Information about Trove user: WFACenVic

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,411,290
2 NeilHamilton 3,045,684
3 noelwoodhouse 2,880,528
4 annmanley 2,236,225
5 John.F.Hall 2,111,019
...
5173 Barlow78 2,572
5174 LectionarySinger 2,572
5175 Rascal 2,572
5176 WFACenVic 2,572
5177 colinpardoe 2,570
5178 audrey 2,568

2,572 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 402
December 2016 116
November 2015 528
October 2015 2
September 2015 104
July 2015 168
June 2015 747
March 2015 505

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,411,259
2 NeilHamilton 3,045,684
3 noelwoodhouse 2,880,528
4 annmanley 2,236,155
5 John.F.Hall 2,111,014
...
5167 Barlow78 2,572
5168 LectionarySinger 2,572
5169 Rascal 2,572
5170 WFACenVic 2,572
5171 colinpardoe 2,570
5172 audrey 2,568

2,572 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 402
December 2016 116
November 2015 528
October 2015 2
September 2015 104
July 2015 168
June 2015 747
March 2015 505

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
A HUNDRED DAYS OF BATTLE. RECORD OF THE FOURTH ARMY. THE AUSTRALIAN PART. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Saturday 25 September 1920 [Issue No.23,135] page 7 2017-03-31 22:21 sufficient lo break the Germans. lt was
virtue of the superior work of our sol-
diers. How it was done is told, in great
part, by Major-General Sir Archibald Mont-
gomery in a handsome work, "The
Story of the Fourth Army in the Battles
of the Hundred Days, August 8 to Novem
ber ll, 1918" (London: Hodder and Stough-
letterpress are numerous sketches, dia-
grams, and over 100 photographs. Alto-
was an officer of the general stair of the
Fourth Army, and his story has been "com-
divisions. The Fourth Army was des-
tined to do great work, and it stands to
the everlasting honour and glory of Aus-
tralia that in this work the Australian
troops did the most arduous and most diffi-
is a brief introductiou to Major-General
that the moral effect of the successful at-
April, May, June, and July. To its re-
lt is too much to say that the Australians
Not only did they do this, but they in-
Chaulnes railway to the Somme. The
southi of the Somme was swept away by
the impetuosity of the Canadians and Aus-
tralians. By 20 minutes past 6 the first ob-
the main attack had been "successful be-
yond the most sanguine expectations, and
the Canadian and Australian Corps had
and southern flanks." The battle was con-
when the American 131st Regiment was at
day of thc battle of Amiens, Major-Gene
ral Glasgow, of the 1st Australian Div-
ision, decided to assault Lihons Hill, a posi
Australian division captured Proyart, Ser-
machine-gun posts in succession - an ex
it became important that Mont St. Quen-
Peronne is a familiar story. Of St. Quen-
three leading battalions when they at-
widely scattered, control by company offi-
ridge and St. Pierre Vaast Wood. Mont
St. Quentin and Peronne wore won against
counter-attacks. He employed nine divi-
On September I8 Glasgow's division of Aus
tralians took the Hindenburg outpost line
along its front. On the following day the
whole of the objective trench system be-
fore the Australians was in their hands,
reaching of the French frontier on Novem-
ber 10. On November ll, at ll a.m., the
armistice was signed.
efforts of men who would wish her to for-
entrusted with the mothering of the Ameri-
cans, who in their first fight advanced im-
well knew to bo necessary. Sir Archibald
graph about the Australians, who in Octo-
ber were concentrated west of Amiens for
a long period of rest after six months' event-
front at the end of March, 1918, and took
a prominent part in finally checking the ad-
July, and which led up lo the attack of
August 8. From August 8 -when the Aus-
had achieved such renmrkable succcss - until
attacking. Its advance had covered a dis-
but the work of the Australians, their in-
dividual intelligence, good comradeship, and
bravery will always remain a vivid memory
A foreword by General Lord Rawlinson ex-
presses the view that the Allies were wise
which the Germans had destroyed all rail-
ways, roads, and bridges during their re-
sufficient to break the Germans. lt was
How it was done is told, in great part, by
in a handsome work, "The Story of the Fourth
Army in the Battles of the Hundred Days,
August 8 to November 11, 1918"
was an officer of the general staff of the
to do great work, and it stands to the
that in this work the Australian troops did the
is a brief introduction to Major-General
It is too much to say that the Australians
- Chaulnes railway to the Somme. The
south of the Somme was swept away by
and the Canadian and Australian Corps had
day of the battle of Amiens, MAJGEN
decided to assault Lihons Hill, a position
ridge and St. Pierre Vaast Wood. Mont
St. Quentin and Peronne were won against
line along its front. On the following day the
whole of the objective trench system
before the Australians was in their hands,
the armistice was signed.
well knew to be necessary. Sir Archibald
were concentrated west of Amiens for a
front at the end of March, 1918, and took a
July, and which led up to the attack of
August 8. From August 8 -when the
had achieved such remarkable succcss - until
and bravery will always remain a vivid memory
A foreword by General Lord Rawlinson
expresses the view that the Allies were wise
A HUNDRED DAYS OF BATTLE. RECORD OF THE FOURTH ARMY. THE AUSTRALIAN PART. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Saturday 25 September 1920 [Issue No.23,135] page 7 2017-03-31 21:50 A HUNDRED DAYS OP BATTLE.
TH- AUST-AI J AN 1'AllT.
Of all the dink periods of the wnr that
impressed popular imagination thc darkest
waa early in 1018, when the Allies scorned
and doubt existed ns to whether it was
sufficient lo break the Germans, lt was
If at that time that wc hud most to lose by
d defeat. Our direct war losses would have
k been absolute, tho power of recuperation
deem his own direct losses, was to bc
feared. In Australia (oday we are legis-
lating for what was in 1018 German Now
period of the, war when the prospect
1' been so disastrous. But we won?nnd 'von
positively, by dint of haiti fighting and by
virtue of thc superior work of our sol-
diers. How it waa done is told, in great
gomery in a handsome work, "Tlie
of tho Hundred Days, August 8 to Novem
ber ll, 1018" (London: Hotlder and Stough
ton; Melbourne': Melville'and Mullen).
This is a work containing more^letuil than
"written by a soldier for soldiers," wc arc
informed, but it is not too technical for thc
general reader, and thc narrative is plain
panying case of valuable maps, and in thc
letterpress are numerous skclchcs, dia-
grams, aud over 100 photographs. Alto-
was an officer of the general stair of tho
piled" fas he modestly puts it; it is really
operations furnished by thc staffs of the
thu "hundred days."
THE AUSTIU-IA'NS.
known, the Australians. On August 8?
when this record begins?there were under
divisions. Thc Fourth Anny was des-
tho everlasting honour and glory of Aus-
is a brief introductiou to Major-Gcneral
Montgomery's story, in -which he recounts
tack of tho Fourth Army on August 8
April, May, June, and July. To its re-
may bo attributed, to a very largo extent,
won the war?it is sufficient to say that
spired the rest of tho army. The author
recalls Napoleon's dictum, that "itt war
moral force is to the.physical as.3 to 1,"
but, He adds, alluding to the fine fighting
spirit of the Australians, "it hos been the
for the great attack upon tho Gdrman line
the front of tho Fourth Army?namely,
7,500 yards?from tho Villers Bretonneux
August 8. "With tho. first gleam of dawn
of a typical August day.the storm broke,
and thc British Army, which only a few
begun its march to the Rhino." The
soutli of the Somme was swept away by
the impetuosity of thc Canadians and Aus-
tralians. By 20 minutes past 0 the first ob-
tho main attack had been "successful be-
yond tlie most sanguine expectations, anti
the Canadian andr Australian Corps had
tinued on tho next day, anti the next, "or
when the American 131sl Regiment was at- £i
laehed to the Australians, and a position Tl1(
astride the Somme was won. On thc third Kii
day of thc battle of Amiens, Major-Gene- thii
ral Glasgow, of the 1st Australian Div;- pej
sion, decided to assault Lihnn-I Hill, n posi- An
lion of much taetical value. The position cen
was won. Its capture brought upon thc Thi
Australians a series of powerful counter- rar
attacks, hut these were beaten off, and ant:
meanwhile the other Australian divisions tro
had made fine progress. There were many Coi
deeds of individual heroism, and examples mo
of daring which inspired the whole of thc of I
advuncing army with a splendid moral. On at
the fourth day of thc battle, when the "Sril Wi
Australian division captured Proyart, Ser- of
geant Stalton, 40th Battalion, armed with ran
only a revolver, rushed four of tho enemy's Bri
machine-gun post- in succession?an ex-
ploit which enabled the battalion to gain futi
its objective. The Victoria Cross was hav
awardetl to him. bon
ll ST, QUENTIN. Art
This battle?the battle of Amiens?may
when tho advance to Peronne was begun.
lifter readjustment, co-operated with the
First French Army. At the end of August
while thc 5th Australian Division captured
Peronne i" a familiar story. Of St. Quen-
tin Major-General Montgomery says:?"It
was n soldiers' battle throughout, in which
tlie Australians were alwiiys conspicuous.
of the day, there were more than GOO men
the intense hostile fire, anti with men so
widely scattered, control by. company, offi'
ccrs was well nigh impossible, but the
fighting snirit of tjie men carried them
through. This spirit' is well expressed by
heard to shout down tho line nt a critical
moment of the fight. 'Como on, boys! Let's
battle 4of Mont St. Quentin is the name
given to thc operations in which tho
Australians captured Peronne, St. Denis.
Mont St. Quentin, and llaut-Allaincs, and
the Third Corps won the Bouchavosncs
ridge and St. Pierre Vaast Wood. Mont
picked troops; and Hie enemy made lo
counter-attacks. He employed nine divi-
Thc visitor to the battlefield may still
find on a small white timber cross thc
words:-^- acti
"Herc lie fii* lindie-.
They met a Digger." ,
Little respite followed Mont SI. Quentin.
On September IS Glasgow's division of Ans- -.,<
ti-iliiiiix look the Hindenburg outpost linc -f |,
along its front. On tho following day the vo||
whole ol' the objective trench system be- .^ji;
lind before the cud of the mouth the whole
of the Hindenburg defences were in British *
han-s. With the capture nf thc Beaurevoir "''
line?if not indeed somewhat before thal?
thc war was recognised ns having been won.
destroyed, and his forces terribly weakened. I
The author describes tho advance to l-» p0)
Cateau anti the battle of the Selle (in which \\rc
Australians were not engaged), and the ^y]
reaching of the French frontier on Novem- \ t
ber 10. On November ll, at ll a.m., thc ."l0g
armistice was signed. ^I,^
THU FINAL PUSH. All:
Australia will not grow braggart about the
thc deeds of her soldiers, but she will always Btu
remember, with proper pride, despite tho pen
efforts of men who would wish her to for- wh:
get, that in the saving of the Empire from llyi
destruction and civilisation from tyranny no ; thai
troops did liner work than thc Australians, mid
In this volume generous recognition is given ! Str:
of the fact. There is nothing Bird here about j T
the Australians' lack of discipline, of which sigr
too much bus been heard. By August 8, in
1018, the Australians had become steady, | nun
seasoned troops. Wc find, that they were Car.
entrusted with the mothering of the Ameri- a fi
cans, who in their first fight advanced im-1 the
potuously beyond their objective without of i,
thc "inopping-un," work which Australians ami
well knew to bo necessary. Sir Archibald i
Montgomery writes ti little valedictory nara
graph about thc Australians, who in Octo- j
ber were concentrated west of Amiens for i
ful lighting:?"The Australian corps had .,
begun to come into the linc on the Amiens !
front at tlie end of March, 1918, and took |
a prominent part in finally checking the ad- '"
vance on Amiens. Then followed thc series
July, nnd which lcd up lo the attack of
August 8. From August 8^-whcn thc Aus-
mid 3rd Corlis, opened the offensive which
had achieved such renmrkable bucccss?until
anti villages lind been captured. Between
August 8 anti October 5 the Australian
corps lind captured GIO officers and 22,244
other ranks from 30 German divisions, nnd
!_2 guns. Time dims many rcccdlections;
hut the work nf the Australians, their in-
to those who had the honour anti pleasure
To this admirable work there aro eleven
official documents, nnd an excellent index.
presses thc view that the Allies were wise
to the thorough nnd systematic manner in
which the Germans lind detrnyed all rail-
ways, rands, and bridges during their re-
least tho British Army, and I think for any
of thc armies, to continue their advance
rapidly anti in strength, anti to immediately
follow np their successes. Had they done
A HUNDRED DAYS OF BATTLE.
THE AUSTRALIAN PART
Of all the dark periods of the war that
impressed popular imagination the darkest
was early in 1918, when the Allies seemed
and doubt existed as to whether it was
sufficient lo break the Germans. lt was
at that time that we had most to lose by
defeat. Our direct war losses would have
been absolute, the power of recuperation
deem his own direct losses, was to be
feared. In Australia to-day we are legis-
lating for what was in 1918 German New
period of the war when the prospect
been so disastrous. But we won - and won
positively, by dint of hard fighting and by
virtue of the superior work of our sol-
diers. How it was done is told, in great
gomery in a handsome work, "The
of the Hundred Days, August 8 to Novem
ber ll, 1918" (London: Hodder and Stough-
ton; Melbourne: Melville and Mullen).
This is a work containing more detail than
"written by a soldier for soldiers," we are
informed, but it is not too technical for the
general reader, and the narrative is plain
panying case of valuable maps, and in the
letterpress are numerous sketches, dia-
grams, and over 100 photographs. Alto-
was an officer of the general stair of the
piled" (as he modestly puts it; it is really
operations furnished by the staffs of the
the "hundred days."
THE AUSTRALIANS.
known, the Australians. On August 8 -
when this record begins - there were under
divisions. The Fourth Army was des-
the everlasting honour and glory of Aus-
is a brief introductiou to Major-General
Montgomery's story, in which he recounts
tack of the Fourth Army on August 8
April, May, June, and July. To its re-
may be attributed, to a very large extent,
won the war - it is sufficient to say that
spired the rest of the army. The author
recalls Napoleon's dictum, that "in war
moral force is to the physical as 3 to 1,"
but, he adds, alluding to the fine fighting
spirit of the Australians, "it has been the
for the great attack upon tho German line
the front of the Fourth Army - namely,
7,500 yards - from the Villers Bretonneux
August 8. "With the first gleam of dawn
of a typical August day the storm broke,
and the British Army, which only a few
begun its march to the Rhine." The
southi of the Somme was swept away by
the impetuosity of the Canadians and Aus-
tralians. By 20 minutes past 6 the first ob-
the main attack had been "successful be-
yond the most sanguine expectations, and
the Canadian and Australian Corps had
tinued on the next day, and the next,
when the American 131st Regiment was at
tached to the Australians, and a position
astride the Somme was won. On the third
day of thc battle of Amiens, Major-Gene
ral Glasgow, of the 1st Australian Div-
ision, decided to assault Lihons Hill, a posi
lion of much tactical value. The position
was won. Its capture brought upon the
Australians a series of powerful counter-
attacks, but these were beaten off, and
meanwhile the other Australian divisions
had made fine progress. There were many
deeds of individual heroism, and examples
of daring which inspired the whole of the
advancing army with a splecdid moral. On
the fourth day of the battle, when the 3rd
Australian division captured Proyart, Ser-
geant Statton, 40th Battalion, armed with
only a revolver, rushed four of the enemy's
machine-gun posts in succession - an ex
ploit which enabled the battalion to gain
its objective. The Victoria Cross was
awarded to him.
ST. QUENTIN.
This battle - the battle of Amiens - may
when the advance to Peronne was begun.
after readjustment, co-operated with the
First French Army. At the end of August
while the 5th Australian Division captured
Peronne is a familiar story. Of St. Quen-
tin Major-General Montgomery says: - "It
was a soldiers' battle throughout, in which
the Australians were always conspicuous.
of the day, there were more than 6OO men
the intense hostile fire, and with men so
widely scattered, control by company offi-
cers was well nigh impossible, but the
fighting spirit of the men carried them
through. This spirit is well expressed by
heard to shout down the line at a critical
moment of the fight. 'Come on, boys! Let's
battle of Mont St. Quentin is the name
given to the operations in which the
Australians captured Peronne, St. Denis,
Mont St. Quentin, and Haut-Allaines, and
the Third Corps won the Bouchavesnes
ridge and St. Pierre Vaast Wood. Mont
picked troops; and the enemy made l5
counter-attacks. He employed nine divi-
The visitor to the battlefield may still
find on a small white timber cross the
words:-
"Here lie six Boches.
They met a Digger."
Little respite followed Mont St. Quentin.
On September I8 Glasgow's division of Aus
tralians took the Hindenburg outpost line
along its front. On the following day the
whole of the objective trench system be-
and before the end of the month the whole
of the Hindenburg defences were in British
hands. With the capture of the Beaurevoir
line - if not indeed somewhat before that -
the war was recognised as having been won.
destroyed, and his forces terribly weakened.
The author describes the advance to Le
Cateau and the battle of the Selle (in which
Australians were not engaged), and the
reaching of the French frontier on Novem-
ber 10. On November ll, at ll a.m., the
armistice was signed.
THE FINAL PUSH.
Australia will not grow braggart about
the deeds of her soldiers, but she will always
remember, with proper pride, despite the
efforts of men who would wish her to for-
get, that in the saving of the Empire from
destruction and civilisation from tyranny no
troops did finer work than the Australians.
In this volume generous recognition is given
of the fact. There is nothing said here about
the Australians' lack of discipline, of which
too much has been heard. By August 8,
1918, the Australians had become steady,
seasoned troops. We find that they were
entrusted with the mothering of the Ameri-
cans, who in their first fight advanced im-
petuously beyond their objective without
the "mopping-up," work which Australians
well knew to bo necessary. Sir Archibald
Montgomery writes a little valedictory para-
graph about the Australians, who in Octo-
ber were concentrated west of Amiens for
ful fighting:- "The Australian corps had
begun to come into the line on the Amiens
front at the end of March, 1918, and took
a prominent part in finally checking the ad-
vance on Amiens. Then followed the series
July, and which led up lo the attack of
August 8. From August 8 -when the Aus-
and 3rd Corps, opened the offensive which
had achieved such renmrkable succcss - until
andi villages lind been captured. Between
August 8 and October 5 the Australian
corps had captured 610 officers and 22,244
other ranks from 30 German divisions, and
332 guns. Time dims many recollections;
but the work of the Australians, their in-
to those who had the honour and pleasure
To this admirable work there are eleven
official documents, and an excellent index.
presses the view that the Allies were wise
to the thorough and systematic manner in
which the Germans had destroyed all rail-
ways, roads, and bridges during their re-
least the British Army, and I think for any
of the armies, to continue their advance
rapidly and in strength, and to immediately
follow up their successes. Had they done
Adoption of Villers-Bretonneux French Public Delighted. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thursday 14 October 1920 [Issue No.23,151] page 7 2017-03-24 17:29 Adoption of Villers-Bretorineux
Adoption of Villers-Bretonneux
Adoption of Villers-Bretonneux French Public Delighted. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thursday 14 October 1920 [Issue No.23,151] page 7 2017-03-24 17:28 :'".,. »- ?. ,¦ thc
French Public Delighted. ?'" fe
'l'he announcement in Paris that the City
of Melbourne lins adopted thc town of
Villers-Brotonnenx for the purposes of re-
construction, luis delighted the French
public. The newspapers recall thc deeds
of the AitBlrulinn divisions in saving
September, 11)18.

The announcement in Paris that the City
of Melbourne has adopted the town of
Villers-Bretonneux for the purposes of re-
construction, has delighted the French
public. The newspapers recall the deeds
of the Australian divisions in saving
September, 1918.
VILLERS BRETONNEUX. ADOPTION BY MELBOURNE. French Town to be Restored. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Friday 8 October 1920 [Issue No.23,146] page 6 2017-03-24 17:26 to dlscuss the proposal that Melbourne,
town of Villers Bretonneux,and become
from which the Allies' counter-oofensive had
proposition at present for the prevention of

there was a strong feelmg among the troops
of her coal, had been completely rruined. The
Gellibrand and Senator Ellliott as vice-
-presidents and with the following members
Miss Reid and Messrs G A Moir (Chied
to discuss the proposal that Melbourne,
town of Villers Bretonneux, and become
from which the Allies' counter-offensive had
at present for the prevention of
there was a strong feeling among the troops
of her coal, had been completely ruined. The
Gellibrand and Senator Elliott as vice-
presidents and with the following members
Miss Reid and Messrs G A Moir (Chief
VILLERS BRETONNEUX. ADOPTION BY MELBOURNE. French Town to be Restored. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Friday 8 October 1920 [Issue No.23,146] page 6 2017-03-24 17:17 Mayoi (Counillor Aikman, MLC), was
held at the Town Hall yesterdav afternoon
town of Villers Bretonneux,and become re
of the Lord Mayor, Councillor Stapley pre-
Lieut-General Sir John Monash ex
plained how intimately the AIF had been
associated with Villers Bretonneux. The
township had been recaptured by the Aus
tralian forces in August 1918, and had be
come the point from which the Allies
counter-offensive had been launched which
had been the beginning of the end of the
Senator Elliott, who was in command of
the I5th Brigade when it took part in
the recapture of the town said that its
recapture had been looked upon by the
French as vital and as the turning point
in the war. While the League of Nations
was not a very practicable proposition at
present for the prevention of war, it would
help if Allied countries were joined in asso
ciations of sentiment, like the adoption of
Eloquent support of the proposal was
given by the French Vice Consul (M
Turck), who said that the adoption of
Villers Bretonneux by Melbourne would
gratify the whole people of France. The
most striking evidence of the devastation
which France had suffered, he said, was
contained in a recent statement by the
French Premier (M Millerand), that
France had lost 600,000 workers and 600,000
farms, mills and factories, large and small;
that her northern districts which in 1913
had produced 10 per cent of her wool
manufactures, 80 per cent of her iron
manufactures, and 53 per cent of her coal,
had been completely ruined. The French
people would never forget that Australia
had a sacred and glorious patrimony on
the soil of France itself, and that the graves
of her sons in Villers Bretonneux formed a
sacred Australian Necropolis. As long as
France lived she would remember with
gratitude the services which Australians
citizens of Melbourne in memorv of the gfreat
A further motion was agreed to, autho
rising the French Vice-Consul to cable to
the French Government announcing the
decision of the meeting. A committee was
formed with Sir John Monash as presi-
dent Sir Tom Gellibrand and Senator El
liott as vice-presidents and with the fol
lowing members (with power to add to
their numbers and to form a small execu
tive) -Madame Crivelli, Lady Miller, Miss
Guthrie, Mrs Staughton, Miss Reid and
Messrs G A Moir (Chief President of the
A.N.A.), Meeks, and Martin as members.
The Lord Mayor was appointed honorary
treasurer, and the town clerk honorary sec
Mayor (Counillor Aikman, MLC), was
held at the Town Hall yesterday afternoon
how intimately the AIF had been associated
with Villers Bretonneux. The township had
from which the Allies' counter-oofensive had
been launched which had been the beginning
of the end of the war.
Senator Elliott, who was in command of the
I5th Brigade when it took part in the recapture
of the town said that its recapture had been
looked upon by the French as vital and as the
turning point in the war. While the League of
Nations was not a very practicable proposition
proposition at present for the prevention of
war, it would help if Allied countries were joined
of French towns.
Eloquent support of the proposal was given
by the French Vice Consul (M. Turck), who
said that the adoption of Villers Bretonneux by
Melbourne would gratify the whole people of
France. The most striking evidence of the
devastation which France had suffered, he
said, was contained in a recent statement by
the French Premier (M. Millerand), that France
had lost 600,000 workers and 600,000 farms,
mills and factories, large and small; that her
northern districts which in 1913 had produced
10 per cent of her wool manufactures, 80 per
cent of her iron manufactures, and 53 per cent
of her coal, had been completely rruined. The
French people would never forget that Australia
had a sacred and glorious patrimony on the
soil of France itself, and that the graves of her
sons in Villers Bretonneux formed a sacred
Australian Necropolis. As long as France lived
she would remember with gratitude the services
which Australians had rendered during the war.
citizens of Melbourne in memory of the great
the French Vice-Consul to cable to the
French Government announcing the decision
of the meeting. A committee was formed with
Sir John Monash as president, Sir Tom
Gellibrand and Senator Ellliott as vice-
(with power to add to their numbers and to
form a small executive) - Madame Crivelli,
Lady Miller, Miss Guthrie, Mrs Staughton,
Miss Reid and Messrs G A Moir (Chied
President of the A.N.A.), Meeks, and Martin
as members. The Lord Mayor was appointed
honorary treasurer, and the town clerk
honorary secretary,
VILLERS BRETONNEUX. ADOPTION BY MELBOURNE. French Town to be Restored. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Friday 8 October 1920 [Issue No.23,146] page 6 2017-03-24 16:54 tive) -Madame Crivelh, Lady Miller Miss
Guthrie, Mrs Staughton Miss Reid ind
A N \ ), Meeks, and Martin as members
nie Lord Mayor was appointed honorary
rotary
tive) -Madame Crivelli, Lady Miller, Miss
Guthrie, Mrs Staughton, Miss Reid and
A.N.A.), Meeks, and Martin as members.
The Lord Mayor was appointed honorary
retary.
VILLERS BRETONNEUX. ADOPTION BY MELBOURNE. French Town to be Restored. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Friday 8 October 1920 [Issue No.23,146] page 6 2017-03-24 16:03 Mayoi (Couneillor Aikman, MLC), wes
held at the lown Hall yesterdav afternoon
lo dlscubs the proposal that Melbourne,
the English cities should adopt the French
town 01 'S íllcrs Bretoniieu\,and become re
German invasion of 1 ranee In the ahijonee
of the Lord Al ljor, Councillor Stapky pre-
sided
T lent General ^ir John Monash i v.
plained how intimately the AIT had been
an ocntcd with Villers Bretonneux The
township had bien ret iptured by th' Sus
traban forces in August 111S and had 'it
war
Senator 1 lhott who was in command of
the Ijth Brigade when it took part m
lrcneh as vital and is the turning point
in the wir While the league of nations
prêtant for the prevention of war, it would
help if Allied countries were joined in ' .sc
ci itions of sentiment, like the adoption of
1 rench towns
Major General Sir Tolm Gellibrand, in
tverv enstnhan division hod taki n part
in the fighting at Villers Brctonncu*-, ind
there w as i orrong feelmg among the troops
in favour of the restoration of the towns! îp
Ly Melbourne
Eloquent sunnort of the proposal was
given by the French Vice Consul (\f
gratify the whole people of Trance The
i\hi"h France had suffered, he said, waa
contained in a recent statement bv the
Trench Premier (Al Millerand), that
I ranee had lost COO 000 workers and ?00 000
fa m s mills and f letones, large and small
that her northern districts which in 1013
manufactures, 80 per cent of her iroi
manufactures, and 53 per cent of her co d
Ind been completely mined Tlic French
rcople would never target that australia
had a sa red and glonous patrimony on
the coil of 1 ranee itself end that ti e graves
of her sons in VIIITS Bretonneux formed a
sacred "lustraban Necropoh» As long as
Prance lived she would remember with
gratitude the services which Austrahins
had rendered during the war
On the mot on of the chairman, it w&s
unamrnoush decided
Tint V illprs HretnnneuT lie adopted b\ the
citi/JMia of Melbourne in memorv of Hie fjTeat
Australian victor* in Au¡ru«t, 1918
A further motion was agreed to, jiitho
T sing the Trench \ ice-Consul to cable to
decision of the meeting A committee was
formed with Sir lohn Monash as presi-
dent Sir Tohn Gellibrand and Senator El
bott as vice-presidents and with the foi
their numbers and to form a small c\ccu
Mayoi (Counillor Aikman, MLC), was
held at the Town Hall yesterdav afternoon
to dlscuss the proposal that Melbourne,
the English cities, should adopt the French
town of Villers Bretonneux,and become re
German invasion of France. In the absence
of the Lord Mayor, Councillor Stapley pre-
sided.
Lieut-General Sir John Monash ex
plained how intimately the AIF had been
associated with Villers Bretonneux. The
township had been recaptured by the Aus
tralian forces in August 1918, and had be
war.
Senator Elliott, who was in command of
the I5th Brigade when it took part in
French as vital and as the turning point
in the war. While the League of Nations
present for the prevention of war, it would
help if Allied countries were joined in asso
ciations of sentiment, like the adoption of
French towns.
Major General Sir Tom Gellibrand, in
every Australian division had taken part
in the fighting at Villers Bretonneux, and
there was a strong feelmg among the troops
in favour of the restoration of the township
by Melbourne.
Eloquent support of the proposal was
given by the French Vice Consul (M
gratify the whole people of France. The
which France had suffered, he said, was
contained in a recent statement by the
French Premier (M Millerand), that
France had lost 600,000 workers and 600,000
farms, mills and factories, large and small;
that her northern districts which in 1913
manufactures, 80 per cent of her iron
manufactures, and 53 per cent of her coal,
had been completely ruined. The French
people would never forget that Australia
had a sacred and glorious patrimony on
the soil of France itself, and that the graves
of her sons in Villers Bretonneux formed a
sacred Australian Necropolis. As long as
France lived she would remember with
gratitude the services which Australians
had rendered during the war.
On the motion of the chairman, it was
unanimously decided -
"That Villers Bretonneux be adopted by the
citizens of Melbourne in memorv of the gfreat
Australian victory in August 1918."
A further motion was agreed to, autho
rising the French Vice-Consul to cable to
decision of the meeting. A committee was
formed with Sir John Monash as presi-
dent Sir Tom Gellibrand and Senator El
liott as vice-presidents and with the fol
their numbers and to form a small execu

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.