Information about Trove user: JohnWarren

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,207,539
2 NeilHamilton 2,237,632
3 annmanley 2,042,301
4 noelwoodhouse 1,821,987
5 maurielyn 1,449,882

3,207,539 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2015 32,028
March 2015 64,759
February 2015 46,993
January 2015 54,920
December 2014 59,108
November 2014 71,328
October 2014 72,644
September 2014 63,064
August 2014 53,529
July 2014 55,745
June 2014 54,260
May 2014 56,079
April 2014 48,047
March 2014 60,166
February 2014 61,348
January 2014 57,902
December 2013 57,210
November 2013 60,146
October 2013 52,494
September 2013 55,069
August 2013 59,983
July 2013 69,277
June 2013 63,156
May 2013 65,275
April 2013 62,426
March 2013 55,380
February 2013 76,096
January 2013 54,488
December 2012 43,891
November 2012 60,051
October 2012 61,706
September 2012 64,589
August 2012 72,377
July 2012 42,421
June 2012 27,912
May 2012 41,948
April 2012 35,654
March 2012 30,076
February 2012 48,784
January 2012 87,012
December 2011 81,171
November 2011 40,923
October 2011 65,188
September 2011 50,684
August 2011 58,418
July 2011 35,299
June 2011 47,361
May 2011 36,441
April 2011 34,146
March 2011 44,765
February 2011 34,198
January 2011 26,377
December 2010 32,650
November 2010 35,129
October 2010 31,352
September 2010 41,356
August 2010 37,031
July 2010 18,885
June 2010 15,908
May 2010 21,234
April 2010 10,541
March 2010 19,675
February 2010 36,122
January 2010 42,239
December 2009 21,244
November 2009 9,688
October 2009 15,337
September 2009 4,836

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
SOLDIER'S LETTER. BRITAIN PREPARED.—AGRICULTURAL COMPARISONS. — THE FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN HORSE. (Article), Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 - 1922), Monday 7 January 1918 page Article 2015-04-19 18:53 t Eggs! I somotlmes doubt the pa
triotism of the liens, for eggs are 4d
"scrub" (lettuce), etc<, appear to bo
the main itoms o£ food for the
all his own food. Sugar is scarbo,
much sugar boet being cultivated and
mndo Into sugar,
French country llfo differs entire
ly to ours. Here it is peuco and
quietness, and milk and honoy. No
droughts or Hoods, no fierce, desper
ate stonns and heat waves as In Aus
tralia; no uncertainty and lone
liness, No disappointments, and ups
and downs characteristic of the Aus
tralian bush lite—no longing and
praying, for rain; no starving stock
and wandering swagmon with 'bow
yaligs' and corkB in their lmts, and
bups In their billy cans; no hiigo
Shearing sheds at which tho shearer
makos an annual cheque, No coun
try race-meetings; no huge Btock
salos—tho wall of tho auctioneer is
stock. Tho 'squatter' takes Ills fat
horso ambulanco, or loads them with
a halter like quiet horses boing.lod
to water. Thoro; are no galloping
eyed -agitators and organisers,' Thoro
soeniB to be none of,tho tragedy:of
tho1 Australian pioneors' life. Noth
ing seems to. disturb, the French
peasant. His way.sooms to be as
cloar and cortaln as tho way of the
politician, who has boon olectod for
three years', service—not military,
for ho servos hlB country in a mor*
profitable way. ■
Eggs! I sometimes doubt the pa-
triotism of the hens, for eggs are 4d
"scrub" (lettuce), etc., appear to be
the main items of food for the
all his own food. Sugar is scarce,
much sugar beet being cultivated and
made into sugar.
French country life differs entire-
ly to ours. Here it is peace and
quietness, and milk and honey. No
droughts or floods, no fierce, desper-
ate storms and heat waves as in Aus-
tralia; no uncertainty and lone-
liness. No disappointments, and ups
and downs characteristic of the Aus-
tralian bush life—no longing and
praying for rain; no starving stock
and wandering swagmen with 'bow-
yangs' and corks in their hats, and
pups in their billy cans; no huge
shearing sheds at which the shearer
makes an annual cheque. No coun-
try race-meetings; no huge stock
sales—the wail of the auctioneer is
stock. The 'squatter' takes his fat
horse ambulance, or loads them with
a halter like quiet horses being led
to water. There are no galloping
eyed agitators and organisers. There
seems to be none of the tragedy of
the Australian pioneers' life. Noth-
ing seems to disturb the French
peasant. His way seems to be as
clear and certain as the way of the
politician, who has been elected for
three years' service—not military,
for he serves his country in a more
profitable way.
SOLDIER'S LETTER. BRITAIN PREPARED.—AGRICULTURAL COMPARISONS. — THE FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN HORSE. (Article), Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 - 1922), Monday 7 January 1918 page Article 2015-04-19 18:50 and,, 'McCormlpk reapers and binders
are'to 1?e;,seen*. No fences'separate
the farms; and' where stock are seen
on tlve rich pastures they iare tied ijp
by the hind leg,' atid thus prevented
to them., Truly, French methods
savor of the pre-historic order, belrig
stackB of wheat and oats remind oQe
of the Home land, but the remem
furrow ploughs; drawn sloivly by one
horse, and at the present time fal
lowed by an aged man or boy, afe
harrow' drawn across a small patch
farms aro all free of weeds. The
womenfolk, old as well as young, a>-e
wheat fields aro bIbo carefully at
tended. All undesirable . weeds,
I have travelled a good deal 111
the north of Franco, and have noticed
dono In the way of cultivation dur
ing the adverse times the Trench
nation Is havin. The country '.Is
oxcept tliat covered by very valuable
forests, is to bo seen. Every corner is
under cultivation,
The French nation Is at war—not
only n percentage of the people.
Every man of military age is flghtipg
These people are car.yying on the
The credit Is largely due to the ten
acity—cheerful tenacity of the wom
women carry, on the work of tholr
Nearly all are in mourning. Someone'
noar and dear to them lias been kill
ed, but they bear the sorrow brav.e
ly, and work on—for Franco. They
them speak English more or lesB flu
and eggs and coffee. Soldiers com
ing out of the front line aro gener
French people havo them at their
mercy, so far as food is-concerned,
they take full advantage of the situ
practice extortion. •
nation. I havo only-seen one or two
"drunks" since I have boon hero,
Frenchmen are always gay and en
thusiastic, and certainly do not re
quire stimulants. In their sober mo
at Id or 2d per glaBS. It Is not
boor as the English know it. It is
about twtco as strong aa pure wator,
dosert camel ho would only feel un
comfortably full—no other sensa
tion. The celobrnted English beer
drinkers, who followed the occupa
tion before' Lord Derby persuaded
thorn to loavo London, ara manifest
lost all their rotundity and, appar
ently, some interest in lifo. The
Fronch people nro satis/led with'it.
their share,. The boys drink It, and
tho baby in Ills cradle calls for his
share.*' Thoy like it because it doos
My knowledge of French is hero dis
coffee, which Is not a good Imitation
odious class of wine, constitutes 'tho
national drink of the Fronch peasan
nation,
and McCormick reapers and binders
are to be seen. No fences separate
the farms, and where stock are seen
on the rich pastures they are tied up
by the hind leg, and thus prevented
to them. Truly, French methods
savor of the pre-historic order, being
stacks of wheat and oats remind one
of the Home land, but the remem-
furrow ploughs, drawn slowly by one
horse, and at the present time fol-
lowed by an aged man or boy, are
harrow drawn across a small patch
farms are all free of weeds. The
womenfolk, old as well as young, are
wheat fields are also carefully at-
tended. All undesirable weeds,
I have travelled a good deal in
the north of France, and have noticed
done in the way of cultivation dur-
ing the adverse times the French
nation is having. The country is
except that covered by very valuable
forests, is to be seen. Every corner is
under cultivation.
The French nation is at war—not
only a percentage of the people.
Every man of military age is fighting
These people are carrying on the
The credit is largely due to the ten-
acity—cheerful tenacity of the wom-
women carry on the work of their
Nearly all are in mourning. Someone
near and dear to them has been kill-
ed, but they bear the sorrow brave-
ly, and work on—for France. They
them speak English more or less flu-
and eggs and coffee. Soldiers com-
ing out of the front line are gener-
French people have them at their
mercy, so far as food is concerned,
they take full advantage of the situ-
practice extortion.
nation. I have only seen one or two
"drunks" since I have been here,
Frenchmen are always gay and en-
thusiastic, and certainly do not re-
quire stimulants. In their sober mo-
at 1d or 2d per glass. It is not
beer as the English know it. It is
about twice as strong as pure water,
desert camel he would only feel un-
comfortably full—no other sensa-
tion. The celebrated English beer
drinkers, who followed the occupa-
tion before Lord Derby persuaded
them to leave London, are manifest-
lost all their rotundity and, appar-
ently, some interest in life. The
French people are satisfied with it.
their share. The boys drink it, and
the baby in his cradle calls for his
share. They like it because it does
My knowledge of French is here dis-
coffee, which is not a good imitation
odious class of wine, constitutes the
national drink of the French peasan-
nation.
SOLDIER'S LETTER. BRITAIN PREPARED.—AGRICULTURAL COMPARISONS. — THE FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN HORSE. (Article), Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 - 1922), Monday 7 January 1918 page Article 2015-04-19 18:43 sound,' l>adly-brert stallions 1b anorl
oub monaoo to tho Btnndard of Aus
tralian lioraou, In this war the Aus
tralian horao — thoso seloatod-from
tho cream of Australian animal#—
. has earned a namo superior to:all
othars, The conditions of his natural 1
life have given him a constitution '
which has onabled him to onduro >
hardships no otliors could onduro. I
Lllto tho Australian soldier, tho Aub- \
Lallan .horso has oarnod famo .for
itsblt among.tho horses of tho world.
And what n vnlimblo assot thoy
would bo if tho thousandB at homo
In Australia woro as uniform in slzo
and tyno as tho Fronch and English,
riding horso,
Thoro in a vast rtlffarouco botwooir
hgrlaulturo In Australia and in
Franco. In Australia thoro aro huge
P'nddofllc# securely fenced with barb
etfv w/re. apd wlrernetting, (md, allthL
ployed, tor tpfi iw.ork la, ona large
scale.? In Prance .Is different;™
holdings are small and the up-£o-dat;e
methods. of, Australia! tore not'xfocetf
Bary.^Wooden. pjpuglis ;and reaping
IxopkB are largely In ugo, but o'n
larger, holdings the Maflsey-IfarriB
up-jtp-date, maphlnery.^is' .,t em
sound, badly-bred stallions is a seri-
ous menace to the standard of Aus-
tralian horses. In this war the Aus-
tralian horse — those selected from
the cream of Australian animals—
has earned a name superior to all
others. The conditions of his natural
life have given him a constitution
which has enabled him to endure
hardships no others could endure.
Like the Australian soldier, the Aus-
tralian horse has earned fame for
itself among the horses of the world.
And what a vauable asset they
would be if the thousands at home
in Australia wore as uniform in size
and type as the French and English
riding horse.
There in a vast difference between
agriculture in Australia and in
France. In Australia there are huge
paddocks securely fenced with barb-
ed wire and wire-netting, and all the
ployed, for the work is one large
scale. In France it is different. The
holdings are small and the up-to-date
methods of,Australia are not neces-
sary. Wooden ploughs and reaping
hooks are largely in use, but on
larger holdings the Massey-Harris
most up-to-date, machinery is em-
SOLDIER'S LETTER. BRITAIN PREPARED.—AGRICULTURAL COMPARISONS. — THE FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN HORSE. (Article), Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 - 1922), Monday 7 January 1918 page Article 2015-04-19 18:37 Thoso Boon In tlio military display
bad brooding and quality, and aro
manlfoBtly subject to alde-bonos;
rlng-bonos, and spavins, Thor# aro
no horsoa In the Army to-day equal
to tho best Australian blood .horse.
Many of .thorn- to-day, alter , throe
yoars' sorvleo, aro as clean and sound ,
In tho legB nH when they wore pur- ,
chasod, Unfortunately, in Auetralla
thoso liorsos aro selootod' from large
numborB, many of which aro worth
loss, undersized brutes. Uniformity
of fllzo,,oto„ is romarUably deficient—
n Berio'ifB doloot which oan only bo
romediod by more stringent preoau-'
tlons on tho part of the Government,
Tho numbor of undorslzed and un
Those seen in the military display
bad breeding and quality, and are
manifestly subject to side-bones,
ring-bones, and spavins, There are
no horsos in the Army to-day equal
to the best Australian blood horse.
Many of them to-day, after three
years' service, are as clean and sound
in the legs as when they were pur-
chased. Unfortunately, in Australia
these horses are selected from large
numbers, many of which are worth-
less, undersized brutes. Uniformity
of size, etc., is remarkably deficient—
a serious dfect which can only be
remedied by more stringent precau-
tions on the part of the Government.
The number of undersized and un-
SOLDIER'S LETTER. BRITAIN PREPARED.—AGRICULTURAL COMPARISONS. — THE FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN HORSE. (Article), Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 - 1922), Monday 7 January 1918 page Article 2015-04-19 18:32 tions. The Froneh people very wise-
. Tho horses, too, are wondorfully
uniform in size and type, but it Is
not tho type calculated to appeal to
tho koon Scottish farmer, who prides
himself on tho inagni/lcent. Clydosr.
dale, of. world tamo. Tho Frenou
Pprchoron, horse Is a oloaii-loggod ani
mal,' round b*»od', and Invariably
with' defective foot, bad (lotion and'
devoid of spirit, Theao horses are
wondorfully quiot, Thoy aro almost
domnRtloatod,.. At the present tlmo,
owing to. the largo nuinber comman
deered by the army, they aro very
valuable, Riding horaos aro very
scarce and soldom booh . on farms, ;
tions. The French people very wise-
The horses, too, are wonderfully
uniform in size and type, but it is
not the type calculated to appeal to
the keen Scottish farmer, who prides
himself on the magnificent Clydes-.
dale, of world fame. The French
Percheron, horse is a clean-legged ani-
mal, round boned, and invariably
with defective feet, bad action and'
devoid of spirit. These horses are
wonderfully quiet. They are almost
domesticated. At the present time,
owing to the large number comman-
deered by the army, they are very
valuable. Riding horses are very
scarce and seldom seen on farms.
SOLDIER'S LETTER. BRITAIN PREPARED.—AGRICULTURAL COMPARISONS. — THE FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN HORSE. (Article), Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 - 1922), Monday 7 January 1918 page Article 2015-04-19 18:30 wealth and resource of tho nation
For 48 hours wo travelled through
prosperous villagos, along tho banks
or beautiful rivers, with vineyards on
dither side, through fields of vivid
green wheat and pastures, till wo ar
rived at Havre, whore wo were
equipped for t.lio battles on tho Wes
tern front. This completod, wo had
valuable forests. and farm lands,
which would gladdon tho heart of
any tonant. Finally, we detrained at
a quiet portion of tho front, whero
accustomed to tho methods of
modern warfare, Tills was in the_
most fertile agricultural aroa imagin
able. lavorywhoro there are snug
In the small patches kept for pas
ture thoro are to bo soon herds of
rod cowb, all wondorfully uniform in
color and size. TIiobo cattlo, if thoy
aro not tho quality of our , boat
herdH, aro romarkablo for uniform-.
Ity. Thoro aro no bad colors or any .
undorsizod animals, Wander through
and note the dilTeroneo. Thore It is
no trouble to discorn tho miserable
little Jersey, and nil sizes and colors
of mysterious hords and orlglna
tlons. Tho Froneh people vory wise
ly stick to 0110 brood, and from the
mlllc and beef point of vlow they
have mode ft wise cholco.
wealth and resource of the nation
For 48 hours we travelled through
prosperous villages, along the banks
of beautiful rivers, with vineyards on
either side, through fields of vivid
green wheat and pastures, till we ar-
rived at Havre, where we were
equipped for the battles on the Wes-
tern front. This completed, we had
valuable forests and farm lands,
which would gladden the heart of
any tenant. Finally, we detrained at
a quiet portion of the front, where
accustomed to the methods of
modern warfare. This was in the
most fertile agricultural area imagin-
able. Evoerywhereere are snug
In the small patches kept for pas-
ture thre are to be soon herds of
red cows, all wonderfully uniform in
color and size. These cattlo, if they
are not the quality of our best
herds, are remarkable for uniform-
ity. There are no bad colors or any
undersized animals. Wander through
and note the difference. There it is
no trouble to discern the miserable
little Jersey, and all sizes and colors
of mysterious herds and origina-
tions. The Froneh people very wise-
ly stick to one breed, and from the
milk and beef point of view they
have made a wise choice.
SOLDIER'S LETTER. BRITAIN PREPARED.—AGRICULTURAL COMPARISONS. — THE FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN HORSE. (Article), Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 - 1922), Monday 7 January 1918 page Article 2015-04-19 18:27 BRITAIN I'llEI'AItED.—AGRICUL
TURAL COMPARISONS. — THK
FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN HORS13.
Veterinary-Sergeant Keith McCly
is now a patient in the Queen's Hos
in his usual informative and inter
esting stylo to his mother as fol
lows:— *
I will give you a little o£ my ex
periences in Prance. It is always a
the Held, as one never knows quite
what will -please the censor, and so
ninny of them differ In tlie Idea as
to what Is permissable. Under pre
bo much necessity for strict censor
British Army as It is to-day should
he the better for publicity. It'is In a
r event oil, find it) was the mystery
truly marvellous In face of the terri
bly ndverse circumstances arising
from unpreparedneBS. To-day the
can't bo clever bo mysterious." But
allowed to writo at random. Many of
• These are the follows the censor has
not be slaudorod or ridiculed. But,
unfortunatoly, many of tho censors in
the field have queer Ideas as to what
should bo written and what should
have given up the idea of writing let
field service cards, which contain i
"I have been admitted into hos
be Btruclc out. I can imagine how
ones In far Australia, waiting
anxiously for nows from tho Austra
comparatively an easy., task. Doing
tho strange methods and moans of
tho East provided tho Australians
with subjects for many lottors, and I
of • what 1 saw and heard. Since
heard but littlo of my movomonts,
owing to all tho obstacles tho letter
writer has to contend with. Having '
would be interested to hear a ltttlo of
tho experiences, a littlo can bo writ
ton within tho law of consorship.
Aftfor all tho long, dreary months
In tho depressing atmosphoro of the
Egyptian wasto, tlio beautiful cli
mate—for it was March when wo ar
tho appoarancos of modorn civilisa
tion were most encouraging. , The
train journey through tho heart oi
the beautifully-fertile country, with
tho hillsides ornamented by vine
yards nnd orchards, and the valleys
almost totally under wheat and uii
classes of cereals, In which people of
busily eugagod, displayed the groat
BRITAIN PREPARED.—AGRICUL-
TURAL COMPARISONS. — THE
FAMOUS AUSTRALIAN HORSE.
Veterinary-Sergeant Keith McCly-
is now a patient in the Queen's Hos-
in his usual informative and inter-
esting style to his mother as fol-
lows:—
I will give you a little of my ex-
periences in France. It is always a
the field, as one never knows quite
what will please the censor, and so
many of them differin the idea as
to what is permissable. Under pre-
be much necessity for strict censor-
British Army as it is to-day should
he the better for publicity. It is in a
revealed, and it was the mystery
truly marvellous in face of the terri-
bly adverse circumstances arising
from unpreparedness. To-day the
can't be clever be mysterious." But
allowed to write at random. Many of
These are the follows the censor has
not be slandered or ridiculed. But,
unfortunately, many of the censors in
the field have queer ideas as to what
should be written and what should
have given up the idea of writing let-
field service cards, which contain a
"I have been admitted into hos-
be struck out. I can imagine how
ones in far Australia, waiting
anxiously for news from the Austra-
comparatively an easy task. Being
the strange methods and means of
the East provided the Australians
with subjects for many lettors, and I
of whatI saw and heard. Since
heard but little of my movements,
owing to all the obstacles the letter
writer has to contend with. Having
would be interested to hear a little of
the experiences, a little can be writ-
ton within the law of censorship.
After all the long, dreary months
in the depressing atmosphere of the
Egyptian waste, the beautiful cli-
mate—for it was March when we ar-
the appearances of modern civilisa-
tion were most encouraging. The
train journey through the heart of
the beautifully fertile country, with
the hillsides ornamented by vine-
yardsand orchards, and the valleys
almost totally under wheat and all
classes of cereals, in which people of
busily engaged, displayed the great
PERSONAL. (Article), Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 - 1922), Friday 11 January 1918 page Article 2015-04-19 18:21 .... Mr. William Tuxford, night officcr
at tho local railway station, has ro
celved an appointment to Ihe Parfces
railway station, which means promo
tion. Mr. Tuxford' has now been sta
tioned hero for over four years, dur
ing which time he has made a largo
circle of friends, who, while regret
ting his departure, wish him all fu
turo prosperity and advanoomont.
Mrs. Buosnell, of Forest Reefs, still
Mrs. F. Edwards and her son, of Ko.
garah, have been , spending a fow
weeks' holiday with' her mother, Mrs.
G, Sams. She leftl for homo by the
I passenger train on" Thursday morn
ing last,
Mr. William Tuxford, night officer
at the local railway station, has re-
ceived an appointment to the Parkes
railway station, which means promo-
tion. Mr. Tuxford has now been sta-
tioned here for over four years, dur-
ing which time he has made a large
circle of friends, who, while regret-
ting his departure, wish him all fu-
ture prosperity and advancement.
Mrs. Buesnell, of Forest Reefs, still
Mrs. F. Edwards and her son, of Ko-
garah, have been spending a few
weeks' holiday with her mother, Mrs.
G. Sams. She leftl for home by the
passenger train on Thursday morn-
ing last.
PERSONAL. (Article), Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 - 1922), Friday 11 January 1918 page Article 2015-04-19 18:17 Tho death occurred last week at
The death occurred last week at
PERSONAL. (Article), Leader (Orange, NSW : 1912 - 1922), Friday 11 January 1918 page Article 2015-04-19 18:17 back looks, had, but thoy will come
again. At tho present wo aro away
from the front lino having a spoil."
Private Volda Plotcher has boon ro
portedi on 8th January, as slightly
than tho wound ho received early last
Juno, when stretcher bearing on 1 no
nian's-land'./Her was thrco weeks off
duty on that occasion,"
back looks bad, but they will come
again. At the present we are away
from the front line having a spell."
Private Velda Fletcher has been re-
ported on 8th January, as slightly
than the wound he received early last
June, when stretcher bearing on no-
man's-land. He was three weeks off
duty on that occasion."

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Andrew Anderson 1838
    List
    Public

    Descendants of Andrew, 2nd son of David

    14 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2013-01-12
    User data
  2. Cobham Watson
    List
    Public

    Descendants of George Cobham Watson and Ann Percival Martyr

    120 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2011-02-25
    User data
  3. Ernest H Martyr
    List
    Public

    These are all the articles that I can find that cover the murder of my great grandfather, in which my great grandmother was aslo charged. Unfortunately there is no evidence so far, here or in the State Archives, of what happened to Kate Callighan.

    79 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2011-01-02
    User data
  4. Foggo
    List
    Public

    Foggo BDM entries

    15 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2013-01-07
    User data
  5. George Martyr 1819
    List
    Public

    Articles relating to my maternal Great Great Grandfather

    78 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2010-11-21
    User data
  6. George Martyr General
    List
    Public

    General items that include mention of George Martyr, Goulburn.

    23 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2010-11-25
    User data
  7. Gibson
    List
    Public

    Gibson related entries

    30 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2014-02-07
    User data
  8. Goulburn Volunteer Rifles dispute
    List
    Public

    A dispute that prominently included George Martyr.

    8 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2010-11-25
    User data
  9. Hoggard, Donovan
    List
    Public

    Relatives of F E Warren

    59 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2013-04-19
    User data
  10. James Martyr
    List
    Public

    Sydney, Owner of Patent Slip

    11 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2011-01-04
    User data
  11. Joesph Martyr 1857 Adelaide
    List
    Public

    Items relating directly to Joseph Martyr (also in George Martyr 1819 list).

    106 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2010-12-14
    User data
  12. John James Martyr
    List
    Public

    of Maitland area.

    125 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2011-01-04
    User data
  13. Joseph Martyr 1822
    List
    Public

    Joseph Martyr, Solicitor, Victoria

    36 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2011-01-08
    User data
  14. Martyr - Other related
    List
    Public

    Items for other Martyr's relatives

    47 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2011-01-08
    User data
  15. Mecham
    List
    Public

    Relatives - two MEcham brothers married 2 Martyr sisters

    35 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2011-05-08
    User data
  16. Morcom
    List
    Public

    Decendants of Joel Morcom

    12 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2013-11-06
    User data
  17. Otford Martyrs
    List
    Public

    These are from Otford, Kent, and not known to be related to our Greenwich Martyr's, according to Tony Marter.

    147 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2011-01-29
    User data
    Rating: r5/5
  18. Shelley
    List
    Public

    74 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2013-06-05
    User data
  19. Thomas William Lockyer Martyr
    List
    Public

    106 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2011-01-04
    User data
  20. Unknown Martyrs
    List
    Public

    Those that currently are not part of Otford or Greenwich Martyrs

    21 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2011-02-08
    User data
  21. Warren related
    List
    Public

    Persons related to us.

    26 items
    created by: public:JohnWarren 2013-06-22
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.