Information about Trove user: JohnMA2227

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,362,827
2 NeilHamilton 3,036,442
3 noelwoodhouse 2,839,879
4 annmanley 2,228,065
5 John.F.Hall 2,097,340
...
106 Ian.Pettet 307,205
107 johnwhin 306,322
108 Paul.McGrath 303,534
109 JohnMA2227 298,667
110 birdwing 298,358
111 Jeff.Noble 296,247

298,667 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 4,448
February 2017 2,050
January 2017 71
December 2016 1,500
November 2016 2,883
October 2016 2,908
September 2016 2,517
August 2016 4,074
July 2016 3,254
June 2016 2,453
May 2016 604
March 2016 1
February 2016 487
January 2016 132
December 2015 1,582
November 2015 1,616
October 2015 892
September 2015 1,132
August 2015 3,372
July 2015 2,819
June 2015 4,000
May 2015 1,932
April 2015 9,374
March 2015 8,851
February 2015 6,114
January 2015 1,003
December 2014 811
November 2014 534
October 2014 481
September 2014 1,157
August 2014 4,471
July 2014 2,010
June 2014 8,114
May 2014 7,915
April 2014 4,860
March 2014 6,731
February 2014 4,846
January 2014 4,664
December 2013 8,482
November 2013 6,153
October 2013 5,505
September 2013 1,491
July 2013 648
June 2013 5,126
May 2013 10,082
April 2013 1,613
March 2013 2,350
February 2013 2,933
December 2012 2,613
November 2012 2,419
October 2012 1,831
September 2012 824
August 2012 2,164
July 2012 519
June 2012 2,277
May 2012 499
April 2012 1,626
March 2012 7,263
February 2012 9,847
January 2012 583
December 2011 1,348
November 2011 3,274
October 2011 3,034
September 2011 1,688
August 2011 786
July 2011 11,401
June 2011 5,536
May 2011 6,073
April 2011 3,067
March 2011 3,788
February 2011 8,778
January 2011 2,202
December 2010 817
November 2010 9,677
October 2010 9,097
September 2010 4,053
August 2010 4,497
July 2010 5,187
June 2010 10,778
May 2010 4,415
April 2010 3,643
March 2010 2,017

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,362,824
2 NeilHamilton 3,036,442
3 noelwoodhouse 2,839,879
4 annmanley 2,227,995
5 John.F.Hall 2,097,335
...
108 Paul.McGrath 303,534
109 birdwing 298,334
110 Jeff.Noble 296,247
111 JohnMA2227 295,919
112 elvie 291,223
113 bernadette.connellan 281,124

295,919 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 3,587
February 2017 1,561
January 2017 71
December 2016 1,382
November 2016 2,765
October 2016 2,208
September 2016 2,055
August 2016 4,074
July 2016 3,254
June 2016 2,453
May 2016 604
March 2016 1
February 2016 487
January 2016 132
December 2015 1,582
November 2015 1,616
October 2015 892
September 2015 1,132
August 2015 3,372
July 2015 2,819
June 2015 4,000
May 2015 1,932
April 2015 9,374
March 2015 8,851
February 2015 6,114
January 2015 1,003
December 2014 811
November 2014 534
October 2014 481
September 2014 1,157
August 2014 4,471
July 2014 2,010
June 2014 8,114
May 2014 7,915
April 2014 4,860
March 2014 6,731
February 2014 4,846
January 2014 4,664
December 2013 8,482
November 2013 6,153
October 2013 5,505
September 2013 1,491
July 2013 648
June 2013 5,126
May 2013 10,082
April 2013 1,613
March 2013 2,350
February 2013 2,933
December 2012 2,613
November 2012 2,419
October 2012 1,831
September 2012 824
August 2012 2,164
July 2012 519
June 2012 2,277
May 2012 499
April 2012 1,626
March 2012 7,263
February 2012 9,847
January 2012 583
December 2011 1,348
November 2011 3,274
October 2011 3,034
September 2011 1,688
August 2011 786
July 2011 11,401
June 2011 5,536
May 2011 6,073
April 2011 3,067
March 2011 3,788
February 2011 8,778
January 2011 2,202
December 2010 817
November 2010 9,677
October 2010 9,097
September 2010 4,053
August 2010 4,497
July 2010 5,187
June 2010 10,778
May 2010 4,415
April 2010 3,643
March 2010 2,017

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 mickbrook 72,435
2 murds5 54,106
3 jaybee67 51,712
4 PhilThomas 20,779
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
9 RodAanensen 4,168
10 poves 3,391
11 sonmaa 2,826
12 JohnMA2227 2,748
13 bainamasquelier 2,544
14 aleon 2,277

2,748 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 861
February 2017 489
December 2016 118
November 2016 118
October 2016 700
September 2016 462


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE SYDNEY COAL DEPOSITS. A LIFE'S HOPE REALISED. JUBILEE OF A SHREWD SUGGESTION A CHAT WITH MR. R. D. ADAMS. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Saturday 23 November 1901 [Issue No.10,751] page 3 2017-03-27 18:21 the right to mine for coal under Sydney Harbour, and
lieving in the soundness cf the project, Mr. Adams
warded bv the formation of a local svndicate.
on the Moorsbank Estate (Liverpool), in 1890, coal
Equallv well-remembered are the objections
right to mine for coal under Sydney Harbour, and
lieving in the soundness of the project, Mr. Adams
warded by the formation of a local syndicate.
on the Moorebank Estate (Liverpool), in 1890, coal
Equally well-remembered are the objections
THE SYDNEY COAL DEPOSITS. A LIFE'S HOPE REALISED. JUBILEE OF A SHREWD SUGGESTION A CHAT WITH MR. R. D. ADAMS. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Saturday 23 November 1901 [Issue No.10,751] page 3 2017-03-27 18:12 the mmm coal
JUBILEE OF A SHREWD SUGGES
TION. '
A CHAT WITH MR. R. ». ADAMS.
the citj at heart, and who desires to eee it make
?whatever progress the enterprise of itfi citizens
uvay deserve, must be gratified at the fact of the
Sydney Harbor Collieries Company's efforts hav
But of ell Sydney's population, there is one man
Adams, ot Snails Bay, Balmain, who first actively
uxk the matter up; who, twenty-seven years ago,
liprlled for. and shordy afterwards obtained, the
uldicuKics, stuck pluckily to his pro
j.i-r. for some sixteen years, until, in
JS^O, a s'yudicale w^s formed which took
ilitf matter up, with the results which ei'e now
kriUTWi to (vcrybody. Mr. Adams's satisfaction
jkusi be oil ilie keener for the fact^hat, unlike
ii:any pioneers of great enterprises, he still re
nins an iniertst in the mine which, in all human
j lobnbiliiy, will, in a very few years, compensate
him for hi-3 past energy and hia far-seeing, bound
li.s perseverance.
iktviixj; corue cut to Australia, like very many
cilicss now prominent in the commercial life of
ilJt? fsuntry, ds a young man, Mr. Adams has been
i-jLu'iiliet! practically all his life with Sydney and
i:*- growth. In au hour's chat
v. uh an 'Evening News' reporter
at his office in Ycung-strect on Friday
af'.ciucon. he proveJ that he possessed a wonder
j'til lunc] of personal anecdote relating to men
?tviici-e nrjues, are now landmarks in the history
as the Ih-st half of the century just ended. It
is exactly fif:y years this month, strange to say,
since Mr. Aili'.ras iimt thought of mining for coal
uui.er Sydney Harocr.
Away back scmewhere in the forties, Mr.
Atliims Eayf he was shown a horseshoe by a
frieml of -)is wlio possessed an estate about the
i:. bed Lpen v.orkod into shape with the aid of
1:. at obtained from coal from his friend's es
i.iio, a narrow s»ani some inches thick having
1' 1 ii found near th»- surface. In jest Mr. Adams
aslft'J for the right to mine for it, and was told
U'.at he might do so if he would ,;ive a royalty
of fid per ton. Later, in November, 1851, Mr.
Adams hiid several conversations with the late
hcv. W. B. Clarke, a distinguished* geologist,
znii«'h io his mind that he never
stated for the mining rights under tbe whole
of Port Jackson. At first the rights of that por
tion reaching from the Heads to Longncse Point,
&'. tsalniaiD, were granted to him. The port;on
beyond, extending from Longnose Paint up to the
railway bridge at Parramatta, was granted after
develop them. Three attempts, he stat?s, were
made to place the enterprise on the London mar
ket, but none were successful. Several other at
tempts made locally met with no batter success.
As in all ventures where a certainty of heavy ex
penditure miz«t precede any possibility of divi
dend-collecting, investors were shy. But, be
living in the soundness cf th? project, Mr. Adams
titn a poor man, until in 1890, hie efforts were re
This was called the 'Sydney and Port Hacking
Coal Company, Limited,' and was formed for the
this time the tbecry of the existence of the coal
I bores which had been put down at Camp Creek
(Helensburgh), in 1884,. at Heathcote, two years
on the Moort'bank Estate (Liverpool), in 1890, coal
bjing reached in each instance. It no longer re
anal under Sydney. The only question was, at
the subsequent flotation of the company in Bng
Jand by Mr. James Inglis, with some of the best
known coal experts in the world on the directo
Eauallv well -remembered ar-» tho rvViicntinTic
which were raised against the mine being estab
there need have been no disfigurement of the har
v ould have been of attractive design, while the
Emoke would have been reduced by smokecon
suming apparatus to a minimum. But the agi
draught can moor beside the quay wail, in any
naturally enthusiaiti=. 'Sydney people,' said he,
'do not yet realise the importance of it. In no
population, wliero coal can be brought up direct
1 am satisfied, from the opinions of experts, that
the coal will be frund superior for steaming pur
from the public view. Sydney is now a naval ar
ec'iial. anA the presence of a great coal mine in the
harbor is, from strategic considerations, of na
tional importance.'
THE SYDNEY COAL
JUBILEE OF A SHREWD SUGGES-
TION.
A CHAT WITH MR. R. D. ADAMS.
the city at heart, and who desires to see it make
whatever progress the enterprise of its citizens
may deserve, must be gratified at the fact of the
Sydney Harbor Collieries Company's efforts hav-
But of all Sydney's population, there is one man
Adams, of Snails Bay, Balmain, who first actively
took the matter up; who, twenty-seven years ago,
applied for, and shortly afterwards obtained, the
the right to mine for coal under Sydney Harbour, and
difficulties, stuck pluckily to his pro-
ject for some sixteen years, until, in
1990, a syndicate was formed which took
the matter up, with the results which are now
known to everybody. Mr. Adams's satisfaction
must be all the keener for the fact that, unlike
many pioneers of great enterprises, he still re-
gains an interest in the mine which, in all human
probability, will, in a very few years, compensate
him for his past energy and his far-seeing, bound-
less perseverance.
Having come out to Australia, like very many
others now prominent in the commercial life of
this country, as a young man, Mr. Adams has been
[involved]? practically all his life with Sydney and
its growth. In an hour's chat
with an "Evening News" reporter
at his office in Young-street on Friday
afternoon. he proved that he possessed a wonder-
ful fund of personal anecdote relating to men
whose names are now landmarks in the history
as the first half of the century just ended. It
is exactly fifty years this month, strange to say,
since Mr. Adams first thought of mining for coal
under Sydney Harbour.
Away back somewhere in the forties, Mr.
Adams says he was shown a horseshoe by a
friend of his who possessed an estate about the
it had been worked into shape with the aid of
coke obtained from coal from his friend's es-
tate, a narrow seam some inches thick having
been found near the surface. In jest Mr. Adams
asked for the right to mine for it, and was told
that he might do so if he would give a royalty
of 6d per ton. Later, in November, 1851, Mr.
Adams had several conversations with the late
Rev. W. B. Clarke, a distinguished geologist,
much to his mind that he never
stated for the mining rights under the whole
of Port Jackson. At first the rights of that por-
tion reaching from the Heads to Longnose Point,
at Balmain, were granted to him. The portion
beyond, extending from Longnose Point up to the
railway bridge at Parramatta, was granted after-
develop them. Three attempts, he states, were
made to place the enterprise on the London mar-
ket, but none were successful. Several other at-
tempts made locally met with no better success.
As in all ventures where a certainty of heavy ex-
penditure must precede any possibility of divi-
dend-collecting, investors were shy. But, be-
lieving in the soundness cf the project, Mr. Adams
him a poor man, until in 1890, his efforts were re-
This was called the "Sydney and Port Hacking
Coal Company, Limited," and was formed for the
this time the theory of the existence of the coal
bores which had been put down at Camp Creek
(Helensburgh), in 1884, at Heathcote, two years
on the Moorsbank Estate (Liverpool), in 1890, coal
being reached in each instance. It no longer re-
coal under Sydney. The only question was, at
the subsequent flotation of the company in Eng-
land by Mr. James Inglis, with some of the best
known coal experts in the world on the directo-
Equallv well-remembered are the objections
which were raised against the mine being estab-
there need have been no disfigurement of the har-
would have been of attractive design, while the
smoke would have been reduced by smoke-con-
suming apparatus to a minimum. But the agi-
draught can moor beside the quay wall, in any
naturally enthusiastic. "Sydney people," said he,
"do not yet realise the importance of it. In no
population, where coal can be brought up direct
I am satisfied, from the opinions of experts, that
the coal will be found superior for steaming pur-
from the public view. Sydney is now a naval ar-
senal, and the presence of a great coal mine in the
harbor is, from strategic considerations, of na-
tional importance."
THE SYDNEY HARBOUR COLLIERY. REACHING THE COAL MEASURES. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 30 November 1901 [Issue No.1861] page 30 2017-03-27 17:24 nitely pronounced to be the Bulii seam.
ramatta River to Sydney Deads.
Adams. The chairman of the Loudon
board, Mr. E. T. Ingbam, is a well-knovrn
nitely pronounced to be the Bulli seam.
ramatta River to Sydney Heads.
Adams. The chairman of the London
board, Mr. E. T. Ingham, is a well-known
THE SYDNEY HARBOUR COLLIERY. REACHING THE COAL MEASURES. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 30 November 1901 [Issue No.1861] page 30 2017-03-27 17:17 dep(h of 3,005ft. A coal seam was found
ai a depth of 2.801ft. from the surface, but
ii li:nl hern hnr.ii by tlie intrusion ot ,1 llow
of basalt in the ape when the world was
was concerned, but the fact had been de
in duly, 1892. On the 8th November,
be 10ft. 3in. in thickness. This was defi
nitely pronounced to lie the Bulii seam.
The bore was curried down to a total depth
Hoof—Clav slate.
Coaly clay slate 0 1
minute veins of ealcite 0 8
quality 2 10
firmly to coal 0 0J
quality, the last thre inches rather
soft and bituminous 0 4}
Coal, soft bituminous, a trifle clayey.. 0 3J
10 3
Six Ramples of the core of coal obtained
Hydroscopic moisture 66
Volatile hydrocarbons 17.57
Fixed carbon 71.09
Ash 10.68
100.00
Moan percentage of sulphur 724
Mean specific gravity 1.846
Mean calorimetric value 13.00
The coal is pronounced good for house
hold purposes, excellent for steaming pur
po>es, and will vield a first-class coke.
The additional mining rights secured Wy
the syndicate in the course of ho ring
possesses mining rights almost from Par
by boat from, the business centre of .Syd
ney, and is easily accessible by tmm and
'bus. The output can be as readily dis
tributed by land-carriage a> by water
long (at which there is a depth of 26tt.
at Tow water). Coal oan thus be shipped
v"Leod Bros, were the contractors. The
H.iwkeshury sandstones are to be found at
as the firBt shots at each were fired on
almost uninterruptedly in three shifts dur
to the Sutherland and Fitzrov dry docks
rubble wwlls on the side of the cove. Jioth
shafts are sunk 20f(. in diameter, hut this
is subsequently reduced to 18ft. by put
ting in a walling of brickwork. Each sec
seated on the solid rock and set: perfectly
level and true'to the centre of the shaft.
as thick as can be worked, without cut
ground, but is usually from 100ft. to 150/t.
shafts will be very like two vertical rail
here be noted that long ago tlie results ob
by the ("remorne bores, and testified to the
cataclysm, as many persons rashly pre
George It. Dibits, Sir Mah-olmn 3).
M'Kacharn. M.H.R.. Mr. dames Inglis,
Colonel James Hums, and Mr. R. D.
Ailani?. The chairman of the Loudon
board, Mr. K. T. Ingbam, is a well-knovrn
colliery proprietor of Yorkshire, and ninny
of the other shareholders are largely in
terested in coal-mining. The accompany
depth of 3,005ft. A coal seam was found
at a depth of 2,801ft. from the surface, but
had been burnt by the intrusion of a flow
of basalt in the age when the world was
was concerned, but the fact had been de-
in July, 1892. On the 8th November,
be 10ft. 3in. in thickness. This was defi-
nitely pronounced to be the Bulii seam.
The bore was carried down to a total depth
Roof—Clay slate.
Coaly clay slate... ... ... ... 0 1
minute veins of calcite... ... 0 8
quality... ... ... ... ... 2 10
firmly to coal ... ... ... ... 0 0¼
quality, the last three inches rather
soft and bituminous... ... ... ... ... 6 4¼
Coal, soft bituminous, a trifle clayey.. 0 3½
10 3
Six samples of the core of coal obtained
Hydroscopic moisture ... ... ... ... ... .66
Volatile hydrocarbons ... ... ... ... ... 17.57
Fixed carbon... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 71.09
Ash... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 10.68
100.00
Mean percentage of sulphur ... ... ... .724
Mean specific gravity ... ... ... ... ... 1.346
Mean calorimetric value... ... ... ... 13.00
The coal is pronounced good for house-
hold purposes, excellent for steaming pur-
poses, and will yield a first-class coke.
The additional mining rights secured by
the syndicate in the course of boring
possesses mining rights almost from Par-
by boat from the business centre of Syd-
ney, and is easily accessible by tram and
bus. The output can be as readily dis-
tributed by land-carriage as by water
long (at which there is a depth of 26ft.
at low water). Coal can thus be shipped
McLeod Bros, were the contractors. The
Hawkesbury sandstones are to be found at
as the first shots at each were fired on
almost uninterruptedly in three shifts dur-
to the Sutherland and Fitzroy dry docks
rubble walls on the side of the cove. Both
shafts are sunk 20ft. in diameter, but this
is subsequently reduced to 18ft. by put-
ting in a walling of brickwork. Each sec-
seated on the solid rock and set perfectly
level and true to the centre of the shaft.
as thick as can be worked, without cut-
ground, but is usually from 100ft. to 150ft.
shafts will be very like two vertical rail-
here be noted that long ago the results ob-
by the Cremorne bores, and testified to the
cataclysm, as many persons rashly pre-
George R. Dibbs, Sir Malcolmn D.
McEacharn. M.H.R., Mr. James Inglis,
Colonel James Burns, and Mr. R. D.
Adams. The chairman of the Loudon
board, Mr. E. T. Ingbam, is a well-knovrn
colliery proprietor of Yorkshire, and many
of the other shareholders are largely in-
terested in coal-mining. The accompany-
THE SYDNEY HARBOUR COLLIERY. REACHING THE COAL MEASURES. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 30 November 1901 [Issue No.1861] page 30 2017-03-27 16:54 REACHING THE OOAE MEASURES.
struck in the workings under Sydney Har
is reaching its climax. J lie possession 01
large supplies of coal is so highly advan
tageous to « country that the colliery
now being developed at Ralmain, Sydney,
in any other part of the Australian con
coastline, and its plentifulness in such con
venient positions forced the fact of its ex
on tlie sea beach. The grand measures of
Lieut. Shorthand, B.X.. sent in search of
been derived from the places where the ex
is-tence of the precious fuel was originally
unanswered. The observations of a num
ber of keenly-observant geologists and per
sons interested in mining have now, how
ever, established the fact that the mea
that the seam worked at Buki corresponds
with that worked at Wal a rah. Catnerine
11 iil Bay; and that the "borehole" seam of
between the northern and southern coal
exists, oi which the Sydney district is the
m a very practical form by a series of bor
\V. 11. Clarke, expressed his belief in the
belief, applied m the year 1874 for mining
rights uoer the whole area of Port Jackson.
River, Botany, Moore - park, Narra
finding coal. At Gamp Creek bore, at a
the lower at 1,577ft. At the Holt-Suther
<md -a lower seam at 2,296ft.. At Liver
the eminent geologists at that time en
REACHING THE COAL MEASURES.
struck in the workings under Sydney Har-
is reaching its climax. The possession of
large supplies of coal is so highly advan-
tageous to a country that the colliery
now being developed at Balmain, Sydney,
in any other part of the Australian con-
coastline, and its plentifulness in such con-
venient positions forced the fact of its ex-
on the sea beach. The grand measures of
Lieut. Shorthand, R.N., sent in search of
been derived from the places where the ex-
istence of the precious fuel was originally
unanswered. The observations of a num-
ber of keenly-observant geologists and per-
sons interested in mining have now, how-
ever, established the fact that the mea-
that the seam worked at Bulli corresponds
with that worked at Waratah. Catherine
Hill Bay; and that the "borehole" seam of
between the northern and southern coal-
exists, of which the Sydney district is the
in a very practical form by a series of bor-
W. B. Clarke, expressed his belief in the
belief, applied in the year 1874 for mining
rights uder the whole area of Port Jackson.
River, Botany, Moore - park, Narra-
finding coal. At Camp Creek bore, at a
the lower at 1,577ft. At the Holt-Suther-
and a lower seam at 2,296ft.. At Liver-
the eminent geologists at that time en-
FRANTIC SIGNALS Injured Men in Shaft BALMAIN EXPLOSION INQUIRY SYDNEY, Wednesday. (Article), Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , Thursday 9 February 1933 [Issue No.17,574] page 8 2017-03-26 22:22 the surfaee after an explosion of gas at
a depth of 2900ft., in the company's workings
reach the cage; and signalleld to be hauled
the surface after an explosion of gas at
a depth of 2900ft., in the company's work-
ings.
reach the cage, and signalleld to be hauled
SERIOUS BOILER EXPLOSION AT WOONONA. (Article), Illawarra Mercury (Wollongong, NSW : 1856 - 1950), Saturday 6 July 1895 [Issue No.118] page 2 2017-03-26 20:44 - WOONONA. ?
(From our Correspondent.)
A very Bad and serious acoidnnt hap
pened' on Wednesday night at'Mr. S. A.
Cope's butchering ej'ablishment af
in manufacturing sausages about 7 o'elook
in the . evening with a ttoam driven
— Messrs. S. A. Cope, D. Cope, _ and
Herbert Cope- — with steam and ? boiling
and may in one ca»e prove fatal, as Mr. D.
Cope, in addition to having severe Bcalds,
received a large wound on tho head. He
a'l three were attended by that p'entleman
is the proprietor of the busines', and the
two brothers aro employed by him. He is
highly respscted os one of our leading
publio men, and much sympathy is felt for
the family by tho whole neighborhood. It
is not definitely known what caused tho acoi
deot, but it is believed to haro been throueh
stand or was intended to stind. Bad as
the case Is, it was ouly by a narrow esoape
Oop6, with her youngest child in her arms,
had scarcely left the ' place where it
occurred, and would have been among tho
sufforers had alio been n n inute la'or. Mr.
D. Oopo is unmarried. The others nre
married, and if care, attention, nnd medical
skill can avail, there is uo doubt a speedy
recovery will rosult.
WOONONA.
(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.)
A very sad and serious accident hap-
pened on Wednesday night at Mr. S. A.
Cope's butchering establishment at
in manufacturing sausages about 7 o'clock
in the evening with a steam driven
and may in one case prove fatal, as Mr. D.
Cope, in addition to having severe scalds,
received a large wound on the head. He
all three were attended by that gentleman
is the proprietor of the busines, and the
two brothers are employed by him. He is
highly respected as one of our leading
public men, and much sympathy is felt for
the family by the whole neighborhood. It
is not definitely known what caused the acci-
dent, but it is believed to have been through
stand or was intended to stand. Sad as
the case is, it was only by a narrow escape
Cope, with her youngest child in her arms,
had scarcely left the place where it
occurred, and would have been among the
sufferers had she been a minute later. Mr.
D. Cope is unmarried. The others are
married, and if care, attention, and medical
skill can avail, there is no doubt a speedy
recovery will result.
COUNTRY NOTES. (Article), Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907), Saturday 13 July 1895 [Issue No.1327] page 17 2017-03-26 20:37 Tho Lismore laud revenue for the
to* selectors taking advantage of the
Many selectors in the Deniliquin dis
a charge of attempting to shoot Ar
The late rains having sufficiently sof
and much larger areas will be under cul
Shearing has been commenced -at
sheep -dying - from the cold and want
held in the Assembly Hall, Pic
son and Miss 51. A. Lamb, of the central
committee,, were present, and the com
institude;-, about £30.
An interesting experiment in the de
carried out by4 Mr. Cobb, at Bando, near
were dehorned in about four, hours. The
100 under the 389t agreement. Tho
Mr. G. Clark and his wife left Goondi
windi, on the M'Intyre, on March 2, in a
canoe, 16ft long,, drawing 7in of water, for
the 2nd instant. Mr- Clarke estimates
the SchoolJof Arts, Bathurst, on July 3.
Mayor of Bathurst, Aid. W. P. Bassett,
National Beekeepers* Association of
honey on the home market. The conven
yet hold.
July 3 in the e-ngine-shed of Mr. S. A.
They« were standing in front of the
blown.' out, enveloping them with hot
water and steam. Medical attend
with the force of tho explosion.
was lifted from his cot by his father, and ho
and tried to extinguish the flames, but tho
last night. Mr. and Mrs. Clyde wore both
to rescue the boy. Mr. Clyde only re
cently took over charge of tho Cooma
The Lismore land revenue for the
to selectors taking advantage of the
Many selectors in the Deniliquin dis-
a charge of attempting to shoot Ar-
The late rains having sufficiently sof-
and much larger areas will be under cul-
Shearing has been commenced at
sheep dying from the cold and want
held in the Assembly Hall, Pic-
son and Miss F. A. Lamb, of the central
committee, were present, and the com-
institution about £30.
An interesting experiment in the de-
carried out by Mr. Cobb, at Bando, near
were dehorned in about four hours. The
100 under the 1894 agreement. The
Mr. G. Clark and his wife left Goondi-
windi, on the McIntyre, on March 2, in a
canoe, 16ft long, drawing 7in of water, for
the 2nd instant. Mr. Clarke estimates
the School of Arts, Bathurst, on July 3.
Mayor of Bathurst, Ald. W. P. Bassett,
National Beekeepers' Association of
honey on the home market. The conven-
yet held.
July 3 in the engine-shed of Mr. S. A.
They were standing in front of the
blown out, enveloping them with hot
water and steam. Medical attend-
with the force of the explosion.
was lifted from his cot by his father, and he
and tried to extinguish the flames, but the
last night. Mr. and Mrs. Clyde were both
to rescue the boy. Mr. Clyde only re-
cently took over charge of the Cooma
Bulli Steam Explosion. DEATH OF THE SECOND VICTIM. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Monday 15 July 1895 [Issue No.8771] page 3 2017-03-26 20:26 second victim of the late boiler explosion,
lied on Friday night, and was buried, on
aown, ana was only field by a couple or
was in good order. A pressure of 301b
second victim of the late boiler explosion,
died on Friday night, and was buried on
down, and was only held by a couple or
was in good order. A pressure of 30lb
Explosion at Bulli. TWO BUTCHERS SCALDED. (Article), Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931), Friday 5 July 1895 [Issue No.8763] page 3 2017-03-26 20:25 Explosion at Eulli.
BULLI, Friday. — A serious . explo
They were standing in front of tbe
blown out, enveloping tbem witb bot
water and steam. Medical attend
ance «was at once procured, as the
men were badly scalded, and tbeir
Cope is tlie sole survivor of the Bulli
-witb tlie force of the explosion.
Explosion at Bulli.
BULLI, Friday.—A serious explo-
They were standing in front of the
blown out, enveloping them with hot
water and steam. Medical attend-
ance was at once procured, as the
men were badly scalded, and their
Cope is the sole survivor of the Bulli
witb the force of the explosion.

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.