Information about Trove user: Peter33

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,411,344
2 NeilHamilton 3,045,684
3 noelwoodhouse 2,880,528
4 annmanley 2,236,225
5 John.F.Hall 2,111,263
...
3094 eands 5,742
3095 Heather1 5,741
3096 jessicaj 5,739
3097 Peter33 5,739
3098 bigreddog 5,738
3099 lanina2 5,738

5,739 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2017 730
March 2017 852
February 2017 388
January 2017 271
December 2016 332
October 2016 163
September 2016 48
January 2016 8
September 2015 82
August 2015 105
July 2015 83
February 2015 1,431
January 2015 186
December 2014 30
November 2014 168
October 2014 588
September 2014 26
August 2014 82
June 2014 26
March 2014 82
February 2014 28
January 2014 30

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,411,313
2 NeilHamilton 3,045,684
3 noelwoodhouse 2,880,528
4 annmanley 2,236,155
5 John.F.Hall 2,111,258
...
3095 bigreddog 5,738
3096 lanina2 5,738
3097 dencar56 5,737
3098 Peter33 5,736
3099 Login2 5,735
3100 enewmann 5,730

5,736 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2017 730
March 2017 852
February 2017 388
January 2017 271
December 2016 332
October 2016 163
September 2016 45
January 2016 8
September 2015 82
August 2015 105
July 2015 83
February 2015 1,431
January 2015 186
December 2014 30
November 2014 168
October 2014 588
September 2014 26
August 2014 82
June 2014 26
March 2014 82
February 2014 28
January 2014 30

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 mickbrook 76,111
2 jaybee67 67,785
3 murds5 54,198
4 PhilThomas 23,645
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
1298 nettiep 3
1299 NikkiNolan 3
1300 paul.stott 3
1301 Peter33 3
1302 rawlingsdc110 3
1303 raybrownii 3

3 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2016 3


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
Wedding Bells Booker—Richards (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Saturday 3 May 1947 [Issue No.26,792] page 10 2017-04-21 09:47 ond son of Mr and Mr8 J. J. Booker,
blossom-. The bodice had satin but-
she wag presented with a satin
ond son of Mr and Mrs J. J. Booker,
blossom. The bodice had satin but-
she was presented with a satin
A METHO. DRINKER. (Article), Casino and Kyogle Courier and North Coast Advertiser (NSW : 1904 - 1932), Saturday 19 March 1932 [Issue No.23] page 2 2017-04-07 17:09 In the Police Court yesterday, be
for drunkenness. On a charge of va
grancy bo was discharged. Constable
In the Police Court yesterday, be-
for drunkenness. On a charge of va--
grancy be was discharged. Constable
A METHO. DRINKER. (Article), Casino and Kyogle Courier and North Coast Advertiser (NSW : 1904 - 1932), Saturday 19 March 1932 [Issue No.23] page 2 2017-04-07 17:07 Fleming gave evid'ence that Silver was
very strongly of the spirit. Ho had a
bottle of methylated spirits in his pos
Fleming gave evidence that Silver was
very strongly of the spirit. He had a
bottle of methylated spirits in his pos-
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Evening News (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1924 - 1941), Saturday 2 December 1939 [Issue No.5501] page 4 2017-04-06 13:13 NOON, at 4 o'clock, for the North,
NOON, at 4 o'clock, for the North
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Evening News (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1924 - 1941), Saturday 2 December 1939 [Issue No.5501] page 4 2017-04-06 13:11 — -funeralnotice.
ffIHE Relatives and Friends of the
respectfully invited to attend her,
funeral, to move' from her late resit;
dance; Hunter Street, West Rock;
hampton, ; THIS (Saturday) AFTER
NOON, at .4 o'clock, for the North,
Rockhampton Cemetery. ..
' Undertakers.
FUNERAL NOTICE
THE Relatives and Friends of the
respectfully invited to attend her
funeral, to move from her late resi-
dence, Hunter Street, West Rock-
hampton, THIS (Saturday) AFTER
NOON, at 4 o'clock, for the North,
Rockhampton Cemetery.
Undertakers.
HORSE TRAINER'S DEATH. ROCKHAMPTON, May 5. (Article), The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Thursday 6 May 1920 [Issue No.19,436] page 7 2017-04-05 13:30 ' ROCKHAMPTON, May 5. I
was a Y shaped fracture on tho left side
gave evidence. The inquiry .was-ad-
journed. "*
ROCKHAMPTON, May 5.
was a Y shaped fracture on the left side
gave evidence. The inquiry was ad-
journed.
HORSE TRAINER'S DEATH. ROCKHAMPTON, May 1. (Article), The Telegraph (Brisbane, Qld. : 1872 - 1947), Saturday 1 May 1920 [Issue No.14,798] page 7 2017-04-05 13:07 ItOGKilA.MI'TGN, May 1.
ilte (lentil of Richard Murphy, a horse
trainer, 011 Sunday last, as a result of
'injuries alleged to' have hern received o»
Saturday night, niter lite race meeting,
formed the subject of a magnlorial -iu-
.jtiiry . All tlie. wilncfises agreed that
1 Murphy, nits under the influence of drink,
; but differed us to the details of the inci
dent. . The inquiry was adjourned.
ROCKHAMPTON, May 1.
The death of Richard Murphy, a horse
trainer, on Sunday last, as a result of
injuries alleged to have been received on
Saturday night, after the race meeting,
formed the subject of a magisterial in-
qiiry . All the witness agreed that
Murphy was under the influence of drink,
but differed as to the details of the inci-
dent. The inquiry was adjourned.
DEATH OF RICHARD MURPHY. MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Thursday 6 May 1920 [Issue No.17,27[?]] page 6 2017-04-05 11:31 Scninr sorg' .tni O'Connor: Ilmr d d hi
fall '- ^\ .i s ,i a heavy f:,.ll or »hint ?
\1 ii ress: \ medium full. Ile ¡av un .
the ^'I'-iind.
..senior-serireiint O'Connor: He ion- ha.
fell did you puah bini »
Pi ninr-sergeant O'Connor- Did y.u
st rike bim t
Witnrss: No. T did not u-e ai.y I irce
to iiush him at all
H.- 8cnior-scr^caut OVonn r: lie went '?
I to the deceased's assistance acd helped
to remore Mm to tts shop, where ha
fanned him and got some brandy for him]
partly regained consciousness, mumbled!
(Esdale'e) away from his eye. The doc-
tor examined tho deceased and thought
told thc doctor thal the deceased had '
fallen on the roadway and WES in »
drunken condition. Witness sent the dei
eeistd home in his ear and asked tba
doctor to see him in the morning if ha
thought it was necessary. The docta]
said "Very well. I wiH call in.and
see him to-morrow." That wu the last
time he saw the 'deceased alive. He) .
heaid on Sunday evening that the des j
ceased, hud died. The roadway at thtj
time was very hard and very uneven, là, \
pisces it was even; but there were a: j
it Was one of Che worst parts of Eastn
street and it was one of the first to ba ,
repaired after that. He did not notion, :
any blood about the deceased. The den
i weighed 12 st. >4
j Senior-sergeant O'Connor. Did he stag*
after yon put him out t
Witness: No. I knew that he was aol
h ated that if he staggered he would
i., oably fall, so I assisted him out.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Up to the'
time he fell on tim road he was unin-
jured !
Witness: Tes, as far aa I know. t
do not know whether be fell on th» foot-
path after 1 returned to the shop.
Mr. Boland: Ton heard Corcoran say,
that you struck him with the right hand*
ls that true t _
I Witness: No: It is m>t\trne.
I Mr. Boland: Did you strike him at all
that night T " -
i Witness: Ko. ?
I Mr. Boland: And yon did not spit oat,
him f
I Witness: No, I did not.
I Mr. Boland: Did you ever nae morel
force titan was necessary to remove hin)
from yow shop I
i Witness: Ko. '
1 Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Was there]
anybody in the shop when he came up f
Witness: Yes. Esdale, junr, was iii
at thc commencement. '
Senior-sergeaut O'Connor: During thal:
whole time he was in was someone there I
I Witnc.-s: Yes, the whole time.
1 Scnlor-sergeant O'Connor : Are yo*
satisfied that bc did not atrike the tram!
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: fife would not
have been far enough ont t
i Witness: No. :
I Senior-sergeant O'Connor: And in any,
case ihey are K'Vel with the surface J
Witness: Yes, they are. ,t
Thc Police Magistrate: I suppose you"
Witness : No. 1 never lose my.
j Witness: Ye«
I The Police .Magistrate : Although hs
cnllcI you all these names ?
I Uitness: I have tolerated him plenty,
'of times before.
I Tho Police Magistrate: I eupposc you
i saw Corcoran that night !
I Witness: No; 1 could r.ot say that I
! The Police Magistrate: You did noS
'SIT Corcoran there "
I Witness: Xo.
I Tlie Police Magistrate: Corcoran spoke
to von :
j Witness:.I did not I heard somebody
call out.: but 1 did not know whose voies;
it wa«. '.?
\ The Polier Magistrate: What did you
hear him call out t
Wain-*: " You won't get a medal for
that ' or something to that effect.
The Pup-o Magistrate: Immediately!
aficr Hie deeeasrd fell yr-u recognised
thin, h's condition vas bad?
sav to thc person when bc spoke to you
alum I getting a medal ?
Witness: I :Mid "Mind your own busi-
ness" I did not utidertand what I
should want a m-'ilal for.
Tho imiuirv \v:is adjourned until tort
o'elnel; on Sa ttl rda v forenoon nevi.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: How did he
fall ? Was it a heavy fall or what ?
witness: A medium fall. He lay on
the ground.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: before he
fell did you push him ?
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Did you
strike him ?
Witness: No. I did not use any force
to push him at all
By Senior-sergeant O'Connor: He went
to the deceased's assistance and helped
to remove him to the shop, where he
fanned him and got some brandy for him
partly regained consciousness, mumbled
(Esdale's) away from his eye. The doc-
tor examined the deceased and thought
told the doctor that the deceased had
fallen on the roadway and was in a
drunken condition. Witness sent the de-
ceased home in his car and asked the
doctor to see him in the morning if he
thought it was necessary. The doctor
said "Very well. I will call in and
see him to-morrow." That was the last
time he saw the deceased alive. He
heard on Sunday evening that the de-
ceased, had died. The roadway at the
time was very hard and very uneven, ln
places it was even; but there were a
it was one of the worst parts of East-
street and it was one of the first to be
repaired after that. He did not notice
any blood about the deceased. The de-
weighed 12 st.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor. Did he stag-
after you put him out ?
Witness: No. I knew that he was so
intoxicated that if he staggered he would
proably fall, so I assisted him out.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Up to the
time he fell on the road he was unin-
jured ?
Witness: Yes, as far as I know. I
do not know whether be fell on the foot-
path after I returned to the shop.
Mr. Boland: You heard Corcoran say,
that you struck him with the right hand
ls that true ?
Witness: No: It is not true.
Mr. Boland: Did you strike him at all
that night ?
Witness: No.
Mr. Boland: And you did not spit on
him ?
Witness: No, I did not.
Mr. Boland: Did you ever use more
force than was necessary to remove him
from you shop ?
Witness: No.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Was there
anybody in the shop when he came up ?
Witness: Yes. Esdale, junr, was in
at the commencement.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: During that
whole time he was in was someone there ?
Witness: Yes, the whole time.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Are you
satisfied that he did not strike the tram
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: He would not
have been far enough out ?
Witness: No.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: And in any
case they are level with the surface ?
Witness: Yes, they are.
The Police Magistrate: I suppose you
Witness : No. I never lose my
Witness: Yes.
The Police Magistrate : Although he
called you all these names ?
Witness: I have tolerated him plenty
of times before.
The Police Magistrate: I suppose you
saw Corcoran that night ?
Witness: No; I could not say that I
The Police Magistrate: You did not
see Corcoran there ?
Witness: No.
The Police Magistrate: Corcoran spoke
to you ?
Witness:.I did not. I heard somebody
call out; but I did not know whose voice
it was.
The Police Magistrate: What did you
hear him call out ?
Witness: " You won't get a medal for
that" or something to that effect.
The Police Magistrate: Immediately
after the deceased fell you recognised
that, his condition was bad?
say to the person when he spoke to you
about getting a medal ?
Witness: I said "Mind your own busi-
ness" I did not understand what I
should want a medal for.
The inquiry was adjourned until ten
o'clock on Saturday forenoon next.
DEATH OF RICHARD MURPHY. MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Thursday 6 May 1920 [Issue No.17,27[?]] page 6 2017-04-03 14:10
Queen Terr» for the Derbyt " meaning .
local race to bo run shortly. Witness
rspticd " I don't know." The deceased said
" You are a - Har," and witness star-
ted to walk round from behind tlie com-,
ter, when the deceased said. " We will ]
-you anyhow." Witness caught hold
out him. The deceased did not fall cn
half-a-ininute later as somebody walked
in ami again abused witness about thc
Thc, deceased did not resist, and. did not
fall/ Tho deceased rrjnained outside for
at Uie same time tlie deceased again
came into thc shop and witness star-,
ted to talk to Sandford, taking no notice I
of the deceased. Witness walked 'out on
however, followed them ont and said
What will you give nie to beat -ho
" 1 will give you nothing." Tile doe.oa.sed '
said " You have no chance. I will -
your hor=e.'' Witness said " I have not .
one in it." The deceased said " You are j
a-Ikir. You have." Witness uM
"Don't sav that. Dick." Tho deren.sed
said " Yon are a-liar." Witness then
caught hold of the deceased, hrushed him
across the face with bis loft hand, and
enid "Cut that out. Dick, and go home".
Thc deceased replie ' " [ will please my
- when I go home." Thc brush with
Hie hand did not. cause the deceased to
stagger, or to full. Witness returned to
I he shop. TJe was followed in by the le-,
ooH-e-I. Catching thc deceased by the
pushed him just across the gutter. Wit- j
ness did not leave thc footpath. Tlc re- '
turned to the shop, and the deo a»"'
went away for a couple of minutes, hi.I
came back and said " You win to-nißlit
.Tack, hut 1 will win t. .-morrow, and f
will Wow your-br;u':i.s rut." Witness
said "All right, Dick, 1 viii meet vou at
thc track in Hie morning." The deceased
s-iid "You are not game. You will not
bc there." Witness said "f will bel
liiere.-' Tho deceased said "If you como'
to tho course in the morning I will bimi
vi.nr-brains smiUicroons.-' Tlie
ile eased a ho called witness n - or u
mongrel, ho was not sure whVh. As the
deceased was alkiug into tile s3iop a rain '
wii.ness met tym. caught him by the !
i-hoiildor, and pu.-hed him out into *l.e
'roadway. Ho hud his left band on thc de- I
Cen sui* i"'fi shoulder and his right liund '
Under Hie dccotn-cd'g right arm holding I
him np. Tu this way bc pushed thc le-|
eoa-ed about Roven yards from the kerb- !
¡mr.. Imt nut as far a.« the tramline. To j
Ur-e H e deceased ulong witness kept his
knee under him. os tho deceased wanted
to Fit down. Ile let (lie demised go I
and said "Go homo. Dick." The Ji
coascd's hat, was IWsiir on the ground lt. '
had fallen off. Witness picked it up :ind
threw it further across tho traiiilin», !
thinking that thc deceased would go after
it. Tlie debased something about
the value of the bat mid something tu.
the ed,et "This i= as-sault," which witness j
interpreted to apply to his notion in nmh- !
ir.g Ike deceased uni,. WitncHs went to
(urn rouu.l io go Iwck to the "li"') mid
the divea-cl i-:uno lurching towards him
w ith his ba nib; stretched out as if to
catch witness. Witness put his ¡eft hand
out to slor him and said " Ho way. Dick "
The deiessod's and witness's arms or ,
bands came in contact and lbj. dei-ea e.l
i-taggored lack a ste), r,T two and fell '
into a sitting position and over on tn hi^
hack, tho ba k of lu's head stn'kii'L' the
rior and then backward and struck the
Queen Terra for the Derby? " meaning a
local race to be run shortly. Witness
replied " I don't know." The deceased said
" You are a ----- Liar," and witness star-
ted to walk round from behind the cou-
ter, when the deceased said. " We will
----- you anyhow." Witness caught hold
out him. The deceased did not fall on
half-a-minute later as somebody walked
in and again abused witness about the
The deceased did not resist, and did not
fall. The deceased remained outside for
at the same time the deceased again
came into the shop and witness star-,
ted to talk to Sandford, taking no notice
of the deceased. Witness walked out on
however, followed them out and said
What will you give me to beat the
" I will give you nothing." The deceased
said " You have no chance. I will -----
your horse.'' Witness said " I have not .
one in it." The deceased said " You are
a ---- Iiar. You have." Witness said
"Don't say that, Dick." The deceased
said " You are a ----- liar." Witness then
caught hold of the deceased, brushed him
across the face with his left hand, and
said "Cut that out, Dick, and go home".
The deceased replied " I will please my
----- when I go home." The brush with
the hand did not. cause the deceased to
stagger, or to fall. Witness returned to
the shop. He was followed in by the de-,
ceased. Catching the deceased by the
pushed him just across the gutter. Wit-
ness did not leave the footpath. He re-
turned to the shop, and the deceased
went away for a couple of minutes, but
came back and said " You win to-night
Jack, but I will win to-morrow, and
will blow your ------ brains out." Witness
said "All right, Dick, I will meet you at
the track in the morning." The deceased
said "You are not game. You will not
be there." Witness said "I will be
there.-" The deceased said "If you come
to the course in the morning I will blow
your brains to smithereens." Tlhe
deceased also called witness a ----- or a
mongrel, he was not sure which. As the
deceased was walking into the shop again
witness met him, caught him by the
shoulder, and pushed him out into the
roadway. He had his left hand on the de-
ceased left shoulder and his right hand
under the deceased right arm holding
him up. In this way he pushed the de-
ceased about seven yards from the kerb
ing, but not as far as the tramline. To
urge the deceased along witness kept his
knee under him, as the deceased wanted
to sit down. He let the deceased go
and said "Go home, Dick." The de-
ceased's hat was lying on the ground. It
had fallen off. Witness picked it up and
threw it further across th tramline,
thinking that the deceased would go after
it. The deceased said something about
the value of the hat and something to
the effect "This is assault," which witness
interpreted to apply to his action in push-
ing the deceased out,. Witness went to
turn round to go back to the shop and
the deceased came lurching towards him
with his hands stretched out as if to
catch witness. Witness put his left hand
out to slop him and said " Go way, Dick "
The deceased's and witness's arms or
hands came in contact and the deceased
staggered back a step or two and fell
into a sitting position and over on to his
back, the back of his head striking the
DEATH OF RICHARD MURPHY. MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY. (Article), Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954), Thursday 6 May 1920 [Issue No.17,27[?]] page 6 2017-04-01 14:48 shop, would you "xiwl Miat lo cnuBo *
:iijiir>Pï
Witness: If lie füll on tlie left side
thc head
r-eiiior sergeant OVonnu' : |f hf fi
huikuard a ml i-truek the roadway wi
the ILK side of the head. Hi.-ro ia el
fence that the deceasd fell backward
Witness: lt musí have been on the lc
fide.
iiciiior-sorn<?H.iit O'Connor: Would a fi
ra the roadway cause thc injury ye
fou nd t
Witnc-s: Vos, it would, owing to the
very thin state of his skull; but it woui
I probably not occur in an individual ha
ling an ordinary skull.
I Senior-sergeant O'Connor: If tin o:
jdiimrv ¡r.il'v ¡dual fell straight baekwar
and struck thc roadway with thc bac
I of his head would that be suilieient t
[cause sueh injuries!
I Witness: No, it would not. Beeide
it would lemo a mark on tile badf c
tho head.
Senior sprier-nt O'Connor: If the di
ceased. in falling, fell first on hw po t<
roadway, would Unit lie suffici'uHn caus
the fracture of thc skull you found!
Witness: Ko. Ile must havc fallen 0:
lr-* left side.
Senior-serpeant O'Connor: Pome wit
nesseg say that the man 'fell straigh
j back and struck the road way with hi
i shoulder and head. ether witnesses sa;
I Witness : I understand it was at nigbt
. Senior-sergeant O'Connor: You un
; asked on that evidence. If he fell firs'
I on his posterior and then liackwnrd. di
! yon think that the fall would bc sufiicien;
lo canse the fracture?
j Witness: No. You are assuming thai
J lie did fall. Assuming that he fell thc
I way you pay, it would not ea use th(
i fracture. The fracture would be at tht
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Could not «
.man full on bis back with hi» head turned
sideways!
ficniov-scrgeant O'Connor: Assuming
that the d?ecaEod fell on lpg posterior and
loft ricV of Iiis hejil striking thc. road,
would that cau?e the fracture
Senior-sergeant O'Connor. Wc want it
cleared. There would bc sufficient force
to cause the fracture if thc roan fell on
a skull that this man badi
man in a drunken condition fall roo.c
helplessly than s sober ma;.' A solier
man would have more «-.mTol of him-
self!
ßcnior-sorgeant O'Connor: You pre-
viously treated thc deceased í
for an injury to In's fa^e.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: After rocoiv
ing thc ¡ninnes, would it have been pos-
accord V
Witness. So. He could not do any pur-
poseful movement after that and wovli
iii. Boland: I have no questions.
Th« Police Magistrate: What couM
cause th« contusion of the lip?
Witness: It could bc caused by any-
thing pinching his lin araiijit his teeth.
It waa a very Email mark.
Tlie Police Magistrale : You say (hat
"» deceased in falling did not strike thc
hack of his head!
Witness: Xo.
on thc back of his head there would be
Witness: Very likely; but from thc in-
juries on the left side of hi* head I
should say that it wa« the place of the
impact if he struck tho road, lt would
nut require [Treat force to cause L>he in-
thinness of hie skull and his drunken con-
Senio'-scrgo?.nt O'Connor: Did Dr.
Buchau n a err ce as to the thinness cf tho
Witness: We did nof. disc"ss that, There
liv Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Dr.
O'brien remarked that the deceased wns
very much vorse then when he fii^t sa.w
Mr. Boland: You say that tjie injurits
to *he left side of the head might have
been caused hy something. I suppose you
Witness: Yes: munt have been caused
hy something smooth and hard.
sidiug in Stanley-street, stated ihat he
deceased waa bia brother. Witness atten-
-lie deceased, who had charge of the
racehorse Paramita, which coni|>eted in
to the course. The laat time that the
deceased had taken liquor was nt Christ-
mas time. 'Ile only drank porir ii: illy.
Ile saw thc deceased on and «ll' at the
some drink. He last saw thc deceased
from him so as to allow him to rcma:n
and he was happy and laughing and 'ok-
known each other for years and had b;en
the best of friends, fro fnr as witness
course between the deceased and Staple
ton. The deceased's health wa« good.
About nine or ton years ago the deceased
was kicked by a horse on Ute'foreh-ad
Seiiiur-sorgonnl O'Connor: Do you at
trihutn that lo the kick?
Witness: I could not say. Ho luted not
to drink niiich until he got the kick.
By Senior-sergpant O'Connor: At a
quart or-pu«t seven o'clock on thc Satur-
day evening after tho races Cyril Cor-
Die!.-. !mt they ¡rave him some brandy to
hr;n¿ him ronnel." Witness waa then told
th.it his brother had lieen taken home
in i ear and that he w.s all right.
Senior-sergeant 0'Co"nor: Is that all
Witness: Yes. *
Mr. Boland: Y'on and Stapleton ara
Witness: Yes; on the best of tornw. ,
Mr. Boland: Das In bellied you
financially? I
Mr. Boland: Do you know ii he las I
Witness: Oh, yes. IT» would give him
anything he asked him for.. Tliev had
they were bovB to; 'ther. |
.lohn Stapleton stated that he was a |
bookmaker and carried on business as a I
tobacconist and hairdresser under the ,
firm name of Stapleton and fa rr. |
The Court waa then adjourned until j
2.1"> p.m., the Police MagLirate intimating ¡
to the winnis that he was not required
to answer uuy question that wis likely
Whc:. the Court resumed.
Stapleton a,.alii took the box. He state!
thal, he had already given the police a
voluntary statement in connection with ;
tho matter. He first, knew the decensed j
when lie went to school with bini at ('h'tr- |
tors Towers twenty-three years ago, and
ho had since frequently seen bini in j
Rockhampton. Thc deceased und wilnr;.-i|
attended thc rare meeting nt Callaghan |
Park on Saturday, tit© 24tii of April. The
deceased had ti horse bi the first rare, |
and so did witness. He firs! saw the de-j
o'clock in the . fternoon. He lind no dis- j
agreement with the deceased there. Wit
noss r'-turned to his sl">p about li.:1ft p m '
the dcieasod cullie to tho -hop. He was
very drunk, Coining into the that, he .
said "I hear you t"'d ;'fiir b¿.v 1" deal ;
lo our horse ln-d.iv.'1 .Tono nido «'.? I
Hess's horse. Howland rod» the il'Vo.isod's ;
horse. Witness said " You ¡Tr sillv tn lis- j
ten to things like flint." The decca,ed ¡
«aid " Well, what pn'ie is «bo (Paramis'tH j
fur the Stradbroke." Wit mw ropl'ed j
" I ha-.-o not g.'t a book on it," or '. 1 am |
not bellini.' on it.'1 he wis uni furo which
"I hon tin- ilereased said "What price |
shop, would you expect that to cause the
injuries?
Witness: If he fell on the left side of
the head
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: If he fell
backward and struck the roadway with
the Ieft side of the head.There is evl-
dence that the deceased fell backward
Witness: It must have been on the left
side.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Would a fall
on the roadway cause the injury you
found ?
Witness: Yes, it would, owing to the
very thin state of his skull; but it would
probably not occur in an individual hav-
ing an ordinary skull.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: If an or-
dinary individual fell straight backward
and struck the roadway with the back
of his head would that be sufficient to
cause such injuries?
Witness: No, it would not. Besides
it would leave a mark on the back of
the head.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: If the de-
ceased, in falling, fell first on his poste-
roadway, would that be sufficient to cause
the fracture of the skull you found?
Witness: No. he must have fallen on
his left side.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Some wit-
nesses say that the man fell straight
back and struck the road way with his
shoulder and head. Other witnesses say
Witness : I understand it was at night
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: You are
asked on that evidence. If he fell first
on his posterior and then backward, do
you think that the fall would be sufiicient
to cause the fracture?
Witness: No. You are assuming that
he did fall. Assuming that he fell the
way you say, it would not cause the
fracture. The fracture would be at the
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Could not a
man fall on his back with his head turned
sideways?
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Assuming
that the deceased fell on his posterior and
left side of his head striking the road,
would that cause the fracture (?)
Senior-sergeant O'Connor. We want it
cleared. There would be sufficient force
to cause the fracture if the man fell on
a skull that this man had?
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Would a
man in a drunken condition fall more
helplessly than a sober man?' A sober
man would have more control of him-
self?
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: You pre-
viously treated the deceased ?
for an injury to his face.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: After receiv-
ing the injuries, would it have been pos-
accord ?
Witness. No. He could not do any pur-
poseful movement after that and would
Mr. Boland: I have no questions.
The Police Magistrate: What could
cause the contusion of the lip?
Witness: It could be caused by any-
thing pinching his lip against his teeth.
It was a very smail mark.
The Police Magistrate : You say that
the deceased in falling did not strike the
back of his head?
Witness: No.
on the back of his head there would be
Witness: Very likely; but from the in-
juries on the left side of his head I
should say that it was the place of the
impact if he struck the road, It would
not require great force to cause the in-
thinness of his skull and his drunken con-
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Did Dr.
Buchanan agree as to the thinness of the
Witness: We did not discuss that, There
By Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Dr.
O'Brien remarked that the deceased was
very much worse then when he first saw
Mr. Boland: You say that the injuries
to the left side of the head might have
been caused by something. I suppose you
Witness: Yes: must have been caused
by something smooth and hard.
siding in Stanley-street, stated that the
deceased was his brother. Witness atten-
the deceased, who had charge of the
racehorse Paramiissa, which competed in
to the course. The last time that the
deceased had taken liquor was at Christ-
mas time. He only drank periodically.
He saw the deceased on and off at the
some drink. He last saw the deceased
from him so as to allow him to remain
and he was happy and laughing and jok-
known each other for years and had been
the best of friends. So far as witness
course between the deceased and Staple-
ton. The deceased's health was good.
About nine or ten years ago the deceased
was kicked by a horse on the forehead
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Do you at-
tribute that to the kick?
Witness: I could not say. He used not
to drink much until he got the kick.
By Senior-sergeant O'Connor: At a
quarter-past seven o'clock on the Satur-
day evening after the races Cyril Cor-
Dick. but they gave him some brandy to
bring him round." Witness was then told
that his brother had been taken home
in a car and that he was all right.
Senior-sergeant O'Connor: Is that all
Witness: Yes.
Mr. Boland: You and Stapleton are
Witness: Yes; on the best of terms.
Mr. Boland: Has he helped you
financially?
Mr. Boland: Do you know if he has
Witness: Oh, yes. He would give him
anything he asked him for.. They had
they were boys together.
John Stapleton stated that he was a
bookmaker and carried on business as a
tobacconist and hairdresser under the
firm name of Stapleton and Carr.
The Court was then adjourned until
2.15 p.m., the Police Magistrate intimating
to the witness that he was not required
to answer any question that was likely
When the Court resumed.
Stapleton again took the box. He stated
that, he had already given the police a
voluntary statement in connection with
the matter. He first, knew the deceased
when he went to school with him at Char-
ters Towers twenty-three years ago, and
he had since frequently seen him in
Rockhampton. The deceased and witness
attended the race meeting at Callaghan
Park on Saturday, the 24tii of April. The
deceased had a horse in the first race,
and so did witness. He firs! saw the de-
o'clock in the afternoon. He had no dis-
agreement with the deceased there. Wit-
ness returned to his shop about 6.30 p m
the deceased came to the shop. He was
very drunk, Coming into the shop, he
said "I hear you told your boy to deal
to our horse today." Jones rode wit-
ness's horse. Rowland rode the deceased's ;
horse. Witness said " You are silly to lis-
ten to things like that." The deceased
said " Well, what price is she (Paramissa)
for the Stradbroke." Witness replied
" I have not got a book on it," or " I am
not betting on it." He was not sure which
Then the deceased said "What price

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Murphy
    List
    Public

    4 items
    created by: public:Peter33 2014-11-30
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.