Information about Trove user: annmanley

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,235,555
2 NeilHamilton 2,266,280
3 annmanley 2,047,647
4 noelwoodhouse 1,839,870
5 maurielyn 1,462,921

2,047,647 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2015 946
April 2015 16,517
March 2015 16,416
February 2015 639
January 2015 2,856
December 2014 1,005
November 2014 612
October 2014 10,726
September 2014 31,962
August 2014 32,012
July 2014 27,428
June 2014 40,343
May 2014 22,817
April 2014 15,363
March 2014 19,715
February 2014 24,184
January 2014 24,677
December 2013 27,211
November 2013 27,128
October 2013 32,366
September 2013 36,567
August 2013 26,825
July 2013 31,039
June 2013 28,428
May 2013 27,292
April 2013 30,601
March 2013 31,616
February 2013 26,453
January 2013 17,516
December 2012 16,707
November 2012 14,311
October 2012 5,918
September 2012 38,755
August 2012 44,609
July 2012 34,527
June 2012 34,351
May 2012 19,704
April 2012 37,154
March 2012 38,134
February 2012 40,545
January 2012 65,078
December 2011 29,707
November 2011 35,699
October 2011 44,777
September 2011 40,392
August 2011 37,550
July 2011 36,571
June 2011 53,560
May 2011 24,588
April 2011 26,013
March 2011 36,711
February 2011 30,852
January 2011 25,789
December 2010 25,101
November 2010 18,682
October 2010 33,565
September 2010 22,735
August 2010 35,629
July 2010 34,457
June 2010 39,716
May 2010 38,682
April 2010 44,571
March 2010 35,547
February 2010 31,701
January 2010 26,075
December 2009 31,682
November 2009 32,360
October 2009 47,978
September 2009 37,292
August 2009 31,098
July 2009 37,514

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
SOUTH COAST. SUTBERLAND, Friday. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 14 December 1901 page Article 2015-05-05 17:10 Mr Jumes Retallick, in t nagel of the British mine
uftai about 10 )curt,'setvicc, flr.| as mulei'ïi mind
iii!iua"ei, his* ii tired Jioin the i Ibec, itnd hah now
piactieallv severed his connection vutli Hie campait' ,
and Mi John oampson, foi some veins lindel jioutttt
iiiaiia¡'cr ol the tmlisli mine, his been ippomted mid
assiitucd the duties of tctiug inatingei
Tlte uttemioit of the Police Comt to da) was oc-
cupied almost eulin Iv b> Mia liuvinig of the cluirfes
ol sly giogsclliiig against Wallet Wabli, miiin"ei,
and Heinian Buhu tocicleiv of lite Woikmen s
Club Hie evidence thiouglioul wits loniridie
ton Asthe jiohce iiia"'iätiali did not coiisidet the
chili a bonn licit one both deft nil tuts were lined ¿JO
with costs, m delimit MC mouths' linpiigoumciit
Mr Thomas Johnson, Intel) projinetoi of thePree
masons' Hotel, who is leaving ttftci ncuil) 1 >)cars'
residence at tho Hamel, wits entert lined In the
ITrokeu Hill Jockev Club hist cv niiing A few even-
ings ago Ali Johnson was made tho guest of the
t'olo Club of which be nasa luembei, aud wus pre-
sented v lth a handsome ¿old locket
Ata meeting ol the Benevolent Sucietv last night
it was jioui'od out that Hiero was eon«itiei iblo dis
treas at Broke» Hill
At tho tilquin into (hu deulh ol lohn Unies
Ilamdfon M Coll, nt Buiru a fit ding of de*th fiom
heat apojilex) vus iceoidei1
The lomki left to-night v ith the following cargo
1G0 bigsiini/i IS bngspotatocs, II j gs, H hides, OG
boxes butte!, 2i cises egf,s, li coops jioultn, 0 eases
hone\, 10 log» june lu logs htiidwood, i do/eir
melons, and 21,)001t eise material
BKOKCN HILL, Pridav
CONDOBOLIN, Frida)
CORAJv.1, Trida)
Mr. James Retallick, manager of the British mine,
after about 10 years' service, first as underground
manager, has retired from the office, and has now
practically severed his connection with the company ;
and Mr. John Sampson, for some years underground
manager of the British mine, has been appointed and
assumed the duties of acting manager.
The attention of the Police Court to-day was oc-
cupied almost entirely by the hearing of charges
of sly grogselling against Walter Webb, manager,
and Herman Bahn, secretary of the Workmen's
Club. The evidence throughout was contradic-
tory. As the police magistrate did not consider the
club a bona-fide one, both defendants were fined £30
with costs, in default six months' imprisonment.
Mr. Thomas Johnson, lately proprietor of the Free-
masons' Hotel, who is leaving after nearly 13 years'
residence at the Barrier, was entertained by the
Broken Hill Jockey Club last evening. A few even-
ings ago Mr. Johnson was made the guest of the
Polo Club, of which he was a member, and was pre-
sented with a handsome gold locket.
At a meeting of the Benevolent Society last night
it was pointed out that there was considerable dis-
tress at Broken Hill.
At the inquiry into the death of John James
Hamilton McColl, at Burra, a finding of death from
heat apoplexy was recorded.
The Tomki left to-night with the following cargo :
160 bags maize, 48 bags potatoes, 11 pigs, 34 hides, 66
boxes butter, 25 cases eggs, 11 coops poultry, 9 cases
honey, 40 logs pine, 25 logs hardwood, 7 dozen
melons, and 21,500ft. case material.
BROKEN HILL, Friday.
CONDOBOLIN, Friday.
CORAKI, Friday.
SOUTH COAST. SUTBERLAND, Friday. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 14 December 1901 page Article 2015-05-05 16:51 ton road, National Park, were suddenly knocked  
At a mci hug of magistrates to-<n) b) mvit ilion
Mi O'Neill, the poll e niuglstiatc, was picscnt, and
explained m leteioitce to ii si ittineiit win li ho had
made about Jvomnu Otthohc und Pinkstaulitme
tencs that ii wits Hue I hat ho did sa) what was
«Hut inert to bun, but thu speech wa« nob lullv
ripottcd and it wies not coireetlv tiudcistool He
munit no slight 01 insult lo un\ dciiciuiiialiou 01
individual On tht molían of Ali (? U Maeluttie
the lmcting iicecpted tue willi iitvwil and exjucs
Bions ot io0rit made b) Mi O'Ni ill
At i meeting of Iho niogiess committee liddon
Tuesdi) evening, sevi lal new iiiiiiilieiswiieadnutled
to the issoeiation It was it solved to request the
ftdii ii authoiities th it its (bei lind lefitsidlJeeciolt i
telephone exehuuge 12 itsidcnh s muli! be peimitte I
lo eonnoet with in existing uxhinni at Hie mile
rate ot i i per munni It was íeprrteo taut it ciicket
ground would be vciv ilesnable, ninia Mill committee
was appointed lo t ruisulei the hu I site Alten lion
was dnwn to the illegrd nisuniliir) coilditiau of the
bli lthhcld luilw i) sUtion
1,1 LCROn, Pula)
ton-road, National Park, were suddenly knocked-
At a meeting of magistrates to-day by invitation
Mr. O'Neill, the police magistrate, was present, and
explained in reference to a statement which he had
made about Roman Catholic and Protestant ceme-
teries that it was true that he did say what was
attributed to him, but the speech was not fully
reported and it was not correctly understood. He
meant no slight or insult to any denomination or
individual. On the motion of Mr. G. E. Machattie
the meeting accepted the withdrawal and expres-
sions of regret made by Mr. O'Neill.
At a meeting of the progress committee held on
Tuesday evening, several new members were admitted
to the association. It was resolved to request the
federal authorities that as they had refused Beecroft a
telephone exchange 12 residents should be permitted
to connect with an existing exchange at the mile
rate of £5 per annum. It was reported that a cricket
ground would be very diserable, and a sub-committee
was appointed to consider the best site. Attention
was drawn to the alleged insanitary condition of the
Strathfield railway station.
BEECROFT, Friday.
GUNNING POLICE COURT. WEDNESDAY—MARCH 29. (Detailed lists, results, guides), The Goulburn Herald and Chronicle (NSW : 1864 - 1881), Saturday 1 April 1865 page Detailed lists, results, guides 2015-05-05 09:37 MAIc.coo.-3iarch 24.-Last Saturday a shocking
.catastropho occurred near Cowra. It seems that a
the road at a right-anglo through the bush, dashed
with such force against a tree as to be killed in
stantlv. To give you some idea of the awful force
of the concussion, when poor oKennedy was picked up
his skull was found to be crushed in, and his neckle
broken: moreover, the skin of paris of his face, and
also one of his whiskers, nOoro found sticking out
unfortunato deceased was much liked; he hao left
behind him a wife and one child.-March 25.--VWhat
I am about to state may appear to some but puorile
v. police. Three boys represented Hall, Gilbort, and
I could not but observe that the soidisant bushrangers,
fair the most popular party, always victorious--lead
ing after each engagement the repreosentatives of
the police in ignominious captivity. Neow, though
our teacher is a man whom I much like, yotI canlnost
but call his attention to this little affair, well know
game of such quostionablo import.-Correspondent
MARENGO. — March 24. — Last Saturday a shocking
catastrophe occurred near Cowra. It seems that a
the road at a right-angle through the bush, dashed
with such force against a tree as to be killed in-
stantly. To give you some idea of the awful force
of the concussion, when poor Kennedy was picked up
his skull was found to be crushed in, and his neck
broken: moreover, the skin of parts of his face, and
also one of his whiskers, were found sticking out
unfortunate deceased was much liked; he has left
behind him a wife and one child. — March 25. — What
I am about to state may appear to some but puerile
v. police. Three boys represented Hall, Gilbeert, and
I could not but observe that the soi disant bushrangers,
far the most popular party, always victorious — lead-
ing after each engagement the representatives of
the police in ignominious captivity. Now, though
our teacher is a man whom I much like, yet I cannot
but call his attention to this little affair, well know-
game of such questionable import. — Correspondent
NEWS OF THE DAY. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 7 May 1881 page Article 2015-05-05 09:13 Wal], a raihvay employee, residing at Blacktown, xvas
also taken to the Inlirmary, having received injuries to
the shoulder and xvrist in consequence of being caught
in the buffers of txvo loaded vane.
Mns. REBECCA AVJIIT.:, xvifo of David AVhite, of
Newtoxvn, was found drowned in a well at tho rear
from norvous depression. She had been attended by
two doctors. Having been missed, a searoh was made,
when her dead body xvas found in a well in a lane at
the back of the house. Tho well, which had not been
in use for two years, was about 12 feet doop, and con-
dead in a paddook off Ilolden-strect, Ashfield. Tho
shafts of a dray, loaded xvith stone, Avere found lying
across his chest Tho body was found by the deceased 3
son-in-laxv, Edward Luly. Doceased was seen at half
past 5 o'clock tho samo evening, when ho xvas proceed-
ing towards Ashfield, and AX\IS driving two horses
attached to a dray Yvhich was loaded Avith stone.
TnE dead body of a man named Thomas Byrne, Yvho
Yx-as formerly a publican, was found lloating in tho
Yvators of Black AVattle Bay yesterday morning. De-
He and his Yvife had been staying at tho Royal Oak
Hotel, Union-street, Pyrmont. Thoy went to bed at
12 o'clock on Wednesday night, and ho xvas missed at
(i o'clook next morning. The wifo of the deceased was
locked up on Thursday for being drunk. Sho xvas
brought beforo the Central Police Court, yesterday,
and fined 10s., or in default to bo imprisoned for four
days. Intelligence, hoAvover, having been received of
the death of her husband, tho polico reported tho
matter to the Court, and brought tho woman up a
which thoy had previously made, and directed that sho
should be discharged. Thero is reason for supposing
tlait Byrne committed suicide.
IN tho Supremo Com t on Thursday, the aotion, "Iloxx-e,
junr., v. De Luuret," xvas lienrd in tho Jury Court, beïoro
Mr. justice AVindoyer. By the accidental omissiou of a
Court." Mr. Simpson, instructed bv Mr. Davidson, ivp
Ëeui ed for the plaintitt ; Mr. Rogers, instructed by Messrs.
lilis and Makinson, for the defendant.
Wall, a raihvay employee, residing at Blacktown, was
also taken to the Infirmary, having received injuries to
the shoulder and wrist in consequence of being caught
in the buffers of twvo loaded vans.
MRS. REBECCA WHITE, wife of David White, of
Newtown, was found drowned in a well at the rear
from nervous depression. She had been attended by
two doctors. Having been missed, a search was made,
when her dead body was found in a well in a lane at
the back of the house. The well, which had not been
in use for two years, was about 12 feet deep, and con-
dead in a paddook off Holden-street, Ashfield. The
shafts of a dray, loaded with stone, were found lying
across his chest. The body was found by the deceased's
son-in-law, Edward Luly. Deceased was seen at half-
past 5 o'clock the same evening, when he was proceed-
ing towards Ashfield, and was driving two horses
attached to a dray which was loaded with stone.
THE dead body of a man named Thomas Byrne, who
was formerly a publican, was found floating in the
waters of Black Wattle Bay yesterday morning. De-
He and his wife had been staying at the Royal Oak
Hotel, Union-street, Pyrmont. They went to bed at
12 o'clock on Wednesday night, and he was missed at
6 o'clock next morning. The wife of the deceased was
locked up on Thursday for being drunk. She was
brought before the Central Police Court, yesterday,
and fined 10s., or in default to be imprisoned for four
days. Intelligence, however, having been received of
the death of her husband, the police reported the
matter to the Court, and brought the woman up a
which they had previously made, and directed that she
should be discharged. There is reason for supposing
that Byrne committed suicide.
IN the Supreme Court on Thursday, the action, "Rowe,
junr., v. De Luuret," was heard in the Jury Court, before
Mr. Justice Windeyer. By the accidental omission of a
Court." Mr. Simpson, instructed by Mr. Davidson, ap-
peared for the plaintiff ; Mr. Rogers, instructed by Messrs.
Ellis and Makinson, for the defendant.
Among Memorials of the Past (For the "Nepean Times.") (Continued.) (Article), Nepean Times (Penrith, NSW : 1882 - 1962), Saturday 6 February 1909 page Article 2015-05-05 09:01 Thoaet are a few of the old names along
th<> nyot bunk .afath ot thorailway
I during the tirno o£ the big flood, wbon so
■ many of tho fanners bad to soek a rofuge
f in and around the old Oastlerengh church.
' Thoir inclusion in these articlos will serve
' as a reminder of the old days long since
passed away. Many of these village fore
fathers have journeyed to their latt homo.
Ia somo cases I have read their simpio
memorials in one or another of (ho little
they rost in peace. Time is the avenger
Yob ev'n.theso bones from insult to protect,
Some frail memorial atiil crccted nigh, - (.
Witb uncouth rhymcBand shapeless sculpture
i A11 tliab beauty, all that wealth o'er gavo,
Awaits alikffvtho inevitable hour :
. The paths of glory lead but to tho grave.
Of those who we may still^count our
odd moments snatohed from a busy round
And bo much that's good in tho worst of us,
To mako the most of the beet of us,
consists not so much in tho multitude of
wants. I trust I will bo pardoned top
wandering: from tho solid coldness of bare
' ■ #" -■ *■ ' ;• •
used to tell a good storyof a Penrith
miser, who one OEristmas Eve seized on
a fine fat duok and a few bushels of prime
grean peas, tho property of a poor widow
woman who had unnappily fallen into his
ootopus-like alutches, Having prepared
jBtarted off for oburoh, leaving a poor
R half-witted and wholly-starved lad of 10
(years to attend to the cooking. JBy way
of precaution he also prooured a bottle of
"PoiBon" in large letters, and placed it
where the poor boy could not hielp seeing,
and (as tho ounning master thought) :
rospeoting tho terrible warning. When 1
hungry, he was horrified to find only the '
ragged remains of his ohoice Christmas 1
dinner left and all tho jelly gone. The :
awful boy he had left in oharge was '
stretched on the floor, bloated up to j
round in terrible pain. ILoughly rousing. ■
'the poor lad with a vicious kick, tho 1
furious old frump demanded an explana
tion, and after'a time spent in groans and
moai?s the temporary cook stammered
out, " Oh, sir 1 I couldn't help it, but it's !
all over with mo now; I'm dying fast, bo
please Iemme die in peace., I attended to 1
the cooking as long as I could, but tho 1
delioious smell of the duok and the peas
overcame me completely. I had to eat a '
third, and at last I thought I oan only be !
killed, so I'll have the first good mei»l of
all my life! Then I got so soared that I
drank all the pbison you left in that red
glass bottle, and it's a-workin' on "me i
now, sir I I'm dead from the etummick <
down already, and I'll soon be fit for the '
undertaker!" The disappointed miser !
made no reply; be felt he oouldn't do
justioe to tbe subjeot, certainly not half
as muoh as the boy had done to his (the
miser's) delicious dinner. '
deck'd, a
(To be continuedj i j
These are a few of the old names along
the river bank north of the railway
during the time of the big flood, when so
many of the farmers had to soek a refuge
in and around the old Castlereagh church.
Their inclusion in these articles will serve
as a reminder of the old days long since
passed away. Many of these village fore-
fathers have journeyed to their last home.
In some cases I have read their simple
memorials in one or another of the little
they rest in peace. Time is the avenger
Yet ev'n these bones from insult to protect,
Some frail memorial still erected nigh,
With uncouth rhymes and shapeless sculpture
All that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave,
Awaits alike the inevitable hour :
The paths of glory lead but to the grave.
Of those who we may still count our
odd moments snatched from a busy round
And so much that's good in the worst of us,
To make the most of the best of us.
consists not so much in the multitude of
wants. I trust I will be pardoned for
wandering from the solid coldness of bare
* * *
used to tell a good story of a Penrith
miser, who one Christmas Eve seized on
a fine fat duck and a few bushels of prime
grean peas, the property of a poor widow
woman who had unhappily fallen into his
octopus-like clutches. Having prepared
started off for church, leaving a poor
half-witted and wholly-starved lad of 16
years to attend to the cooking. By way
of precaution he also procured a bottle of
" Poison" in large letters, and placed it
where the poor boy could not help seeing,
and (as the cunning master thought)
respecting the terrible warning. When
hungry, he was horrified to find only the
ragged remains of his choice Christmas
dinner left and all the jelly gone. The
awful boy he had left in charge was
stretched on the floor, bloated up to
round in terrible pain. Roughly rousing
the poor lad with a vicious kick, the
furious old frump demanded an explana-
tion, and after a time spent in groans and
moans the temporary cook stammered
out, " Oh, sir ! I couldn't help it, but it's
all over with me now ; I'm dying fast, so
please lemme die in peace. I attended to
the cooking as long as I could, but the
delicious smell of the duck and the peas
overcame me completely. I had to eat a
third, and at last I thought I oan only be
killed, so I'll have the first good meal of
all my life! Then I got so scared that I
drank all the poison you left in that red
glass bottle, and it's a-workin' on me
now, sir ! I'm dead from the stummick
down already, and I'll soon be fit for the
undertaker!" The disappointed miser
made no reply; he felt he couldn't do
justice to tbe subject, certainly not half
as much as the boy had done to his (the
miser's) delicious dinner.
deck'd,
(To be continued)
Among Memorials of the Past (For the "Nepean Times.") (Continued.) (Article), Nepean Times (Penrith, NSW : 1882 - 1962), Saturday 6 February 1909 page Article 2015-05-05 08:50 notioing here and there some old relic
thai; seems so strangely forlorn and for
to tho very first chapter^ o£ the district's
history, the ever ohanging conditions of
,life appear so apparont—
OhnngR and decay all around I Bee.
Even the river has largely ohanged its
course. Tho water that iB now sparkling
in tho hot sunlight has shrunk baok from
oaks, beneath whoBe sheltering limbs
many a traveller and teamster has sproad
his blanket ia the days when men were
attraoted westwards by the vision of
golden riohes—mapy of these old oaks
ilood waters, Among the most notable
landmarks of these old days were un
doubtedly the old tweed faotor'y on the
mile higher up than tho bridge; and the
flour mills, along' the other side of the
river going downstream—all three worked
by water-wheels. These were Allen's, Ool
loss's and Howell's. Allen's mill was on
built by Mr MoHenrjp, of Lambridge, but
old parts of maohinery and a few old
posts. Mr John Oolless's mill was fur
ther down stream, underneath OaBtle
reagh. I suppose that has long sinue
gono too. I nave before me as I write an
.old record of the river settlements, giving
£ho names of the residents 42 years ago,
>six months before the big flood of 1867.
Some ot the older generation of readers
may be interested in a few of the nam^p,
as follows:— '
Emu Femiy.—Eobert Beatson, publi
oan; Henry Bennett, publican; Onarles
Evans, squatter,; Samuel/Fayers, oar
penter; Samuel MoOree, storekeeper;
Erank Peisley, labourer ; John Tapp,
labourer: John fright,, wheelwright.
Emu Plains.—Biohard' Alcorn,, cattle
detitor; William Banks, labourer; Thos.
Boluu, oontraotor; Henry Chapman,
blacksmith; George A Oolless, farmer ;
William Pukes, carpenter; Page Jude,
farmor; Oharlos Paul, schoolmaster;
Eov Thos. Unwin, incumbent Sfc .Paul's,
Emu Plains; Honry York, cattle farmer.
Oabtlebeagh.—John Byrnes, farmer ;
William OollesB, farmer; Ed. Clemson,
farmer; John Oolless, farmor, eto.;
Honry Devlin, farmpr; John Erazor,
farmer; Charles Hadley, farmer; Thos.
one or the very, first on the Hawkesbury
and Nopoan )Bivora); Peter Howell,
farmer; Donald Kennedy, formor; Miohael
lftnsula, farmer; William Lavondor, oar
rior; Miohael Long, farmer (thon down
tUo river near Single's and Hadloy'e);
Ofaas, Mills, fannor; P, MoOanu, splitter;
Hozokiah Parker, blacksmith; John
Parker, farooAr ; Henry Purooll, farmer j
John Shaw, farmer; Charles Singlo and
Joseph Singlo, farm are; Michael Tinny,
farmer; and Levi Wltoome, farmer.
noticing here and there some old relic
that seems so strangely forlorn and for-
to the very first chapter of the district's
history, the ever changing conditions of
life appear so apparent —
Change and decay all around I see.
Even the river has largely changed its
course. The water that is now sparkling
in the hot sunlight has shrunk back from
oaks, beneath whose sheltering limbs
many a traveller and teamster has spread
his blanket in the days when men were
attracted westwards by the vision of
golden riches — many of these old oaks
flood waters. Among the most notable
landmarks of these old days were un-
doubtedly the old tweed factory on the
mile higher up than the bridge ; and the
flour mills, along the other side of the
river going downstream — all three worked
by water-wheels. These were Allen's, Col-
less's and Howell's. Allen's mill was on
built by Mr McHenry, of Lambridge, but
old parts of machinery and a few old
posts. Mr John Colless's mill was fur-
ther down stream, underneath Castle-
reagh. I suppose that has long since
gone too. I have before me as I write an
old record of the river settlements, giving
the names of the residents 42 years ago,
six months before the big flood of 1867.
Some of the older generation of readers
may be interested in a few of the names,
as follows :—
EMU FERRY. — Robert Beatson, publi-
can ; Henry Bennett, publican ; Charles
Evans, squatter ; Samuel Fayers, car-
penter; Samuel McCree, storekeeper ;
Frank Peisley, labourer ; John Tapp,
labourer : John Wright, wheelwright.
EMU PLAINS. — Richard Alcorn, cattle
dealer ; William Banks, labourer ; Thos.
Bolan, contractor ; Henry Chapman,
blacksmith ; George Colless, farmer ;
William Dukes, carpenter ; Page Jude,
farmer ; Charles Paul, schoolmaster ;
Rev Thos. Unwin, incumbent St Paul's,
Emu Plains ; Henry York, cattle farmer.
CASTLEREAGH. — John Byrnes, farmer ;
William Colless, farmer ; Ed. Clemson,
farmer ; John Colless, farmer, etc. ;
Henry Devlin, farmer ; John Frazer,
farmer ; Charles Hadley, farmer ; Thos.
one of the very, first on the Hawkesbury
and Nepean Rivers) ; Peter Howell,
farmer ; Donald Kennedy, farmer ; Michael
Kinsula, farmer ; William Laveender, car-
rier ; Michael Long, farmer (then down
the river near Single's and Hadley's) ;
Chas. Mills, farmer ; P. McCann, splitter;
Hezekiah Parker, blacksmith ; John
Parker, farmer ; Henry Purcell, farmer ;
John Shaw, farmer ; Charles Single and
Joseph Single, farmers ; Michael Tinny,
farmer ; and Levi Witcome, farmer.
Among Memorials of the Past (For the "Nepean Times.") (Continued.) (Article), Nepean Times (Penrith, NSW : 1882 - 1962), Saturday 6 February 1909 page Article 2015-05-05 08:40 Hmong Memorials of
St Paul's church is a solid-stono struc
ture occupjing a conspicuous position
overlooking tho main western1 railway
lino, The building, which is about 60
years of ago, is showing some signs <?f
dooay, particularly the roof. This, how
ever, I understand, is to bo recovered
reotmt dato, having been erected, so I was
informed, about 10 years ago. The in
ornaments, sacerdotal or othorwise, being
to say. the building contains no me
morials of departed benofaotora or parish
presented by Mrs Wagstaif. The first
clergyman was the Bey Henry Pulton,
Evan (Penrith), Oastlereagh and Rich
mond. He was [the great |
grandfather of the members of i
the well-known Penrith firm of merohants, I
whioh chujch he was the first incumbent.
After Parson Fulton's ministry the parish'
was divided, for we \find that the Rev
Stephens and the Bey John Vincent at
Oastlereagh cum, Emu (not St Paul's,
Emu, cum Oastlereagh, as at -present).
Mr Makinson also was the first clergy
man at St Thomas's, Mulgoa, only re
mained at Penrith until 1811, his succes
sor at St Stephen's being the Bev B. K. j
Soonoe, who, strange to say, together])
Boman Oatholio Ohuroh. The opening of
a new church at Penrith attraoted several
of the big families from the Oastlereagh
ohurch, notably H. MoHenry and Sir
John Jamison, who with Messrs B. 0.
Jjethbridge, 0. York, A. Tindale, Oaptain
King and Dr Clarke were the first pew
holders. Since then the Oastlereagh
ohuroh has slowly declined, and gradu
at llmu; and to-day we find no trace of
boyond the fast-decaying epitaphs in the
and muoh mutilated register. Yet there
are those in the district who can remem
these may be pleasant reminisoences of
yarn could bo told of these old associa
tions with the ohuroh in whose rafters it
ollioial resident of Penrith who may still
remember the time when as a sm&rt, gay
young fellow he drove to ohurch there;
and this may reoall to memory an inci
dent that ooourred one fine Sunday after
well - dressed yourlg men went in for ^
broadcloth, and our young friend—
" young friend " he was then-—was rather
stoutly built, and boing desirous of ap
pearing smart whilo in suoh good com.
pany, upon reaching ..the ohuroh he
Jumped out of the bug»y to let the slip
rails down, when an acoident occurred to
the best broadcloth, necessitating on the •
br William Fbeame.
tho " Nepeau Times,'')
* # * n
Among Memorials of
St Paul's church is a solid-stone struc-
ture occupying a conspicuous position
overlooking the main western railway
line. The building, which is about 60
years of age, is showing some signs of
decay, particularly the roof. This, how-
ever, I understand, is to be recovered
recent date, having been erected, so I was
informed, about 16 years ago. The in-
ornaments, sacerdotal or otherwise, being
to say, the building contains no me-
morials of departed benefaotors or parish-
presented by Mrs Wagstaff. The first
clergyman was the Rev Henry Fulton,
Evan (Penrith), Castlereagh and Rich-
mond. He was the great
grandfather of the members of
the well-known Penrith firm of merchants,
which church he was the first incumbent.
After Parson Fulton's ministry the parish
was divided, for we find that the Rev
Stephens and the Rev John Vincent at
Castlereagh cum Emu (not St Paul's,
Emu, cum Oastlereagh, as at present).
Mr Makinson also was the first clergy-
man at St Thomas's, Mulgoa, only re-
mained at Penrith until 1841, his succes-
sor at St Stephen's being the Rev R. K.
Sconce, who, strange to say, together
Roman Catholic Church. The opening of
a new church at Penrith attracted several
of the big families from the Castlereagh
church, notably H. McHenry and Sir
John Jamison, who with Messrs R. C.
Lethbridge, C. York, A. Tindale, Captain
King and Dr Clarke were the first pew-
holders. Since then the Castlereagh
church has slowly declined, and gradually has become subordinate to its daughter
at Emu; and to-day we find no trace of
beyond the fast-decaying epitaphs in the
and much mutilated register. Yet there
are those in the district who can remem-
these may be pleasant reminiscences of
yarn could be told of these old associa-
tions with the church in whose rafters it
official resident of Penrith who may still
remember the time when as a smart, gay
young fellow he drove to church there;
and this may recall to memory an inci-
dent that occurred one fine Sunday after-
well - dressed young men went in for
broadcloth, and our young friend —
" young friend " he was then — was rather
stoutly built, and being desirous of ap-
pearing smart while in such good com-
pany, upon reaching the church he
jumped out of the buggy to let the slip-
rails down, when an accident occurred to
the best broadcloth, necessitating on the
BY WILLIAM FREAME.
(For the " Nepean Times.")
* * *
Brevities. (Article), Nepean Times (Penrith, NSW : 1882 - 1962), Saturday 12 January 1889 page Article 2015-05-05 08:15 arc paramount in Samoa.- and that she lias conse
payments. -.
In the Assembly, on Wednesday night Sir Henry
Parkes characterised tiis action in " franking" the.
Chinaman .oyer the border " an -innocent '. breaking
,of tlie'law." . . 1
votes against 23. '
the freehold property. . '
Tlie contractor for tho Panama Canal .has agreed
.to proceed with the work,- he having received a
Thiee men have been arrested on suspicion of
being concerned in tlie murder of Hans Olunl, a
The Berlin press hope that America, will, join
.with Germany in putting an end to the intrigues
which exist in Samoa,' and thus facilitate a settle
. the latters diplomas were stolen in 1804.
. , The miners at the Wnllsend Colliery have asked
to be. allowed to work coal as they did before tho
.recent strike. Tho matter has Iwen referred to Mr.
Binney, the Secretary of the Coal Owners' Associ
ation. :: - .; -?
What is the.meaning of this extract from a Hong
kong paper-" The departure of 100 emigiants from
Yokohama to Australia has been postponed iu com
Entries for..the -principal events in connection
with lvutoombii Athletic sports to be held on 26th
Eetries may.be left at this office up till 9.30, a.m.
on.that day.,
Should , resistance be offered to the Police at
the resisting jjeople, rind the police will then pro
by the military. .
. "At. Thursday's meeting of the City Council
A.ldermuu J. 1). Youug called Aldermuu Riley au
" unmitigated liar," and as ho refused to withdraw
the words tlie chairman (Alderman Chapman) ad
journed the meeting. '
that she was couccined in the revelation of certain
despatches during 'the Franco-German war- The
German press insinuate that the Downger Empress
Victoria sliould'makc a similar denial.
' Sir Henry Pnrkes was questioned in the Assembly
on Weduuseay as to the admission into the colony
.Government 'was answerable for his return within.
lOday's, and that it was a case of " innocent breaking
of the law. <
The Princess Helene of Russia had a miraculou
escape on Sunday. She was being driven in a sledp
along the Markov Railway, wlien the vehicle to
overtaken by a train. The driver of the sledge v
killed on the spot, and the Princess rendered
sensible. The train passed over her body, but
escaped without sorious injury.
" A tree-may be known by the fruit that g
I therefrom consequently the Flour turned o'
G. MATTHEWS & SON, of liathurst, may be j
by its successes at exhibitions, a few .of whi
are at liberty to enumerate, as follows
bury, 188o ; bydnoy, 1884. 1885; London,
medal, 1880.; Adulniduj 1887 j &c. Read .
vcrtiscmuut. . .-u, -
are paramount in Samoa, and that she has conse-
payments.
In the Assembly on Wednesday night Sir Henry
Parkes characterised his action in " franking" the
Chinaman over the border " an innocent breaking
of the law."
votes against 23.
the freehold property.
The contractor for the Panama Canal has agreed
to proceed with the work, he having received a
Three men have been arrested on suspicion of
being concerned in the murder of Hans Olund, a
The Berlin press hope that America will, join
with Germany in putting an end to the intrigues
which exist in Samoa, and thus facilitate a settle-
the latters diplomas were stolen in 1864.
The miners at the Wallsend Colliery have asked
to be allowed to work coal as they did before the
recent strike. The matter has been referred to Mr.
Binney, the Secretary of the Coal Owners' Associ-
ation.
What is the meaning of this extract from a Hong-
kong paper —" The departure of 100 emigiants from
Yokohama to Australia has been postponed in com-
Entries for the principal events in connection
with Katoomba Athletic sports to be held on 26th
Entries may be left at this office up till 9.30 a.m.
on that day.
Should resistance be offered to the Police at
the resisting people, and the police will then pro-
by the military.
At Thursday's meeting of the City Council
Alderman J. D. Youug called Alderman Riley an
" unmitigated liar," and as he refused to withdraw
the words the chairman (Alderman Chapman) ad-
journed the meeting.
that she was concerned in the revelation of certain
despatches during the Franco-German war. The
German press insinuate that the Dowager Empress
Victoria sliould make a similar denial.
Sir Henry Pnrkes was questioned in the Assembly
on Wednesday as to the admission into the colony
Government was answerable for his return within
10 days, and that it was a case of " innocent breaking
of the law.
The Princess Helene of Russia had a miraculous
escape on Sunday. She was being driven in a sledge
along the Markov Railway, when the vehicle was
overtaken by a train. The driver of the sledge was
killed on the spot, and the Princess rendered in-
sensible. The train passed over her body, but she
escaped without serious injury.
" A tree may be known by the fruit that grow
therefrom ;" consequently the Flour turned out of
G. MATTHEWS & SON, of Bathurst, may be j???
by its successes at exhibitions, a few of which we
are at liberty to enumerate, as follows : H
bury, 1885 ; Sydney, 1884, 1885; London,
medal, 1886; Adelaide, 1887 ; &c. Read Ad-
vertisement.
Brevities. (Article), Nepean Times (Penrith, NSW : 1882 - 1962), Saturday 12 January 1889 page Article 2015-05-05 08:04 Council meet Monday nighty
I.O.O.F. meet Tuesrlaynight.
being carried out at the JRedfcni station.
A' new Masonic-hall is to bo erected at Bathursl
at a cost o£ £2680
sugar crop in Java. ? _ , '
Salvation barracks at Rothnrwhithc, England, re
duced to ashes. Nothing "saved." .
Mrs. Donald Kennedy, 101 years of age lias ]ust
died at Cowra. ' *
Camden Dairy Co. operate on 1200 gallons ot
milk daily. n
Kobertson Dairy factory commenced operations
" Mascotte" lias a consultation on the _ Bathurst
Saturday February 9tli. See future advertisement.
An unsuccessful attempt at a dy lamite outrage
has been made in Italy. Z'
The Germans are enraged witlr the Americans
over the rising in Samoa. . ,.i ?
The Iteverend C.V1I. Spurgeo^i^'f'Bustainpd a
serious shock to.the system in cOnsequenco~ora fall
downstairs. , .
Billy Bowles has given up the terpiscliorcan art,
great artist. '
Mr. Want M.P., had an interview with tho
Governor on Tlmisday, but declined to attempt to
form a Cabinet. ? ' ' , . -
Royal Palace, Madrid. It created terribla panic but:
injured nobody. ,~v' , ' U
putin tho witness box on Tuesday./; Just a little bit
toosmart-Mr. Hill. . J..^
, A "race has been arranged at Aucklandbetween a
,war canoe manned by Maori and a cutter belonging'
to H.M.S. Orlando. ?;
Mrs. M'Nee, Salvationist, of Newtown, has'com
with a red hot fork. . TV .
the Druids Gala day at Penrith close with the Sec
retary on Wednesday next. ' .
Louisa Collins was executed on Tuesday in Dar
lingliurst Gaol for the murder, by poisoning, of her
The Soudan Sheiks have been invited to nieetand
of establishing peace and security. .
The floods on the Yellow River. China have causcd
a famine, and couutless people are starving . A re
A corner's jury on Tuesday censured the manage
ment of the Melbourne PoliceHospital and suggested
. . A Commissioner of Railways for Queensland at
'£3000 a year, and an assistant Commissioner at
reported to be preparing for, the exodus of a million
the debate on Mr. Fehon's appointment on Wed
nesday night) to answer the speech of Mr. Want.
' When the Assembly, met on Friday Sir Henry
Parkes announced that the Ministry had rcsigned,and
the Katoomba: Sports to be held on the 26th &28tli
January. Publican's booth, cake stalls, gate3 die.
Mr. G. S. Dibbs has undertaken to form a Govern
ment. the names . of the members of which will
Before the Assembly adjourned on Thursday Mr..
the Opposition, and provoked equally unpleasant re
band. * .
Rrftvities.? .
Council meet Monday night.
I.O.O.F. meet Tuesday night.
being carried out at the Redfern station.
A new Masonic-hall is to be erected at Bathurst
at a cost of £2680
sugar crop in Java.
Salvation barracks at Rotherwhithe, England, re-
duced to ashes. Nothing "saved."
Mrs. Donald Kennedy, 101 years of age has just
died at Cowra.
Camden Dairy Co. operate on 1200 gallons of
milk daily.
Robertson Dairy factory commenced operations
" Mascotte" has a consultation on the Bathurst
Saturday February 9th. See future advertisement.
An unsuccessful attempt at a dynamite outrage
has been made in Italy.
The Germans are enraged with the Americans
over the rising in Samoa.
The Reverend C. H. Spurgeon has sustained a
serious shock to the system in consequence of a fall
downstairs.
Billy Bowles has given up the terpischorean art,
great artist.
Mr. Want M.P., had an interview with the
Governor on Thursday, but declined to attempt to
form a Cabinet.
Royal Palace, Madrid. It created terrible panic but
injured nobody.
put in the witness box on Tuesday. Just a little bit
too smart Mr. Hill.
A race has been arranged at Auckland between a
,war canoe manned by Maori and a cutter belonging
to H.M.S. Orlando.
Mrs. McNee, Salvationist, of Newtown, has com-
with a red hot fork.
the Druids Gala day at Penrith close with the Sec-
retary on Wednesday next.
Louisa Collins was executed on Tuesday in Dar-
linghurst Gaol for the murder, by poisoning, of her
The Soudan Sheiks have been invited to meet and
of establishing peace and security.
The floods on the Yellow River, China have caused
a famine, and countless people are starving A re-
A corner's jury on Tuesday censured the manage-
ment of the Melbourne Police Hospital and suggested
A Commissioner of Railways for Queensland at
£3000 a year, and an assistant Commissioner at
reported to be preparing for the exodus of a million
the debate on Mr. Fehon's appointment on Wed-
nesday night, to answer the speech of Mr. Want.
When the Assembly met on Friday Sir Henry
Parkes announced that the Ministry had resigned, and
the Katoomba Sports to be held on the 26th & 28th
January. Publican's booth, cake stalls, gates &c.
Mr. G. S. Dibbs has undertaken to form a Govern-
ment, the names of the members of which will
Before the Assembly adjourned on Thursday Mr.
the Opposition, and provoked equally unpleasant re-
band.
Brevities.
Some of the Old Hands. (Article), Nepean Times (Penrith, NSW : 1882 - 1962), Saturday 4 May 1912 page Article 2015-05-05 07:41 " Mrs BUITOII, she only died a few1
years ago, aged 90. Her husband, I
known.-in the old days as Jimmy the I
being very much in request at wed
dings. otc. _
" I see you liavo. Ned Carroll s
name down. He came, to tlio. district
tlio Richmond Road, Ned' wont to
work for McCredy, tlie shoemaker,
Greek. He married Miss Sarah Hoy;
and well do I remember tlieir wed
ding, for I had great fun tin sett
ling them. Ned chipped in The
Nepoan Times" a few years back,
and soon after paid tlie district a
was down ho called in, and we had
" Then there, was Levi Witcom, who
lived towards Oranebrook. He was
a man of some means. Ho loft the
ho returned to this district. How
over, he again went to England, and
011. returning to New South AVales,,
died and was buried.at sea. - . |
"Mrs Fraser, widow of Captain
years ago, and Was the daughter of
Fulton, in whoso old church she was
married in 1805.
"Charles and Tom Hadley. were,
both old hands. So w&s John Her
bert; lie died during 1873. Donald
member of a pioneering family, uvea
down where Plunkott's lived; ^ and
during, tho time of the 67 flood,
Kerry Lodge Was occupied by the.
Lamrocks." . .
. Ono of tho best known old iden
tho late John Colloss, farmer,, and
miller, of Castloreagli. He lived in
the 5house mow Occupied % AMILanco,
at tho time or his death m 1893.
He Was considered to bo tho oldest
first with Mr Melvey, and subse
Fulton. Ho was apprenticed to Mr
Hough os a millwright, ©to; but loft
founder of Colless' Mill| . on. the.
Nepean at Castlereagh. .
The Fields, Jacksons, , Gormans,
aro all: 'very old families, long associ
ated with Ojwtlereagh.
Synopsis of No 5-The1 first settlers
on the River-soma particulars by the.
Writer. .
" Mrs Burrell, she only died a few
years ago, aged 90. Her husband,
known in the old days as Jimmy the
being very much in request at wed-
dings, etc.
" I see you have Ned Carroll's
name down. He came to the district
the Richmond Road, Ned went to
work for McCredy, the shoemaker,
Creek. He married Miss Sarah Hoy;
and well do I remember their wed-
ding, for I had great fun tin kett-
ling them. Ned chipped in "The
Nepean Times" a few years back,
and soon after paid the district a
was down he called in, and we had
" Then there was Levi Witcom, who
lived towards Cranebrook. He was
a man of some means. He left the
he returned to this district. How-
ever, he again went to England, and
on returning to New South Wales,
died and was buried at sea.
" Mrs Fraser, widow of Captain
years ago, and was the daughter of
Fulton, in whose old church she was
married in 1865.
" Charles and Tom Hadley were
both old hands. So was John Her-
bert; he died during 1873. Donald
member of a pioneering family, lived
down where Plunkett's lived; and
during the time of the '67 flood,
Kerry Lodge was occupied by the
Lamrocks."
One of the best known old iden-
the late John Colless, farmer, and
miller, of Castlereagh. He lived in
the house mow occupied by AldILance,
at the time of his death in 1893.
He was considered to be the oldest
first with Mr Melvey, and subse-
Fulton. He was apprenticed to Mr
Hough as a millwright, etc; but left
founder of Colless' Mill, on the
Nepean at Castlereagh.
The Fields, Jacksons, Gormans,
are all very old families, long associ-
ated with Castlereagh.
Synopsis of No 5 — The first settlers
on the River — some particulars by the
writer.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. ANMEF
    List
    Public

    Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force (ANMEF)

    11 items
    created by: public:annmanley 2014-06-09
    User data
  2. Manly Cemetery
    List
    Public

    Interments (burials) in Manly Cemetery, New South Wales, Australia

    85 items
    created by: public:annmanley 2013-09-26
    User data
  3. Manly Daily
    List
    Public

    For articles quoted from The Manly Daily, for which virtually no pre 1955 copies (and even later) survive.

    3 items
    created by: public:annmanley 2013-10-10
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.