photo. Eric Douglas the Commanding Officer of RAAF Amberley is in this photo sitting behind the large Bass Drum which he played in the Band at special times. We also had a lighter drum which had a red rim and a shoulder strap. It had patches, so perhaps it was my brothers. I remember both drums and hit at them briefly, especially the one with the shoulder strap. It is a wonder that I did not grow up wanting to play a drum in a band. In actual fact I have a bongo drum and it reminds me of those impressionistic days of childhood.

    "LAIDLEY MONSTER LOAN RALLY COME ONE! COME ALL!
    Help LAIDLEY DISTRICT to "Ring the Bell" on its Victory Loan Quotas & win its HONOUR PENNANT! In place of the WILL MAHONEY CONCERT PARTY a First-Class Programme will be presented, R.A.A.F. AMBERLEY BAND, ESME LIND Queensland's Leading Song Bird - Winner of the original Margaret Lawrence Scholarship, Corporals Laugher and Cork, Startling Novelty Piano Duettists - Sid Jones and Gladys Raines, Musical Entertainers - SAM HARRIS, Brisbane's Own Baritone and Brilliant Compere - & other OUTSTANDING ARTISTS BE THERE --- WITH THE REST OF LAIDLEY..." Queensland Times, Ipswich of 20 October, 1944.

    Queensland Times, Ipswich of 21 October, 1944 - LAIDLEY WAR LOAN RALLY
    "...In place of the Will Mahoney concert party, a first-class programme was given by the Amberley R.A.A.F. Band (and) Miss Esme Lind, Sid Jones, Gladys Raines, and Mr Sam Harris. The accompanist was Miss Mona Walters, Ipswich..."

    "R.A.A.F. BAND ENTERTAINS.
    A first-class entertainment was given in the Queen's Park on Sunday afternoon by the R.A.A.F. Band, in aid of Aunt Peggy's Prisoner-of-war Fund. Variety was added to the programme by the inclusion of vocal and instrumental items by several band members. Numbers played by the band were: March, "Punchinello," "Fierce Raged the Tempest;" "Rock of Ages:" selection. "The Pirates of Penzance;" waltz, "Flowers of Australia;" popular: Intermezzo, "Chinese Temple Garden:" march, "Appreciation:" "God Save the King." A collection taken up by members of the Children's Penguin Club returned £12/2/2 to the Prisoners-of-war fund. 'Members of the band were entertained to refreshments at the kiosk by the organlser, Mr. F. Watson". From the Queensland Times, Ipswich of 21 November, 1944.

    R.A.A.F. in War Kit In Loan March.
    A Squadron of R.A.A.F. personnel with 'tin hats' and fixed bayonets added a new note to an Air Force Victory Loan march through the city (Brisbane) yesterday. Many of them recently went through a 'toughening' course and are billed for tropical service. Many decorated pilots and aircrew from overseas also marched. A number have had hundreds of operatlonal flying hours over Europe. The parade included over 1000 R.A.A.F. and 500 W.A.A.A.F. personnel - marching six abreast in a column led by Wing Commander J. R. Gordon, commanding R.A.A.F. Station, Kingaroy. Five bands played. The salute was taken by Group Captain G.E. Douglas, Officer Commanding, R.A.A.F. Aircraft Depot, Amberley...". From the Courier Mail of 7th April, 1945.

    "R.A.A.F. VICTORY BALL.
    The R.A.A.F. 1945 Victory Ball and Floor Show is to be presented in the Ipswich Town Hall on Thursday, May 10. Besides dancing to music by Leo Stakinskli and his R.A.A.F. Dance Band, patrons will be entertained by many celebrity artists from Brisbane, in adddition to the W.A.A.A.F. Ballet and R.A.A.F. Vaudevillians". From the Queensland Times, Ipswich of 5 May, 1945.

    LOWOOD.
    "...A feature will be the visit of the R.A.A.F. Amberley Band, which will play in Lowood during the afternoon, and up to 8.15 at night, in front of the theatre. After the finish of the broadcast it is expected that the crowd In the hall and the artists will proceed to the Show Hall, where a dance will be held. Music will be provided by the R.A.A.F. Amberley Dance Band. A charge of 2/- each will be made for admission". From the Queensland Times, Ipswich of 20 October, 1945.

    "LOAN RALLY
    The Mooloolaba Loan Committee, in conjunction with the Queensland Loan Organization, is arranging for a free concert to be held in the Pacific Theatre next Sunday evening, at which a loan appeal will be made. The R.A.A.F. Band from Amberley and a number of Brisbane artists are contributing to the programme...". From the Nambour Chronicle...of 26 October, 1945.

    "LAIDLEY LOAN RALLY TO-NIGHT.
    A Fourth Victory Loan rally is to be held tonlght in the Laidley School of Arts. The R.A.A.F. Amberley Band and Jimmy Reid (master Illusionist) will head the list of supporting artists. Admission is free". From the Queensland Times, Ipswich of 26 October, 1945.

    From 1946 to 1948 the RAAF Band stationed at Amberley Air Base accompanied marching and drills on the tarmac near the C/o's home. I witnessed some of these events as a young child. I was a 'hanging on the fence' admirer and critic - calling out to those airmen who were out of step. When the Band leader or Drill master was elsewise occupied I got a sly return smile or a tongue poked at me. I was dressed in my brother's hand-me-down Navy Blue RAAF uniform, hence my 'authority' to dress-down a fellow troop. Besides, by then I had seen a few RAAF drills, marches and parades and knew a disciplined march when I saw one. My father was at work on the RAAF Station and my mother was probably too embarassed to think or see what I might have been doing. I was about 5.

    Sally E Douglas

    19 items
    created by: public:beetle 2017-04-29
    User data
  87. RAAF GUARD OF HONOUR - Prince's Pier, Port Melbourne - March 1924
    List
    Public

    The RAAF Guard of Honour

    In March, 1924 Eric Douglas was in the RAAF Guard of Honour at Prince's Pier, Port Melbourne, for Vice Admiral Sir Frederick Field. The occasion was the visit of the British Services Squadron World Tour when it visited Melbourne. Vice Admiral Field the Commanding Officer was on the flagship HMS Hood. THE RAAF Band played 'Rule Britannia' and 15 guns were fired by Field Artillery. It was said to be a striking scene.

    The British Navy was of great interest to the Public especially when the ships could be viewed at the St Kilda Pier - huge crowds visited the Warships. The Naval officers were entertained at a Vice Regal Ball at Wattle Path by the Governor and Lady Stradbroke. (It appears that Wattle Path was the Wattle Path 'Palais' on the St Kilda Esplanade). This ball was attended by Dame Nellie Melba. There was also a Midshipmans' Ball and a Squadron Dance on the HMS Hood. Also the visiting Navy attended a Race Meeting at Moonee Valley, amongst other functions.

    There was also an Empire Cruise march through the streets of the City of Melbourne by 1500 'Bluejackets' - men of the visiting British Naval Fleet. This caused much excitement for Melbournians.

    Sally E Douglas

    36 items
    created by: public:beetle 2015-11-12
    User data
  88. RADIO STATIONS 3UZ MELBOURNE AND 2GB SYDNEY - talk or speech by Eric Douglas in 1939
    List
    Public

    "Introduction To And Speech By Flight Lieut. Douglas

    Hal: 3UZ relaying to 2GB Sydney.

    The time is just 7.15, and from 3UZ we have great pleasure in introducing Flight Lieut. Douglas of the Royal Australian Air Force who was in charge of the plane which left Discovery 2 and flew over the wastes of the Antarctic to discover Lincoln Ellsworth and his co-explorer Mr Kenyon.

    This very interesting talk is being relayed to 2GB, Sydney, and we greet the listeners to this station. 3UZ desires to acknowledge with gratefulness the co-operation of “The Star” newspaper in connection with this matter.

    Ladies and gentlemen, I am honoured to present to you Flight Lieut. Douglas.

    Flight Lieut. Douglas’ Speech -

    How do you do, everybody! I have been asked by the management of 3UZ to give you a brief description of our trip in Discovery 2 to attempt the rescue of the two fliers Mr Ellsworth and Mr Kenyon.
    We left Melbourne on the 23rd December and proceeded to Dunedin. The reason for this was that Dunedin is 700 miles nearer to the Bay of Whales than Melbourne, and this meant that we were able to replenish our fuel, food and water supplies and thereby have a greater stock of each should any emergency arise. Actually, my only interest, apart from a desire to see the city, was the fact that I was anxious to replenish my supplies of pemmican, which is a highly concentrated from of food considered very handy when the chance of being without food of a normal kind, is present.
    Leaving Dunedin on 2nd January we set a course for the Bay of Whales. Steaming at 11 knots we had an uneventful trip south to the ice pack. The seas were moderately calm and as we got further south, were practically without any life. After 150 miles in open pack, it became heavier, closer together and the progress of the ship became slower. After two and a half days of this the pack became so heavy that we were practically brought to a standstill.
    On the trip south we worked constantly getting the machines, stores and plans in faultless order. Any emergency, as you can understand, had to be prepared for, and, for this reason, not the slightest thing was left to chance. A sledge had to be carried on the Wapiti should that be used, and this was attended to, and food of no bulk but with plenty of nourishment was allotted by the doctor to both myself and Flying Officer Murdoch, who made every flight but one with me. As well as Flying Officer Murdoch, who at times acted as navigator, the actual complement of the Flying Crew consisted of:-
    Sgt. Spooner - emergency pilot, who was to stand by the Moth in the event of the Wapiti being disabled.
    Sgt. Easterbrook and Cpl. Cottee - two metal riggers.
    Air Craftsman Gibbs - and Sgt. Reddrop.
    The first opportunity to fly the moth, which was equipped on this occasion with floats in place of its usual wheels, came when we left some heavy pack and came into a pool of water. On this occasion I flew to a height of 2000 feet and covered some miles observing the trend of the pack which I found was to the south. Several days later another flight was necessary so Flying Officer Murdoch and I took off in the moth. This particular flight was of importance to the Commander of the ship because he had reached a point where he was a little bit at a loss. He admitted that it gave him quite an easy mind when we discovered it would be easy going.
    A day and a half later we broke through into open water which was open as far as the eye could see, and we quickly steamed the remaining 450 miles to the Bay of Whales.
    Steaming south in the open water you see the ice glare. This is just a very bright or whitish light above the horizon. Upon approaching closer you see a long table of ice. The edge of the barrier extended as far as the eye could see in either direction, approximately 100 feet high.
    Approaching the mouth of the Bay of Whales, the ship’s officers observed, through glasses, what appeared to be a small dark coloured tent with a pole erected on either side of the tent from which floated orange streamers some 15 feet in length. The Captain surmised from this that, as Ellsworth was carrying ground strips of this colour he would not be very far away. The ship then fired off about half a dozen maroon rockets which exploded with tremendous noise at the height of about 1000 feet.
    As no movement was seen on the barrier it was presumed that they were either dead or at “Little America”. Of course, the quickest way to find out was to fly the aeroplane.
    We lowered the moth overboard and Murdoch and I proceeded to reconnoitre and eventually reached “Little America”, which lay about six miles due south from the tent. We flew over the barrier at a height, according to our instruments of 1000 feet. I say, according to our instruments, because, owing to the very deceptive nature of the atmosphere, it was difficult, with ordinary sight, to tell whether we were 100 feet or 5000 feet above the ice. There was a peculiar shimmer which is quite unusual to anything I have previously experienced. We eventually discovered it to be “Little America” by the 35 foot tripod masts which had been erected for wireless purposes by Byrd on one of his previous expeditions.
    After circling undecidedly for a few minutes, we were immediately delighted to see a figure emerge from what appeared to be a burrow in the snow.
    The figure waved in a particularly casual manner and seemed not the slightest bit concerned at our arrival. We dropped a small parachute containing food, cigarettes and a letter from the Captain of the Discovery 2, congratulating the party on its achievement, and asking them, at the same time, if they felt fit enough to pull on the 6 mile walk to the Bay of Whales coastline. The figure in question proved to be Mr Kenyon, although at the time we did not know whether it where he or Lincoln Ellsworth. That Mr Kenyon is casual was borne out by Ellsworth, who said that never, at any time, had he struck so delightful and easy-going a man.
    As I said before, we were more than delighted to realise that at least one of the fliers was safe and so, with this knowledge, we turned the plane round and headed on what might be called a zig-zag course back to the ship. On our way back we searched for both faults in the ice which would endanger our land party and also a suitable ramp or ice slope up which they might climb to the barrier.
    We eventually lighted alongside the ship and shouted the glad tidings to the anxiously awaiting Captain and crew who, even down to the cook, had gathered on the poop. After the plane was hauled on board congratulations were passed all round and, naturally we had a couple of toasts to celebrate the occasion. The wireless operator was of course, immediately busy on the job sending the news to the outside world which we knew was also waiting. Replies of congratulation were received and we felt that our task which appeared so hopeless in an area of this size had been successfully accomplished.
    After an hour or so we returned to the deck, a rapidly moving and violently swaying figure appeared on the skyline. This, on later investigation, appeared to be the casual Kenyon. Kenyon, after having seen us flying over his depot, had slid down his ice ramp into the hut where Lincoln Ellsworth was lying suffering from a slight chill. He broke the news to Ellsworth that he guessed a plane had passed over a while ago and dropped a message. Ellsworth, delighted at the sudden turn of events, thought that it was a relief party from the “Wyatt Earp” and was surprised to find that it was an Australian boat and rescue party which had come on the scene.
    Kenyon, however, was not the slightest perturbed, and thought it would be a good idea to stroll across and see the boat. Picking up only a razor, his pipe and matches, and bidding Ellsworth a cheery goodbye, he climbed out of the underground hut, put on his snow shoes, and plodded away to the coast at the Bay of Whales.
    This figure of Kenyon on the skyline was what the watchers on the boat picked out, and a party set out in a launch and landed on the ice.
    Kenyon greeted them with the remark that it was “jolly decent of them to drop in on us like this”. Kenyon and the party returned to the ship and made arrangements next day to revisit “Little America” and enquire into the well-being of Mr Ellsworth. This was done, the party going ashore next morning, if there were such a thing as morning or night in this part of the world, because the sun was shining for 24 hours a day.
    Half a mile from “Little America”, which is actually only a depot, and not, as many people think, a complete continent, we came across Mr Ellsworth plodding through the snow.
    Due to the bracing atmosphere the men developed ravenous appetites and, as Lincoln Ellsworth puts it, they immediately set to “Eat him out of house and home”.
    After lunch Mr Ellsworth packed on a small sledge all his essential gear, and the party then returned over the snow to the launch awaiting in the Bay of Whales.
    Our venture having been successfully accomplished, we look back with a certain amount of happiness and gratitude on the work which had previously been put in by everyone connected with the search. This helped to a tremendous extent in making the actual rescue one which went without a hitch. It was due in no small measure to the work done in Australia, the organising and wonderfully efficient method with which everything was thought of and carried out that the whole trip from start to finish was as successful, as we are glad to say it was.
    Although we did our part to the best of our ability, it would have been of no use had not the people behind the scenes done such wonderful ground work both here in Melbourne, in Dunedin and later aboard the Discovery 2.
    It was a pleasure to me to see the quickness with which the Australian Government grasped the situation and the thoroughness with which they went into preparations for the rescue and it was certainly these same preparations that made the task of Flying Officer Murdoch and myself so much easier.
    It is fitting for me to close this chat by saying that it was with the greatest sorrow that we on board learned of the death of His Majesty King George 5th. The ceremony observed was simple, being just the lowering of the flag to half mast and observing of the two minutes’ silence.
    Goodnight everybody, and thank you Mr Percy."

    (Eric Douglas Antarctic Collection)

    Sally Elizabeth Douglas

    7 items
    created by: public:beetle 2011-12-03
    User data
  89. REBECCA (LEAHY) SEVIOR - Born 1836 in Launceston.
    List
    Public

    Rebecca (Leahy) Sevior was a Linen Draper, Confectioner and Publican. She was the Licensee of three hotels, with the most well known in her day being the South Yarra Club Hotel. Rebecca was the Licensee from early July, 1889 in the old building of the hotel. Then she went to a neighbouring temporary building to run the hotel for six months from July, 1892 and would have moved into the new building in about January, 1893. However, by July 1893 it appears that Oldfield was the Publican.

    The 'new' Hotel building was called the South Yarra Club Hotel until at least 1936 and it has to be the present hotel called the Arcadia which is situated at the corner of Toorak and Punt Roads in South Yarra. (Pic of the South Yarra Club Hotel of around 1900 on Trove, matches much later and current Pics of the Arcadia). Plus I know the Hotel.

    Rebecca was born in 1836 in Launceston to John Sample Leahy c1810 and Ellen McCarthy c1813, newly arrived 'Bounty Scheme' immigrants from Kinsale, County of Cork, Ireland. Rebecca was one of eight children.

    Rebecca Leahy and her brother Richard Leahy were baptized on 1st November, 1857 at St Stephens, Church of England, Portland - Portland Area Baptisms

    In 1861 Rebecca married John (William) Sevior born 1834 Launceston, at St Stephens, Church of England, Portland. At the time of their marriage Rebecca was living in Portland and John was living in Hamilton. John’s parents were John Sevior c1799 and Mary Ann Lucas (or Stansbury) 1810 of Launceston. John Sevior snr was born in Somerset, England and Mary Ann Lucas was born in Hampshire, England.

    In 1862 Rebecca and John Sevior were in Portland where John was the Publican of the Builders’ Arms (the hotel belonging to his mother-in-law Ellen Leahy).

    A Mrs John Sevior (Rebecca Leahy) is listed in the book on Portland Pioneer Women's - Book of Remembrance - Centenary of Portland 1834 to 1894. Mrs William Leary (Margaret Leahy - sister of Rebecca) and Ellen Leahy (either the mother or sister of Rebecca) and Mrs John Leahy (wife of John Henry Leahy - Rebecca's brother) are also listed. [There is some reference to 1838 but I don't think that the family was in Portland until 1841 - from Launceston]. The book was published by Edwin Davis at the 'Observer' Office, Julia Street, Portland.

    At the time of Rebecca's death on 4th July, 1914, at the age of 78, at the Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, of her two children with John Sevior; Ellen born 1869 was dead (1902) and John William born 1871 was stated as being 41 but he was 42. Her Death Certificate also said that she was a widow and had been at Portland Bay for 36 years (she had arrived in Portland Bay with her parents by 1841). There was a stage when Rebecca and her husband John had lived at Hamilton - their first child Ellen Sevior was born in 1869 at Hamilton and they were in Hamilton to 1870. Their second child John William Sevior was born in 1871 in Otway Street, Portland from his Birth Certificate (his Marriage Certificate of 1861 states that he born at Cape Nelson). Rebecca Sevior also lived in Melbourne for many years - from at least 1877 (living in 2 "Moores Cottages" in Rosslyn Street, West Melbourne, under the name of John William Sevior - Sands and McDougall Directory; there is more than one reference to this John being called John William Sevior including by his son of the same name). In 1878 John Willam Sevior was at 44 Peel Street, Hotham (now North Melbourne). In 1880 John Sevior was at 4 Trafford Place off Chetwynd Street, Hotham. In 1881 J W Sevior was at 100 Levesen Street, Hotham and in 1882 and 1883 in Erskine Street, Hotham - bearing in mind that John died at his home at “Rose Cottage” Flemington Road, Flemington in March, 1883. I am not sure if John owned or rented the properties where he and his family lived in Melbourne.

    In September 1863, Rebecca’s husband John Sevior was the Publican at the Prince of Wales Hotel (stone hotel and stables) at 123 to 125 Thompson Street, Hamilton - the license (licence) being transferred from his brother Robert Sevior born 1836 Launceston. In 1865 John was still the Publican [Victorian Gazetter - but his name was spelt Senior]. From 1886 to 1867 John Sevior was a Produce Merchant at 106 Gray Street (Brick shop - owners John H Clough and J W Blogg). Between 1866 to 1868 John Sevior was granted a Crown Grant - Allot 10 Sect 17a, at McIntyre Street, South Hamilton - Produce Merchant (owner of House and Premises). In 1868 John Sevior was a Farmer at 112-116 Gray Street, Hamilton (Shop and Premises - later destroyed by fire). In 1870 John Sevior had a business (Shop) as a Dealer at 136 Thompson Street, Hamilton. [Hamilton History Centre 2004]

    From 4th May 1861 to 8th August 1868 - John Sevior and his brother Robert Sevior were Wholesale and Retail Butchers near the old Post Office in Gray Street Hamilton (Hamilton Spectator). They advertised in the Hamilton Spectator on 15th June 1861 “J & R Sevior Butchers - Wholesale and Retail - Monthly Payments - No Second Price!...Prime Beef 3d per lb, Neck 2 and ½ per lb, Steaks 4d per lb, Mutton forequarter 3d, hind-quarter 3 and ½ d, Mutton Chops 4d and Pork 7d. Of course, besides these businesses John and Robert were jockeys and horse breeders and trainers. Plus they were also busy racing their early horses Becky Sharp (Maid of Erin) and Hotspur. In John’s case he was also a Ploughing Match Judge and a Racing Steward. Plus they both had Crown land and other enterprises ie training stables and grain stores at Muckleford and Castlemaine; while John still had interests at Portland and Robert had land at Green Gully, Strangeways. They were both excellent riders and when at Muckleford in the late 1850’s John wrote to the Alexander Mail and indicated that he was about to ride from Muckleford to Portland! (John wrote to the Alexander Mail more than once on various matters of concern). [Castlemaine Archives 2004].

    Both John Sevior born 1834 and Robert Sevior 1836 born in Launceston, were listed in 1851 as being eligible to vote in the Legislative Assembly. At this time John was a Freehold land and Tenant Farmer and Robert was a Freeholder and Farmer - both at the Muckleford Division, County of Talbot. [Mount Alexander Mail of 1956, at the Castlemaine Archives].

    Ellen Sevior born 1869 in Hamilton, the daughter of John and Rebecca Sevior married Louis Alfred Soumprou born 1864 Creswick in 1891 at Christ Church, South Yarra. Louis Alfred was a son of Louis Soumprou born 1829 at Pointis de Riviere, Barbazan, Saint-Gaudens, Upper Haute Garonne, Midi-Pyrenees, France (Barbazan is about 80 km's by road from Lourdes) and Sarah Coulson c1843.

    Australian newspapers of 1929 - online - give Louis' birth place as in the Toulouse district - http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/4004139?searchTerm=louis%20soumprou&searchLimits=

    Pointis de Riviere is in south-west France - http://www.lion1906.com/departements/haute-garonne/pointis-de-riviere-.php

    The Pointis de Riviere address for Louis' Birth came from John Ron Soumprou who is now the only living descendant of Ellen Sevior and Louis Alfred Soumprou. It may also be on the Birth Certificate of Louis Soumprou 1829

    The story is broadly that - Louis Soumprou born in 1829 had run away from his parents vineyard near Lourdes in France at the age of about 13 to be a Linen Hawker but by the age of 23 he was set to be a Gold Miner on the diggings at Creswick. However instead he opened up a General Store at Creswick, he later went to Malmsbury to manufacture cement - none of these ventures succeeded. Louis then went to Port Albert from Melbourne by ketch and walked 200 miles to the gold rushes at Omeo with his dog "Austral" who saved him when he was attacked by a pack of wild dogs - he did not make his fortune at Omeo either.

    Louis then went to Carlton, Melbourne where he began a Wine and Spirit Business in 1874/75 (now Jimmy Watson's Wine Bar in Lygon Street) and he was also involved in the beginnings of (Chateau) Tahbilk with his cousin Ludovic Laporte or Marie, also from France. [Undated newspaper cutting of 1929].

    The Birth Certificate of Louis Soumprou born 1829 apparently shows that his father was Jean-Marie Soumprou - a Contractor of Toulouse and that his mother was named Mary.

    The name is sometimes spelt Somprou both in France and Australia. Plus from a French genealogical website other variations in the spelling are Semprou, Samprou and Sompron.

    Louis Alfred Soumprou 1864, (a son of Louis Soumprou 1829) and Ellen Sevior had four children - Louis Sevior Soumprou 1894, Ellen (Nell) Florence Soumprou 1895, and Isla Josephine Soumprou - all three born in North Carlton and John (Jack) Cyril Soumprou 1899 born in South Fitzroy.

    Rebecca Sevior was widowed on 13th March, 1883 when her husband John died at their home "Rose Cottage" in Flemington Road, Flemington, Victoria. (Probate for the Will of john Sevior in May, 1890 was £720).

    However from 1883 onwards Rebecca had to think of a way to earn a living for herself and her two young children Ellen Sevior and John William Sevior and act upon her ideas.

    In 1884 and to early 1885 Rebecca Sevior sold Linen Drapery and Toys at 188 Drummond Street, Carlton. In January, 1885 she advertised for public sale through an agent her stock in trade which consisted of items such as linen drapery, dress stuffs, calicoes, hats, children's and women's underclothing, boxes of flowers, toys and furniture.

    From Sands and McDougall Directory -
    * 1884 Mrs Rebecca Sevior - 158 Drummond Street, Carlton.
    * 1885 Mrs Rebecca Sevior "Confectioner" at 158 Drummond Street, Carlton.
    * 1886, 1887, 1888 R Sevior "Bristol Hotel" no 59 (or 50) Rathdowne Street, Carlton. The number is now 301 Rathdowne Street (May, 2007) but it is no longer a Hotel. The Carlton Community History Group website says that the Bristol