Information about Trove user: Rhonda.M

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,511,057
2 NeilHamilton 3,078,727
3 noelwoodhouse 2,976,878
4 annmanley 2,243,457
5 John.F.Hall 2,205,673
6 DonnaTelfer 1,719,303
7 maurielyn 1,648,783
8 Rhonda.M 1,621,658
9 C.Scheikowski 1,615,483
10 culroym 1,604,876

1,621,658 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 22,911
May 2017 38,533
April 2017 44,602
March 2017 50,893
February 2017 42,315
January 2017 67,427
December 2016 48,882
November 2016 54,814
October 2016 57,622
September 2016 47,617
August 2016 53,336
July 2016 28,758
June 2016 6,613
May 2016 5,587
April 2016 14,343
March 2016 15,279
February 2016 11,487
January 2016 673
December 2015 1,902
November 2015 13,104
October 2015 27,476
September 2015 33,945
August 2015 27,379
July 2015 25,938
June 2015 37,277
May 2015 21,200
April 2015 1,565
March 2015 12,766
February 2015 16,220
January 2015 6,545
December 2014 7,659
November 2014 14,260
October 2014 14,014
September 2014 32,789
August 2014 16,919
July 2014 14,537
June 2014 17,496
May 2014 10,518
April 2014 3,450
March 2014 18,632
February 2014 4,090
January 2014 9,502
December 2013 16,889
November 2013 10,493
October 2013 27,604
September 2013 17,023
August 2013 26,000
July 2013 20,652
June 2013 21,508
May 2013 37,107
April 2013 20,233
March 2013 2,401
February 2013 2,807
January 2013 1,047
December 2012 2,025
November 2012 18,750
October 2012 8,684
September 2012 7,469
August 2012 19,173
July 2012 16,916
June 2012 22,811
May 2012 14,246
April 2012 19,837
March 2012 13,217
February 2012 17,194
January 2012 2,876
December 2011 7,429
November 2011 2,981
October 2011 7,591
September 2011 31,913
August 2011 19,955
July 2011 26,256
June 2011 17,484
May 2011 17,740
April 2011 26,629
March 2011 18,129
February 2011 9,213
January 2011 11,526
December 2010 4,314
November 2010 5,782
October 2010 1,397
September 2010 3,378
July 2010 3,994
June 2010 5,771
May 2010 5,524
April 2010 932
March 2010 2,920
February 2010 122
January 2010 498
December 2009 746
November 2009 962
October 2009 3,317
September 2009 5,370
August 2009 4,527
July 2009 3,110
June 2009 1,551
May 2009 445
April 2009 1,133
March 2009 1,065
February 2009 3
December 2008 6
November 2008 19
August 2008 89

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,511,026
2 NeilHamilton 3,078,727
3 noelwoodhouse 2,976,878
4 annmanley 2,243,387
5 John.F.Hall 2,205,668
6 DonnaTelfer 1,719,301
7 maurielyn 1,648,783
8 Rhonda.M 1,621,645
9 C.Scheikowski 1,615,144
10 culroym 1,604,726

1,621,645 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 22,911
May 2017 38,533
April 2017 44,602
March 2017 50,893
February 2017 42,315
January 2017 67,414
December 2016 48,882
November 2016 54,814
October 2016 57,622
September 2016 47,617
August 2016 53,336
July 2016 28,758
June 2016 6,613
May 2016 5,587
April 2016 14,343
March 2016 15,279
February 2016 11,487
January 2016 673
December 2015 1,902
November 2015 13,104
October 2015 27,476
September 2015 33,945
August 2015 27,379
July 2015 25,938
June 2015 37,277
May 2015 21,200
April 2015 1,565
March 2015 12,766
February 2015 16,220
January 2015 6,545
December 2014 7,659
November 2014 14,260
October 2014 14,014
September 2014 32,789
August 2014 16,919
July 2014 14,537
June 2014 17,496
May 2014 10,518
April 2014 3,450
March 2014 18,632
February 2014 4,090
January 2014 9,502
December 2013 16,889
November 2013 10,493
October 2013 27,604
September 2013 17,023
August 2013 26,000
July 2013 20,652
June 2013 21,508
May 2013 37,107
April 2013 20,233
March 2013 2,401
February 2013 2,807
January 2013 1,047
December 2012 2,025
November 2012 18,750
October 2012 8,684
September 2012 7,469
August 2012 19,173
July 2012 16,916
June 2012 22,811
May 2012 14,246
April 2012 19,837
March 2012 13,217
February 2012 17,194
January 2012 2,876
December 2011 7,429
November 2011 2,981
October 2011 7,591
September 2011 31,913
August 2011 19,955
July 2011 26,256
June 2011 17,484
May 2011 17,740
April 2011 26,629
March 2011 18,129
February 2011 9,213
January 2011 11,526
December 2010 4,314
November 2010 5,782
October 2010 1,397
September 2010 3,378
July 2010 3,994
June 2010 5,771
May 2010 5,524
April 2010 932
March 2010 2,920
February 2010 122
January 2010 498
December 2009 746
November 2009 962
October 2009 3,317
September 2009 5,370
August 2009 4,527
July 2009 3,110
June 2009 1,551
May 2009 445
April 2009 1,133
March 2009 1,065
February 2009 3
December 2008 6
November 2008 19
August 2008 89

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 98,364
2 mickbrook 85,060
3 murds5 54,198
4 PhilThomas 28,193
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
746 merrin 13
747 phicat 13
748 redcliffs 13
749 Rhonda.M 13
750 RJHA 13
751 RoyHenderson 13

13 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

January 2017 13


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
LT.-COM. NASMITH WON THE V.C. FOR SHEER EFFRONTERY He Took a Submarine Through the Heavily Guarded Dardanelles and Raided Constantinople (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Saturday 21 December 1940 [Issue No.29,433] page 3 2017-06-27 10:27 against submarines even, when the subs,
Yes. Lleut.-Commander Stoker was the
adventures of Lleut.-Commander Nasmlth
In Eil were particularly interesting, said
the commander. Nasmlth afterwards com-
Admiral Sir Martin Dunbar-No smith, is
JLiET'S hear the story, said the major, as
our subs, were get.ting through.
Nasmlth in Eil was the fourth to pene-
Eil entered the Dardanelles early in the
morning of May 19, 1915, and, off Achl
Lt -Commander Nasmith (right) talking
with a shipmate of EM at Imbros
One destroyer tried to ram the sub., but Eil
Next day a large sailing-ship was'sighted.
Eil followed her in and found herself
with guns still blazing. One of Ell's peri-
/\ SMALL steamer was sighted off Con-
Rodosto. Eil followed her in, and, though
ram Eil.
day, when Nasmith took Eil into the
ing toward Eil, and thought he was being
LiEAVING the harbour Eil ran aground
troyers, but again Eil escaped.
Early on the morning of June 7 Eil
straits. Deep under the minefield off Kllld
the sub.'s hydroplanes. Eil was towing a
Eil rose to the surface stern first, towing
Well, that's the story of Eil and Nasmith,
against submarines even, when the subs
Yes. Lieut.-Commander Stoker was the
adventures of Lleut.-Commander Nasmith
in E11 were particularly interesting, said
the commander. Nasmith afterwards com-
Admiral Sir Martin Dunbar-Nasmith, is
LET'S hear the story, said the major, as
our subs. were getting through.
Nasmith in E11 was the fourth to pene-
E11 entered the Dardanelles early in the
morning of May 19, 1915, and, off Achi
Lt.-Commander Nasmith (right) talking
with a shipmate of E11 at Imbros
One destroyer tried to ram the sub., but E11
Next day a large sailing-ship was sighted.
E11 followed her in and found herself
with guns still blazing. One of E11's peri-
A SMALL steamer was sighted off Con-
Rodosto. E11followed her in, and, though
ram E11.
day, when Nasmith took E11 into the
ing toward E11, and thought he was being
LEAVING the harbour E11 ran aground
troyers, but again E11 escaped.
Early on the morning of June 7 E11
straits. Deep under the minefield off Kilid
the sub.'s hydroplanes. E11 was towing a
E11 rose to the surface stern first, towing
Well, that's the story of E11 and Nasmith,
No title (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 17 November 1877 [Issue No.7105] page 4 2017-06-26 16:52 It is always a irave inisforfciino when
important constitutional questions havo
to bo dooideil by gentlemen who are
lawyers and nut statosmen. The mouth
pieces of the opposition party in tho
f Yinriivil anneal' tn hn an fai' ennvineed
by our arguments upon tho respective
powers and privileges of tho two
(.'ham hois that tlmy admit that the
Houso ol' Lords would, if payment of
members wero included in the Appro
priation Bill, havo no alter native hut to
pass the measure. But tho leaders of the
dominant party in tho Council insist
that the analogy of the British consti
tution does not hold good iu Victoria ;
that the functions of tho Queen, Lords
and Commons aro quite dissimilnr to
those of the Governor, Counnil and As
sembly ; and that tho not of Parliament
which is tho foundation of our liberties'
and privileges is to bo oonstrued by the
same teohnfoal rules of construction
whioh would bo applied to a contraot or
a ohavter party. Isfo argument can be
satisfactorily conduoted when the oppos
premises. Sir Oiiaui.es Sr, alien and
Mr. 'Anderson would interpret tho
Constitution Act with tho same strict
Venetian money-lender, Mr. Shyloak.
To the assertion that tho frnmcrs of tho
.confer upon tho people of Victoria ex
actly tho sumo rights of solf govern
onaniies" Sladen and Mr. Anderson
rights is to bo found in tho bond, and
tl|ey shake the Constitution Act in our
faces. Now even upon their own nar
row and technical ground they havo
got far the Worst of it; and tho legal
argument, as propounded in the state
ment of reasons for disagreeing witli
:tha Council which wero drawn up
by tho Assembly, and in tho speech
ot Mr. Casey, completely controverted
tho position assumed by tho leaders of
the .Second Chamber. But we protest,
in the interests ot free institutions, of
Parliamentary government, nnd of ra
tional liberty, against any nttempt to
..Niax Prius. Tho constitution of Vic
toria is and was intended to bo in every
.respect analogous totkutof the Mother
Country ; and if thcto be any. failure it
into a written constitution tho elasticity
be adapted to the circumstances of tho
.sought to govern a people by the Btrict
rules of legal pedants who did not suc
ceed in driving his subjects to tbo very
be made in this' country the only re-
Bult must be that the constitu
the interests of a nation ore concerned
tion is that tho precedents of the
Houses of Parliament iu Victoria, and'
There has bean more than one occa
sion during the brief history of Vic
now. led by Sir Ciiari.es Sladen and
Air; Anderson attempted to thrust their
-legality down the throats of the people
'bf:, this country. It was in vain
that Mr. Higinbothaji and the other
'popular leaders proved inconteBtably
.the example set by M.v. Glad
stone in the Paper Duties Bill,
to abandon pretensions which had pre
viously tieen gracefully conceded by tbo
.House of Lords. Mr. Fellows, another
lawyer, insisted upon tho Con
into-tarmoil -and confusion for several
years. But although successful in caus
tide, and tiie tnriif which had necessi
tated ' the tuclc became the law of
country. .H 01 did the acts of the ma
steps taken by Sir Charles Darling
hut the Second (.bomber found no ad
the, best constitutional writers in the
I'nited Kingdom Tho Conscript Fa
thers were told, iu unmistakable terms,
that in a dispute witli a stronger body
the wall; and, in the forcible lunguago of
the 'Hqtwdai / llevlew , the Council was
Warned that if two men will gat upon a
horse ono of them must ride bohind.
, The refusal by Sir W illiaii
Stawell, auother lawyer, to concede
the dissolution udvised by the first
Berry Government is auother and most
defenders of tho Acting-Governor ad
tendered to him by his responsible ad
though badly informed people, " Vie-
" circumstances Mr. Gladstone or Air.
" by the . provisions of an English
" nothing about dissolutionin the bond."
But tho opinion of constitutional
authorities iu the mother country was
universally condemnatory of tho refusal
of Sir William Stawell, and the Lon
don Time a was very severe in its stric
tures. Tiie unwisdom and danger of
doparting from tho well known prece-
, dents of the British constitution havo
of tho past two years. The country
gave the verdict in AJay last, which but
for Sir William Sta well's error of
eighteen months before, and the only re
sult of tho M'G'nlloch usurpation has
water for just that period. livery at
tempt to ignore tho spirit for (lie letter
disputes has ended iu failure and dis
aster, and there is repson to fear that
counsels of the legal olemont of tho
to follow leaders who will infallibly con
duct it into a citl do sac, from which
there is uo retreat, and tho only possible
outcome is disaster nnd defeat.
Now that educntion is conferred witli
now that wo have colleges lor girls as
uble to say, while the lecture-i-ooms of
tho ( niversity are filled with fair giri-
gruduates — tho young woman of tho
timo is fust becoming capable of doing
much of tho work now almout mono
ousting him. Let tho doors of tho pro
fessions ho thrown wide, and compara
those that do follow the now path lot
woman boginH to copo with woman tho
samo rule should hold good. For in-
otauco, tho reform of the civil sorvico is,
it is to bo hoped, a thing of tho no dis
tant future. When n righteonH system
of competitive examinations is in voguo,
a good deal of tho bickerings, tho joa-
lousy and heartburning no>v pretty preva
lent will molt away, and, if porfeotion bo
not attainod, there will bo at all ovents
Till then, howovor, the best that can bo
of appointing to offices should boaxorcised
in a wise and discreet f'nshiou, unbiassed
fiuonco. It would bo especially dis
couraging if women, on thoir admission
to the civil scrvico, should find them
selves hampered by tlioso very contri
vance that ha ve been tho plague of their
vacancies in the postand telegraph offices
would bo thrown open to women.
Amongst the applicants for theso were
passed tho civil service and matricula
tion examinations, but who wore not
situations, uf course all could not have
should have the first cluim. Notwith
standing this, tho posts wore given to tho
untried daughters of awealthypolitician,
who ought to havo had the decency
instanco as an unusually flagrant ono,
competitive examinations, lot us have
some standard to guido ub. Alerit, at
the first consideration, nnd afterwards,
other things being oqual, necessity,
We do not wnnt our civil servico to
the friends and relations of tho wealthy —
peoplo who would hasten to a hospital
too much of that kind of thing has al
Though the Eaton case was finally dis
on Thursday night, it would bo
take a disinterested view of the con
troversy between Mr. W ardell andAIr.
I'aton. As long a3 the fact remains
that Mr. Wardell kept Mr. Eaton in
full salary, and at tho samo time re
to nrrive at any other conclusion than
for not dismissing him. Air. Eaton
as Mr. Eaton has done. Instead of
avoiding the light of day, ho bus never
lost an opportunity of directing the at
tontion of Parliament to his compluints.
Board after board has sat upon liirn b v his
in 1876, after a CRreful and exhaustive
his salary -to be paid from the date of his
dismissal, and that he should be re
Civil Servioe Act. It was even de
documentary evidence waB sup
in which Bbould not havo been
that the board which gave this judg
ment blundered, and conducted the in
vestigation in a perfunctory spirit. Air.
Eaton ought nob to bo blamed if his
judges did nob handle his caso as they
should have done. Jf the various
boards havo failed, by their own con-
fission, to do justice to the dispute, we
imugine that Parliament is not likely to
the debate on Thursday night wont
against Air. Eaton, it does not follow
that Mr. Eaton himself muy not
kind Bhould bo judicial in tone and be
look for this characteristic in a discus
sion in which the Minister of the depart
ment has to rely solely upon the infor
mation that may have beon supplied
Patterson was necessarily placed in the
position of advocating the cause of Air.
Wardell. He knew only what Air.
Wardell told him, anil ho must
either have repeated what Air.
Waiidell told himj or havo publicly
any bias, he was - acting as Al'r. War-
DELl's mouthpiece, and could scarcely
against Air. Eaton.
It is always a grave misfortune when
important constitutional questions have
to be decided by gentlemen who are
lawyers and not statesmen. The mouth-
pieces of the opposition party in the
Council appear to be so far convinced
by our arguments upon the respective
powers and privileges of the two
Chambers that they admit that the
House of Lords would, if payment of
members were included in the Appro-
priation Bill, have no alternative but to
pass the measure. But the leaders of the
dominant party in the Council insist
that the analogy of the British consti-
tution does not hold good in Victoria;
that the functions of the Queen, Lords
and Commons are quite dissimilar to
those of the Governor, Council and As=
sembly; and that the act of Parliament
which is the foundation of our liberties
and privileges is to be construed by the
same technical rules of construction
which would be applied to a contract or
a charter party. No argument can be
satisfactorily conducted when the oppos-
premises. Sir CHARLES SLADEN and
Mr. ANDERSON would interpret the
Constitution Act with the same strict-
Venetian money-lender, Mr. Shylock.
To the assertion that the framers of the
confer upon the people of Victoria ex-
actly the same rights of self-govern-
CHARLES SLADEN and Mr. ANDERSON
rights is to be found in the bond, and
they shake the Constitution Act in our
faces. Now even upon their own nar-
row and technical ground they have
got far the worst of it; and the legal
argument, as propounded in the state-
ment of reasons for disagreeing with
the Council which were drawn up
by the Assembly, and in the speech
of Mr. Casey, completely controverted
the position assumed by the leaders of
the Second Chamber. But we protest,
in the interests of free institutions, of
Parliamentary government, and of ra-
tional liberty, against any attempt to
Nisi Prius. The constitution of Vic-
toria is and was intended to be in every
respect analogous to that of the Mother
Country; and if there be any failure it
into a written constitution the elasticity
be adapted to the circumstances of the
sought to govern a people by the strict
rules of legal pedants who did not suc-
ceed in driving his subjects to the very
be made in this country the only re-
sult must be that the constitu-
the interests of a nation are concerned
Salus populi suprema lex. Our conten-
tion is that the precedents of the
Houses of Parliament in Victoria, and
There has been more than one occa-
sion during the brief history of Vic-
now led by Sir CHARLES SLADEN and
Mr. ANDERSON attempted to thrust their
legality down the throats of the people
of this country. It was in vain
that Mr. HIGINBOTHAM and the other
popular leaders proved inconteastably
the example set by Mr GLAD-
STONE in the Paper Duties Bill,
to abandon pretensions which had pre-
viously been gracefully conceded by the
House of Lords. Mr. FELLOWS, another
lawyer, insisted upon the Con
into turmoil and confusion for several
years. But although successful in caus-
tide, and the tariff which had necessi-
tated the tack became the law of
country. Nor did the acts of the ma-
steps taken by Sir CHARLES DARLING
but the Second Chamber found no ad-
the best constitutional writers in the
United Kingdom. The Conscript Fa
thers were told, in unmistakable terms,
that in a dispute with a stronger body
the wall; and, in the forcible language of
the Saturday Review, the Council was
warned that if two men will get upon a
horse one of them must ride behind.
The refusal by Sir WILLIAM
STAWELL, another lawyer, to concede
the dissolution advised by the first
Berry Government is another and most
defenders of the Acting-Governor ad-
tendered to him by his responsible ad-
visers.' "But," said these worthy al-
though badly informed people, " Vic-
" circumstances Mr. Gladstone or Mr.
" by the provisions of an English
" nothing about dissolution in the bond."
But the opinion of constitutional
authorities in the mother country was
universally condemnatory of the refusal
of Sir WILLIAM STAWELL, and the Lon-
don Times was very severe in its stric-
tures. The unwisdom and danger of
departing from the well known prece-
dents of the British constitution have
of the past two years. The country
gave the verdict in May last, which but
for Sir WILLIAM STAWELL's error of
eighteen months before, and the only re-
sult of the M'Culloch usurpation has
water for just that period. Every at-
tempt to ignore the spirit for the letter
disputes has ended in failure and dis-
aster, and there is reason to fear that
counsels of the legal element of the
to follow leaders who will infallibly con-
duct it into a cul de sac, from which
there is no retreat, and the only possible
outcome is disaster and defeat.
-----------------
Now that education is conferred with
now that we have colleges lfr girls as
able to say, while the lecture-rooms of
the university are filled with fair girl-
gruduates — the young woman of the
time is fast becoming capable of doing
much of the work now almost mono-
ousting him. Let the doors of the pro-
fessions be thrown wide, and compara-
those that do follow the new path let
woman begins to cope with woman the
same rule should hold good. For in-
stance, the reform of the civil service is,
it is to be hoped, a thing of the no dis-
tant future. When a righteous system
of competitive examinations is in vogue,
a good deal of the bickerings, the jea-
lousy and heartburning now pretty preva-
lent will melt away, and, if perfection be
not attained, there will be at all events
Till then, however, the best that can be
of appointing to offices should be exercised
in a wise and discreet fashion, unbiassed
fluence. It would be especially dis-
couraging if women, on their admission
to the civil service, should find them-
selves hampered by those very contri-
vances that have been the plague of their
vacancies in the post and telegraph offices
would be thrown open to women.
Amongst the applicants for these were
passed the civil service and matricula-
tion examinations, but who were not
situations. Of course all could not have
should have the first claim. Notwith-
standing this, the posts were given to the
untried daughters of a wealthy politician,
who ought to have had the decency
instance as an unusually flagrant one,
competitive examinations, let us have
some standard to guide us. Merit, at-
the first consideration, and afterwards,
other things being equal, necessity.
We do not want our civil service to
the friends and relations of the wealthy —
people who would hasten to a hospital
too much of that kind of thing has al-
-------------------
Though the Eaton case was finally dis-
on Thursday night, it would be
take a disinterested view of the con-
troversy between Mr. WARDELL and Mr.
EATON. As long as the fact remains
that Mr. WARDELL kept Mr. EATON in
full salary, and at the same time re-
to arrive at any other conclusion than
for not dismissing him. Mr. EATON
as Mr. EATON has done. Instead of
avoiding the light of day, he has never
lost an opportunity of directing the at-
tention of Parliament to his complaints.
Board after board has sat upon him by his
in 1876, after a careful and exhaustive
his salary to be paid from the date of his
dismissal, and that he should be re-
Civil Service Act. It was even de-
documentary evidence was sup-
in which should not have been
that the board which gave this judg-
ment blundered, and conducted the in-
vestigation in a perfunctory spirit. Mr.
EATON ought not to be blamed if his
judges did not handle his case as they
should have done. If the various
boards have failed, by their own con-
fession, to do justice to the dispute, we
imagine that Parliament is not likely to
the debate on Thursday night went
against Mr. EATON, it does not follow
that Mr. Eaton himself may not
kind should be judicial in tone and be
look for this characteristic in a discus-
sion in which the Minister of the depart-
ment has to rely solely upon the infor-
mation that may have been supplied
PATTERSON was necessarily placed in the
position of advocating the cause of Mr.
WARDELL. He knew only what Mr.
WARDELL told him, and he must
either have repeated what Mr.
WARDELL told him, or have publicly
any bias, he was acting as Mr. WAR-
DELL's mouthpiece, and could scarcely
against Mr. EATON.
No Title (Article), The Herald (Fremantle, WA : 1867 - 1886), Saturday 28 February 1885 [Issue No.4] page 2 2017-06-26 15:39 IF the colony can be made to ad
which are about to be undertake i. It
is difficult to forsee the ultimate re
by the syndicates which have respec
tively embarked in these works,means
the expenditure of a very largesum of
very large-probably not less than
supply all which the railway contrac
benefit derived from the expenditnre
far greater than under existing cir
cumstances it is hkely to be. It is
be able to supply enough of the neces
earies of life for its existing population
ifrhas not produced enough bacon,
butter, cheese,, or even hay, corn, or
most favorable seasons it has to im.
Consequently, it is not in a pcsition
again the local tradesmen-and black
smiths, the wheelwrights, the carpen
ters, the masons-will find employ
ment at increased rates, while-what
thing else-everything will be paid
forinmcash. Money will be put in
where apound note is seldom seen
than any earnings where no mney is
seen. In theory,money is not wealth,
of these land grantrailways must be
equally beneticial in another way.
while at the same time,they leave be
not numbered the creation of a nation
ale about'to be undertaken by means
and production. T'he good effects of
be fairly set down as ultimately remu
get the colony to move. Whetherit will
will prove as ineffectual from a nation
be but that thete will be great pros
far asprosperity can be engendered
by a hrge influx and wide and active
colony advances or stands still, as re
Last Wednesday's West Australhan has :a
leading article commenting ureaon the posi.
Court and a Judage presiding over a Colonial
Bar. The article is somewhat labouredl,
out, bat it wvould appear that its aim is to
of the Bench by making its power:subservicnt
to the power of the Government-an out
and has caused an irreparable breach be
tween Sir William G. Des. Vmeux, the Gov.
Chief Justice, of that Colony. The \V West
Australian would indirectly apoear to hold
with the action taken by Sir William Des
Vsux, and as our readers may inot be ac
quainrted with the circumstances which led
We are aware that Sir Hlenry Wrentuorlsley
has obtaine I leave qf absence from Fiji on
the grounls of ill.health, and that for sonme
of South Australia; that he has acceptedl
at Tssmanin, while retaining the Chief
Justiceship of Fiji, and that he has pro.
ceeded;to his destination. We have also
read that Sir William Des Vtsux is on his
recllectel that in 1883, Chief Justice
Wrenfordsley, who was then Acting Gov
ernor of this Colony, received the appoint
ment of Chief Justice of Fiji, in succcssion
to Sir John Gorr.c, who had been transfer
red to the Chnef Justiceship of the Leewarnt
Ge.;eral of Fiji meanwhile acting as Chief
Juslic or that Colony. The resson of Sir
John Gorrie's removal has beenr stated to
have been that as a Judge hie was to some
extent influenced by his political prepos
sessions, and that his rule of cuondiuct gave
color to the decisions of Magistrares, so that
persons engaged in a suit against tie Grown
ease Everett v. The Crown, Sir John Gorrie
severely reprehended Executive interfer
encc; t~is resulted in an open rupture with
the Government, and le-i to hris removal.
Sir Hie: ry Wrenfordsley assumcJ the Chief
J usticeship of Fiji in September 1853 ; from
the outset he failed to filid fvor with Sir
\William Des Vaux, aii a first cause of of
fence was his declining to take his sest in
judge: it was the business of the Giovern
ment and the Legislature to make laws-his
to administer them,,so long as they were not
repugnant to the principles of British jurs
prudence. Unler taese circumstances Sir
lHenry Wrenfordlsley was looked upon by
the Government House P.arty as inimical to
their interests, as one threatening the fur
ther abase sad exerc'se of arbitrary official
failing health compelled him to quit tihe
Colouy ont lieave of absence, ihut it was sup.
posed that he would notbe abseht more than
iooked for with the most hopeful anticipati.
ons. During his tenure of offie Ie delivered
no less than tive decisions adverse to the
Government. In Parr v the Attosney Gen.
eral, lie overruled the dcmurrer entered by
restitution by the Crown of property wrong
folly withheld; and in Pair v the Acting
Agent General of Immigration,which, though
so severe acensure upon the mal-administrati.
that the victory was more galling than a de
dictate to him-a Judge--whatthat decision
should have been. In proportion to the dis
like of himu by Sir William Des Verax Sir
his impartialityand strict independence, but
when hle accepted the hospitality of the
taken to prevent impropersignificance being
in a false position, Governcr Des Vaux took
exception to the denmonstration, and asserted
that Sir IHenry haId publicly indentified him
by allowing them to make him their pro
so far as to report the ,circumstance to the
Secretary of State. Uuder such conditions
Sir Hlenry felt that hle could not return to
to England tolay the matter before the Sec.
Chief Justice of a Crown Colony has receiv.
temporarely a judgeship at Tasmania,a coun
Sir Henry won the good will of the people '
for hifstrict impartiahty, he marked his
advent by proposing an improvement eu the
judicial administra'ion of the Colony by the
introduction of the Supreme Court (Indic
tute) Act, and the new rules and proceed
Ings. He represented the Colony at the In
he administered the Government of this nol
uny from the departure of Uovernor Rlobinson
Mlelbonrna "Argus' in an editorial, has said
popular judge that ever -at upou the Fijian
gentleman has returned to his charge,
IF the colony can be made to ad-
which are about to be undertake. It
is difficult to forsee the ultimate re-
by the syndicates which have respec-
tively embarked in these works, means
the expenditure of a very large sum of
not indeed be spent in the colony nor
very large — probably not less than
supply all which the railway contrac-
benefit derived from the expenditure
far greater than under existing cir-
cumstances it is likely to be. It is
be able to supply enough of the neces-
saries of life for its existing population
it has not produced enough bacon,
butter, cheese, or even hay, corn, or
most favorable seasons it has to im-
Consequently, it is not in a position
again the local tradesmen — and black-
smiths, the wheelwrights, the carpen-
ters, the masons — will find employ-
ment at increased rates, while — what
thing else — everything will be paid
for in cash. Money will be put in
where a pound note is seldom seen
every one will have some in his pocket,
than any earnings where no money is
seen. In theory, money is not wealth,
of these land grant railways must be
equally beneficial in another way.
while at the same time,they leave be-
not numbered the creation of a nation-
are about to be undertaken by means
and production. The good effects of
be fairly set down as ultimately remu-
get the colony to move. Whether it will
will prove as ineffectual from a nation-
be but that there will be great pros-
far as prosperity can be engendered
by a huge influx and wide and active
colony advances or stands still, as re-
Last Wednesday's West Australhan has a
leading article commenting upon the posi-
Court and a Judge presiding over a Colonial
Bar. The article is somewhat laboured,
out, but it would appear that its aim is to
of the Bench by making its power subservient
to the power of the Government — an out-
and has caused an irreparable breach be-
tween Sir William G. Des. Vœux, the Gov-
Chief Justice, of that Colony. The West
Australian would indirectly appear to hold
with the action taken by Sir William Des-
Vœux, and as our readers may not be ac-
quainted with the circumstances which led
We are aware that Sir Henry Wrentor lsley
has obtained leave of absence from Fiji on
the grounls of ill health, and that for some
of South Australia; that he has accepted
at Tasmania, while retaining the Chief
Justiceship of Fiji, and that he has pro-
ceeded to his destination. We have also
read that Sir William Des Vœux is on his
recollected that in 1883, Chief Justice
Wrenfordsley, who was then Acting Gov-
ernor of this Colony, received the appoint-
ment of Chief Justice of Fiji, in succession
to Sir John Gorre, who had been transfer-
red to the Chief Justiceship of the Leeward
General of Fiji meanwhile acting as Chief
Justice of that Colony. The reason of Sir
John Gorrie's removal has been stated to
have been that as a Judge he was to some
extent influenced by his political prepos-
sessions, and that his rule of conduct gave
color to the decisions of Magistrates, so that
persons engaged in a suit against the Crown
case Everett v. The Crown, Sir John Gorrie
severely reprehended Executive interfer-
ence; this resulted in an open rupture with
the Government, and led to his removal.
Sir Henry Wrenfordsley assumed the Chief
Justiceship of Fiji in September 1883; from
the outset he failed to find favor with Sir
William Des Vaux, and a first cause of of-
fence was his declining to take his seat in
judge: it was the business of the Govern-
ment and the Legislature to make laws — his
to administer them,so long as they were not
repugnant to the principles of British juris-
prudence. Under these circumstances Sir
Henry Wrenfordsley was looked upon by
the Government House Party as inimical to
their interests, as one threatening the fur-
ther abuse and exercise of arbitrary official
power over law and justice. Sir Henry's
failing health compelled him to quit the
Colouy on leave of absence, but it was sup-
posed that he would not be absent more than
looked for with the most hopeful anticipati-
ons. During his tenure of office he delivered
no less than five decisions adverse to the
Government. In Parr v the Attorney Gen-
eral, he overruled the demurrer entered by
restitution by the Crown of property wrong-
fully withheld; and in Parr v the Acting
Agent General of Immigration, which, though
so severe a censure upon the mal-administrati-
that the victory was more galling than a de-
dictate to him — a Judge — what that decision
should have been. In proportion to the dis-
like of him by Sir William Des Vœux Sir
his impartiality and strict independence, but
when he accepted the hospitality of the
taken to prevent improper significance being
in a false position, Governor Des Vœux took
exception to the demonstration, and asserted
that Sir Henry haId publicly indentified him-
by allowing them to make him their pro-
so far as to report the circumstance to the
Secretary of State. Under such conditions
Sir Henry felt that he could not return to
to England to lay the matter before the Sec-
Chief Justice of a Crown Colony has receiv-
temporarely a judgeship at Tasmania, a coun-
Sir Henry won the good will of the people
for his strict impartiality, he marked his
advent by proposing an improvement in the
judicial administration of the Colony by the
introduction of the Supreme Court (Indica-
ture) Act, and the new rules and proceed-
ings. He represented the Colony at the In-
he administered the Government of this Col-
ony from the departure of Governor Robinson
Melbourne "Argus' in an editorial, has said
popular judge that ever sat upou the Fijian
gentleman has returned to his charge.
THE VALUE OF POPULATION. (Article), Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 - 1918), Saturday 27 August 1864 [Issue No.452] page 13 2017-06-26 15:23 We too are advocates of immigration, pro
legs, and not something decrepit, rioketty,
' assisted' immigration, because there should
bo no occasion in Victoria for having to assist
enough for the; stranger. The way to assist
.will then come freely and fast enough; they
^ Indeed, the very fact of offering to pay their
' screws loose ' in our social arrangements.
v. ours, be reduced to the strait of holding up
artificial inducements ? The emigrants : of
Europe cannot fail ' to see that there is not fair
fashion. How is it that .the United States
have never had assisted immigration ? Emi
own accord, and in shoals, because the coun
England is the great modern coloniser, but- if
the land system and the, protected manufac
her neighbor's systems of cheap land and pro
. teotion to native industry. Victoria has made
talk of 'assisting' immigration, as it refuses
to come of itself.*
needful — oan alone, make prosperity— bears on
the market was exclusively supplied by im
, ports. Population, in their view, is a thing
. profit of the feeding and clothing. Then, too,
, employers of labor sought to cheapen it by in
The squatters find the multitude of desti
heavy annual burden on their outTstations ;
. while the heavy expenditure on public
give employment to the surplus laborers-,
Bounder notions on the subject than at any
remunerative employment, of population. In
deed, population of itself may make or aggra
vate national aflyersity instead of prosperity--.
that is when it is surplus. And it is sur
census list, but according to the op
the. number. Our own colony is an example.
and producing, not progress, but national confu
was an admirer obtained full swing. If popu
be the most prosperous country on the., globe.
possessed. But, in comparison with the indus
trial opportunities presented, and the remunera
tiveness of the employment available, the popu
lation was dense indeed— and it is hard to say
the proper conditions of its existence are pro
evil land arrangements, and by being de
barred from manufacture. , And this artificial
creation of a surplus 'population at last
.whole nation in a common ruin. The badly
Estates Court. The spectacle was an illustra
tion of the the6ry presented to the colonies in
we may note that the population of Bel
On the contrary, and because it is remunera
We are indeed advocates for assisting immi
America from Europe. Why should not Vic
gold country.' California is more difficult of
' assisted immigration.'' She does not want it,
for her, never those of Gibbon Wakefield.
We too are advocates of immigration, pro-
legs, and not something decrepit, ricketty,
"assisted" immigration, because there should
be no occasion in Victoria for having to assist
enough for the stranger. The way to assist
will then come freely and fast enough; they
Indeed, the very fact of offering to pay their
"screws loose" in our social arrangements.
ours, be reduced to the strait of holding up
Europe cannot fail to see that there is not fair
fashion. How is it that the United States
have never had assisted immigration ? Emi-
own accord, and in shoals, because the coun-
England is the great modern coloniser, but, if
the land system and the, protected manufac-
her neighbor's systems of cheap land and pro-
tection to native industry. Victoria has made
talk of "assisting" immigration, as it refuses
to come of itself.
needful — can alone, make prosperity— bears on
the market was exclusively supplied by im-
ports. Population, in their view, is a thing
profit of the feeding and clothing. Then, too,
employers of labor sought to cheapen it by in-
The squatters find the multitude of desti-
heavy annual burden on their out-stations ;
while the heavy expenditure on public
give employment to the surplus laborers,
sounder notions on the subject than at any
remunerative employment, of population. In-
deed, population of itself may make or aggra-
vate national adversity instead of prosperity —
that is when it is surplus. And it is sur-
census list, but according to the op-
the number. Our own colony is an example.
and producing, not progress, but national confu-
was an admirer obtained full swing. If popu-
be the most prosperous country on the globe.
possessed. But, in comparison with the indus-
trial opportunities presented, and the remunera-
tiveness of the employment available, the popu-
lation was dense indeed — and it is hard to say
the proper conditions of its existence are pro-
evil land arrangements, and by being de-
barred from manufacture. And this artificial
creation of a surplus population at last
whole nation in a common ruin. The badly
Estates Court. The spectacle was an illustra-
tion of the theory presented to the colonies in
we may note that the population of Bel-
On the contrary, and because it is remunera-
We are indeed advocates for assisting immi-
America from Europe. Why should not Vic-
gold country. California is more difficult of
"assisted immigration." She does not want it,
for her, never those of GIBBON WAKEFIELD.
THE GENTLE ART OF BEAUTY. (Article), Evening Journal (Adelaide, SA : 1869 - 1912), Saturday 8 February 1896 [Issue No.7883] page 3 2017-06-26 15:14 Tho neck, to look "woll, must have two
such ae creamy washes and good powders, well
rubbed in'•with a pieoe of chamois leather; but
aocord. There never should bo a bone visible,
never • be exposed to the unadmiring,
almost contemptuous gazo of—man. Far,
from gight under the folds of chiffon, crcpe de
good appearance, leaving the charms (')undernrnth
to the lively imagination of the beholder,
instead of to actual sigut, than to overhear in
tonee which the utterera evidently suppose to
be suppressed, and which are in reality stace
given vedoe to amidst amused giggles, cause
It is, aa l have remarked, a matter of no small
difficulty to " fatten tie neck alone;
of coarse, it can be done by taking
which generously responds quickest to the invitatjon^to
become stout; but I have been
know—as she assure^ me most solemnly that
she is speaking from hor own experience—of
a prescription, and as certainly she who aome
a most alarming display of " salt-oellars," now
boasts a really beautiful neck—I give her
readers to use their own judgment in tryiiig
it, but should any of thorn do so, I shall be
It ia simply this. Rub well into the nock
and shcmldeire (of course this can also apply to
pure olive oil, every night tor at least three
months, washing oS tlie surplus nest morning
end of ,tiie stipulated time the neck wiE be
ocmsideraUy jphnnper, when yon can either
discontinue tne on or continue, supposing it
does not quite meet yonr views. Of oonrse,
this treatment, to quote my friend, has ite
drawbacks, one being. that olive oil is not an a
role the moat daintily perfumed thing to use,
and another that it-soils the nnderdothing
oneself to coveziag wp the cheat with anything
the grease reaching the
lUUTm $ I tii oniy-mtnor
trials," and tberasoli acipfry repays for these
Turkish aaihs; bat when, these, owing to
medical orders or rather reasons, are unattainable,
the next best thing is constant, vigorous
with a washing glove, and aftcrwaris with a
solution of alum, ordinary vinegar, or th
of boiling water on to abont a iablespoonful of
honey, and, after stirring, allow it to bocome
will gradually remove all spots and rou rT h-
ness.—The OenUasoman.)
training which ehe received. Her father was a
man of Bcholariy and artistic tastes, genial and
kindly, and dovotod to his children, whose
education he conducted largely himself. '' I
had to learn," tho Princess once said; 4 ' we were
mors than ordinary skill The Prince® of
Wales has inherited har mother's musical skill,
and is a proficient player upon tbc piano and
rither. Any one who has seen Her Royal
Highness slip in quietly with ber daughters to
St. Anne's, Soho, during tho performance of
the Passion music in Lent, and "watched her
is artistic to her Snger- tips.
and figure both in colour and form, ajid sho
never favours any of the oddities and extravacifes
of fashion. When a desperate attempt
the crinoline the Princess refused even to have,
the proverbial thin end of Viu: wedge t-) make
way for the hideous hoop. Again, the Prince
has refused to favour the very large aletves
now in fashion ; and nothing, 1 fancy, would
bonnets which she invariably v.-ears far a revival
of the "poke" or "c-al-?>cuttle : ' shape.
With true artistic sense she makes her dree-s a
Bhe never looks what we call "parti
cular,"bnt always alike eh:u-ming. It is well
known thatduring her girlhood the Princess
and trimmed herself the most bewitcbm^arrangements
in headsttar. It is plea_=j.nt to
the lovliest gills in Europe, chatting over und
plimning how tbeir not very plentiful pinmoney
could be expended to •the best advantage.
What consultations there must have
been as to how the prettiest dress-is could lie
fitting and trying OIL, all done in the privacy
parents looking on, probably not without scene
anxiety as to the future in etn; e for their love! v
girls. The innocent little vynities of prettv
girls are very charging, because they aia:
generally indulged in to please somebody cl^e,
as Tennyson so" Ijejiutifuliy realizes in his
picture of the maiden waiting for ber lovc-r—
And thinking "this will please liiai best,"
She take* a riband or a rose;
for he will see them on to-nipht ;
And with tlie thought her colour burns;
And, having left the Rlass, she turns
Onoe more to set a ringlet right.
'
—The Womiit at Home.
The neck, to look well, must have two
such as creamy washes and good powders, well
rubbed in with a pieoe of chamois leather; but
aocord. There never should be a bone visible,
never be exposed to the unadmiring,
almost contemptuous gaze of — man. Far,
from sight under the folds of chiffon, crepe de
good appearance, leaving the charms (?)under-
neath to the lively imagination of the beholder,
instead of to actual sight, than to overhear in
tones which the utterers evidently suppose to
be suppressed, and which are in reality stage
given voice to amidst amused giggles, cause
It is, as l have remarked, a matter of no small
difficulty to fatten the neck alone;
of course, it can be done by taking
which generously responds quickest to the in-
vitation to become stout; but I have been
know — as she assures me most solemnly that
she is speaking from her own experience — of
a prescription, and as certainly she who some
a most alarming display of "salt-cellars," now
boasts a really beautiful neck — I give her
readers to use their own judgment in trying
it, but should any of them do so, I shall be
It is simply this. Rub well into the neck
and shoulders (of course this can also apply to
pure olive oil, every night for at least three
months, washing off the surplus next morning
end of the stipulated time the neck will be
considerably plumper, when you can either
discontinue the oil or continue, supposing it
does not quite meet your views. Of course,
this treatment, to quote my friend, has its
drawbacks, one being that olive oil is not an a
rule the most daintily perfumed thing to use,
and another that it soils the underclothing
oneself to covering up the chest with anything
which might prevent the grease reaching the
...; but these are, after all, only minor
trials, and the result amply repays for those
Turkish baths; but when, these, owing to
medical orders or rather reasons, are unattain-
able, the next best thing is constant, vigorous
with a washing glove, and afterwards with a
solution of alum, ordinary vinegar, or the
of boiling water on to about a tablespoonful of
honey, and, after stirring, allow it to become
will gradually remove all spots and rough-
ness - The Gentleman.]
training which she received. Her father was a
man of scholarly and artistic tastes, genial and
kindly, and devoted to his children, whose
education he conducted largely himself. "I
had to learn," the Princess once said; "we were
mors than ordinary skill The Princess of
Wales has inherited her mother's musical skill,
and is a proficient player upon the piano and
zither. Any one who has seen Her Royal
Highness slip in quietly with her daughters to
St. Anne's, Soho, during the performance of
the Passion music in Lent, and watched her
is artistic to her finger-tips.
and figure both in colour and form, and she
never favours any of the oddities and extrava-
gances of fashion. When a desperate attempt
the crinoline the Princess refused even to have
the proverbial thin end of the wedge to make
way for the hideous hoop. Again, the Princess
has refused to favour the very large sleeves
now in fashion; and nothing, I fancy, would
bonnets which she invariably wears far a revival
of the "poke" or "coal-scuttle" shape.
With true artistic sense she makes her dress a
she never looks what we call "parti-
cular," but always alike charming. It is well
known that during her girlhood the Princess
and trimmed herself the most bewitching
arrangements in headgear. It is pleasant to
the lovliest girls in Europe, chatting over and
planning how their not very plentiful pin-
money could be expended to the best advan-
rage. What consultations there must have
been as to how the prettiest dresses could be
fitting and trying on, all done in the privacy
parents looking on, probably not without some
anxidety as to the future in store for these lovely
girls. The innocent little vanities of prettv
girls are very charming, because they are
generally indulged in to please somebody else,
as Tennyson so beautifully realizes in his
picture of the maiden waiting for her lover —
And thinking "this will please him best,"
She takes a riband or a rose;
For he will see them on to-night ;
And with the thought her colour burns;
And, having left the glass, she turns
Once more to set a ringlet right.
—The Woman at Home.
Garden Calendar. CONSERVATORY AND POT PLANTS. (Article), Weekly Times (Melbourne, Vic. : 1869 - 1954), Saturday 26 June 1886 [Issue No.876] page 4 2017-06-26 15:02 Garden Calendar;
conservatory and pot plants.
looked om Aha; f eipottfed nt they require
it, uslngr$oiii>loaiii mixed with
plenty Qf cr. gqod . show plants,
breadthlslaririorei deslj?abl«; than Itoight ;
the desired shape. Epiphyllutns, in bloom,
rwetting the— flowerep ss' rtbey sre -easily
sniall buttonliblb;; . bbtitittbra;? Hfhbnilfif,
Cyclamens, said Chinese-Primulas are now
showicg blodm biifi the latter are far below
the standard--caused, no doubt, by a bad
selection ot Sebd saved from inferior sorts.
largest and best flo wersj which should be
carefully hybrid ised vrith ? otbrs : of a
plenty _of lighfc.is requiredfiuring the winter
without any danger. This is. a. good; time
for potting . Ferns . aisd . making: hanging
baskets. Window boxes may qlso be made,
nsing hardy plants which are raised from
Dohble -Dwarf- Stocks, Virginian Stock,
Swain. Riy«r. Daisy (bine and white), Tom
the flower garben.
and 8lovsest-growlhg month among plants.
coihiog spring. This is the best time for
vigorous rooting plants, plenty of manure;
may be mixed with the soil for growing?
prnued, and cuttings of same inserted ;
will be necessary. The moderate-grow
ing sorts should be pruned to about;
the climbing or pillar varieties should be left-
spring,, to the detriment of the flowers. The
planting of Pines. Aurap&rias, and other
Coniferous trees atod shrubs, also the
clipping into shape Of such- as are suitable,
may sow be carried out. Most of the
Cypress faniily will sfcand clipping well,: and
have a lovely afTpearahOe Hwhe'n neatly
C. torulosa and C. Lambertiana and roacro-
carpawiU make .a beautiful evergreen wjptll
if planted, say, 4f|» apart, and ell-trimmed
now. Dahlias, if iu moist ground, should
be dug up and stored in sand. Siugs and
snails will now be troublesome, Their
? tele kitchen garden.
A good supply of toe hardy vegetables
growth of many will he very slow they
when genial weather, arrives. Carrots and
Apart in ground which has been deeply
sfirred,.: and well enriched if necessary,
prepared earth. This applies more espe
twSfposes to French beans, to which they
next, A good supply of young cabbage,
cauliflower, and other plants should be In
readiness to plant out when required To
thriv« todidly in
hharly pdrts. No garden should be
&«f£r&gas
roofs Milrttiqw be planted, toe fori# lf(;
i#i |a#hPirecl6»dlieEtlit .t"'
hiS-tklt distance. Hot/b&te ahdramj
THE ORCHARD AND FRUIT GARDEN,
finished their growth for this Beason
ba finished before the aap fiegins to rise, or,
sayi" before the first blossoms appear!
Grafting Of fruit and other trees should
trees are grafted early thereis more chance
of faUure from ever#d causes, viz., grafts
rqugh we&taerjbr mar dry out and fail ta
ug)ite with theKtock, but.if grafting is per
.unite with the stock and start , into growth,
'made, if any fruit is stb be gathered next
the plants. This will ensure "heavy props
for two Or three years, when the beds should
gooseberries should be planted withoutdelay
them to ripen. In making a selection ot
Jnne. The same remark applies to other
.a common thing, with most perrons to
fruit and arrive at maturity. " This idea
would be a very correct one if toey could be
instance. :
Garden Calendar.
CONSERVATORY AND POT PLANTS.
looked over, and re-potted if they require
it, using rich, fibrous loam mixed with
plenty of sand. For good show plants,
breadth is far more desirable than height;
the desired shape. Epiphyllums, in bloom,
wetting the flowers, as they are easily
small buttonhole bouquets. Hyacinths,
Cyclamens, said Chinese Primulas are now
showing bloom; but the latter are far below
the standard — caused, no doubt, by a bad
selection of seed saved from inferior sorts.
largest and best flowers, which should be
carefully hybridised with others of a
plenty of light is required during the winter
without any danger. This is a good time
for potting Ferns and making hanging
baskets. Window boxes may also be made,
using hardy plants which are raised from
Double Dwarf Stocks, Virginian Stock,
Swan River Daisy (blue and white), Tom
THE FLOWER GARDEN.
edgings; in fact, every alteration and im-
and slowest-growing month among plants.
coming spring. This is the best time for
vigorous rooting plants, plenty of manure
may be mixed with the soil for growing
pruned, and cuttings of same inserted;
will be necessary. The moderate-grow-
ing sorts should be pruned to about
the climbing or pillar varieties should be left
spring, to the detriment of the flowers. The
planting of Pines, Auracarias, and other
Coniferous trees and shrubs, also the
clipping into shape of such as are suitable,
may now be carried out. Most of the
Cypress faniily will stand clipping well, and
have a lovely appearance, when neatly
C. torulosa and C. Lambertiana and macro-
carpa will make a beautiful evergreen wall
if planted, say, 4ft. apart, and well-trimmed
now. Dahlias, if in moist ground, should
be dug up and stored in sand. Slugs and
snails will now be troublesome. Their
THE KITCHEN GARDEN.
A good supply of the hardy vegetables
growth of many will be very slow they
when genial weather arrives. Carrots and
apart in ground which has been deeply
stirred, and well enriched if necessary,
prepared earth. This applies more espe-
purposes to French beans, to which they
next. A good supply of young cabbage,
cauliflower, and other plants should be in
readiness to plant out when required. To
not be forgotten, as both thrive splendidly in
nearly all parts. No garden should be
without them. Rhubarb and asparagus
roots must now be planted, the former 3ft.
apart in each direction, and the latter, say
half that distance. Hot beds and frames
THE ORCHARD AND FRUIT GARDEN.
finished their growth for this season,
be finished before the sap begins to rise, or,
say, before the first blossoms appear.
Grafting of fruit and other trees should
trees are grafted early there is more chance
of failure from several causes, viz., grafts
rough weather, or may dry out and fail to
unite with the stock, but if grafting is per-
unite with the stock and start into growth.
made, if any fruit is to be gathered next
the plants. This will ensure heavy crops
for two or three years, when the beds should
gooseberries should be planted without delay
them to ripen. In making a selection of
June. The same remark applies to other
a common thing, with most persons to
fruit and arrive at maturity. This idea
would be a very correct one if they could be
instance.
ARTIFICIAL RAINMAKING. The American Experiments. (Article), South Australian Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1895), Saturday 5 December 1891 [Issue No.1,737] page 6 2017-06-26 10:34 operators wculd attach large charges of ex- ',
piGaves primed with electric caps. At the j
proper -moment by pressing down 'the handie
of tlio dynamo half a do::ea large bundles oil
dynamite or racksrock would be exploded.
These explosions were plainly heard at Mid
land, a distance of S3 miles to windward. The
series oi explosion?, which were lx-2'.ui os tU-j
afternoon of the 17r.ii, were continued with re
morning, Lke the d-ay preceding, was perfectly
clear, and there was no indication oi anything
but the finest weather. Socn after noon, how
at a p.m. the experimenters wore 'driven from
their guns' by the answering charge fro:n tha
heaven?, and eiaie running in to shelter
drenched to the skin. The rain fell till S p.m.,
after whk-li your correspondent drove to Mid
land station, a distance of 23 ml]'?-:, over a road
£cc-ted under water, ivhi-Ji varied from 3 to
40 in. snoVpth.''
A KCIX-ESS.'!'' BOMilAIJDMENT.
'The £v.si experiment of ihis series was
on account of the prevailing gales the manipu
lation of the balloons was very slow and -iTrii-
vrss exploded, seven balloons being employed
for the purpose. The smaller baiiooas were
iired at an altitude of 1,000 it. Ijy siestas of
electrical cables connected isitfi batteri--s on
the ground, but; the concussion irom the exnio
sioii of iLe larger bailouts — 12 it. i:i di-ioi-jier
— is so enormous as to be considered dang^rou?
or at least injurious Jit thai; Oista^ie-*, ??=?) that
they wtre filed sit iiiuc-h greater Ltdoriits by
Kuans uf time fuses inserted in the
necks- The explosions were continued
late into the ni^iit, and «it 11.30 p.m.
t}:e weary experimenters lay do-.vn tG sleep, but
cnlv to he awakened at oaia. by the rush of
which critic from the west and soon broke over
a.m., ?Keying' the grass 'well for the tJiird tioie
in liidays. At o.S0 p. in. of the 25sh, the
barometer Jiad hid least: d the normal pressure
ar.d dry bulb hygrometer shoived tlie relative
humidity of the air to be only 16° — a most re
markable and unfavorable condition — and tic
do'.ibt that m leh J the credit for the late wtt
wt-athcr belongs to Uncle JSani's rainmakers, cr
have occurred. When they arrived s?t
leave it green and itourishujg.'
operators would attach large charges of ex-
plosives primed with electric caps. At the
proper moment by pressing down the handle
of the dynamo half a dozen large bundles of
dynamite or rackarock would be exploded.
These explosions were plainly heard at Mid-
land, a distance of 25 miles to windward. The
series of explosions, which were begun on the
afternoon of the 17th, were continued with re-
morning, like the day preceding, was perfectly
clear, and there was no indication of anything
but the finest weather. Socn after noon, how-
at 5 p.m. the experimenters were 'driven from
their guns' by the answering charge from the
heavens, and came running in to shelter
drenched to the skin. The rain fell till 8 p.m.,
after which your correspondent drove to Mid-
land station, a distance of 23 miles, over a road
flooded under water, which varied from 3 to
40 in depth.''
A SUCCESSFUL BOMBARDMENT.
"The final experiment of ihis series was
on account of the prevailing gales the manipu-
lation of the balloons was very slow and diffi-
was exploded, seven balloons being employed
for the purpose. The smaller balloons were
fired at an altitude of 1,000 ft. by means of
electrical cables connected with batteries on
the ground, but the concussion from the explo-
sion of the larger balloons - 12 ft. in diameter
— is so enormous as to be considered dangerous
or at least injurious at that distance, so that
they were fired at much greater heights by
means of time fuses inserted in the
necks. The explosions were continued
late into the night, and at 11.30 p.m.
the weary experimenters lay down to sleep, but
only to be awakened at 3 a.m. by the rush of
which came from the west and soon broke over
a.m., wetting the grass well for the third time
in 16 days. At 3.30 p.m. of the 25th, the
barometer had indicated the normal pressure
and dry bulb hygrometer showed the relative
humidity of the air to be only 16° — a most re-
markable and unfavorable condition — and the
doubt that much of the credit for the late wet
weather belongs to Uncle Sam's rainmakers, or
have occurred. When they arrived at
leave it green and flourishing.
ARTIFICIAL RAINMAKING. The American Experiments. (Article), South Australian Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1895), Saturday 5 December 1891 [Issue No.1,737] page 6 2017-06-26 10:27 though the information hitherto to hand regard
Department of Agriculture dispatched a rain
General Robert St. George Dyrenforth, 'an
eminently scientific and eamble man.''
selected for these tests is known as 'C''
on it are branded with the letter 'C' — a
tract of chapparal-eovered land covering
300,000 acres. During by far the greater por
tion of the year it is entirely free from' rains,
and the water for the cattle and horses is sup
scanty living. 'With almost no rain during the
summer, and no adequate means of irriga
for irrigation purposes. Such is the character'
Texas, and in view of this fact General Dyren
a single exception, 'and,' writes a special
date ''C:J Ranch, Midland, Texas, August
31), ' if the material with which to work had
country might have been drenched with raiu
for as long a period as could be desired.'
'; The party (continues this correspondent)
enough of the appa-ra-tns was in position for a
preliminary test. The gas generators for in
were not yet in running order, so tliat the
explosions were fired with rackaroek powder, a
ingredients, which are not explosive until com
bined, and so can be shipped by; express or
clouds began to gather and -form a little to the
south of' the ranch hsadquarbers and
soon broke with full force over tha field
and the rain gauge showed 2\ inches at the
ranch-house. .From this time until August 2G
the attempt to keep the weather in an un
which there was heavy firing to any consider
on the 17th and 18th days 'of August, when
boxes of rock powder, dynamite, aud
blsFting powder v.T?re stored. From tho dynamo
duplex wires ltd for several hundred feet- ia
though the information hitherto to hand regard-
Department of Agriculture dispatched a rain-
General Robert St. George Dyrenforth, "an
eminently scientific and ramble man,"
selected for these tests is known as "C" - A
on it are branded with the letter "C" — a
tract of chapparal-covered land covering
300,000 acres. During by far the greater por-
tion of the year it is entirely free from rains,
and the water for the cattle and horses is sup-
scanty living. With almost no rain during the
summer, and no adequate means of irriga-
for irrigation purposes. Such is the character
Texas, and in view of this fact General Dyren-
a single exception, "and," writes a special
date "C" Ranch, Midland, Texas, August
31), "if the material with which to work had
country might have been drenched with rain
for as long a period as could be desired."
"The party (continues this correspondent)
enough of the apparatus was in position for a
preliminary test. The gas generators for in-
were not yet in running order, so that the
explosions were fired with rackarock powder, a
ingredients, which are not explosive until com-
bined, and so can be shipped by express or
clouds began to gather and form a little to the
south of the ranch headquarters and
soon broke with full force over the field
and the rain gauge showed 2¼ inches at the
ranch-house. From this time until August 26
the attempt to keep the weather in an un-
artificial, for there did not a day pass on
which there was heavy firing to any consider-
on the 17th and 18th days of August, when
boxes of rock powder, dynamite, and
blasting powder were stored. From the dynamo
duplex wires led for several hundred feet in
The Philosopher's Stone. AN ENGLISH CHEMIST CLAIMS TO HAVE DISCOVERED THE SECRET OF PRODUCING DIAMONDS BY ARTIFICIAL MEANS—[?]ION SCIENTIFIC INDOR[?]MENTS OF HIS WORK. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Saturday 13 March 1880 [Issue No.4022] page 3 2017-06-26 10:22 The philosopher's Stone.
KS ENGLISH CUEMIB* CUAIU6 TO B»TE D1S
C^V£Bl;i- THIi BKCSXT Olf PRODUCING VIA.'
MoNDa BY AB'lFlfliL MEANS — BIU11 8C1EN
Tirje hNDOBtimsvTe ov Hit wobx.
LonJoi, Dec«ml-er 19, 1873.— Mr. James Mac
lsar, at toe St Etillox Cbemioal Worts, has in
formed the Glasgow PhiloBophlca.1 Society that,,
after cxpnimccta since 1866, he liu . aaoctitd is
obtaining crysUlllaod forma of carbon whltth
ProfoasorB Tjndall as 4 Smyth, and Mr. Mask e-
lvn.^ of the British Museum, do sot doubt, aa
diamonds. lulSiS, two fainousaxnarineots were
mude ceai'ly at the smine time by MM. Cagnlard
deLatourfindflo.naal,bothdi»ttafr«iBliedinFrcnoh
coiencs. -I. dcX&tourproatmtca hia rosultetoth*
Academy of Scionoo), October 10, 182S,aud tbo»»
of M. Gannal w*re prasentod Kerembor 2S iu 'he
same year. Cufiniard do Lateur sent to the aoa
deiny* 10 tubea contsiniziff s- number of light
brotm cryfitals, some of which were of consider
able JuncHsione. The} wor» brilliant, tr*n*p6rcnt,
and bardor tbaa qaarts. Submitted' io intense
beat In contact witli the air the crystal* ?xperi-
enjod not tbc tlightost change, a proof sufficient
diamond. Besides, notwithstanding thuir un
by (he latter,. 'gem. The academical SBVanB
concluded that they were merely sillcatss
or u.rtiiicia.1 precious stones. The exporimanta
of H. Gannal [rained more rvnown,. Specimens
of bis jiroduntioUB wer* «est to M. Cham
pignoy, diro.'tor of tha workrooms of tha jewel
ler Petitot, who examined th«m with we: and,
having mtiofied himjeM that thoy soraUhiid tteel
and could be soratcned by no metal, that they
ware of pure waterajiddUplayedabriUieut lustre,
coucluded that these little bod.lc9 wan) nothing
clue but diamonds. Tiiis declaration, oomiag
From a uiun Tr«U reraed in th* special trade,
created a panic in tbe diamond business; for it is
nail known that any sudden rise or fall i& the,
ralue of precious stones would t?e nttendad by
:0Hsequunue9 only second inimportauoa to sudden.
variations in the value of gold. Duri'ag tho
P rench Hevolution the erica of diaiiionds waa
doubled in n. few niGn.f.hs- The inimtinso capital
wkicb in tbis form sow lioa dorsaant iu royal
treusmies or in private hands is Uttlo eubpected
by people ouUido the trade.
tisted nr riEK.
At tbe time of II. Ganflal'o experiments tho
nature of the diamond was stil 1 imperfectly under
stood. The first important fact about it -was
established as late as tbe middle of the I7tli cen
tury by Boyle, who showed that und«r tbe in
fluence of a great lieat Iho diamond disappeared.
In 1094. Cosuio III., Grand . Duke of Tuscany,
BubjccU'd a diamond at Florence to tbc intense
beat of the sun's rays by means of a concave)
mirror. The diamond first tplit, then emitted
a French lapidary »ftomed~ Maflhrd affirmed that
fire had no effect upon the diamond. He took, the
bowl of a twbacco pipe, placed three diamonds in
packed, ulesed tha msutti of the pipe with a covsr
of iron, and then shut up bhe whole in aorocible
fillod with ohaik and covered with a eiliceous
coating. Tha crucible was now subjected
to a temperature «u«h that Kt the end of foux.
hourE it was- completely soft. Then tbe ftr» waa
sluckened. As toon as tlio crucible cooled it waa
broken open, the pipe bowl vom found entire, with
the charcoal in it as black aa at first, and in tha
midst of this were the thcec diamonds, in svery
etone hod always disappeared when heated in tha
presence of air. It had undertone no modification
when removed from tbe action of tbe air bv means
of powdered charcoal and Kme. TJpon this Sir
Humphrey Davy in England, and LavoUier iu
France EDeedilv solved the, tirobli-m. 'Whatia
the diamond P ' asks Babinet. 'The Diott pre
carbon ¥ The naoat common material that is
known. Yet the diamond and carbon are iden
tical. Diamond is oryttaliiied carbon.' All
ihe publication in 1841 of the work o£ MM.
Dumas und Stoss.
WEALTH lij THB CBUC1I1LS.
li. Ganual'B crysUlsj having 1*en shown to be
wcrtblefis, the slumbers of jewel owners were
attain disturbed by the experiments of 11. Des
pretz. This patient and perseverinjj cliemlst
fixed a cylinder of pure carbon to tbe positive
the other pole; he then plunged both poks into
coating. Tho product of tbe experiment was
sent to M. Girndin to test upon hard stones. He
proved, in the. presence of M. DesprcU and
which bad enveloped the platimv wiru sufficed to
polish.Eeveral rubies. As it is known thsrt the
ruby, 111. Gaudin did not hestitate to consider the
Eubstunoe as the powder of the diamond. This
science. ' The qucstun still remains,' Ettys M.
Dienlafait, 'is there any reasonable probability
that the diamond will yet be produced artifi
cially f This qufelion .we must unswer ia lie
afirmative. When It is considered ho-v perfectly
substoncei tnuch more oowplex in compOEitio'n
and eoinplio:i.ted in CL-ysttJline eonstitutiou have
bt'jn artificially produced ; when it is considered,
too, what definite results wore furnished hy the
experiments of- M. Dcspretz — for in such a case
—there seems to bo no reason for Berions doubts
of the possibility of .the artificial reproductions of
from .which diamond merchaifts And owners of
diamonds will have much to suffer ; but iu this,
as in other ensos, the loss that will fall upon a
small section oftliocominunitywiUbenutwcig'hed
a thousand times .by the advantages, which arts
tnl industry in general will derive from the dis
covery,'
The Philosopher's Stone.
AN ENGLISH CHEMIST CLAIMS TO HAVE DIS-
COVERED THE SECRET TO PRODUCING DIA-
MONDS BY ARTIFICIAL MENAS - HIGH SCIEN-
TIFIC .............MENTS OF HIS WORK.
London, December 19, 1873.— Mr. James Mac-
lear, of the St Rollox Chemical Works, has in-
formed the Glasgow Philosophical Society that,
after experiments since 1.... he has succeeded in
otbaining crystallised forms of carbon which
Professors Tyndall and Smyth, and Mr. Maske-
lyne, of the British Museum, do not doubt, are
diamonts. In 1825 two famous experiments were
made nearly at the same time by MM. Cagnoard
de Latour and Gannal, both distinguished in French
science. M.de Latour presented his results to the
Academy of Science, October 19, 1825, and those
of M. Gannal were presented November 25 in the
same year. Cagniard de Lateur sent to the aca-
demy 10 tubes containing a number of light-
brown crystals, some of which were of consider-
able dimensions. They were brilliant, transparent,
and harder than quartz. Submitted to intense
heat in contact with the air the crystals experi-
enced but the slightest change, a proof sufficient
diamond. Besides, notwithstanding their un-
by the latter gem. The academical savant
concluded that they were merely silicates
or artificial precious stones. The experiments
of M. Gannal gained more renown. Specimens
of his productions were sent to M. Cham-
pignay, director of the workrooms of the jewel-
ler Peritot, who examined them with care; and,
having satisfied himself that they scratched steel
and could be scratched by no metal, that they
were of pure water and displayed a brilliant lustre
concluded that these little bodies were nothing
else but diamonds. Tiiis declaration, coming
from a man well versed in the special trade,
created a panic in the diamond business; for it is
well known that any sudden rise or fall in the
value of precious stones would be attended by
consequences only second in importance to sudden
variations in the value of gold. During the
French Revolution the price of diamonds was
doubled in a few months. The immense capital
which in this form now lies dormant in royal
treasuries or in private hands is little suspected
by people outside the trade.
TESTED BY FIRE.
At the time of M. Gannal's experiments the
nature of the diamond was still imperfectly under-
stood. The first important fact about it was
established as late as the middle of the 17th cen-
tury by Boyle, who showed that under the in-
fluence of a great heat the diamond disappeared.
In 1094. Cosimo III., Grand Duke of Tuscany,
subjected a diamond at Florence to the intense
heat of the sun's rays by means of a concave
mirror. The diamond first split, then emitted
a French lapidary named Maillard affirmed that
fire had no effect upon the diamond. He took the
bowl of a tobacco pipe, placed three diamonds in-
packed, closed the mouth of the pipe with a cover
of iron, and then shut up the whole in a crucible
filled with chalk and covered with a siliceous
coating. The crucible was now subjected
to a temperature such that at the end of four
hours it was completely soft. Then the fire was
slackened. As toon as the crucible cooled it was
broken open, the pipe bowl was found entire, with
the charcoal in it as black as at first, and in the
midst of this were the three diamonds, in every
stone had always disappeared when heated in the
presence of air. It had undergone no modification
when removed from the action of the air by means
of powdered charcoal and lime. Upon this Sir
Humphrey Davy in England, and Lavolaier in
France speedily solved the problem. "What is
the diamond?" asks Babinet. "The most pre-
carbon? The most common material that is
known. Yet the diamond and carbon are iden-
tical. Diamond is cystallised carbon." All
the publication in 1841 of the work of MM.
Dumas and Stoss.
WEALTH IN THE CRUCIBLE.
M. Gannal's crystals having been shown to be
worthless, the slumbers of jewel owners were
again disturbed by the experiments of M. Des-
pretz. This patient and persevering chemist
fixed a cylinder of pure carbon to the positive
the other pole; he then plunged both poles into
coating. The product of the experiment was
sent to M. Gandin to test upon hard stones. He
proved, in the presence of M. Despretz and
which had enveloped the platina wire sufficed to
polish several rubies. As it is known that the
ruby, M. Gaudin did not hestitate to consider the
substance as the powder of the diamond. This
science. "The question still remains," says M.
Dienlafait, "is there any reasonable probability
that the diamond will yet be produced artifi-
cially? This question we must answer in the
afirmative. When it is considered how perfectly
substances much more complex in composition
and complicated in crystalline constitution have
been artificially produced; when it is considered,
too, what definite results were furnished hy the
experiments of M. Despretz — for in such a case
— there seems to be no reason for serious doubts
of the possibility of the artificial reproductions of
from which diamond merchaifts and owners of
diamonds will have much to suffer; but in this,
as in other cases, the loss that will fall upon a
small section of the community will be outweighed
a thousand times by the advantages, which arts
and industry in general will derive from the dis-
covery."
SEVEN PILLARS OF WISDOM WOMAN DIED FOR LAWRENCE (Article), The Longreach Leader (Qld. : 1923 - 1954), Saturday 21 May 1938 [Issue No.861] page 4 2017-06-25 17:27 SEVEN PILLARS OF WISDOM ?
discoveries in Palestine reveal - that
th« S.A. of the dedication was Sara
waa head of the British Secret Ser-
vio» in Palestine. Lawrence, dis-
, ' it is believed, Sara first met Law-
outside Jerusalem which WEB his
I Zichrow. They tortured her for
j three days, but failed to make her
I name the mysterious Englishman
1 who, disguised as. an Arab sheik,
harassed the Turkey At last she
went to a. room where-ja revolver had
Sara, lt is believed, left a note for
j Lawrence. It never reached him.
SEVEN PILLARS OF WISDOM
discoveries in Palestine reveal that
the S.A. of the dedication was Sara
was head of the British Secret Ser-
vice in Palestine. Lawrence, dis-
it is believed, Sara first met Law-
outside Jerusalem which was his
Eichrow. They tortured her for
three days, but failed to make her
name the mysterious Englishman
who, disguised as an Arab sheik,
harassed the Turks. At last she
went to a room where a revolver had
Sara, it is believed, left a note for
Lawrence. It never reached him.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.