Information about Trove user: Rhonda.M

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,367,222
2 NeilHamilton 3,037,671
3 noelwoodhouse 2,844,721
4 annmanley 2,228,356
5 John.F.Hall 2,097,342
...
7 DonnaTelfer 1,607,352
8 C.Scheikowski 1,544,307
9 culroym 1,530,462
10 Rhonda.M 1,514,257
11 frankstonlibrary 1,493,808
12 yelnod 1,441,029

1,514,257 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 49,538
February 2017 42,315
January 2017 67,427
December 2016 48,882
November 2016 54,814
October 2016 57,622
September 2016 47,617
August 2016 53,336
July 2016 28,758
June 2016 6,613
May 2016 5,587
April 2016 14,343
March 2016 15,279
February 2016 11,487
January 2016 673
December 2015 1,902
November 2015 13,104
October 2015 27,476
September 2015 33,945
August 2015 27,379
July 2015 25,938
June 2015 37,277
May 2015 21,200
April 2015 1,565
March 2015 12,766
February 2015 16,220
January 2015 6,545
December 2014 7,659
November 2014 14,260
October 2014 14,014
September 2014 32,789
August 2014 16,919
July 2014 14,537
June 2014 17,496
May 2014 10,518
April 2014 3,450
March 2014 18,632
February 2014 4,090
January 2014 9,502
December 2013 16,889
November 2013 10,493
October 2013 27,604
September 2013 17,023
August 2013 26,000
July 2013 20,652
June 2013 21,508
May 2013 37,107
April 2013 20,233
March 2013 2,401
February 2013 2,807
January 2013 1,047
December 2012 2,025
November 2012 18,750
October 2012 8,684
September 2012 7,469
August 2012 19,173
July 2012 16,916
June 2012 22,811
May 2012 14,246
April 2012 19,837
March 2012 13,217
February 2012 17,194
January 2012 2,876
December 2011 7,429
November 2011 2,981
October 2011 7,591
September 2011 31,913
August 2011 19,955
July 2011 26,256
June 2011 17,484
May 2011 17,740
April 2011 26,629
March 2011 18,129
February 2011 9,213
January 2011 11,526
December 2010 4,314
November 2010 5,782
October 2010 1,397
September 2010 3,378
July 2010 3,994
June 2010 5,771
May 2010 5,524
April 2010 932
March 2010 2,920
February 2010 122
January 2010 498
December 2009 746
November 2009 962
October 2009 3,317
September 2009 5,370
August 2009 4,527
July 2009 3,110
June 2009 1,551
May 2009 445
April 2009 1,133
March 2009 1,065
February 2009 3
December 2008 6
November 2008 19
August 2008 89

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,367,219
2 NeilHamilton 3,037,671
3 noelwoodhouse 2,844,721
4 annmanley 2,228,286
5 John.F.Hall 2,097,337
...
7 DonnaTelfer 1,607,350
8 C.Scheikowski 1,544,064
9 culroym 1,530,385
10 Rhonda.M 1,514,244
11 frankstonlibrary 1,493,808
12 yelnod 1,440,991

1,514,244 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 49,538
February 2017 42,315
January 2017 67,414
December 2016 48,882
November 2016 54,814
October 2016 57,622
September 2016 47,617
August 2016 53,336
July 2016 28,758
June 2016 6,613
May 2016 5,587
April 2016 14,343
March 2016 15,279
February 2016 11,487
January 2016 673
December 2015 1,902
November 2015 13,104
October 2015 27,476
September 2015 33,945
August 2015 27,379
July 2015 25,938
June 2015 37,277
May 2015 21,200
April 2015 1,565
March 2015 12,766
February 2015 16,220
January 2015 6,545
December 2014 7,659
November 2014 14,260
October 2014 14,014
September 2014 32,789
August 2014 16,919
July 2014 14,537
June 2014 17,496
May 2014 10,518
April 2014 3,450
March 2014 18,632
February 2014 4,090
January 2014 9,502
December 2013 16,889
November 2013 10,493
October 2013 27,604
September 2013 17,023
August 2013 26,000
July 2013 20,652
June 2013 21,508
May 2013 37,107
April 2013 20,233
March 2013 2,401
February 2013 2,807
January 2013 1,047
December 2012 2,025
November 2012 18,750
October 2012 8,684
September 2012 7,469
August 2012 19,173
July 2012 16,916
June 2012 22,811
May 2012 14,246
April 2012 19,837
March 2012 13,217
February 2012 17,194
January 2012 2,876
December 2011 7,429
November 2011 2,981
October 2011 7,591
September 2011 31,913
August 2011 19,955
July 2011 26,256
June 2011 17,484
May 2011 17,740
April 2011 26,629
March 2011 18,129
February 2011 9,213
January 2011 11,526
December 2010 4,314
November 2010 5,782
October 2010 1,397
September 2010 3,378
July 2010 3,994
June 2010 5,771
May 2010 5,524
April 2010 932
March 2010 2,920
February 2010 122
January 2010 498
December 2009 746
November 2009 962
October 2009 3,317
September 2009 5,370
August 2009 4,527
July 2009 3,110
June 2009 1,551
May 2009 445
April 2009 1,133
March 2009 1,065
February 2009 3
December 2008 6
November 2008 19
August 2008 89

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 mickbrook 73,272
2 murds5 54,198
3 jaybee67 52,522
4 PhilThomas 20,779
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
634 megann 13
635 phicat 13
636 redcliffs 13
637 Rhonda.M 13
638 RJHA 13
639 RoyHenderson 13

13 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2017 13


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
LADIES CHITCHAT. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 23 August 1912 [Issue No.1,913] page 5 2017-03-30 14:44 embellishments sho.tld end. in Paris table
: decorations have already been extended to
; chairs, and the experiment has been tried
| of placing every woman guest beneath a
i bower of flowers erected on her chair,
i The originality of this scheme is undoub
! tcdly a recommendation, but tbe effect
' produced is likely to strike the less
suggestive of a gala -performance to be
associated with a private dinner tabic,
j It is interesting to note that*the royal
I children are being taught the minuet, ga
I votte. waltz, and all kinds of quadrilles,
' whilst the new order of dan:ing is not
in /avour. Sometimes the modern ball
room finds it diflicult to distinguish be
tween a romp and ;a dance, whilst the
graceful movements or the minuettc are
children are being instructed give a (ore
cast of what wifl be in vogue in the
near future, and the coming fashion is
temperament is growing. Men of scicnco
are no longer in doubt as to the im
: mense influence that the hue of their sur
sensitive individuals, aud even more it
they are fashionuMj? afflicted by nerves.
cure .cannot do so by looking through a
pattern hook and discovering the particu
kind of gloom. Only complete surround
•upholstery reveal' the success or failure'of
picasantcst aspect.
from scientific* premises of.the Martian
who is declared bv many eminent "scien
portrait does not suggest that even tbe
foreigners, should wc ever get into cum- ••
married Hindus. North American -Indians,
even savage Souths Africans, hut the
Martian sounds even l;ss attractive than
anv of these, as he is supposed-to he
large prominent,- light blue eyes, and
and their legs are almost, as thin in
proportion to their bodies as those ol
birds. She would be a brave worn;1* who
woiild marry this, even with a tan
settlement. '
The art of dinner table decoration is
always open to elaboration. But a ques-
tion now appears to have arisen as to
where such floral and generally realistic
embellishments should end. In Paris table
decorations have already been extended to
chairs, and the experiment has been tried
of placing every woman guest beneath a
bower of flowers erected on her chair.
The originality of this scheme is undoub-
tedly a recommendation, but the effect
produced is likely to strike the less-
suggestive of a gala performance to be
associated with a private dinner table
It is interesting to note that the royal
children are being taught the minuet, ga-
votte, waltz, and all kinds of quadrilles,
whilst the new order of dancing is not
in favour. Sometimes the modern ball
room finds it diflicult to distinguish be-
tween a romp and a dance, whilst the
graceful movements or the minuette are
children are being instructed give a fore-
cast of what will be in vogue in the
near future, and the coming fashion in
temperament is growing. Men of science
are no longer in doubt as to the im-
mense influence that the hue of their sur-
sensitive individuals, and even more it
they are fashionably afflicted by nerves.
cure cannot do so by looking through a
pattern book and discovering the particu-
kind of gloom. Only complete surround-
upholstery reveal the success or failure of
pleasantest aspect.
from scientific premises of the Martian
who is declared bv many eminent scien-
portrait does not suggest that even the
foreigners, should we ever get into com-
married Hindus, North American Indians,
even savage Souths Africans, but the
Martian sounds even less attractive than
any of these, as he is supposed to be
large prominent light blue eyes, and
and their legs are almost as thin in-
proportion to their bodies as those of
birds. She would be a brave woman who
would marry this, even with a substan-
tial marriage settlement.
LADIES CHITCHAT. (Article), The Week (Brisbane, Qld. : 1876 - 1934), Friday 23 August 1912 [Issue No.1,913] page 5 2017-03-30 14:39 onlv daughter on her sixth liirthdav a
railway* train—consisting ,ol a beautiful
parlour car, a sleeping car. and a kitchen
car. for Tier own-private use. The little
going to children's parties in neighbour
manages to retain a marvellously youth
She is a woadcrfullv attractive and cul
and u sculptor of ho mean ability. Her
Gardens, and the hronze memorial to the
One of the most interesting of * foreign
Duchess of Mcckk-njeig-Strclitz. She is
old mansion called Schless Schepp, near
Dresden, for the greater part of "each
age. the Grand Duchess takes a wonder
fully vital interest. • in all that goes on.
while bcr taste.for all, that is best in
music, art. and literature is in no wise
birthday in July. She is the only sur
.Jacohsbure. Ohio, has addressed a. peti
tion to congress demanding that her pen
sion -of twelve dollars a month be in
creased to one hundred. The ladv is 114
years old. and she justifies her demand
from tiie faet that her first husband was
a soldirr who fought in the Mexican cam- ]
paign, and by whom she had 22 child- i
ren. On his death she" married Mr. ]
Sweenev, and by him bad another II
children. On the ground that she can no :
Jon?er work. - and on account of the ;
State's indebtedness to her, the old lady f
prays that her demand may be favourably i
considered. > I
Belgium sees to - it that its young j
women are married long;bcforc their years J
merit for them the description of - old [
maids, and it docs it through its unique ,
and annual marriage lair. Springtime, i
being, of coure. the natural time, of woo-}
the season of this all important
event. On the appointed day the towns I
and villages in which 'a fair is to be held [
blossom forth in the gayest oi gay colours. >
The carnival spirit is "in the air. and de
corations of all kinds abound. AU inter-J
est centres in the public market souarc,
early morning, a hapnr laughing crowd |
that the afternoon is sure to bring forth. |
Music and dancing while away the hours j
until 2 p.m.. when," with the burgomaster
at their head, the voung women who form
the great attraction of the day, put- in ;
their appearance. The bands stop playing
The crowds draw apart, and the fair can
single young mciy of the community. Thev
are there to get wives. They - get them.
The process is quite simple. The voung
man. looking over the collection of fair
damsels before him. decides upon the one j
' by the hand. Unless the young woman
act constitutes a betrothal. . . Marriage
l The burgomaster is there .to unite the
: couples in the bonds of matrimony, and
I not infrequently the pair at oucc step
{ forward, hand in hand, to bear the words
onlv daughter on her sixth birthday a
railway train—consisting of a beautiful
parlour car, a sleeping car, and a kitchen
car, for her own-private use. The little
going to children's parties in neighbour-
manages to retain a marvellously youth-
She is a wonderfully attractive and cul-
and a sculptor of no mean ability. Her
Gardens, and the bronze memorial to the
One of the most interesting of foreign
Duchess of Mecklenberg-Strelitz. She is
old mansion called Schloss Schepp, near
Dresden, for the greater part of each
age, the Grand Duchess takes a wonder
fully vital interest. in all that goes on.
while her taste for all that is best in
music, art and literature is in no wise
birthday in July. She is the only sur-
Jacohsburem Ohio, has addressed a peti
tion to congress demanding that her pen-
sion of twelve dollars a month be in
creased to one hundred. The lady is 114
years old, and she justifies her demand
from the fact that her first husband was
a soldier who fought in the Mexican cam-
paign, and by whom she had 22 child-
ren. On his death she married Mr.
Sweeney, and by him had another 11
longer work. - and on account of the
State's indebtedness to her, the old lady
prays that her demand may be favourably
considered.
Belgium sees to it that its young
women are married long before their years
merit for them the description of old
maids, and it does it through its unique
and annual marriage fair. Springtime,
being, of course the natural time, of woo-
ing, is the season of this all important
event. On the appointed day the towns
and villages in which a fair is to be held
blossom forth in the gayest of gay colours.
The carnival spirit is in the air, and de-
corations of all kinds abound. All inter-
est centres in the public market square,
early morning, a happy laughing crowd
fills it, enjoying in anticipation the scene
that the afternoon is sure to bring forth.
Music and dancing while away the hours
until 2 p.m., when, with the burgomaster
at their head, the young women who form
the great attraction of the day, put in
their appearance. The bands stop playing.
The crowds draw apart, and the fair can-
single young men of the community. They
are there to get wives. They get them.
The process is quite simple. The young
man, looking over the collection of fair
damsels before him, decides upon the one
by the hand. Unless the young woman
act constitutes a betrothal. Marriage
The burgomaster is there to unite the
couples in the bonds of matrimony, and
not infrequently the pair at once step
forward, hand in hand, to hear the words
A Slight Change. (Article), The Wyalong Star and Temora and Barmedman Advertiser (West Wyalong, NSW : 1894 - 1895; 1899 - 1906), Tuesday 27 January 1903 [Issue No.8] page 4 2017-03-30 14:32 Mk. Mose.-^ was being shown over
the business premises of Mr. Solo
walls. ' Ma gootness me. Tkey,' he
cried, ' vot vos all does leedle boddles
vor i ' Uli, said luey, ' aer lnsnur
auce agent lie makes me put all dose |
up before lie vould itisliuie der pre
mises !' ' An' vot vos dey vor Ikey ?'
' Vy, veil der fire begins you trow one
of djse ou der flame, and that makes
der fire go out.' 'Ma goodness me.
Ikey, vot is in de boddles?' 'Veil,'
said Ikey, ' I don't know vot vos in .
dey re all full of paraffin now ?'
MR. MOSES was being shown over
the business premises of Mr. Solo-
walls. "Ma goutness me, Ikey," he
cried, "vot vos all does leedle boddles
vor?" "Oh", said lkey, "der inshur-
ance agent he makes me put all dose
up before he vould insure der pre-
mises!" "An' vot vos dey vor Ikey?"
"Vy, ven der fire begins you trow one
of dese on der flame, and that makes
der fire go out." "Ma goodness me.
Ikey, vot is in de boddles?" "Vell,'
said Ikey, "I don't know vot vos in
dey're all full of paraffin now?"
A DISGRACE TALBRAGAR BRIDGE Dilapidated and Dangerous (Article), Mudgee Guardian and North-Western Representative (NSW : 1890 - 1954), Thursday 27 August 1936 page 6 2017-03-30 14:29 Dilapidated and Dangeroui
*? pine poles near the old
of people to ask, 'What's ths
timber for?' When they sre
informed 4hat the council are
going to repair the o^d bridge,
At the July meeting o: 'ii* CoVr
bora Shire Council the sum of .C23
was voted towards lepai.ini; the
old bridse. and whilst ii h :i rela
tively small amount, it i- i.ene the
leas too mucu to throw away. To
try to ilo anything wiiii th-j clil
ramshackle structure is i »;iste of
money, as the least observant j.cr
=on can plainly see.
Councillor Sam Yeo is not a'.one
in his belief that if ilic- bridge is
interfered with, It will be the end
was found to be rotten and iw
numerous defects promptly hidde;)
of dumping ninety tons of eartn
on it. Wnat must it bajike no.w?
What sense would there be In fit
'to prop it up' bears a striking
it makes a person wonder If the
council are sincere in their inten
merely a gesture, designed to alle
viate public Indignation at the un
prepared to regard all other con
H Is years since the council took
correspondent of the 'Wellington
Times' asserts, then why the ne
despite the assurance of the gentle
all the talk about the. bridge, no
body has ever mentioned the ap
no fences or guard rails to com
ment about? There Is general be
of 1920. ...''..
cross a brI6T;e without a guard rail
to add a sense of security, It is a
trying to bring stoek over to the
drowned in the waters of the Tal
i In the circumstances we are com
Roads Board, though we have hesi
tated to mention this relatively, un
straight avay and buiU .a new
bridge. We pften hear of things
described as 'standing disgraces,'
hecome Just A DISGRACE— with-
Dilapidated and Dangerous
pine poles near the old
of people to ask, "What's the
timber for?" When they are
informed that the council are
going to repair the old bridge,
At the July meeting of the Cob-
bora Shire Council the sum of £25
was voted towards repairing the
old bridse. and whilst it is a rela-
tively small amount, it is none the
less too much to throw away. To
try to do anything with the old
ramshackle structure is a waste of
money, as the least observant per-
son can plainly see.
Councillor Sam Yeo is not alone
in his belief that if the bridge is
interfered with, it will be the end
was found to be rotten and its
numerous defects promptly hidden
of dumping ninety tons of earth
on it. What must it be like now?
What sense would there be in fit-
"to prop it up" bears a striking
It makes a person wonder if the
council are sincere in their inten-
merely a gesture, designed to alle-
viate public Indignation at the un-
prepared to regard all other con-
It is years since the council took
correspondent of the "Wellington
Times" asserts, then why the ne-
despite the assurance of the gentle-
all the talk about the bridge, no
body has ever mentioned the ap-
no fences or guard rails to com-
ment about? There Is general be-
of 1920.
cross a bridge without a guard rail
to add a sense of security, it is a
trying to bring stock over to the
drowned in the waters of the Tal-
In the circumstances we are com-
Roads Board, though we have hesi-
tated to mention this relatively un-
straight avay and build a new
bridge. We often hear of things
described as "standing disgraces,"
cecome just A DISGRACE— with-
GENERAL NEWS MAYOR'S THIRD YEAR (Article), Maryborough Chronicle, Wide Bay and Burnett Advertiser (Qld. : 1860 - 1947), Monday 4 May 1942 [Issue No.21,987] page 2 2017-03-30 14:23 Brisbane - Alderman Chandler) entered
h's third year of office. Becruse of
his dLslike of ostentatious display he
of office: while the mayoral Whuin,
than £100n— has never graced his
che^t in public.
Brisbane (Alderman Chandler) entered
his third year of office. Becruse of
his dislike of ostentatious display he
of office: while the mayoral chain,
than £100 — has never graced his
chest in public.
LATEST CABLES. [COPYRIGHT.] THE FAR EAST. RUSSO-JAPANESE TENSION. RUSSIA COME TO STAY IN MANCHURIA. OSTENTATIOUS DISPLAY AT NEWCHWANG. LONDON, October 12. (Article), Tasmanian News (Hobart, Tas. : 1883 - 1911), Tuesday 13 October 1903 [Issue No.7006] page 4 2017-03-30 14:22 TASMANIA*.' PBBSS
ASSOCIATION,
[CorswaiiT.l
played national aire, and tbe troops
ettlements at Newnhwangon Friday.
n cxoduB of Chinese from the
Yalu Valley are arriving at Cliifu
r Sbeepoo.
TASMANIAN PRESS
ASSOCIATION.
[COPYRIGHT.]
played national airs, and the troops
settlements at Newchwang on Friday.
An exodus of Chinese from the
Yalu Valley are arriving at Chifu
or Sheepoo.
THE LIMERICK STRIKE. CITY IN STATE OF SIEGE. OSTENTATIOUS DISPLAY OF ARMED FORCE. LONDON, April 25. (Article), The Capricornian (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1875 - 1929), Saturday 10 May 1919 [Issue No.19] page 10 2017-03-30 14:20 OSTENTATIOUS DISPLAY OF ..
' AHMED FORCE. . '
LONDOX, April £5.
miliUtry firmly keep the upper hand. A.
f«jr passive registers remained outsvd*
tie town, Throughout tbe night the
- majority secretly crossed the Shanon is
bo»t*. The pricsti indaced tie wjinen
and girls to return -to their homes. Tha
strika committee hss act yet issued local
notes owing: to the discovery that they.
«an be easily printed bv ua-aathorUel
Meanwhile taere is aa ejxeBUOn of
buted wire barriers, while detachments
of troops, with fixed 'bayonets, guard
every road '»^''f to town- The most
formidable weapon of all, a ' tan';.' is
drawn across tie largest bridge. Its guns
«ver the main streets. A Lcarje gun
in the neighbouring boa-tiKMse covers .the
awomoany al! tie military transmrt.
'Armoured care consptcaoaalT inverse
the streets. The town is quiet and or
d-Tfy. for ^rhich, the strike coinin'.'.tee
badge*, compel the closing of shone and
have even forced the Oountr CoumH to
abut its doors.
It appears tfcat hundreds remained out
«de the prodamicd area *n night King.
The-.' continued their AaamstaUaah
is relars ami saa£. danced, and -sn-tt\lY
enjoyed themselves us tbe residents pro
vided plenty \A gcod sccomnioJatuui.
Some lUnqcol to return in boat?, lin
were located br Bearchlicto*. Tlie exiles
the military, bu failed, until larav num
bers boarded a- train travelling *o the
boundary. ThrT surprised sentries at the
station anj hnndreda iKnitrated the bar
ligi and. flEcapesL
TmJter
Four delegates from the Iriah Ubonr
ttfcutive id Linericlr eonfeir.'d *fo
m. eleu- cut folicT
' It fe estimated that out of 38,000
peopt* at limerick 20,000 sbuiiud W
mite u- tra»eL The kat batch of atn
ken. wlie remained out of tbe tow»,
nanlMd to a diatajtt (tataea ssa «-
tniaed for the Tillage berood Lrmerkk.
. The military detected the ruse ana
loekel the earriage daon. Tbe (triken.
on arrival at limerick, escaped or the
doors on the opposite tide and senmMed
across the nils.
The strikers' 'bulletin'' protest*
against tie Engjsh iiaoers fateely describ
ing tie trouble as SSaa Fate, whfle tt --
aotnally the -workers against the tyranny
of inhumanitr and oppreanon. 'We
mean to fight the battle to the.end,' con
duds the bulletin.
ARMED FORCE.
LONDON, April 25.
military firmly keep the upper hand. A
few passive resisters remained outside
the town. Throughout the night the
majority secretly crossed the Shanon is
boats. The priests induced the women
and girls to return to their homes. The
strike committee has not yet issued local
notes owing to the discovery that they.
can be easily printed by unauthorised
Meanwhile there is an extension of
barbed wire barriers, while detachments
of troops, with fixed bayonets, guard
every road leading to town- The most
formidable weapon of all, a "tank" is
drawn across the largest bridge. Its guns
over the main streets. A Lewis gun
in the neighbouring boathouse covers the
accompany all the military transport.
Armoured cars conspicuously traverse
the streets. The town is quiet and or-
derly, for which the strike committee
badges, compel the closing of shops and
have even forced the County Council to
shut its doors.
It appears that hundreds remained out
side the proclaimed area all night long.
The continued their demonstration
against the Ministry until the morning
in relays and sang, danced and generally
enjoyed themselves as the residents pro-
vided plenty of good accommodation.
Some attempted to return in boats, but
were located by searchlights. The exiles
the military, but failed, until large num-
bers boarded a train travelling to the
boundary. They surprised sentries at the
station and hundreds penetrated the bar-
rier and escaped.
Later
Four delegates from the Irish Labour
executive in Limerick conferred with
a clear cut policy.
It is estimated that out of 38,000
people at Limerick 20,000 obtained per-
mits to travel.The last batch of stri-
kers, who remained out of the town,
marched to a distant station and en-
trained for the village beyond Limerick.
The military detected the ruse and
locked the carriage doors. The strikers,
on arrival at Limerick, escaped by the
doors on the opposite side and scrambled
across the rails.
The strikers' "bulletin" protests
against the Englsih papers falsely describ-
ing the trouble as Sinn Fein, while it is
actually the workers against the tyranny
of inhumanity and oppression. "We
mean to fight the battle to the end," con-
cludes the bulletin.
BAR ON TRAVELLERS DECISION IN GERMANY. Ostentatious Display Abroad. (Article), Tweed Daily (Murwillumbah, NSW : 1914 - 1949), Saturday 5 April 1924 [Issue No.82] page 5 2017-03-30 14:10 I.-
m DECISION IN GERMANY.
I v Ostentatious Display Abroad.
I (Australian Press Association.)
I BERLIN, Thursday.— The Govern-
I ment is taking drastic ' action against
I wealthy Germans who have a mania for
I travelling where their display of luxury
I has created ,a bad impression, especially
I in view of the world-wide appealss on
I behalf of starving German children. ..
I: It is estimated that 70,000 Germans'
I are temporarily abroad, and the Fin-
I ance Minister points out that their dc-
I mands on foreign - currency make . it
I most difficult to maintain the value" of
I the'- mark. The Government, therefore.
I is closing the frontier for two days ahd
I has decided to charge' £25 for each Ger-
I man "desiring to leave upon foreign tra
for business men, invalids, and- those
DECISION IN GERMANY.
Ostentatious Display Abroad.
(Australian Press Association.)
BERLIN, Thursday.— The Govern-
ment is taking drastic action against
wealthy Germans who have a mania for
travelling where their display of luxury
has created a bad impression, especially
in view of the world-wide appeals on
behalf of starving German children.
It is estimated that 70,000 Germans
are temporarily abroad, and the Fin-
ance Minister points out that their de-
mands on foreign currency make it
most difficult to maintain the value of
the mark. The Government, therefore,
is closing the frontier for two days and
has decided to charge £25 for each Ger-
man desiring to leave upon foreign tra-
for business men, invalids, and those
ANZAC DAY CELEBRATED. NO OSTENTATIOUS DISPLAY. LONDON, Friday. (Article), The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 - 1918), Tuesday 24 April 1917 [Issue No.14426] page 6 2017-03-30 14:08 AWZAC DAY CELEBRATED.
(United Service Gable) .
tatiouslv in London to-day.
There was a service, at the war
by Mr. Edward Seymour Hicks' com
pany. a tea, and a Red Gross concert
ANZAC DAY CELEBRATED.
(United Service Cable).
tatiously in London to-day.
There was a service at the War
by Mr. Edward Seymour Hicks' com-
pany, a tea, and a Red Cross concert
FEDERAL PARLIAMENT Opening Yesterday LABOR PRACTISES ECONOMY No Ostentatious Display (Article), Tweed Daily (Murwillumbah, NSW : 1914 - 1949), Thursday 21 November 1929 [Issue No.274] page 3 2017-03-30 14:07 "FEDERAL PARLIAMENT
!
v No Ostentatious Display
V . " ' y
tralia was opened torday. In the morning proceedings were
mostly of a formal nature, the opening speech of the Gover
when the members were sworn in was Mr. W- M. Hughes.
In accordance with; the new Labor Government s poliiy
.The Governor General arrived
in a carriage instead < of the
State coach, and there . were no
- cadets'- from the Naval College at
Jirjfis Bay. The guard of -honor was
furnished by cadets from the . Eoyal
Military College at Duntroonj and they
took up their positions near; the steps
of Parliament House, in the rear be
ing the Canberra and BungentTore Light
. , All the galleries 'in the Senate were
delivered his opening speech, as fol
lows: , "My adAdserSj having received .
amandate from the people to maintain I
the Federal principle in Industrial
legislation, will- submit to . you early I
prove the working, of the Federal Con
have extended invitations to represen
tatives 01- the employers and employees
p to: meet- in -conference' for -the purpose
improvements whereby 'more '.cordial, re
lations, among the parties to industry
, miiy. be facilitated. .
$ warded to His Majesty 's : Government
state of employment in the Common
t the, assisted passage clause of the
£34)000,000 migration - agreement- be "
; tweeq Britain and the ; Government of
reply, my Ministers propose" to consult
with the Governments of the . States on
the whole matter of -assisted migra
tion. The industrial, "conditions have
compelled my Ministers to further re
strict the admission of foreign immi
grants to the Commonwealth.;
"My Ministers propose to .co-ordin
arid Migration .Commission .- with", those
; of the Comirionwealth Council of Scien-
1 tific. and Industrial Research,; and this
work will be brought uriderl the direct
. Mr.'E. Riley (Cook) moved ' that Mr.
N. J. O. Makin (Hindmarsh)- bo
Speaker.' v.-;.-/
. In. seconding the motion, ."Mr. J. Cur-
tin (Fremantle) said lie was ""quite sure
that j members would - recognise Mr.
Makin 's .- fitness for the office/ for he
had av wide knowledge of Parliament
ary procedure. . .
A'Mr. Cr. E. Yates (Adelaide)- said that
(personally he thought" the ' tiriic . f or
electing Speakers under the ; present
Party that the Speaker : of the Legis
lative Assembly should be a paid of
ficial, and lie thought that this should
also apply in the House of r Represen
tatives;? He was fortified1, in his opiri-
ion'-BjJweeerit occurrences in the House
Mr. Yates . said that the Speaker
under : the present system could not
give justice to the elcctoratdUie reprc1
seated. The position was sin . anomaly,
and the «tiriie. had arrived .when " the
or - political opinions/ They had -had
Dr. Earle Page said ir- had. always
weeks they had had no bpcaker at a.L,
Groom. Something.shoulcl .be done to
Mr. Seuilin said lie desired to con
1 When the members re-assembled in
tlie House of Representatives, Mr. W.
M. Hughes, who had not v arrived at
Mr.. Seuilin subsequently moved that
a Bill to amend to the Acts Interpreta
sitting. .
Mi. Seuilin then moved that Messrs.
"iioiloway, , EIdridg and the mover be
appointed to prepare the Address-m-
Reply, and that the' committee report
at . next sitting.
M'Grath had had conflicts with, the
standing orders and would see that thev
'Mr.. R. -F. H. Green (Richmond) said
but he seemed only to have had experi
orders. It had surprised- him that the
who- had acted as Deputy Chairman in
not too . late for you to nominate' him.
Mr. Green said it was certainly sur
Mr. Seuilin offered Mr. M 'Gr ath his
congratulations. He thought the mem
than if a strict disciplinarian had ob
Mr. J. G. Latham (Nationalist lead
Page (Country Party leader) also con
Mr. Seuilin said it was the desire of
In connection with the by-el -3C lion for
the Franklin seat, Mr. Seuilin an-
of writs had beenjfixed for January 4-
Mi. Seuilin then moved that the
Franklin, and the House rose till 2.80
FEDERAL PARLIAMENT
No Ostentatious Display
CANBERRA, Wednesday— The 12th Parliament of Aus-
tralia was opened to-day. In the morning proceedings were
mostly of a formal nature, the opening speech of the Gover-
when the members were sworn in was Mr. W. M. Hughes.
In accordance with the new Labor Government's policy
The Governor General arrived
in a carriage instead of the
State coach, and there were no
cadets from the Naval College at
Jervis Bay. The guard of honor was
furnished by cadets from the Royal
Military College at Duntroon, and they
took up their positions near the steps
of Parliament House, in the rear be-
ing the Canberra and Bungendore Light
All the galleries in the Senate were
delivered his opening speech, as fol-
lows: "My advisers, having received
a mandate from the people to maintain
the Federal principle in industrial
legislation, will submit to you early
prove the working of the Federal Con-
have extended invitations to represen-
tatives of the employers and employees
to meet in conference for the purpose
improvements whereby more cordial re-
lations among the parties to industry
may be facilitated.
state of employment in the Common-
the assisted passage clause of the
£34,000,000 migration agreement be-
tween Britain and the Government of
reply, my Ministers propose to consult
with the Governments of the States on
the whole matter of assisted migra-
tion. The industrial conditions have
compelled my Ministers to further re-
strict the admission of foreign immi-
grants to the Commonwealth.
"My Ministers propose to co-ordin-
and Migration Commission with those
of the Comirionwealth Council of Scien-
tific and Industrial Research, and this
work will be brought under the direct
Mr. E. Riley (Cook) moved that Mr.
N. J. O. Makin (Hindmarsh) be
Speaker.
In seconding the motion, Mr. J. Cur-
tin (Fremantle) said he was "quite sure
that j members would recognise Mr.
Makin's fitness for the office, for he
had a wide knowledge of Parliament-
ary procedure.
Mr. G. E. Yates (Adelaide) said that
personally he thought the time for
electing Speakers under the present
Party that the Speaker of the Legis
lative Assembly should be a paid of-
ficial, and he thought that this should
also apply in the House of Represen-
tattles, He was fortified in his opin-
ion by recent occurrences in the House
Mr. Yates said that the Speaker
under the present system could not
give justice to the electorate he repre-
sented. The position was an anomaly,
and the time had arrived when the
or political opinions. They had had
Dr. Earle Page said it had always
weeks they had had no Speaker at all,
Groom. Something should be done to
Mr. Scullin said he desired to con-
When the members re-assembled in
the House of Representatives, Mr. W.
M. Hughes, who had not arrived at
Mr. Scullin subsequently moved that
a Bill to amend to the Acts Interpreta-
sitting.
Mi. Scuilin then moved that Messrs.
Holloway, EIdridge and the mover be
appointed to prepare the Address-in-
Reply, and that the committee report
at next sitting.
M'Grath had had conflicts with the
standing orders and would see that they
Mr. R. F. H. Green (Richmond) said
but he seemed only to have had experi-
orders. It had surprised him that the
who had acted as Deputy Chairman in
not too late for you to nominate him.
Mr. Green said it was certainly sur-
Mr. Scullin offered Mr. M'Grath his
congratulations. He thought the mem-
than if a strict disciplinarian had ob-
Mr. J. G. Latham (Nationalist lead-
Page (Country Party leader) also con-
Mr. Scullin said it was the desire of
In connection with the by-election for
the Franklin seat, Mr. Scullin an-
of writs had been fixed for January 4.
Mr. Scullin then moved that the
Franklin, and the House rose till 2.30

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.