Information about Trove user: Porepunkah51

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,511,057
2 NeilHamilton 3,078,727
3 noelwoodhouse 2,976,878
4 annmanley 2,243,457
5 John.F.Hall 2,205,673
...
5955 aapike1 2,071
5956 kpeken 2,071
5957 LNewm 2,071
5958 Porepunkah51 2,071
5959 annabelle 2,070
5960 peejay52 2,070

2,071 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 679
May 2017 62
April 2017 285
March 2017 502
February 2017 211
January 2017 102
December 2016 165
April 2016 65

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,511,026
2 NeilHamilton 3,078,727
3 noelwoodhouse 2,976,878
4 annmanley 2,243,387
5 John.F.Hall 2,205,668
...
6075 ccol2621 2,002
6076 Dereksw 2,001
6077 b-positive 2,000
6078 Porepunkah51 2,000
6079 lanternarius 1,999
6080 lynnotluf 1,998

2,000 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 608
May 2017 62
April 2017 285
March 2017 502
February 2017 211
January 2017 102
December 2016 165
April 2016 65

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 98,364
2 mickbrook 85,060
3 murds5 54,198
4 PhilThomas 28,193
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
219 MollyOscar 73
220 Glennie5 72
221 marlened 72
222 Porepunkah51 71
223 annmanley 70
224 ontymay 69

71 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

June 2017 71


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE MONITOR. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 20, 1828. (Article), The Sydney Monitor (NSW : 1828 - 1838), Saturday 20 December 1828 [Issue No.180] page 3 2017-06-20 22:58 (toatinucd fromU page 143J.)
* for admitting in.his evidence, that he hAad stated cer
tain falsehoods-of .his General, and that they were all
I s' IJ dwelling upon the evidence of private Budd,
(says Captain R.) I shall briey notice the fact,
that the whole of the evideAre of the 'Veterans who
lieve Aiun on his oath; and yet, gentlemen, this is
msinent charicter to support this charge of the prosecu
" It Is also in evidence, that this individual -ceom
panied the Court of Enguiry from Sydney to Newcas
tie, where, on his landiag, he repeatedly declared to the
oitlt his Excellency Lieutenaut General Darling, and
so'me of his Excellency's Stafl at Governmenat-house,
but that he wasr also promised by his Excellency his
red upon him, or any other soldier of my compa
grve evidence against me ; and further using his,
Budd'swords, that he 'bhad done for me" as he termed
it, and. that, " the General promised he would be
O:.: reading a book lately purchnsed by us, entitled
".The general regulations and orders for the Army,"
number l17, page 1416,) we have been surprised not
* only at the elegant perspicuity of the style, but also
e*n repeatedly to be a w tness against others, but never
larought to a Court-martial himself.
- AoAIN, on the same score of discipline. A medi
eal board refuses one sickly Major to go home ; but
under an trrest; while another officer, who being
Court-martial is gone home, of which he is the sub
ject. Again. Lots of officers on full pay, particu
get nrone- Other lots were allowed to remuain in the
Again.. A'number of privates in the Buffs, healthy
and to remain in the Colony, after putting the Go
vernment to the expense of bringifbg them out to the
.Colony.
TIIERE seems to us to be a deal of liability in the
- instance, how did it happen we saw Captain Duma
resq first on full 'pay, then on half pay, and now again
C'Tna followin; officers have either got permission
to go home, or to remain in the Colonr, all of them
i'h hav~rg obtained farms in extent four miles round.
To wilt. Lieztenar.t-Colonel Dumaresq--Veterans ;
J. P. Hunter'a liver.
continued from page 143J sic )
for admitting in his evidence, that he had stated cer
tain falsehoods of his General, and that they were all
In dwelling upon the evidence of private Budd,
(says Captain R.) I shall briefly notice the fact,
that the whole of the evidence of the Veterans who
believe him on his oath; and yet, gentlemen, this is
minent character to support this charge of the prosecu-
" It Is also in evidence, that this individual accom-
panied the Court of Enquiry from Sydney to Newcastle
, where, on his leading, he repeatedly declared to the
with his Excellency Lieutenant General Darling, and
some of his Excellency's Staff at Government-house,
but that he was also promised by his Excellency his
give evidence against me; and further using his,
Budd's words, that he had done for me" as he termed
it, and that, " the General promised he would be
On reading a book lately purchased by us, entitled
"The general regulations and orders for the Army,"
number 17, page 1416,) we have been surprised not
only at the elegant perspicuity of the style, but also
on repeatedly to be a witness against others, but never
brought to a Court-martial himself.
AGAIN, on the same score of discipline. A medical
l board refuses one sickly Major to go home ; but
under arrest; while another officer, who being
Court-martial is gone home, of which he is the sub-
ject. Again. lots of officers on full pay, particu-
get none- Other lots were allowed to remain in the
Again, A number of privates in the Buffs, healthy
and to remain in the Colony, after putting the Go-
vernment to the expense of bringing them out to the
Colony.
THERE seems to us to be a deal of liability in the
instance, how did it happen we saw Captain Duma
resq first on full pay, then on half pay, and now again
THE following officers have either got permission
to go home, or to remain in the Colony, all of them
us having obtained farms in extent four miles round.
To wlt. Lieutenant-Colonel Dumaresq--Veterans ;
J. P. Hunter's River.
THE MONITOR. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 20, 1828. (Article), The Sydney Monitor (NSW : 1828 - 1838), Saturday 20 December 1828 [Issue No.180] page 3 2017-06-20 22:43 Tua following we extract from the defence of .
Captain- Robison, [as [published in 'he, Aulstraliap
Journal of the 19th September last, and ~e canmot
conceive (as we before suggested) how the Court -
(sheing it had the power) could permit. Budd to de-.,
.sart its precincts, wsthout trying hiun.the anad .therq
(For (opteiruation ee Irt ,rage)
I'i .
The following we extract from the defense of .
Captain Robison, [as [published in 'he, Australian
Journal of the 19th September last, and we cannot
conceive (as we before suggested) how the Court
(seeing it had the power) could permit. Budd to de-
port its precincts, without trying him then and there
(For continuation see last page)
I
THE MONITOR. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 20, 1828. (Article), The Sydney Monitor (NSW : 1828 - 1838), Saturday 20 December 1828 [Issue No.180] page 3 2017-06-20 22:40 It A Court 3martial, or Military Coqrt of EnIufry,
consisting of Captain Jackson of the 57th Regt., on
olicer of the 63d. whose name ue just nww hapenm
not to hnow, and Lieutenans Robertson of the M?untcd
ePolice, has been ordered to aseemble at Newcastle or a
private belongintg to the N'eu, South Wales Peterans,
on certain charges of private Bludd, of the same co'm
pony. This iludd distinguished himself by his ewt
dence on the late Court JlIartial at the Military
Ilarracht, in a way to render him the objeqrt of an
/him appear not to have been entertained; whilst thoae
made by lBudd, who has managed to gain for himseff
the/ Ill-will of his comrades Ie the sain comnpany, are
to be made the sabjectl of a Court-martial ; which
economicall5 conducted as it may be, must, notwith?atan4. •
ing, be e.spensive. This require* eeplanatioa. 7. '
accused party has berel a discharged pensioner, witA a?
ball in his body, from the arraty br many years. (dlu
We are quite surprised to see this acecount. The
months ago to disband the Veterans. It seems to uq
a great responsibility which his Excellency take supon'
him, in continuing to hurthen the British .Reveno ,
by continuing a most expensive corps, paid by she,
Colony, when Ilis Majesty Jhasordered its disbandment ?
As to private Budd, the accusations of a soldier who carq
presume to defame his General, by ahlleging ha sat
down with hini for four hours in a familiar way, and
ponfident go British General Officer, much less the
Governor of a Colony, would ever dream of,is ou-."
worthy of notico. In lieu of being called upon once
A Court Martial, or Military Coort of Enquiry,
consisting of Captain Jackson of the 57th Regt., an
officer of the 63d. whose name we just now happen
not to know, and Lieutenant Robertson of the Mounted
Police, has been ordered to aseemble at Newcastle on a
private belonging to the New, South Wales Veterans,
on certain charges of private Budd, of the same com-
pany. This Budd distinguished himself by his evi-
dence on the late Court Martial at the Military
Barracks, in a way to render him the object of an
him appear not to have been entertained; whilst those
made by Budd, who has managed to gain for himself
the Ill-will of his comrades In the same company, are
to be made the subject of a Court-martial ; which
economically conducted as it may be, must, notwithstand
ing, be expensive. This requires explanation. The
accused party has been a discharged pensioner, with a
ball in his body, from the army for many years. (Aus
We are quite surprised to see this account. The
months ago to disband the Veterans. It seems to us
a great responsibility which his Excellency takes upon
him, in continuing to burthen the British .Revenue,
by continuing a most expensive corps, paid by he,
Colony, when His Majesty has ordered its disbandment ?
As to private Budd, the accusations of a soldier who can
presume to defame his General, by alleging he sat
down with him for four hours in a familiar way, and
confident no British General Officer, much less the
Governor of a Colony, would ever dream of, is un
worthy of notice. In lieu of being called upon once
THE MONITOR. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 20, 1828. (Article), The Sydney Monitor (NSW : 1828 - 1838), Saturday 20 December 1828 [Issue No.180] page 3 2017-06-20 22:21 Slapse of en tone I After twenty long
o, f ofguilty remorse, or sincere penitence
?e?ai: .. British subjects been. called upon by,
men, who had been too mnuch the victims of their
powpr.
Wn feel perfectly convinced, that in depart
ing fiom the law, amd inflicting illegal punish
hislova of military discipline, to gratify the love ofr
which consists in `the pleasure of seeing man o
.beast writhing under bodily torture, or groaning
under nental anguish, is a very rare appetite. Even
to view the destruction of men and things wvith
pleaSure, is a different propensity to cruelty. Very
great. warriors are generally lovers of acts of
the absiract ?P The law nevertheless adjudged
discipline, he. himself violated the first rules of
discipline. The same articles -of war which de.
scrioed the offence of the soldier whom he pun
punishment to which that soldier wasliable. While
law.m?rtlal, so far as to punish the said soldier's
same law hi?self, when he came to inflict [the
punishment. lHe.made his own law thereupon.
justice. HLe who professed a lore of justice, and
But when he presumed touse a severer instrument,
he therebychose, with moalus animus, to run the risk
of the cor.sequences. And history, for the warning
"wful consequences to both parties.
SYaT Governor %) all had no legal advisers about
Fle ttLrefore might plead ignorance, and the want
andi it held, that the life of a soldier who might
not have diedif the punishment had been no hea
vie:r than the law prescribed, had been illegally,
an4 unnecessarily and wantonly placed in jeopardy.
to his widowed rcwe, and to hisl orphan children,
as the life of a mighty monardch i to his family.
on the poor soldier'slife. And the equality of man
in this reepect, (thanks to those cberiptures which
be equal to the life of .Majesty itself.
Wanr should General Darling, with the Aitor
ia his Cunc;is, act so rashly as to alter the
Se loaded them w'i?h iron~ :unknown to Eoglih
'men? Why did he not order the regimental Sur
men was so sickly
Tuai friends of the Governor allege his Excel
'lency's regard. for the honour of the army,
rules of the service- as justifying his treatment
of Privates Sudds and Thotur-mon. Should then
not he, who is so 'fervent for disci n irond for
Sthe due excercise of the laws, be relip
ously tenacious himself to exhibit a pious obedi
ence to those laws ? Is it to be endured, that any
he himself depairts from -discipline and the law,
THE character of a man however, is not to be
gathered from one isolated fact- In judging of
A certain individual named Lockaye, alias Ed.
(under Dutch law, under thelnotorious Lord Char
It is well known, that ,Commissioner LBigge in
day of his landing, shewled themselves his
the time of MIr. Bigge, a prisoner for life,
no lapse of years atone. After twenty long
years of guilty remorse, or sincere penitence
have British subjects been called upon by,
men, who had been too much the victims of their
power.
We feel perfectly convinced, that in depart
ing from the law, amid inflicting illegal punish
his love of military discipline, to gratify the love of
which consists in `the pleasure of seeing man or
beast writhing under bodily torture, or groaning
under mental anguish, is a very rare appetite. Even
to view the destruction of men and things with
pleasure, is a different propensity to cruelty. Very
great warriors are generally lovers of acts of
the abstract? The law nevertheless adjudged
discipline, he, himself violated the first rules of
discipline. The same articles of war which de-
scribed the offence of the soldier whom he pun
punishment to which that soldier was liable. While
law, martial,, so far as to punish the said soldier's
same law himself, when he came to inflict the
punishment. He.made his own law thereupon.
justice. He who professed a love of justice, and
But when he presumed to use a severer instrument,
he therebychose, with malus animus, to run the risk
of the consequences. And history, for the warning
awful consequences to both parties.
Yet Governor Wall had no legal advisers about
He therefore might plead ignorance, and the want
and it held, that the life of a soldier who might
not have died if the punishment had been no hea
vier than the law prescribed, had been illegally,
and unnecessarily and wantonly placed in jeopardy.
to his widowed wifee, and to his orphan children,
as the life of a mighty monarch is to his family.
on the poor soldier's life. And the equality of man
in this respect, (thanks to those Scriptures which
be equal to the life of Majesty itself.
What should General Darling, with the Attoneyr
in his Councils, act so rashly as to alter the
he loaded them with iron~ :unknown to English-
men? Why did he not order the regimental Su-r
men was so sickly?
The friends of the Governor allege his Excel-
lency's regard. for the honour of the army,
rules of the service as justifying his treatment
of Privates Sudds and Thompson. Should then
not he, who is so fervent for discipline for
the due excerise of the laws, be religiosly
tenacious himself to exhibit a pious obedi-
ence to those laws? Is it to be endured, that any
he himself from discipline and the law,
The character of a man however, is not to be
gathered from one isolated fact. In judging of
A certain individual named Lockaye, alias Ed-
(under Dutch law, under the notorious Lord Char
It is well known, that ,Commissioner Bigge in
day of his landing, shewed themselves his
the time of Mr. Bigge, a prisoner for life,
THE MONITOR. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 20, 1828. (Article), The Sydney Monitor (NSW : 1828 - 1838), Saturday 20 December 1828 [Issue No.180] page 3 2017-06-18 20:35 The illegality of an act is in most cases proe
The illegality of an act is in most cases pro
Gen. Darling & Capt. Robison. A Letter addressed by R. Robison, Esquire, to the Members of the House of Commons; containing an outline of Evidence against Lieut.-General Darling (late Governor of New South Wales), in reply to a pamphlet privately circulated among them by that officer, since the sentence of four months' imprisonment passed on' Captain Robison, on the 15th June, 1835, for a Libel, imputing to him the manslaughter of private Joseph Sudds, of the 57th Regiment.—(Price One Shilling).—London Printed and Published by W. Lake, 50, Old Bailey, and may be had of all Booksellers. (Concluding from our last.) (Article), The Sydney Monitor (NSW : 1828 - 1838), Saturday 19 December 1835 [Issue No.856] page 4 2017-06-18 17:54 I may notice one circumstance apparent onl
cgo far to justify this suspicion. One of m?
compllaints against Genieral D.rling wah his
prffligate grants to his dependants. Obaserve
he way in n hich he answers this ; it is unne
cessary to quote the entireatsage. lie denies
the charge, " except' rdfI grants to Archdea
coun Scott and Mr. Ml'Leay as were -usually
lotment of ground. containing fifty acres oi
thereabouts, in El'z.abeth Bay, which was
,`ranted to, the said Alexander 1?l'L'ay, as one
of. the'oflicers of the civil government of the
said Colony, to whom thi deponent was au'h:
rized by Isis fRlIjestl's Secretary of State to
make gt antts for the purpose of erecting hou?sc
for their residences."
Fifty acres- of land are a pretty good al
owuance for building a Secretary'd rt sidence,
-especially-when-an extensive- sea frontage
inaks them worth- about a thdusand pounds
per acre! But to prevent all suIspicion that
'Iis grant was of any value, General M)arling
pl oces ds to swrre, #' that he was informed,
silo ment of land had been offered by his inm
med'a'e predecessor to Abchdeacon Scott, who
ha'l refused the, a me."
Nothhig would have-been more easy than to
have cororctedlhis information and belief, by
asking Art hdeacon Scott for itftrmation ; the
Archdeacon must have knowvn the fact,, whe
,.her the offer had been made and refused, and
as lie also made.an affidavit in aggravation of
my pIunishment, it was the most natural thinga
in h,. world to confirm this part of hii patron's
case; but no, lhe s ys not a word about it.
Archtdencon Scott, for reasons best known to
himsalf, carefiully refrains from swe.ring one
syl'a',le r,-specting this' same grant of land,
rests alone to obtain wh.,tever credit the)
deserve !' !!
'I'This jis the only point unconnected with the
case of Sudds, or my Court-:nartiis, on which
I shall presume to trouble you.
I now, .Gentlemnen, leave the. matter in your
hands, firmly coriitliing in your honour to do
justice to aH i..njtred man. I f el. that the
step which I amn taking is unusual,. and b)
those who do not ktiow "me,n may be deemed
imnpertinent.; but General Darling has driven
me into it by his- example.; in one respect,
however, -I shall not imltatet hlin tahis letter
shill be circulated amongst' you all, wviliout
- will do-m ore,--for-I will -putliah-it-to-t he-world
rand- entable-lthe-publie-o-judge-between us.---I
lrive no occasion to resort to underhand mn
cnamývring, and I .hte the prieniple. So far,
thelefore, 'I will not follow may prosecutor's
example.
If you feel.inclined to censure this address,
I enltreat you 'to pause till you consider my
position ; until my case led some kind cou
nexiaons to -e?nquire into it, _av.tsdestitutetu_
uniafortned judgment, and I therefore involved
it in suat -a lat) rillth of collateral circum.
statnces that I rendered it unintelligile to
strangers. I consrequence of this i.jutlici'iat
course, I found mnyself compelled in iry afli
Sdavits of maitigation, to ramble through a witle
hlien speaking on mny oathl slIonit-exlmrseme
to the clharge of t.lscihoodt. Ut thits i have
lienselvrs were confounded by the voluminous
posed to tme to assume as facts many things
,vhich the affidavits contradicted, and to found
upo)I thiese lr ise ausumption an argument to
encrease mny punish!nent.
They even went further -than this, for they
-expressly-assigned as-a-reason--for-g-reater-a -
Iverity, that I had untruly chprged the. pros,
* ster with preriding at the Executive Council
of _1829, when I. niver made such a charge a'
.-11, hut accusedillim correctly of presiding at
*he Council of 1826. in which I am borne out
ly the- minutes -of- its-pro-eedigs -laid upon
your ablle, and printedtl by your order.
If ?lien the learned Judges of thle land have
prvedl thliemselves perplexed by tihe intricacy
pireiieiced readers will be mnore so, unless I
I prepare them to understand it, bIy clearing it
I of all extraneous matter.
This has been my-otject lii this hurried sad.
dress-I have preparedt it witllhiu four-and
twenty hours to iansure its reaching your hands
in tithe to perusee it before tihe debate. I will
a not add to the emphatie entreaties with wvhiehl
I have solicitedl you to peruse it-uly hopes,
mI y f.rtutunes,_ and what I value more thlan all,
my reputation as" a gentlemaan antd a s-olier,
are now in your hands; hy your vote you may
risrore me to thtt honour whilsi I am co.,
scious Ibefore God that. I have not justly for
feited, or yCu mnay consign mse for ever to
hopeless misery and irretrieveable disgrace; iti
is uatdter these circumttanices that I ask not for
your pity, not fu'ryour indulgence, but simply
for justice it your handts; justice you cannot
Saduiaister unles.you clearly understand my
- case ; and uo eloquence, atd no skill can
rm ke the case ialteligitble by oral explanation.
a I wvill venture but on one word more; this is
no partj-qiestion ; in the h ape it now comies
- hlaefre you, it .is not even a inliitary questlon.
,I have either teen legally tried, or I have not;i
r if my trial was illegal my sentence was unjust,
Sandl Ihe .maiutes of the Court-martial will,
Vr Wi-t-produced, at once decide-the-legaliy-or
p illegzality of niy trial. .
* I have chlarged Genertal Darling-with-aggra.
e wated manslaughter, petjury, aandopprestion.
If my char.e is well founded, my preseti
i imprisonmentr Ia Cdeuserved. 1 rest my accu-
sation chiefly onu tihe evidenceyou have yoar
selves publiahed; a;ndl have supporTed. that
evidence by tihe conduct of. General Ditlhag
I iimtself. This again is no party question--it is
,one of solernu import, not only to mne but to
a the country. - 'l'he charge has lbtaited ton
I greatl notoriety to ire qua-haed wiah us inveesti
gation; ii is for you to say wlhetlher, either in
I.- justice tome oa to the higher interestls of our
I Calonev, the door shall be, closed to all far
.ther enquiry ; or whether, notawitffstaodrmng hi.
Smilitary rank,-hls elevated .flic'e,--oand his
j powerful ,connexionis, you will-coumpel inu
prosecumar, wida sihe mternnsens-esf-ev .-i.10ed
n justice to come forwuid atid-amqtiit hIri lfsl', to
I. the satisfaction of the ctuatray,..uf the heavy
a criees which ? have laid to his charge.
".. :I..- havethe. honour. to be,
" . , 'Gentleaiden,
. X?_;Wfiih-.greatxespect, -
Youut very.obiediea t seravnt,:
S .II9B tf Lt' R N7
I may notice one circumstance apparent on
go far to justify this suspicion. One of my
complaints against General Darling was his
profligate grants to his dependents. Observe
the way in which he answers this ; it is unne
cessary to quote the entire pasage. He denies
the charge, "except' such grants to Archdea
con Scott and Mr. McLeay as were usually
lotment of ground. containing fifty acres or
thereabouts, in Elizabeth Bay, which was
granted to, the said Alexander McLeay, as one
of the offlicers of the civil government of the
said Colony, to whom this deponent was atho-
rised by his Majesty's Secretary of State to
make grants for the purpose of erecting houses
for their residences." NP
Fifty acres- of land are a pretty good all
owance for building a Secretary's residence,
especially when an extensive sea frontage
makes them worth-about a thousand pounds
per acre! But to prevent all suspicion that
his grant was of any value, General Darling
proceeds to swear, " that he was informed,
allotment of land had been offered by his im-
mediate predecessor to Archdeacon Scott, who
had refused the same." NP
Nothing would have been more easy than to
have corrected his information and belief, by
asking Archdeacon Scott for iinforation; the
Archdeacon must have known the fact, whe-
ther the offer had been made and refused, and
as he also made an affidavit in aggravation of
my punishment, it was the most natural thing
in the world to confirm this part of hiispatron's
case; but no, he says not a word about it.
Arctdencon Scott, for reasons best known to
himself, carefully refrains from swering one
syliable respecting this same grant of land,
rests alone to obtain whattever credit they
deserve !!!
This is the only point unconnected with the
case of Sudds, or my Court-martial, on which
I shall presume to trouble you. NP
I now, Gentlemen, leave the. matter in your
hands, firmly confiding in your honour to do
justice to an injured man. I feel. that the
step which I am taking is unusual, and by
those who do not know me, may be deemed
impertinent.; but General Darling has driven
me into it by his- example; in one respect,
however, I shall not imitate him; this letter
shall be circulated amongst you all, without
will do more, for I will publish it to the world,
and enable the-public to judge between us. I
have no occasion to resort to underhand ma
noevering, and I hate the principal. So far
therefore, I will not follow may prosecutor's
example. NP
If you feel inclined to censure this address,
I entreat you to pause till you consider my
position; until my case led some kind con-
nextions to inquire into it, I was destitute of
uninformed judgment, and I therefore involved
it in such a labyrinth of collateral circum-
stances that I rendered it unintelligible to
strangers. In consequence of this injudicious
course, I found myself compelled in my affi
davits of mitigation, to ramble through a wide
when speaking on my oath, should expose me
to the charge of falsehood. Of this I have
lthnselvrs were confounded by the voluminous
posed to me to assume as facts many things
which the affidavits contradicted, and to found
upon these false asumptions an argument to
increase my punishment. NP
They even went further than this, for they
expressly assigned as a reason for greater XXasverity
, that I had untruly charged the.prosecutor
with presiding at the Executive Council
of 1829, when I never made such a charge at
all but accused him correctly of presiding at
the Council of 1826. in which I am borne out
by the minutes of its proceedings laid upon
your table, and printed by your order. NP
If whien the learned Judges of thls land have
proved themselves perplexed by the intricacy
perienced readers will be more so, unless I
prepare them to understand it, by clearing it
of all extraneous matter.
This has been my object in this hurried ad
dress - I have prepared it within four-and
twenty hours to insure its reaching your hands
in time to peruse it before the debate. I will
not add to the emphatic entreaties with which
I have solicited you to peruse it -my hopes,
my forutunes, and what I value more than all,
my reputation as" a gentleman and a soldier,
are now in your hands; by your vote you may
restore me to this honour which I am con-
scious before God that. I have not justly for-
feited, or you may consign me for ever to
hopeless misery and irretrieveable disgrace; it
is under these circumsances that I ask not for
your pity, not for your indulgence, but simply
for justice it your hands; justice you cannot
administer unless .you clearly understand my
case ; and no eloquence, and no skill can
make the case intelligible by oral explanation. NP
I will venture but on one word more; this is
no party question; in the hope it now comes
before you, it.is not even a miylitar question.
I have either been legally tried, or I have not;
if my trial was illegal my sentence was unjust,
and the minutes of the Court-martial will,
when procured, at once decide the legality or
illegality of my trial. NP.
I have charged General Darling with aggra-
vated manslaughter, perjury, and oppression. NP
If my chance is well founded, my present
imprisonment is undeserved. I rest my accu-
sation chiefly on the evidence you have your
selves published; and have supported that
evidence by the conduct of. General Darling
himself. This again is no pariy question--it is
,one of solemn import, not only to me but to
the country. The charge has obtained too
great notoriety to be quashed with out investi-
gation; it is for you to say whether, either in
justice to me or to the higher interests of our
Colonies, the door shall be closed to all fur-
ther inquiry; or whether, notwihstanding his
military rank,--his elevated office,---and his
powerful connexions, you will compel my
prosecutor, with the sternness of even-handed
justice to come forward and acquit himself to
the satisfaction of the country, of the heavy
a crimes which I have laid to his charge.
I have the. honour. to be,
Gentlemen,
With great respect
Your very obedient servant,:
ROBERT ROBISON
Gen. Darling & Capt. Robison. A Letter addressed by R. Robison, Esquire, to the Members of the House of Commons; containing an outline of Evidence against Lieut.-General Darling (late Governor of New South Wales), in reply to a pamphlet privately circulated among them by that officer, since the sentence of four months' imprisonment passed on' Captain Robison, on the 15th June, 1835, for a Libel, imputing to him the manslaughter of private Joseph Sudds, of the 57th Regiment.—(Price One Shilling).—London Printed and Published by W. Lake, 50, Old Bailey, and may be had of all Booksellers. (Concluding from our last.) (Article), The Sydney Monitor (NSW : 1828 - 1838), Saturday 19 December 1835 [Issue No.856] page 4 2017-06-18 14:25 them by that officer, siince the sentence of four
on the 15th June, 1835, for a Libel, impting to
Old Bailey, and may be had of all Booksellers.
This is the simple statement of the wlhole
Slints by me ; it is not contriadicted lyi General
Darline; though he had-five nionhli' notice of
my U allid,vit :--lie rejected that balidavit upon
technical groutnd., feeling it to be unanlswera
ble. Anld here 1 n am willing to rest my excul
patioin, merely asking tbhe sinlple question, whyi
G(ieneral l).~'rling did not "put Sturm upon his
.trial for writing this suspicious letter?
sively acquitted myself of. those charges which
l' e.r upon my c hatracter as a man of honour, I
have nit yet exposed tih conduect f (enerral
I)arliig; respectinig iv Court 'laLtial, to the
SfullFextent which his zallidlvit enables ume to do.
In iny ilildavii, in miitigation, I expressbly
chargedl General .DL) rlinr with Ilainig seiit
*lhome minutes in ai ' garbled and untrue state;
that they are. gaibltld and untrue is obvious
i4pon inspectiin of them..: the Court'. mset
daily from the I2th to die I 'ih of July, liut iti
m.ieetings are not. recorded ! !!-the evidence
and Cross-exalminalions are .not attached tit
.eeclh charge to which they apply, but are all
}Iuddl.d _.togelhler" I)r. Lushinglon, and ilr.
Al aurit e O'CuinTeelllae e examined theii, aid
will coinfirt my statement.--lt ouilil, there
fore, have kleenalunsafe for General Darling to
have contradicted me in his afliduavhi ; so f..r
froi attempting to (etlquit himself of thal
wse ions th arge of falsifyillg these mninutes, he
prudently abstains front saying one word
about them I
words are as follorws,;
in the said defenant's said affidavit , nor ever
gave him any grant of land in the said Colouy
lTh:s ii anotlher instanice that ishows how
carefully .Lenieral Darlitg ihas sworn, unider
* the advice oif his special pleader.; on theTface
of his averment, it appears to bie a pointed
and dircet contlradiction, but his pamiphler,
iap,pily, enables mae to expose its full sey.
--lie. only-saewrsll-hlat.-he- hail no-communttice
tion wiltIh Budd ' concerning the Court-mar
tial." ThI'is would lie perfectly consistent wilth
?fi-?etlent communicatlons caoncerniing me, (it
aoncernaiiig the evideare lhi sholln'd give, or
conceerningr 'the grant which lie miglht expect-.
l.adl his olj'ect, therefore, baeen to give a comn
plete reply to iny ac. usa ion, instead of
dl.ning...otnly_an, iutertoturse " contcerning the
lrt.t?"i ' lie wioiuld lave extendedil is
dlisclaimer to " all coi?versatioins or cotnonmu
i;i:,.tionh whatever, direct or indirect, witlh
private Thomias Budd ;" tadil san ha accordingly,
are the exact twol ds uhic It lie uses in his pam
phlet at the bottom of p age 16, when hle is In.
lnnr unler the onli?i.,t of as oth bor feat
.*of ai indlictment for pel jury ! Why dlid he ino,
swear to what he his written, if what lie wro.r
is triue ? I .am entitled to iinfer that Jie enluivo
rated i-rthe-one-case to coav- y-a-false ilre-
carry ill t itpression farther.
. But, even on his own showing,_how grosuly
culpablIe taid suspicious is his coinduct i Blud
coinfessedt; on his cross-examinalion before the
Cour.nmartial, tliat liit li-rhii, iati lis-.citu!i
* riades, tilrltlgh untruly, tliat General I)arling
atteanmlteal to lrilehhliialy_a.ap-gr ant of latial.
'liThus he. atool before tie (Court a'self-con
victeal liar, gtli'ly of the-atrocious calutity ol
.charginig ilei Governor with ani attemlnpt to
suiorn his evidence. Yet to this self-colivicted
!iar, to this caanfessed calumnisa or, Gemneral
Da.rling, viwhh full notice of his guilt, adnuits.
haviag giveta tihe very reward thalt his peijury
.was to receive ! ! !
.le attlemnpls, it is true, to exienuate Ihl
act, Ity representing Bldtl tot hare reelived ii
-in colnnan wilh other sollierse; but asurelt
this aplilogy i--too-flilaytol-pas5 currenlt whit
anty imanil. After suchl a glaring accusation of
corruption oa?ainst the hithest atlthorily in tLher
Co Ilo? y, tailnd after a confession that the chlarge
was false, Budld ought to hlave iieen specialll
Sexcepted fromn every mark of publlic fatvour.
Thlere is but one way of recontriling the atl-.
n iiiceil facts a ith probtanihility, and that is, Ily
assumiarng that thie bribie was really p.omiaedl;
rithat Bndd denied it, lest he should forfeit his
. reward, anal that the reward was paid lest hle
shoullld betray the secret. l'Thls solution' ren
*liere the .matter plain, andti is the onily one
, that can reconcile General I)arlinig's cantious
atlfiivit, with hiis very iacautlioue pamllllet.
every word that l have said."'
contradictinns. Ithis not because.l do not no
- teice them, that Ih.ir nol-exilstence m .ay t
Anferre4.rtltut I ref'rain, because I have already
esal more thian enough to prov?i dhat my pro.
secutor is utterly unworthy of credii, ven
.unqder circuaistancees mnost favoraile for him.
STf lie Is unworthy_ofcredie, now thlat helhas
had his opportunity of replyiig in" ihe way
selected by hhtselt, it fullvows, as a necessary
corolla'y, tliat --le remaiils saulject-to ill-tlhe
hIeay, tlltplltations..Ithaat .I have.inad .of maii-.
slauglhtlri perjury,' and lppression.
show of answering in detail the various chargue
which ~i re-published on the authority of Mr
Hal.; nearly two-:hirds of his voluminous af-l
dlavit refer to to is part bf the libel. This JWas at
onnce convenientand safe; convenient, because
it makes a broaddlisplay of innocence ; and
safe, beeause the facts being, for the mostpart;
avowedly iut of my own-knowledge, I cannot
contradict them. :if,however, you are con.
vineed that he Ihas tailed toaqt- umsetiff'tl
crinesthat I lmve'charged'ipon?hit',:lc is noi
unreasonable to infer' thit the imputations
mnadle by 'others i.re equally -well-fotnded.
on the 15th June, 1835, for a Libel, imputing to
London. Printed and Published by W. Locke, 30
Old Bailey, and may be had of all Booksellers. -----------
This is the simple statement of the whole
points by me ; it is not contradicted by General
Darling; though he had five months' notice of
my affidavit :--He rejected that affadivit upon
technical grounds, feeling it to be unanswera-
ble. And here I am willing to rest my excul
pation, merely asking the simple question, why
General Darling did not put Sturt upon his
trial for writing this suspicious letter? NP
sively acquitted myself of those charges which
bear upon my character as a man of honour, I
haveyett yet exposed the conduct of General
Darling; respecting my Court Martiall, to the
full extent which his affidivit enables me to do. NP
In my affidivit, in mitigation, I expressly
charged General Darling with having sent
home minutes in a garbled and untrue state;
that they are garbled and untrue is obvious
upon inspecting of the: the Court met
daily from the I2th to the 16th of July, but its
and Cross-examinalions are not attached to
each charge to which they apply, but are all
huddled together: Dr. Lushintlon, and Mr.
Maurice O'Connell have examined them, and
will confirm my statement.--lt would, there
fore, have been unsafe for General Darling to
have contradicted me in his affidivit; so far
from attempting to (acquit himself of the
serious charge of falsifying these minutes, he
prudently abstains fronm saying one word
about them! NP
words are as follows,; INDENT

gave him any grant of land in the said Colony
pany received on obtaining their discharge." NP
This is another instance that shows how
carefully General Darling has sworn, under
the advice of his special pleader.; on the face
of his averment, it appears to be a pointed
and direct contradiction, but his pamphlet,
happily, enables me to expose its fallacy. NP
He only that he had no-communication
with Budd ' concerning the Court-mar
tial." This would be perfectly consistent with
frequent communicatlons concerning me, or
concerning the evidence he should give, or
concerning 'the grant which he might expect.
Had his object, therefore, been to give a com-
plete reply to my accusation, instead of
denying only an intercourse concerning the
Court-martial," he would have extended his
disclaimer to " all conversatioins or comm
unications whatever, direct or indirect, with
private Thomas Budd;" and such accordingly,
are the exact words he uses in his pam
phlet at the bottom of page 16, when he is no
longer under the obligation of as oath or fear
of an indictment for pr jury! Why did he not
swear to what he his written, if what he wrote
is true? I am entitled to infer that he equivocated
in the one case to convey a false impression
carry that impression farther. NP
But, even on his own showing, how grossly
culpabIe and suspicious is his conduct! Budd
confessed on his cross-examination before the
Court-martial, that he had boasted to his
comrades, though untruly, that General Darling
attempted to bribe him by a grand of Land.
'Thus he.stool before the (Court a self-con
victed liar, guilty of the atrocious calumny of
charging the Governor with an attempt to
suborn his evidence. Yet to this self-conivicted
!iar, to this confessed calumniator or, General
Darling, with full notice of his guilt, admits.
having given the very reward thlt his perjury
was to receive ! ! ! NP
He attempts, it is true, to extenuate the
act, by representing Budd to hare received it
in common with other soldiers; but surely
this apology is too flimsy to pass current with
any man. After suchl a glaring accusation of
corruption against the highest authority in the
Colony, and after a confession that the charge
was false, Budd ought to have been specially
excepted from every mark of public favour. NP
There is but one way of reconciling the ad-
mitted facts with probability, and that is, by
assuming that the bribe was really promied;
that Budd denied it, lest he should forfeit his
reward, and that the reward was paid lest he
should betray the secret. This solution ren-
ders the matter plain, and is the only one
that can reconcile General Darling's cautious
affidivit, with his very incautious pamphlet. NP
every word that l have said."' NP
the bargain. NP
contradictions. It is not because l do not
notice them, that, their non-existence may be
inferred; but I ref'rain, because I have already
said more than enough to prove that my pro-
secutor is utterly unworthy of credit, enen
under circumstances most favourbile for him.
If he is unworthy of credit, now that he has
had his opportunity of replynig in the way
selected by himself, it follows, as a necessary
corollary, that he remains subject to all the
heavy, imputations that I have made of man.
slaughter, perjury and oppression NP
show of answering in detail the various charges
which I re-published on the authority of Mr
Hall; nearly two-thirds of his voluminous affi
davit refer to this part of the libel. This was at
once convenient and safe; convenient, because
it makes a broad dlsplay of innocence ; and
safe, because the facts being, for the most part;
avowedly out of my own knowledge, I cannot
contradict them. If,however, you are con-
vinced that he has tailed to acquit himself of the
crimes that I have charged upon him, it is not
unreasonable to infer that the imputations
made by others are equally well-founded. NP
Classified Advertising (Advertising), The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), Thursday 18 April 1833 [Issue No.2273] page 1 2017-06-18 12:40 Crain Timothy, No. °>i 325, Ldward (3), 20 Carman,
In the Supreme Côurf.
Sheriff's Office, S\ r>H6Y, 10th Afiut, 1835
Allic« Hartley.
hour of One o'clock, in George-street, opposite King'»
litle, Interest, and Ed tate of Defendant, in and t6 all that
Piece Or Parcel of Land, situate in (he County of Nortlium>
borland, containing }00 Acres, more or less, known as No.
3 Tarra on the W ollOrrtbi Brook, bounded on the North by
unlocnted Mountain, and South by Government Land, unless
Crain Timothy, No. °>i 325, Ldward (3), 20 Carman,
In the Supreme Court.
Sheriff's Office, Sydney, 10th April 1835
Allen v Hartley.
hour of One o'clock, in George-street, opposite King's
Title, Interest, and Estate of Defendant, in and to all that
Piece or Parcel of Land, situate in the County of Northum-
berland, containing 100 Acres, more or less, known as No.
2 Farm on the Wollombi Brook, bounded on the North by
unlocated Mountain, and South by Government Land, unless
SHIPPING NEWS. ARRIVED (Article), The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 - 1848), Tuesday 9 December 1828 [Issue No.360] page 3 2017-06-17 22:41 - AYCourt Martial, or Military Court of Enquiry,
.consisting- of Captain Jackson of the 57th Regt.,
an oflicerof the 63d, !whbse name we : just' mdw
.happen not to know, and Lieutenant, ftobertson
?or the Mounted Police, has been ordered to as
semble at Newcastle bn'a private belonging to the
New South Wales; Veterans, dn certain charges of
distinguished . himself 'by his evidence 011 the
made by Budd, who has managed to gain for Him
tial; which, economically conducted as it hVayi'
Quires explanation. The accused party has been a
discharged pensioner, with a bail in ,his body,
from the army for many years. -- '?'-?- '?...??
The man' has been doing garrison duty, a duty
in the regiment! here, who happen ' to be con
sidered un tit for? the climate of India to the New
with an additional number of bands for no man
ner of purpose, if- J*e e*£ «pt^doiog- tl»atuiutyv tn.
A Court Martial, or Military Court of Enquiry,
consisting of Captain Jackson of the 57th Regt.,
an office of the 63rd, whoae name we just now
happen not to know, and Lieutenant, Robertson
of the Mounted Police, has been ordered to as
semble at Newcastle on a private belonging to the
New South Wales Veterans, on certain charges of
distinguished himself'by his evidence on the
impeachment; but the charges against him
made by Budd, who has managed to gain for him-
tial; which, economically conducted as it may
quires explanation. The accused party has been a
discharged pensioner, with a ball in his body,
from the army for many years.
The man has been doing garrison duty, a duty
in the regiment here, who happen to be con
sidered ufit for the climate of India to the New
with an additional number of hands for no man-
ner of purpose, if we except doing that duty to
IN BANKRUPTCY. NOTICE TO CREDITORS. (Government Gazette Private Notices), Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 2001), Friday 17 June 1904 [Issue No.333] page 4865 2017-06-12 16:09 Office of the Kegistrar in Bankruptcy, Citizen's Chambers,
Wednesday, 6tli July, 1901, at 11 a.m., if not previously
Il,8fc4) a fifth account and fifth plan of distribution
Office of the Registrar in Bankruptcy, Citizen's Chambers,
Wednesday, 6th July, 1901, at 11 a.m., if not previously
Il884) a fifth account and fifth plan of distribution

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.