Information about Trove user: Ruben

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,554,986
2 NeilHamilton 3,081,182
3 noelwoodhouse 3,029,151
4 John.F.Hall 2,254,330
5 annmanley 2,254,028
...
425 christill 84,092
426 JulieDern 83,942
427 sonmaa 83,651
428 Ruben 83,478
429 cricketman 83,390
430 cloudwatcher 83,340

83,478 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2017 1,863
June 2017 7,242
May 2017 2,477
April 2017 4,179
March 2017 2,547
February 2017 775
January 2017 519
December 2016 52
November 2016 199
October 2016 229
September 2016 390
August 2016 365
July 2016 540
June 2016 209
May 2016 431
April 2016 1,466
March 2016 4,933
February 2016 1,024
January 2016 47
December 2015 137
November 2015 2,214
October 2015 338
September 2015 81
August 2015 8,264
July 2015 3,874
June 2015 762
May 2015 224
April 2015 7,100
March 2015 14,873
February 2015 10,820
January 2015 5,304

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,554,955
2 NeilHamilton 3,081,182
3 noelwoodhouse 3,029,151
4 John.F.Hall 2,254,325
5 annmanley 2,253,958
...
422 Davekle 84,198
423 christill 84,055
424 JulieDern 83,942
425 Ruben 83,478
426 cricketman 83,390
427 cloudwatcher 83,167

83,478 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2017 1,863
June 2017 7,242
May 2017 2,477
April 2017 4,179
March 2017 2,547
February 2017 775
January 2017 519
December 2016 52
November 2016 199
October 2016 229
September 2016 390
August 2016 365
July 2016 540
June 2016 209
May 2016 431
April 2016 1,466
March 2016 4,933
February 2016 1,024
January 2016 47
December 2015 137
November 2015 2,214
October 2015 338
September 2015 81
August 2015 8,264
July 2015 3,874
June 2015 762
May 2015 224
April 2015 7,100
March 2015 14,873
February 2015 10,820
January 2015 5,304

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
BOBBY BEAR'S ADVENTURES: Motor Mower (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Thursday 9 July 1936 [Issue No.28,045] page 18 2017-07-27 23:36 The\¡ fixed » motor io ihc monier.
Dobb^ said, "She'll be a goer."
A'olu she's off t The speed's tip-lop.
Fine, ¡t lool(s! tiitl can the}) slop?
No, on she go<.s, ami donn »lie ni»".
//ion. lo\J\> pmisus liubv ffiiii'
They fixed a motor to the mower.
Bobby said, “She'll be a goer.”
Now she's off ! The speed's tip-top.
Fine, it looks! But can they stop?
No, on she goes, and down she mows
Those lovely Pansies Ruby grows.
JOLLY JUMBO AND HIS PALS (Article), Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947), Tuesday 21 February 1939 [Issue No.20,993] page 3 2017-07-27 19:42 '£ WISH I had a sled,' sighed ^olly
Jumbo watching his pals toboggan*
ing merrily down the BilL T\cuej all
'Oh, well,' he trumpeted; 'TO to
and make 'one in the baic gardrn.'
And te trotted idfate again. ' Bat
the way he was. suddenly tullhji
''Hurray, hurray, hurray!' he shouted
09 his sled. But his pals gaped la
astonislurfent, for his sled looked aus
pfcieudjr 19b * laM* to 4»n.
“I WISH I had a sled,” sighed Jolly
Jumbo watching his pals toboggan-
ing merrily down the hill. They all
“Oh, well,” he trumpeted; “I'll go
and make one in the back garden.”
And he trotted home again. But on
the way he was suddenly smitten by a
“Hurray, hurray, hurray!” he shouted
on his sled. But his pals gaped in
astonishment, for his sled looked sus-
piciously like a ladder to them.
Children come before husband NATURE HAS SUFFERED MANY SNUBS IN COURSE OF DOMESTIC EVOLUTION Says ELIZABETH WEBB, Speaking Personally (Article), Sunday Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1926 - 1954), Sunday 9 January 1949 [Issue No.977] page 8 2017-07-25 20:26 1 ELIZABETH I
| , WEBB, |
| Speaking |
I Personally (
'My mate* at work asked
me to tie if \ you could write
an article on 'Should a wife
neglect her hatband for her
family?' at tome toy their
wivet just look on them at a
spare part. Some toy their
wife won't listen or discus* any
for an hour.'
If we are to take into ac
the answer to the query,,
'Should a wife neglect her
husband for her family?' is
mate stronger than her in
made it- secondary.
But this should not dis
formal marriage, nor for.
design permanent waves, re
and* possibly, even instincts
the initial efforts
Children are often de
binds the bricks. I have ob
MOTHER run
ning a home on an ordin
in the house, and no 'let
up' from- ths care of her
playing the cheerful com
panion for her husband dur
children's life. Most hus
bands at this stage are gen
It is later, when the chil
supervision, that the eiut
seem unable to Ret back to
again and again. The hus
band then becomes an ap
which must not be jeopar
to 'keep an eye on the old
man.'
Many have cause to mis
wonder how largely- they are
though they do nothing' to
- Some women either cannot
or will not think or talk in
wash and mend for a man.
for the more physical appe
would they recognise, intelli
of beery, racing-tout hus
shelve all responsibility, leav
because she 'manages better' .
^ KNOW, too,
of the pay being swal
asks for that little com
respect for her man, con
There are many ways of re
confided to a fellow out
patient at the hospital: 'My
old man's* orlright — mind yer,
to the pictures Saturday!'
passion this is only a cal
not at hand U» step in and
P
?Perhaps for
mal marriage is an en
tirely unnatural insti
of raising- cheap laughs in
'Marriage helps a man and a
partner they would haye pre
ferred.' Or inspiring people
the heading, 'So you Rttt.t.
want to get married?'
Here and now the question ?
husbands are pining them
share intelligent and stimu
dark decade. ?
Says ELIZABETH
WEBB,
Speaking
Personally
“My mate at work asked
me to tie if you could write
an article on ‘Should a wife
neglect her husband for her
family?’ as some say their
wives just look on them as a
spare part. Some say their
wife won't listen or discuss any
for an hour.”
If we are to take into ac-
“Should a wife neglect her
husband for her family?” is
mate stronger than her in-
made it secondary.
But this should not dis-
formal marriage, nor for
design permanent waves, re-
and possibly, even instincts
the initial efforts.
Children are often de-
binds the bricks. I have ob-
A MOTHER run-
ning a home on an ordin-
in the house, and no “let
up” from the care of her
playing the cheerful com-
panion for her husband dur-
children's life. Most hus-
bands at this stage are gen-
It is later, when the chil-
supervision, that the gulf
seem unable to get back to
again and again. The hus-
band then becomes an ap-
which must not be jeopar-
to “keep an eye on the old
man.”
Many have cause to mis-
wonder how largely they are
though they do nothing to
Some women either cannot
or will not think or talk in-
wash, and mend for a man.
for the more physical appe-
would they recognise, intelli-
of beery, racing-tout hus-
shelve all responsibility, leav-
because she “manages better”
I KNOW, too,
of the pay being swal-
asks for that little com-
respect for her man, con-
There are many ways of re-
confided to a fellow out-
patient at the hospital: “My
to the pictures Saturday!”
passion this is only a cal-
not at hand to step in and
PERHAPS for-
mal marriage is an en-
tirely unnatural insti-
of raising cheap laughs in
“Marriage helps a man and a
partner they would haye pre-
ferred.” Or inspiring people
the heading, “So you STILL
want to get married?”
Here and now the question
husbands are pining them-
share intelligent and stimu-
dark decade.
FAMOUS ARTIST'S FUNERAL (Article), The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), Wednesday 2 July 1952 [Issue No.13,228] page 7 2017-07-25 02:01 "Jimmy Bancks will
of great Australians,"
"His name will be
opinion," said Rev. Good
where - the service was
Sunday bun for 29 years,
aied yesterday, aged 63.
After the . service the
cortege left for the North
ern Suburbs Cremator
ium. ,
death came as. a shock to
by her sister. Mrs. Keith
'.Bancks' sister) and Mr.
general manager of Asso
representing the chair
and bqard of directors;
Newspapers Ltd.; Mr. Gil
Fielder (representing sub
E. W. MacAlpine and Mr
David McNicol (Consoli
(Aust. Consolidated In
dustries), Mr. Ken .Hall
Murray, Mr. H a r a 1 d
Bowden (J. C. William
Doyle (managing direc
Mr. J. C. James repre
and C.' Ives the Journal-.,
ists' . Club.
“Jimmy Bancks will
of great Australians,”
“His name will be
opinion,” said Rev. Good-
where the service was
Sunday Sun for 29 years,
died yesterday, aged 63.
After the service the
cortege left for the North-
ern Suburbs Cremator-
ium.
death came as a shock to
by her sister Mrs. Keith
Bancks' sister) and Mr.
general manager of Asso-
representing the chair-
and board of directors;
Newspapers Ltd.; Mr. Gil-
Fielder (representing sub-
E. W. MacAlpine and Mr.
David McNicol (Consoli-
(Aust. Consolidated In-
dustries), Mr. Ken Hall
Murray, Mr. Harald
Bowden (J. C. William-
Doyle (managing direc-
Mr. J. C. James repre-
and C. Ives the Journal-
ists' Club.
'EVOLUTION OF THE "COMIC STRIP" (Article), Sunday Times (Perth, WA : 1902 - 1954), Sunday 12 August 1945 [Issue No.2477] page 6 2017-07-21 23:11 'EVOLUTION OF THE "COMIC STRIP"
In the not far distant past the "comic
strip"-or stories told in cartoons-was
old alike--from.adventure in '-Wanda the
War Girl" to characteristic Aussie humor
in "Bluey and Curly."
in virtually-every American newspaper
some 20.00 dailies with a total circulation
pf more, than 44 million. Before ,the war
about 25 million 'copies of inexpensive,
Evolution of tibe comic strip is described, by
William Láas in the journal "U.S.A." as follows:
Actually a "comic strip" may be neither comic
sical idea and a knack of turning-out simple,
humorous pen-and-ink drawings, -arranged in a
"strip" across the page. Today à comic, strip may
About half a century ago, Messrs. Pulitzer an'1
proprietors' in New Jork, deve-
loped the idea of the "family
newspaper." Newspapers bought
by men; they reasoned,- were also
paper!
1894, and on Sundays the "New
York World" issued a section of
material of "family" appeal. One
chin he called "The Kid."
"The Kid" began to .appear
every week-a new episode with
acter. The novelty won Instant
buy the paper with the "fun-
nies"; they could scarcely wait
among them "The Captain arid
the Kids" or _"'Katzenjammer
Kids" (since 1897), "Bringing Up
Father," or "Maggie and Jiggs"
(1911), "Krazy Kat," ".Mutt and
Jeff," and others.
* * * 4
strips aré naive-but emotionally
mium On imagination, literary
ward sheer adventure, or "action
comics." These stories eventually
violence, crimé, and pseudo
- Psychologists have since, con-
-an emotional release no: more
harmful than the juvenile' ro-
continuity was successfully 'ap-
This attracted better . writers,
parts»
The Katzenjammer Kids is the oldest colored
the Captain's fellow-sufferer was hot the
who said, "Dodgast my binnacles."
Dickens or "Victor Hugo. Char-
careful and authentic enroñólo-<
gical - succession. Twenty-three
years ago "Skeezix" was a found-
t._
?K -K M
A BVENT of war has stimu
plane pilots are instructed - by .,
coached on battle conduct. and
Between 1935 and 1939 th«
number of American cartoon fea- -
swiftly in every country acquain- ;
ted with them-with the signifi-
cant exception of "Axis" nations. :
Older features, such' as "Tho
Captain and the Kids" and
"Bringing Up Father," have been
popular for years. More recently, ^
fies to its validity as a common*"
their hearts in their own follc
'EVOLUTION OF THE “COMIC STRIP”
In the not far distant past the “comic
strip”—or stories told in cartoons—was
old alike—from.adventure in “Wanda the
War Girl” to characteristic Aussie humor
in “Bluey and Curly.”
in virtually every American newspaper—
some 2000 dailies with a total circulation
of more than 44 million. Before the war
about 25 million copies of inexpensive,
Evolution of the comic strip is described by
William Laas in the journal “U.S.A.” as follows:
Actually a “comic strip” may be neither comic
sical idea and a knack of turning out simple,
humorous pen-and-ink drawings, arranged in a
“strip” across the page. Today a comic strip may
About half a century ago, Messrs. Pulitzer and
proprietors' in New York, deve-
loped the idea of the “family
newspaper.” Newspapers bought
by men; they reasoned, were also
paper.
1894, and on Sundays the “New
York World” issued a section of
material of “family” appeal. One
chin he called “The Kid.”
“The Kid” began to .appear
every week—a new episode with
acter. The novelty won instant
buy the paper with the “fun-
nies”; they could scarcely wait
among them “The Captain arid
the Kids” or “Katzenjammer
Kids” (since 1897), “Bringing Up
Father,” or “Maggie and Jiggs”
(1911), “Krazy Kat,” “Mutt and
Jeff,” and others.
* * *
strips are naive—but emotionally
mium on imagination, literary
ward sheer adventure, or “action
comics.” These stories eventually
violence, crime, and pseudo-
Psychologists have since, con-
an emotional release no more
harmful than the juvenile ro-
continuity was successfully ap-
This attracted better writers,
parts.
||The Katzenjammer Kids is the oldest colored
the Captain's fellow-sufferer was not the
who said, “Dodgast my binnacles.”||
Dickens or Victor Hugo. Char-
careful and authentic chronolo-
gical succession. Twenty-three
years ago “Skeezix” was a found-
* * *
ADVENT of war has stimu-
plane pilots are instructed by
coached on battle conduct and
Between 1935 and 1939 the
number of American cartoon fea-
swiftly in every country acquain-
ted with them—with the signifi-
cant exception of “Axis” nations.
Older features, such as “The
Captain and the Kids” and
“Bringing Up Father,” have been
popular for years. More recently,
fies to its validity as a common
their hearts in their own folk
IN SPITE OF THE NAZIS (Article), Sunday Times (Perth, WA : 1902 - 1954), Sunday 12 March 1944 [Issue No.2404] page 2 2017-07-21 21:42 IN SPITE OF ]
'Continuft' from tir>«viou> jane)
He looked al. them (quizzically,
"Captain Brancombß gave me a
message for you. Mr. Jefferson."
"BrancombeV" Burk was puz-
him off on this assignment. "What
is the message?" he' asked.
".Captain Branconbe asked me
meet, that he sent you on a job.
If and when it's finished he'd like
to see you. He alsD said to re-
mind you ? that Lord Mountbatten
is very enthusiast!* about his
he gets a crack at tiern."
Burk snorted. *Jf Brancombe
only knew-!" he started; then.
"Oh, well, what's t|e use! Bul f
what infernal "cheek?" be ex-
off. "Top asked for it, old man,"
he drawled. "After all, you re-
Zari. and get the Peeri back on
our side. Well, Zaij was beyond
human help, and row the Decri.
or what ls left of ttjem. are fight-
ing with our frftendq Our work is [
a scrap with our friend the "Sip
major?" *
'Td like to see hm get what's ?
coming to him," saii Burk. "After
h Ls reward." ;
"Ï think you can leave that to
us." said the Indian "As you so
shrewdly guessed, í our leader'
planes were carryiib paratroops.
They will be landinf now on the
plains beyond the iweep of the
hills, and when waattack from .
this side the Jap foipes that have ll
been pressing this tray will I>o
caught like the rats '.hey are."
Burk looked at the smiling L
young lieutenant, thought of the r
few who were left of »he Deer»
membered the strom, well equip-
ped force of Jap sidiers whose
camp they had ieeriln. ».
"T certainly hope that you're
right." he said slow*?.
(What is Burk poing to do?
Follow this thrillinqserial in next
week's "Sunday Tines.")
IN SPITE OF
(Continued from previous page)
He looked at them quizzically,
“Captain Brancombe gave me a
message for you, Mr. Jefferson.”
“Brancombe?" Burk was puz-
him off on this assignment. “What
is the message?” he asked.
“Captain Brancombe asked me
meet, that he sent you on a job,
if and when it's finished he'd like
to see you. He also said to re-
mind you that Lord Mountbatten
is very enthusiastic about his
he gets a crack at thern.”
Burk snorted. “If Brancombe
only knew——!” he started; then.
“Oh, well, what's the use! But
what infernal cheek?” he ex-
off. “Top asked for it, old man,”
he drawled. “After all, you re-
Zari, and get the Pecri back on
our side. Well, Zarj was beyond
human help, and now the Decri.
or what is left of them, are fight-
ing with our friends. Our work is
a scrap with our friend the Nip
major?”
“I'd like to see him get what's
coming to him,” said Burk. “After
his reward.”
“I think you can leave that to
us,” said the Indian “As you so
shrewdly guessed, our ‘leader’
planes were carrying paratroops.
They will be landing now on the
plains beyond the sweep of the
hills, and when we attack from
this side the Jap forces that have
been pressing this way will be
caught like the rats they are.”
Burk looked at the smiling
young lieutenant, thought of the
few who were left of the Decri
membered the strong, well equip-
ped force of Jap soldiers whose
camp they had been in.
“I certainly hope that you're
right.” he said slowly.
(What is Burk going to do?
Follow this thrillinq serial in next
week's “Sunday Times.”)
Setiar—by Lance Denver In Spite Of The Nazis (Article), Sunday Times (Perth, WA : 1902 - 1954), Sunday 12 March 1944 [Issue No.2404] page 1 2017-07-21 21:24 Setior---by-Lance Denver
SYNOPSll
son and Ma
joined the e
Chinese gui
tribesmen
the leadei
chief taine**;
tells her tl
ammunitioi
to her- in
ere apr-roa<
to help hei
Zari. She
and her
pledged to
READ ON
1: Burk Jeffer.
tland have now
mbined band of
iliac and Decri
ho_ are under
ip of that old
The Razor« He
at suppliée and
are being sent
he gliders that
ing, and offer*
avenge her son
plies that she
followers are
hat end. NOW
By now. the] gliders were com-
ing In on tojthe airfield, where
each was met! by a band of wil-
that the pilots ot the gilders were
ail Indians. E C expected them to
trained 'K In la ay the British,
were constant^ returning to their
homeland to aeln drive out thé
Japs. ¡
Leader of lie glider "train"
was a yoting Indian lieutenant.
"To wbojn I ive_l the honor of
reporting?" hi asked Burk. Burk
indicated The lazor. "Our Chief -
tainess," he said simply. 'Tm
Burk Jeffersoi and this is Mait-
land. We're \ tr correspondents."
"Indeed." i gain that flashing
dentials to Tie Razor with a
slight bow, aid turned again to
the two men. y
"You will h ve a great deal to
report, gentle en. ? May 1 con-
gratúlate you a your forethought
at being Here t this time? It'*
seldom that th ; remote front is in
the spotlight q the world's news."
"We're her by chance." Said
Burk, "but nw we're here we
hope to be abï to help you. Mr.
"My name w ula be difficult for
an English to ?ue," said the In-
dian. "My frlnds in Bombay us-
ually call me frank."
"O.K., Frat :," grinned Burk.
"And now si pose you tell ne
landed;" - -
"We passed ou on the way In."
interposed Mailand. "We were
in the Lancastr that managed to
pass you. becsse you didn't have
any engines."!
"Tes, I reccpised your plane,"
said Frank, 'tart of my mission
was-to look folyou gentlemen, yet
you say '^ou'rehere by chance."
* (Contrauecon next vage)
Serial—by Lance Denver
SYNOPSlS: Burk Jeffer-
son and Maitland have now
joined the combined band of
Chinese guerillas and Decri
tribesmen who are under
the leadership of that old
chieftainess, The Razor. He
tells her that supplies and
ammunition are being sent
to her in the gliders that
ere approaching, and offers
to help her avenge her son
Zari. She replies that she
and her followers are
pledged to that end. NOW
READ ON . . .
By now the gliders were com-
ing in on to the airfield, where
each was met by a band of wil-
To his surprise Burk noticed
that the pilots of the gilders were
all Indians. He expected them to
trained in India by the British,
were constantly returning to their
homeland to help drive out the
Japs.
Leader of the glider “train”
was a young Indian lieutenant.
“To whom have l the honor of
reporting?” he asked Burk. Burk
indicated The Razor. “Our Chief-
tainess,” he said simply. “I'm
Burk Jefferson and this is Mait-
land. We're war correspondents.”
“Indeed.” Again that flashing
dentials to The Razor with a
slight bow, and turned again to
the two men.
“You will have a great deal to
report, gentlemen. May I con-
gratulate you in your forethought
at being here at this time? It's
seldom that this remote front is in
the spotlight of the world's news.”
“We're here by chance.” Said
Burk, “but now we're here we
hope to be able to help you. Mr.
——”
“My name would be difficult for
an English tongue,” said the In-
dian. “My friends in Bombay us-
ually call me Frank.”
“O.K., Frank,” grinned Burk.
“And now suppose you tell us
landed;”
“We passed you on the way in.”
interposed Maitland. “We were
in the Lancaster that managed to
pass you, because you didn't have
any engines.”
“Yes, I recognised your plane,”
said Frank, “Part of my mission
was to look for you gentlemen, yet
you say you're here by chance.”
(Continued on next page)
"GIRLS" NOW BOYS (Article), Mirror (Perth, WA : 1921 - 1956), Saturday 20 April 1946 [Issue No.1248] page 19 2017-07-18 02:19 'GIRLS'
For 4 years there was no pret
tier pair of 'misses' than
little pinafores, and wearing girl
looked the part. Then the par
be boys, took them, to the bar
ber ant . ? ? «
Here they are transformed Into
the 'reg'lar fellers.' With hair
they're ofssies no longer. Short
for the 'girls' clothes.'
“GIRLS”
For 4 years there was no pret-
tier pair of “misses” than
little pinafores, and wearing girl-
looked the part. Then the par-
be boys, took them, to the bar-
ber and . . . .
Here they are transformed into
the “reg'lar fellers.” With hair
they're cissies no longer. Short-
for the “girls' clothes.”
No title (Article), The Kadina and Wallaroo Times (SA : 1888 - 1954), Thursday 18 March 1954 [Issue No.[?]] page 6 2017-07-18 01:50 ?
“I am not sneaking in—I took them off to defende myself!”
HAZEL (Article), The Australian Women's Weekly (1933 - 1982), Saturday 6 September 1947 [Issue No.13] page 32 2017-07-17 20:27 "I've only got turn hands."
"I've only got two hands."

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Australian Discovery And Colonisation, The Empire (Sydney)
    List
    Public

    Series of Articles, Published in “The Empire” (Sydney, NSW) 1865-1866

    232 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-04-24
    User data
  2. Famous Australian Trials, Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld)
    List
    Public

    Tales of Laws and Lawyers

    12 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-03-16
    User data
  3. Famous Disasters, By George Blaikie
    List
    Public

    Series of Articles, Published in the Sunday Magazine of “The Mail” (Adelaide, SA) 1951
    (continued as “Our Strange Past”)

    21 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-02-26
    User data
  4. Hugh Buggy's crime stories, The Argus (Melbourne)
    List
    Public

    See also Hugh Buggy's crime stories in Mail (Adelaide)

    97 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-03-19
    User data
    Tags:
  5. Hugh Buggy's crime stories, The Mail (Adelaide)
    List
    Public

    Series of articles in The Mail (Adelaide, 1949-1951)

    See also Hugh Buggy's crime stories in The Argus (Melbourne)

    97 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-03-19
    User data
    Tags:
  6. Inside the Gestapo, By Hansjurgen Koehler, Western Mail (Perth)
    List
    Public

    Book Review

    36 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2016-03-23
    User data
  7. Killers I Have Met, By Harry Mann, Mirror (Perth)
    List
    Public


    Series of articles about well-known criminals in the past and their crimes.

    Started by Harry Mann 30 June 1951.
    Continued by 08 September 1951 as Detective Looks At Crime.
    After Harry Mann's death (04 October 1952) continued 08 November 1952 by an anonymous detective under the title of Ex-Inspector Main.

    136 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-03-17
    User data
  8. My Natives and I, By Daisy M. Bates, West Australian (Perth)
    List
    Public

    32 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-03-05
    User data
    Tags:
  9. My Natives and I, By Daisy M. Bates, Western Mail (Perth)
    List
    Public

    21 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-03-05
    User data
    Tags:
  10. Our Strange Past, By George Blaikie, The Mail (Adelaide)
    List
    Public

    Series of Articles, Published in the Sunday Magazine of “The Mail” (Adelaide, SA) 1951-1954
    (continuation of “Famous Disasters”)

    (later in "Western Mail" (Perth, WA) and "The Newcastle Sun" (NSW))

    228 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-02-26
    User data
  11. Our Strange Past, By George Blaikie, The Newcastle Sun (NSW)
    List
    Public

    Series of Articles, Published in “The Newcastle Sun” (NSW) 1954-
    (before in "The Mail" (Adelaide, SA) )

    111 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-04-15
    User data
  12. Our Strange Past, By George Blaikie, Western Mail (Perth)
    List
    Public

    Series of Articles, Published in “Western Mail” (Perth, WA) 1952-
    (before in "The Mail" (Adelaide, SA) )

    125 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-03-02
    User data
  13. The Australian Women's Weekly — Laughs
    List
    Public

    236 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-12-12
    User data
  14. The Australian Women's Weekly — Serial
    List
    Public

    17 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-12-12
    User data
  15. The Australian Women's Weekly — Sketches
    List
    Public

    21 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2016-01-01
    User data
  16. The Australian Women's Weekly — Weekly Novel
    List
    Public

    Supplement of "The Australian Women's Weekly"

    A complete book-length novel every week.

    95 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-08-26
    User data
  17. The West Australian Aborigines, By Daisy M. Bates, Western Mail (Perth)
    List
    Public

    Marriage Laws and Some Customs.

    Read before the Royal Geographical Society (Melbourne) and the Natural History Society (Perth).

    5 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-03-05
    User data
    Tags:
  18. War Against Crime, Memoirs of Superintendent John Roche
    List
    Public

    Published in Truth (Sydney, NSW), 1937

    12 items
    created by: public:Ruben 2015-02-23
    User data
    Tags:

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.