Information about Trove user: NeilHamilton

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,307,504
2 NeilHamilton 2,997,988
3 noelwoodhouse 2,784,428
4 annmanley 2,225,988
5 John.F.Hall 2,078,494

2,997,988 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

February 2017 38,384
January 2017 13,667
December 2016 33,281
November 2016 61,832
October 2016 4,594
September 2016 18,860
August 2016 17,572
July 2016 16,873
June 2016 34,240
May 2016 43,164
April 2016 20,596
March 2016 22,777
February 2016 30,008
January 2016 52,838
December 2015 51,589
November 2015 60,542
October 2015 37,145
September 2015 9,150
August 2015 48,889
July 2015 52,822
June 2015 33,346
May 2015 36,180
April 2015 51,031
March 2015 55,439
February 2015 84,359
January 2015 60,979
December 2014 55,154
November 2014 87,514
October 2014 63,293
September 2014 60,110
August 2014 64,229
July 2014 53,493
June 2014 51,404
May 2014 51,270
April 2014 56,447
March 2014 40,969
February 2014 33,308
January 2014 50,171
December 2013 46,257
November 2013 53,897
October 2013 34,049
September 2013 70,301
August 2013 71,235
July 2013 40,049
June 2013 54,700
May 2013 72,596
April 2013 66,076
March 2013 54,088
February 2013 49,892
January 2013 53,849
December 2012 65,047
November 2012 60,916
October 2012 45,521
September 2012 50,429
August 2012 50,781
July 2012 52,887
June 2012 50,683
May 2012 51,871
April 2012 51,523
March 2012 39,886
February 2012 46,422
January 2012 55,422
December 2011 36,132
November 2011 15,960

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,307,501
2 NeilHamilton 2,997,988
3 noelwoodhouse 2,784,428
4 annmanley 2,225,918
5 John.F.Hall 2,078,489

2,997,988 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

February 2017 38,384
January 2017 13,667
December 2016 33,281
November 2016 61,832
October 2016 4,594
September 2016 18,860
August 2016 17,572
July 2016 16,873
June 2016 34,240
May 2016 43,164
April 2016 20,596
March 2016 22,777
February 2016 30,008
January 2016 52,838
December 2015 51,589
November 2015 60,542
October 2015 37,145
September 2015 9,150
August 2015 48,889
July 2015 52,822
June 2015 33,346
May 2015 36,180
April 2015 51,031
March 2015 55,439
February 2015 84,359
January 2015 60,979
December 2014 55,154
November 2014 87,514
October 2014 63,293
September 2014 60,110
August 2014 64,229
July 2014 53,493
June 2014 51,404
May 2014 51,270
April 2014 56,447
March 2014 40,969
February 2014 33,308
January 2014 50,171
December 2013 46,257
November 2013 53,897
October 2013 34,049
September 2013 70,301
August 2013 71,235
July 2013 40,049
June 2013 54,700
May 2013 72,596
April 2013 66,076
March 2013 54,088
February 2013 49,892
January 2013 53,849
December 2012 65,047
November 2012 60,916
October 2012 45,521
September 2012 50,429
August 2012 50,781
July 2012 52,887
June 2012 50,683
May 2012 51,871
April 2012 51,523
March 2012 39,886
February 2012 46,422
January 2012 55,422
December 2011 36,132
November 2011 15,960

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
German Brutality to Belgian Women. North of France. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 25 November 1916 [Issue No.780] page 18 2017-02-25 17:17 ^rell established, that the Germans have been
ing Post"'), but I have lately found three such
bad taken over the line in the La Bassee
v>ith the crowd of refugees to seek security
siuerable confusion prevailed on the railways
was cut ofT by the Germans somewhere near
searched t and everything they possessed was
.others, who, of course, witnessed the shootings.
lepressed by the same methods.
%omen had become acquainted, and the two
Verraelles, being allowed scanty rations of
Ing the same rigid discipline, the Huns had
banded over to a Bavarian regiment and soon
? Then the British came and the fighting be-
< came hotter. The two lines were now very
S close together, and the Germans hurled savage
5 epithets across to their new enemies. The
? married woman speaks English and understood.
< The ignorance of these poor things was, how-
S ever, great. They understood that the Germans
> were often calling out for our fellows to throw
( them over tins of jam, and one day, to use
< her own half expression, they threw one that
) must have had some explosive in it, for it
) blew up, killing one woman and injuring some
c others. It was one of our first primitive hand
s grenades, of course. These particular three
) women had now been twenty-five days in the
) trenches, and had fortunately escaped so far
< all but the hard labor, when a friendly soldier
S gave them the hint that the two younger girls
) were next for attendance on the captain and
? his billet-mate. That threw them into desper-
( ation. That night, while they were engaged in
S making up their cook-house fire, which was
) placed somewhat apart at the dead end of a
( trench, the married woman, looking over the
< parapet, saw two British soldiers repairing
> wire. She managed to attract their attention
) and explain their predicament. They promised
c to help them to escape, but it had to be put
s off for two nights more until a friendly sentry
S should be on duty at that place. Two days
) more of agonised apprehension followed.
5 The British soldiers were as good as their
well established, that the Germans have been
ing Post"), but I have lately found three such
had taken over the line in the La Bassee
with the crowd of refugees to seek security
siderable confusion prevailed on the railways
was cut off by the Germans somewhere near
searched and everything they possessed was
others, who, of course, witnessed the shootings.
repressed by the same methods.
women had become acquainted, and the two
Vermelles, being allowed scanty rations of
ing the same rigid discipline, the Huns had
handed over to a Bavarian regiment and soon
Then the British came and the fighting be-
came hotter. The two lines were now very
close together, and the Germans hurled savage
epithets across to their new enemies. The
married woman speaks English and understood.
The ignorance of these poor things was, how-
ever, great. They understood that the Germans
were often calling out for our fellows to throw
them over tins of jam, and one day, to use
her own half expression, they threw one that
must have had some explosive in it, for it
blew up, killing one woman and injuring some
others. It was one of our first primitive hand
grenades, of course. These particular three
women had now been twenty-five days in the
trenches, and had fortunately escaped so far
all but the hard labor, when a friendly soldier
gave them the hint that the two younger girls
were next for attendance on the captain and
his billet-mate. That threw them into desper-
ation. That night, while they were engaged in
making up their cook-house fire, which was
placed somewhat apart at the dead end of a
trench, the married woman, looking over the
parapet, saw two British soldiers repairing
wire. She managed to attract their attention
and explain their predicament. They promised
to help them to escape, but it had to be put
off for two nights more until a friendly sentry
should be on duty at that place. Two days
more of agonised apprehension followed.
The British soldiers were as good as their
German Brutality to Belgian Women. North of France. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 25 November 1916 [Issue No.780] page 18 2017-02-25 17:13 Blung across the parapet at the far end of the
women clambered over «.nd slid into the water,
she carried on her shoulder, and so, wading '
way through the water away past the British 1
have never seen their rescuers since. Pre
go a long way before they found a house in
9. result Mademoiselle took pneumonia.
She is now earning a small living as a semp
things happened, but thfey must not be for
slung across the parapet at the far end of the
women clambered over end slid into the water,
she carried on her shoulder, and so, wading
way through the water away past the British
have never seen their rescuers since. Pre-
go a long way before they found a house in-
a result Mademoiselle took pneumonia.
She is now earning a small living as a semp-
things happened, but they must not be for-
German Brutality to Belgian Women. North of France. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 25 November 1916 [Issue No.780] page 18 2017-02-25 17:12 Prior to the great Allied offensive at
positions, four villages being taken in
ance. Since then the
this wise, despite desperate Itnlgar resist
Allies have entered Monustir.
"Which lay by the canal, there "were fifteen other
•which were not yet in that state of perfection
that they soon attained. The women tell nie
of the trenches, but no time was lost in con
and so forth taken from houses In the neighbor
hood. Their duties were to cook and wesh
those who were not retained for special at
carry ammunition. TTiey were made to under
Except as taskmasters the «soldiers were
under strict orders not to molest the women In
Turkish pasba. The officers were accommo
children Buffered severely. Many of the sol
them. Indeed, It was by the connivance of one
was eventually effected. Ia particular, there
( was one captain, a grey-haired men, with cruel,
) fang-like teeth, that they held in peculiar a>
? horrence.
j WHEN THE BRITISH CAME.
? Then the British came and the fighting be
5 epithets across to their new enemies. Tb»
< The ignorance of these poor things was, how
S ever, great. They understood that the German#
( them over tins of jam, and one day, to "S9
< her own naif expression, they threw one that
) must have had some explosive in It, for it
) women had now been twenty-five days in tha
) were next for attendance on the captain an<1
? his billet-mate. That threw them into desper
( ation. That night, while they were engaged In
( trench, the married woman, looking over t*1®
< parapet, saw two British soldiers repair^S
c to help them to escape, but it had to be Put
S should be on duty at that place. Two
word, however, and conveyed a rope, which W
positions, four villages being taken in his wise, despite desperate Bulgar resist-
ance. Since then the Allies have entered Monastir.
which lay by the canal, there were fifteen other
which were not yet in that state of perfection
that they soon attained. The women tell me
of the trenches, but no time was lost in con-
and so forth taken from houses In the neighbor-
hood. Their duties were to cook and wash
those who were not retained for special at-
carry ammunition. They were made to under-
Except as taskmasters the soldiers were
under strict orders not to molest the women in
Turkish pasha. The officers were accommo-
children suffered severely. Many of the sol-
them. Indeed, it was by the connivance of one
was eventually effected. In particular, there
was one captain, a grey-haired men, with cruel,
fang-like teeth, that they held in peculiar ab-
horrence.
WHEN THE BRITISH CAME.
? Then the British came and the fighting be-
5 epithets across to their new enemies. The
< The ignorance of these poor things was, how-
S ever, great. They understood that the Germans
( them over tins of jam, and one day, to use
< her own half expression, they threw one that
) must have had some explosive in it, for it
) women had now been twenty-five days in the
) were next for attendance on the captain and
? his billet-mate. That threw them into desper-
( ation. That night, while they were engaged in
( trench, the married woman, looking over the
< parapet, saw two British soldiers repairing
c to help them to escape, but it had to be put
S should be on duty at that place. Two days
word, however, and conveyed a rope, which was
German Brutality to Belgian Women. North of France. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 25 November 1916 [Issue No.780] page 18 2017-02-25 17:07 ONE has had occasion from time to time )
during the war to call attention to the s
lamentable fact, unfortunately only too <
^rell established, that the Germans have been )
In the habit of keeping women In their trenches \
—usually captives from the invaded territories. (
It has not been possible heretofore to ascertain >
the experiences of these wretched victims <
(writes the special correspondent of the "Morn- ?
ing Post"'), but I have lately found three «uch £
now living in the north of France, who man- <
aged to escape from their captivity. Natur- J
ally their story is now of old date, 'since they )
were captured during the German advance and <
were helped to escape from the German trenches )
by some British soldiers shortly after we ^
bad taken over the line in the La Basse® )
sector, but it has lost none of its poignant <
human interest. I have verified the details to )
the best of my ability, and 1 understand the ?
women's statement to the authorities was ac- <
cepted as substantially correct, although the >
poor, distraught creatures make some com- c
prehensible confusion as to places they passed (
through in the course of their wanderings. )
The women are Belgians; one is a young |
married woman with three children; the other S
two are girls, one of whom comes of highly )
respectable people, her father and mother |
having kept a substantial jewellery shop in >
one of the Belgian cities. As they are still (
residing there it is inadvisable to give the 4
name of the town. This girl, being of supertor 5
education, tells the best story. They were j
all strangers to each other until thrown to- >
gether in the course of their painful wander- <
lugs. Mademoiselle and her two brothers, aged <
fourteen and sixteen, happened to be in Brus- ;
aels when the Germans broke into Belgium. <
"With the imprudence of their youth the two i
boys went out to see the "fun" and watch j
the Germans marching in on Brussels. Upon <
some pretext or other, for nothing is known s
definitely on the subject, they were caught ;
and shot. The sister fled home, but, her father <
deciding to stand his ground and look after his )
property as far as he could, she was sent off )
v>ith the crowd of refugees to seek security <
in France. )
After days of hardship in a crowded train )
the refugees got well into France, but, as was <
only natural in that momentous time, con- <
siuerable confusion prevailed on the railways ]i
in the handling of civilian traffic. In the end, (>
after unnumbered side-trackings and route i[
was cut ofT by the Germans somewhere near 5
Amiens. When they perceived their predica- )
ment the able-bodied men and boys made oft (
on all sides across country before the Germans J
came up, but many were picked off by the )
riflemen as they cut across the fields. Those )
who remained were bundled out and marshalled <
in the road, where they were thoroughly S
searched t and everything they possessed was )
taken from them. The first lesson they were ?
taught was that of unquestioning, immediate <
obedience to each and every order their rough i
captors gave, and to avoid any miscon- >
ceptions numbers were shot for the most <
trivial offences, so «s to impress the (
.others, who, of course, witnessed the shootings. )
The very natural screams of the women were .
lepressed by the same methods. (
WOMEN AS OFFICERS' MENIALS. \
The victims, thus thoroughly cowed, were \
marched off towards the north, nor did they )
see a vehicle again. The old and infirm dropped ?
out and remained where they fell. These three (
%omen had become acquainted, and the two s
girls each took one of the children, bo as to >
relieve the young mother of an almost im- ?
possible task. For a time they sojourned in I
Verraelles, being allowed scanty rations of S
bread and water. Up till then, beyond exact- )
Ing the same rigid discipline, the Huns had ?
not physically maltreated their prisoners, but (
after what they now know was the battle of £
the Marne, when the Germans fell back to )
their defensive lines, the party was divided ?
up (that is to say, the women, for the men s
had already disappeared). These three were S
taken to Auchy-lez-La Bassee, where they were \
banded over- to a Bavarian regiment and soon <
•ent up to the trenches. Ii» their section,
ONE has had occasion from time to time
during the war to call attention to the
lamentable fact, unfortunately only too
^rell established, that the Germans have been
In the habit of keeping women In their trenches
—usually captives from the invaded territories.
It has not been possible heretofore to ascertain
the experiences of these wretched victims
(writes the special correspondent of the "Morn-
ing Post"'), but I have lately found three such
now living in the north of France, who man-
aged to escape from their captivity. Natur-
ally their story is now of old date, since they
were captured during the German advance and
were helped to escape from the German trenches
by some British soldiers shortly after we
bad taken over the line in the La Bassee
sector, but it has lost none of its poignant
human interest. I have verified the details to
the best of my ability, and I understand the
women's statement to the authorities was ac-
cepted as substantially correct, although the
poor, distraught creatures make some com-
prehensible confusion as to places they passed
through in the course of their wanderings.
The women are Belgians; one is a young
married woman with three children; the other
two are girls, one of whom comes of highly
respectable people, her father and mother
having kept a substantial jewellery shop in
one of the Belgian cities. As they are still
residing there it is inadvisable to give the
name of the town. This girl, being of superior
education, tells the best story. They were
all strangers to each other until thrown to-
gether in the course of their painful wander-
lugs. Mademoiselle and her two brothers, aged
fourteen and sixteen, happened to be in Brus-
aels when the Germans broke into Belgium.
"With the imprudence of their youth the two
boys went out to see the "fun" and watch
the Germans marching in on Brussels. Upon
some pretext or other, for nothing is known
definitely on the subject, they were caught
and shot. The sister fled home, but, her father
deciding to stand his ground and look after his
property as far as he could, she was sent off
v>ith the crowd of refugees to seek security
in France.
After days of hardship in a crowded train
the refugees got well into France, but, as was
only natural in that momentous time, con-
siuerable confusion prevailed on the railways
in the handling of civilian traffic. In the end,
after unnumbered side-trackings and route
was cut ofT by the Germans somewhere near
Amiens. When they perceived their predica-
ment the able-bodied men and boys made off
on all sides across country before the Germans
came up, but many were picked off by the
riflemen as they cut across the fields. Those
who remained were bundled out and marshalled
in the road, where they were thoroughly
searched t and everything they possessed was
taken from them. The first lesson they were
taught was that of unquestioning, immediate
obedience to each and every order their rough
captors gave, and to avoid any miscon-
ceptions numbers were shot for the most
trivial offences, so as to impress the
.others, who, of course, witnessed the shootings.
The very natural screams of the women were
lepressed by the same methods.
WOMEN AS OFFICERS' MENIALS.
The victims, thus thoroughly cowed, were
marched off towards the north, nor did they
see a vehicle again. The old and infirm dropped
out and remained where they fell. These three
%omen had become acquainted, and the two
girls each took one of the children, so as to
relieve the young mother of an almost im-
possible task. For a time they sojourned in
Verraelles, being allowed scanty rations of
bread and water. Up till then, beyond exact-
Ing the same rigid discipline, the Huns had
not physically maltreated their prisoners, but
after what they now know was the battle of
the Marne, when the Germans fell back to
their defensive lines, the party was divided
up (that is to say, the women, for the men
had already disappeared). These three were
taken to Auchy-lez-La Bassee, where they were
sent up to the trenches. In their section,
How a Raiding Zeppelin Came to Earth. Crew Captured: Commander Wants to Telephone London. East Coast. Town Sunday. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 18 November 1916 [Issue No.779] page 4 2017-02-25 17:02 Ship from bis farm was a cripple. He hurried,,
fell. As they neared tbe spot they saw the
Germans standing in the road. For all thej$
CRIPPLE'S MOTOR-CYCLE BIDE.
hia task when in the darkness he collided with
errand known1 and the military authorities were
things—guns, maps, notes, instructions, tele
wreck lies it is a landmark for miles. It com
in Its vicinity by its 70ft. of height.
Nothing now of the aluminium framework re
< mains, but it gives a splendid idea of what
S tile monster fully equipped must have looked
) like. A grefat blunt npse swells to the centre
} of the framework, which tapers off to a fin
( like stern. In the centre can be seen dis
> tinctly the ladder passing through the ballonets
( by which the gun platform at the top of the
( envelope is reached. The whole glistens and
i shimmers in the noonday sun like burnished
; silver.
> EYE-WITNESSES' ACCOUNTS.
j> Eye-witnesses of the stirring scenes tell
) thrilling stories. One woman said: "My hus
(■ band and I heard the hum of the airship
( engines, and on looking out saw it just above?
> our orchard in front of the house. It seemed
? to overshadow everything. We saw it come
s down near our men's cottage, and I saw the
S Germans get out of the car and heard them
) speaking in English. Some of them spoke
( English very well, and were using bad language,
S which we could understand. We were con
> cealed in the hedge, watching them as they
^ passed. We h£ard them fire their revolvers,
y and there was a rattling in the trees, as If
) they were throwing their pistols away."
? Thg special constable who stopped the Ger
5 mans is a carrier. A sturdily built man of
> middle age, he makes little of his plucky ac
/ "and I went towards It. At the top of the
< road it was pitch black, and I had no light
v on my bicycle. I met them and said, 'Her*,
) you, what's up?* and one of them, whom I
) learned afterwards to be the commander, said.
( 'Which is the way?' I saw that there was
S a large number of them, and they went off.
? I followed them until I met the village eon
( stable, and then we told them that they must
i consider themselves under arrest. They all
> seemed youngish, thick-set men, but I could
? not judge properly, as they were heavily padded
\ against the cold. One wanted to know what
) I thought about the war. But I did uot tell
) him. I did not want to hurt his feelings, but
< he seemed quite pleased that the war wtrnld
) not affect him much more."
) The occupants of the double tenement cot-.
? tage near which the Zeppelin fell frankly admit
( that the sight of the monster terrified them.
£ They told how the commander or another mem
) ber of the crew came and hapimered at their
( door and finally broke a window. They thought
•> perhaps it was done with the intention pf
) warning them that there was danger. As a
<j matter of fact, the two families who occupy
I the building were unhurt by the fire, as they
(.were smashed and, as stated above, the dog
C in its kennel was injured.
ship from his farm was a cripple. He hurried
fell. As they neared the spot they saw the
Germans standing in the road. For all they
CRIPPLE'S MOTOR-CYCLE RIDE.
his task when in the darkness he collided with
errand known and the military authorities were
things—guns, maps, notes, instructions, tele-
wreck lies it is a landmark for miles. It com-
in its vicinity by its 70ft. of height.
Nothing now of the aluminium framework re-
mains, but it gives a splendid idea of what
the monster fully equipped must have looked
like. A great blunt nose swells to the centre
of the framework, which tapers off to a fin-
like stern. In the centre can be seen dis-
tinctly the ladder passing through the ballonets
by which the gun platform at the top of the
envelope is reached. The whole glistens and
shimmers in the noonday sun like burnished
silver.
EYE-WITNESSES' ACCOUNTS.
Eye-witnesses of the stirring scenes tell
thrilling stories. One woman said: "My hus-
band and I heard the hum of the airship
engines, and on looking out saw it just above
our orchard in front of the house. It seemed
to overshadow everything. We saw it come
down near our men's cottage, and I saw the
Germans get out of the car and heard them
speaking in English. Some of them spoke
English very well, and were using bad language,
which we could understand. We were con-
cealed in the hedge, watching them as they
passed. We heard them fire their revolvers,
and there was a rattling in the trees, as if
they were throwing their pistols away."
The special constable who stopped the Ger-
mans is a carrier. A sturdily built man of
middle age, he makes little of his plucky ac-
"and I went towards It. At the top of the
road it was pitch black, and I had no light
on my bicycle. I met them and said, 'Here,
you, what's up?' and one of them, whom I
learned afterwards to be the commander, said.
'Which is the way?' I saw that there was
a large number of them, and they went off.
I followed them until I met the village con-
stable, and then we told them that they must
consider themselves under arrest. They all
seemed youngish, thick-set men, but I could
not judge properly, as they were heavily padded
against the cold. One wanted to know what
I thought about the war. But I did not tell
him. I did not want to hurt his feelings, but
he seemed quite pleased that the war would
not affect him much more."
The occupants of the double tenement cot-.
tage near which the Zeppelin fell frankly admit
that the sight of the monster terrified them.
They told how the commander or another mem-
ber of the crew came and hammered at their
door and finally broke a window. They thought
perhaps it was done with the intention of
warning them that there was danger. As a
matter of fact, the two families who occupy
the building were unhurt by the fire, as they
were smashed and, as stated above, the dog
in its kennel was injured.
How a Raiding Zeppelin Came to Earth. Crew Captured: Commander Wants to Telephone London. East Coast. Town Sunday. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 18 November 1916 [Issue No.779] page 4 2017-02-25 16:56 nearer to the ground. scraped the tree-tops,
engine stopped It settled to the earth, stretch
Loud-mouthed curses earner from the three gon
dolas, some in guttural English, understand
heed to the hails of the Germans. The com
no one came to bis bidding, and, grumbling
smashed windows and scorched paint, the labor
er's cottage only two yards away was •un
a little terrier crying in its terror in the kemiel
The commander made hi*, vgice heard above
the chatter which had broken out among hia
■without hats, scantily clad bui.
stabs of light broke oyt here
the sky. Presently the wea
and queries. Special cou
Imagine the? astonishment of
track, when he heard the rhyth
barred the way of the advanc
hefty men wearing a dark uni
whom was probably, &alf, his
age and twice as agile? Ha
replied, "That is the, road,"
of other Essex men would bo
deep-voiced one. and off they
marched. The "special" fol
and these two 'bold men, put
to the touch, told the Ger
mono 4-V..% 4- tU. j
*uau>7 iuai iut5jf were uclult
were told. The opportune arrival of a sccond
The German commander Bimply shrugged his
shoulders and obeyed the directions of tho
men who were unafraid—a patrol of armed sol- j
identity. It shoftld be remembered that all
blackness of a country lane. "I am," he saii,
HTJN TO TELEPHONE TO LONDON.
Then, as if this were not sufficient, her fired
telephone' to someone in London, who will let
my wife know that I am safe." The prepos
terousness of the suggestion was quickly coun
know what there may be against you." Phleg
| inevitable, and with his crew marched stolidly
i off to the captivity which at the moment of
' writing has brought him and his crew to tbe
J safe keeping of' the authorities.
> It should be told how the military, patrol
J came so opportunely on the gcene. , One of
' thoBe who watched the destruction of the air-'
nearer to the ground. It scraped the tree-tops,
engine stopped It settled to the earth, stretch-
Loud-mouthed curses earner from the three gon-
dolas, some in guttural English, understand-
heed to the hails of the Germans. The com-
no one came to his bidding, and, grumbling
smashed windows and scorched paint, the labor-
er's cottage only two yards away was un-
a little terrier crying in its terror in the kennel
The commander made his voice heard above
the chatter which had broken out among his
without hats, scantily clad but
stabs of light broke out here
the sky. Presently the wea-
and queries. Special con-
Imagine the astonishment of
track, when he heard the rhyth-
barred the way of the advanc-
hefty men wearing a dark uni-
whom was probably, half, his
age and twice as agile? He
replied, "That is the road,"
of other Essex men would be
deep-voiced one, and off they
marched. The "special" fol-
and these two bold men, put
to the touch, told the Ger-
mans that they were under
were told. The opportune arrival of a second
The German commander simply shrugged his
shoulders and obeyed the directions of the
men who were unafraid—a patrol of armed sol-
identity. It should be remembered that all
blackness of a country lane. "I am," he said,
HUN TO TELEPHONE TO LONDON.
Then, as if this were not sufficient, he fired
telephone to someone in London, who will let
my wife know that I am safe." The prepos-
terousness of the suggestion was quickly coun-
know what there may be against you." Phleg-
inevitable, and with his crew marched stolidly
off to the captivity which at the moment of
writing has brought him and his crew to the
safe keeping of the authorities.
It should be told how the military, patrol
came so opportunely on the scene. One of
those who watched the destruction of the air-
How a Raiding Zeppelin Came to Earth. Crew Captured: Commander Wants to Telephone London. East Coast. Town Sunday. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 18 November 1916 [Issue No.779] page 4 2017-02-25 16:10 Xeppelin airships raided
England. London and tho
Midlands were the princi
journey. The special arti
cle about the injuied air
East Coast. Tnwn Sunriav
frm-\ HIS is the full story of
I the second Zeppelin which
lie's a stark and staring
♦reek in Essex. It was told me
■f those who gasped for breath
,, the German crew alight, cur
,, sing, from their gondolas, and
then march off into the black
Picture it. A night of vel
comes a flying terror, blot
down to the sea, and habita*
"was injured.
Kocon iita* after 1ft TV m whon
over the tree'-tops.
(bulk of a giant Zeppelin travelling towards the
sea. It lumbefred through the air unhindered
by cither shot or shell and unsought by any
stabbing light. Darkness absolute, save Tor
the twinkling stars, reigned. < Only the beat
' of the engines, punctuated by metallic crashes
! and heavy thuds, reached the ground.
Plying scarcely 300 feet up, the airship nosed
* its way to the sea, and then, as if its com
Suddenly the "hum" ceased, and a farmer, look
• striking in the branches. The airship, the
Zeppelin airships raided
England. London and the
Midlands were the princi-
journey. The special arti-
cle about the injured air-
East Coast Town, Sunday.
THIS is the full story of
the second Zeppelin which
lies a stark and staring
wreek in Essex. It was told me
by those who gasped for breath
the German crew alight, cur-
sing, from their gondolas, and
then march off into the black-
Picture it. A night of vel-
comes a flying terror, blot-
down to the sea, and habita-
was injured.
began just after 10 p.m., when
over the tree-tops.
bulk of a giant Zeppelin travelling towards the
sea. It lumbered through the air unhindered
by either shot or shell and unsought by any
stabbing light. Darkness absolute, save for
the twinkling stars, reigned. Only the beat
of the engines, punctuated by metallic crashes
and heavy thuds, reached the ground.
Flying scarcely 300 feet up, the airship nosed
its way to the sea, and then, as if its com-
Suddenly the "hum" ceased, and a farmer, look-
striking in the branches. The airship, the
Where the War will he Won! The Key to Victory. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 11 November 1916 [Issue No.778] page 8 2017-02-25 16:01 ; wasting time!" And so on.
> Well, what has happened? And what is going
> to happen?
) There is no doubt now that the Salonika ex-
> pedition was one of the most far-reaching
( schemes of the war. Its effects are bound to
) be seen before long. Had we not landed, the
i whole of the Near East would have been over-
? run by the Teuton hordes.
s Roumania would never have come on our side
) —if, indeed, she had not been compelled to
( come in against us. Greece, by the strange
( political gymnastics of King Constantine, would
) have almost certainly played us false; Servia's
) gallant little army would surely have been
( wiped out; and even Italy's position as regards
S Germany would have been altogether differ-
) ent.
( To-day our prestige in the Balkans is at its
( height. And the meaning of this can be ob-
) served in the Far East, not least in our cher-
} ished Indian possessions. By holding fast to
( Salonika we created a timely diversion, held up
^ Bulgaria, afforded a passage to, and later re-
/ organised, the very valuable if sorely-tried
< Servian, army; we protected Roumania from
) execution, and gave the necessary support to
< the Gr.eek patriots who wished Greece to Join
s the Entente.
i Now, if purely defensive operations have pro-
wasting time!" And so on.
Well, what has happened? And what is going
to happen?
There is no doubt now that the Salonika ex-
pedition was one of the most far-reaching
schemes of the war. Its effects are bound to
be seen before long. Had we not landed, the
whole of the Near East would have been over-
run by the Teuton hordes.
Roumania would never have come on our side
—if, indeed, she had not been compelled to
come in against us. Greece, by the strange
political gymnastics of King Constantine, would
have almost certainly played us false; Servia's
gallant little army would surely have been
wiped out; and even Italy's position as regards
Germany would have been altogether differ-
ent.
To-day our prestige in the Balkans is at its
height. And the meaning of this can be ob-
served in the Far East, not least in our cher-
ished Indian possessions. By holding fast to
Salonika we created a timely diversion, held up
Bulgaria, afforded a passage to, and later re-
organised, the very valuable if sorely-tried
Servian, army; we protected Roumania from
execution, and gave the necessary support to
the Gr.eek patriots who wished Greece to Join
the Entente.
Now, if purely defensive operations have pro-
Where the War will he Won! The Key to Victory. (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 11 November 1916 [Issue No.778] page 8 2017-02-25 16:00 By SIDNEY A. MOSELEY, Author of "The Truth about the Dardanelles. •
KEEP, your eye on Salo
to the situation, and prob
hundred realises it. even yet
landed at the .Greek town.
"What! Another expedi
ops moves are quickly for
everybody was waiting anxi
ously for the next Swap in the
Balkans? If you spoke to any
was a doubtful sh&ke of the
they said. "Look how the Ger
mans are scoring—overwhelm
would have us believe. Fortun
of action. The scene was Ver
the gloomy outlook of Che
seemed 10 relieve me euio»r
conducting the war, and who were being con
tinually asked by amateurish busybodieB what <
to develop. Those ^ho know their -Near
East must know that there, at least, en
gineering is much more fruitful than "ginger
ing." The • one requires the finesse of the
Few people—even those usually well Informed '
in the mind of M. Br land, the great French
planned the Salonika expedition. His pro
able opposition froiji, a powerful section.
we occupied this very important strategic cen
tre, sa£ down on our haunches, and waited.
8oon ~ those who were opposed to the new
; wasting time!" And so on. £
> Well, what has happened? And what is going ?
> to happen? )
) There is no doubt now that the Salonika ex- )
> pedition was one of the most far-reaching (
( schemes of the war. Its effects are bound to S
) be seen before long. Had we not landed, the )
i whole of the Near East would have been over- (
? run by the Teuton hordes. £
s Roumania would never have come on our side (
) —if, indeed, she had not been compelled to \
( come in against us. Greece, by the strange )
( political gymnastics of King Constantine, would ?
) have almost certainly played us false; Servia'S <
) gallant little army would surely have been s
( wiped out; and even Italy's position as regards \
S Germany would have been altogether differ- <
) ent. * \
( To-day our prestige in the Balkans is at its )
( height. And the meaning of this can be ob- ?
) served in the Far East, not least in our cher» £
} ished Indian possessions. By holding fast to i
( Salonika-we created a timely diversion, held up r
^ Bulgaria, afforded a passage to, and later re- (
/ organised, the very valuable if sorely-tried S
< Servian, army; we protected Roumania from /
German threats of frightfulness being put into ?
) execution, and gave the necessary support to \
< the Gr.eek patriots who wished Greece to Join )
s the Entente. c
i Now, if purely defensive operations have pro- >
move forward while the in
tentions of Greece were un
known would have been un
side by side with ours, per
the Salonika front, can scarce
ly make a prolonged resis
sound far-fetched at this junc
Chatalja lines would be short'
Possibly a simultaneous mov«
other parts suitable for a land
1 cannot say.
With the breaking-up of Bul
Austria and the doom of Fran
Hindenburg knew something when he de
to get to Berlin, and that that route was ap
knew on the day the French landed at Salo
an .enemy offensive will be directed against
Valona,. which is credited with being almost as
and should a * venturesome foe endeavor to
reorganised armies bf Servia and Montenegro,
There would have been none of these pos
sibilities had we not strongly entrenched our*
selves at Salonika.—'
'Answers."
By SIDNEY A. MOSELEY, Author of "The Truth about the Dardanelles.
KEEP, your eye on Salo-
to the situation, and prob-
hundred realises it, even yet.
landed at the Greek town.
"What! Another expedi-
ous moves are quickly for-
everybody was waiting anxi-
ously for the next step in the
Balkans? If you spoke to any-
was a doubtful shake of the
they said. "Look how the Ger-
mans are scoring—overwhelm-
would have us believe. Fortun-
of action. The scene was Ver-
the gloomy outlook of the
seemed to relieve the embar-
conducting the war, and who were being con-
tinually asked by amateurish busybodies what
to develop. Those who know their Near
East must know that there, at least, en-
gineering is much more fruitful than "ginger-
ing." The one requires the finesse of the
Few people—even those usually well Informed
in the mind of M. Briand, the great French
planned the Salonika expedition. His pro-
able opposition from, a powerful section.
we occupied this very important strategic cen-
tre, sat down on our haunches, and waited.
Soon those who were opposed to the new
; wasting time!" And so on.
> Well, what has happened? And what is going
> to happen?
) There is no doubt now that the Salonika ex-
> pedition was one of the most far-reaching
( schemes of the war. Its effects are bound to
) be seen before long. Had we not landed, the
i whole of the Near East would have been over-
? run by the Teuton hordes.
s Roumania would never have come on our side
) —if, indeed, she had not been compelled to
( come in against us. Greece, by the strange
( political gymnastics of King Constantine, would
) have almost certainly played us false; Servia's
) gallant little army would surely have been
( wiped out; and even Italy's position as regards
S Germany would have been altogether differ-
) ent.
( To-day our prestige in the Balkans is at its
( height. And the meaning of this can be ob-
) served in the Far East, not least in our cher-
} ished Indian possessions. By holding fast to
( Salonika we created a timely diversion, held up
^ Bulgaria, afforded a passage to, and later re-
/ organised, the very valuable if sorely-tried
< Servian, army; we protected Roumania from
German threats of frightfulness being put into
) execution, and gave the necessary support to
< the Gr.eek patriots who wished Greece to Join
s the Entente.
i Now, if purely defensive operations have pro-
move forward while the in-
tentions of Greece were un-
known would have been un-
side by side with ours, per-
the Salonika front, can scarce-
ly make a prolonged resis-
sound far-fetched at this junc-
Chatalja lines would be short-
Possibly a simultaneous move
other parts suitable for a land-
I cannot say.
With the breaking-up of Bul-
Austria and the doom of Fran-
Hindenburg knew something when he de-
to get to Berlin, and that that route was ap-
knew on the day the French landed at Salo-
an enemy offensive will be directed against
Valona, which is credited with being almost as
and should a venturesome foe endeavor to
reorganised armies of Servia and Montenegro,
There would have been none of these pos-
sibilities had we not strongly entrenched our-
selves at Salonika.—"Answers."
Hindenburg, the Ferocious: The Kaiser's Last Hope (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 4 November 1916 [Issue No.777] page 4 2017-02-25 15:28 ( is now East Prussia in the twelfth century.
> In the Eastern command he had surprising
( luck, for the Russians, in their hurry to in-
^ vade Germany, pushed forward a weak and ill-
( equipped forte into the deadly country of the
> Masurian swamps and lakes, only to be fallen
£ on by Hindenburg's vastly superior army, which
> defeated them very badly. The Berlin people
> vasion, and Hindenburg became a hero and a
) demigod. He rose to the zenith of fame by
(- his successful invasion of Poland and Russia,
^ aided by a vast superiority of numbers and an
> enormous preponderance of artillery.
| ''LET THE SWINE DROWN."
} To show the cold-blooded cruelty of this typi-
) cal Hun, tall in stature, coarse and gross in
^ proportions, and ferocious in nature, it is
$ related that in the course of the battle of
is now East Prussia in the twelfth century.
In the Eastern command he had surprising
luck, for the Russians, in their hurry to in-
vade Germany, pushed forward a weak and ill-
equipped forte into the deadly country of the
Masurian swamps and lakes, only to be fallen
on by Hindenburg's vastly superior army, which
defeated them very badly. The Berlin people
vasion, and Hindenburg became a hero and a
demigod. He rose to the zenith of fame by
his successful invasion of Poland and Russia,
aided by a vast superiority of numbers and an
enormous preponderance of artillery.
''LET THE SWINE DROWN."
To show the cold-blooded cruelty of this typi-
cal Hun, tall in stature, coarse and gross in
proportions, and ferocious in nature, it is
related that in the course of the battle of

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.