Information about Trove user: JPEditor

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,363,071
2 NeilHamilton 3,036,442
3 noelwoodhouse 2,839,879
4 annmanley 2,228,065
5 John.F.Hall 2,097,340
...
72 Trevor.Poultney 426,062
73 dmarkwick 419,405
74 desmodium 413,287
75 JPEditor 411,296
76 rosier 410,483
77 JaneM1951 409,794

411,296 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 10,473
February 2017 22,079
January 2017 31,067
December 2016 35,258
November 2016 38,533
October 2016 27,598
September 2016 8,817
August 2015 5
December 2014 4
June 2014 858
April 2014 2,277
March 2014 12,882
February 2014 17,113
January 2014 27,033
December 2013 24,823
November 2013 5,563
October 2013 509
September 2013 307
July 2013 25
June 2013 75
January 2013 837
December 2012 654
November 2012 448
October 2012 115
September 2012 254
August 2012 15
July 2012 20
June 2012 221
May 2012 67
December 2011 37
August 2011 9,986
July 2011 16,118
June 2011 5,863
May 2011 14,791
April 2011 40,068
March 2011 30,875
February 2011 23,165
January 2011 2,463

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,363,068
2 NeilHamilton 3,036,442
3 noelwoodhouse 2,839,879
4 annmanley 2,227,995
5 John.F.Hall 2,097,335
...
72 Trevor.Poultney 426,062
73 dmarkwick 419,405
74 desmodium 413,287
75 JPEditor 411,296
76 rosier 410,483
77 JaneM1951 409,771

411,296 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

March 2017 10,473
February 2017 22,079
January 2017 31,067
December 2016 35,258
November 2016 38,533
October 2016 27,598
September 2016 8,817
August 2015 5
December 2014 4
June 2014 858
April 2014 2,277
March 2014 12,882
February 2014 17,113
January 2014 27,033
December 2013 24,823
November 2013 5,563
October 2013 509
September 2013 307
July 2013 25
June 2013 75
January 2013 837
December 2012 654
November 2012 448
October 2012 115
September 2012 254
August 2012 15
July 2012 20
June 2012 221
May 2012 67
December 2011 37
August 2011 9,986
July 2011 16,118
June 2011 5,863
May 2011 14,791
April 2011 40,068
March 2011 30,875
February 2011 23,165
January 2011 2,463

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
Starter Counted Out By Games Crowd (Article), The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), Saturday 5 February 1938 [Issue No.8764] page 1 2017-03-26 12:43 . The starter was counted out by the crowd at the Em
pire Games to-day, when Mrs. T. Peake (Australia) -was
disqualified for breaking the mark m the semi-final of the
women's 100 yards;
Mrs. Peake, young and. petite: and
the mother of a seven-year-oid son,
said she 'had "no complaints."
"We . can't be worried," she said,
Mrs, Peake said that just before
lnnded near the track, and the starter
had called the competitors back. Ap
parently she had been a little con
fused after this incident, ana was
extremely sorrv - that it nad Hap
pened. :
Mrs. Peake. who won tne second
heat of tne event, was claimed to
have had a very good chance oi win
ning tne semi-flnal. leaving her to
meet a countrywoman. Miss Decima
Norman, m tne final. Miss Norman s
time in ner heat and semi-flnal were
equalled later bv Miss Baroara Burke
(South Africa) in tiie otner semi
Proudly bearing Hi national flag in tbe parade of alhlelet, Janki Dans, the role
Indian representative at the Empire Games, was loudly Japped. Leading bun is
an Air League cadet?
The starter was counted out by the crowd at the Em-
pire Games to-day, when Mrs. T. Peake (Australia) was
disqualified for breaking the mark in the semi-final of the
women's 100 yards.
Mrs. Peake, young and. petite, and
the mother of a seven-year-old son,
said she had "no complaints."
"We can't be worried," she said,
Mrs. Peake said that just before
landed near the track, and the starter
had called the competitors back. Ap-
parently she had been a little con-
fused after this incident, and was
extremely sorry that it had hap-
pened.
Mrs. Peake. who won the second
heat of the event, was claimed to
have had a very good chance of win-
ning the semi-final, leaving her to
meet a countrywoman, Miss Decima
Norman, in the final. Miss Norman's
time in her heat and semi-final were
equalled later by Miss Barbara Burke
(South Africa) in the other semi-
Proudly bearing his national flag in the parade of athleles, Janki Dass, the sole
Indian representative at the Empire Games, was loudly clapped. Leading him is
an Air League cadet!
PHOTOGRAPHY AND EXPLORATION. TO THE EDITOR OF THE ARGUS. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wednesday 20 November 1861 [Issue No.4,826] page 3 2017-03-26 12:02 which Burke and his companions passed. ;
should have had on his return from Carpentaria,
rectified if an artist could bo sent in any vessel
But a matter of more thrilling interest *- '* -
,*.!.:-:,",",.. ".- . --.«.»i»»
wo.auB ....,,. ». mo spots where our devotod ex-
the vegetation of tho district, would be most in-
This could bo done in both cases at small cost,
and I do trust the matter will be considerad
I am, Sir, yours,.
which Burke and his companions passed.
should have had on his return from Carpentaria.
rectified if an artist could be sent in any vessel
But a matter of more thrilling interest is the
taking views of the spots where our devoted ex-
the vegetation of the district, would be most in-
This could be done in both cases at small cost,
and I do trust the matter will be considered
I am, Sir, yours,
WOMEN'S EVENTS 100 YARDS (Detailed lists, results, guides), The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), Saturday 5 February 1938 [Issue No.8764] page 9 2017-03-26 11:26 Time, 114.
Heat 3.— J. Dolson (Canada), i;
Ilcat 4.— D. Norman (Australia) 1,
,D. Lumley (New Zealand) 2, W. Jef
frey (England) 3, I. Bleasdale (Can
, First Senii-Final.— Norman 1,
Walker 2, Dolson 3, Saunders 4.
Meagher 5, Stokes 6. Won by.'. 24
yards with a yard between', second
Second Semi-final— Burkef.l,- Wood
land 2, Howard 3, Lumley 4, Won by
and third. Time, 11. 1-10. . Peake was
did not face, the starter, .
Time, 11½.
Heat 3.— J. Dolson (Canada), 1;
Heat 4.— D. Norman (Australia) 1,
D. Lumley (New Zealand) 2, W. Jef-
frey (England) 3, I. Bleasdale (Can-
First Semi-Final.— Norman 1,
Walker 2, Dolson 3, Saunders 4,
Meagher 5, Stokes 6. Won by 2½
yards with a yard between second
and third. Time 11 1-10 (Empire
Second Semi-final— Burke 1, Wood-
land 2, Howard 3, Lumley 4. Won by
and third. Time, 11. 1-10. Peake was
did not face the starter.
WOMEN'S EVENTS 100 YARDS (Detailed lists, results, guides), The Sun (Sydney, NSW : 1910 - 1954), Saturday 5 February 1938 [Issue No.8764] page 9 2017-03-26 11:15 Africa), Usee.; Empire Games, E.
Hiscock (England), Tl.Ssec.; Aus
llsec.
Heat l.—B. Burke (South Africa)
1. J. Walker (Australia) 2, B. I-Ioward
and third. Time, 11 2-5."
Ilcat 2. — T. Peake (Australia) 1, D.
Zealand) 4. Won by inches/with
Africa), 11sec.; Empire Games, E.
Hiscock (England), 11.3sec.; Aus
11sec.
Heat 1.—B. Burke (South Africa)
1. J. Walker (Australia) 2, B. Howard
Heat 2. — T. Peake (Australia) 1, D.
Zealand) 4. Won by inches,with
Read the synopsis of the opening chapters on page 40, and commence reading the popular humorist's latest story, Now! Summer Lightning (Article), Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Thursday 30 May 1929 [Issue No.3186] page 17 2017-03-25 14:50 "Whi -Viover you' like." ' *'
"Or-gosh!" • ' . ' 1
"Whit's the inatter?"
"StH'l I've got an idea."
"Beginners' luck." " .
"Why not go, to Norfolk Street?'
"'ft' Mur .home?". ' ' ' .
"\o.. There's nobody there; And our butler is
a star ,h bird. He'll get us tea and say no
thing,' ■ ' >
"Whichever you like."
"Or—gosh!"
"What's the matter?"
"Sue! I've got an idea."
"Beginners' luck."
"Why not go to Norfolk Street?'
"To your home?"
"Yes. There's nobody there. And our butler is
a staunch bird. He'll get us tea and say no-
thing."
Read the synopsis of the opening chapters on page 40, and commence reading the popular humorist's latest story, Now! Summer Lightning (Article), Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Thursday 30 May 1929 [Issue No.3186] page 17 2017-03-24 21:50 Head the synopsis of the opening chapters on page 40, and commence reading the popular humorist's latest story,
"Good morning, Lady Constance." Rupert Baxter-, adyanced with joyous camaraderie: glinting Irom both lenses. Then he perceived his former employei
and' his exuberance vanished. "Er—good • morning, ' Lord E'msworth," . he said. . . . .
P. G. JVODEHOUSE
Illustrated by Dennis Connelly,
"J>Y the way," Said-Ronnie, the., flood
of eloquence .subsiding. "A thought
we're headed for?" , .
"I moan nt the moment."
"I supposed you were taking mo to
tea somewhere." ' •
"Bur where?' 'We've got right out. ' '
of the tea zone. 'What with one thing
and • another, ,1've . .just been driving' ' J .
at random—to and fro, 'as it were—
and \vr .soem to have worked round to
somewhere in the Swiss .cottage neigh- *
borhoo.i, We'd better switch back and set a course
lor the Carlton or. some place. How do you feelu
about tiro Carlton ?" ' . •
"All Mght." '■•••■ ' ■ • \
"Or tile Ritz?"
Read the synopsis of the opening chapters on page 40, and commence reading the popular humorist's latest story, Now!
"Good morning, Lady Constance." Rupert Baxter advanced with joyous camaraderie glinting from both lenses. Then he perceived his former employer
and his exuberance vanished. "Er—good morning, Lord Emsworth," he said.
P. G. WODEHOUSE
Illustrated by Dennis Connelly.
"BY the way," said Ronnie, the flood
of eloquence subsiding. "A thought
we're headed for?"
"I mean at the moment."
"I supposed you were taking me to
tea somewhere."
"But where? We've got right out
of the tea zone. "What with one thing
and another, I've just been driving
at random—to and fro, as it were—
and we seem to have worked round to
somewhere in the Swiss cottage neigh-
borhood. We'd better switch back and set a course
for the Carlton or some place. How do you feel
about the Carlton ?"
"All right."
"Or the Ritz?"
Read the synopsis of the opening chapters on page 40, and commence reading the popular humorist's latest story, Now! Summer Lightning (Article), Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Thursday 30 May 1929 [Issue No.3186] page 17 2017-03-24 21:50 Head the synopsis of the opening chapters on page 40, and commence reading the popular humorist's latest story,
"Good morning, Lady Constance." Rupert Baxter-, adyanced with joyous camaraderie: glinting Irom both lenses. Then he perceived his former employei
and' his exuberance vanished. "Er—good • morning, ' Lord E'msworth," . he said. . . . .
P. G. JVODEHOUSE
Illustrated by Dennis Connelly,
"J>Y the way," Said-Ronnie, the., flood
of eloquence .subsiding. "A thought
we're headed for?" , .
"I moan nt the moment."
"I supposed you were taking mo to
tea somewhere." ' •
"Bur where?' 'We've got right out. ' '
of the tea zone. 'What with one thing
and • another, ,1've . .just been driving' ' J .
at random—to and fro, 'as it were—
and \vr .soem to have worked round to
somewhere in the Swiss .cottage neigh- *
borhoo.i, We'd better switch back and set a course
lor the Carlton or. some place. How do you feelu
about tiro Carlton ?" ' . •
"All Mght." '■•••■ ' ■ • \
"Or tile Ritz?"
Read the synopsis of the opening chapters on page 40, and commence reading the popular humorist's latest story, Now!
"Good morning, Lady Constance." Rupert Baxter advanced with joyous camaraderie glinting from both lenses. Then he perceived his former employer
and his exuberance vanished. "Er—good morning, Lord Emsworth," he said.
P. G. WODEHOUSE
Illustrated by Dennis Connelly.
"BY the way," said Ronnie, the flood
of eloquence subsiding. "A thought
we're headed for?"
"I mean at the moment."
"I supposed you were taking me to
tea somewhere."
"But where? We've got right out
of the tea zone. "What with one thing
and another, I've just been driving
at random—to and fro, as it were—
and we seem to have worked round to
somewhere in the Swiss cottage neigh-
borhood. We'd better switch back and set a course
for the Carlton or some place. How do you feel
about the Carlton ?"
"All right."
"Or the Ritz?"
Road the Synopsis of the Opening Chapter on Page 42, and Commence Reading this Humorous Serial, Now! Summer Lightning CHAPTER II. (Article), Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Thursday 23 May 1929 [Issue No.3185] page 17 2017-03-24 21:41 .say I didn't
slishtest difference."
say I didn't
slightest difference."
Road the Synopsis of the Opening Chapter on Page 42, and Commence Reading this Humorous Serial, Now! Summer Lightning CHAPTER II. (Article), Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Thursday 23 May 1929 [Issue No.3185] page 17 2017-03-24 21:39 "Oh. your mother is —er—no longer
"Too bad," said Ronnie, brighten
"My father's name was Cotter
Icigli. I-Ie was in the Irish Guards."
Ronnie's ecstatic cry seriously In
tlie exercise of his duties.
it doesn't matter to me. of course,
jellied eels. But think what an enor
"But it will. . We must get him
about him," he urged, recovering
11is mother, lie thought of his Aunt
Constance, find reason told him that
"Spending her life dancing on sup
per tables with tight • stock
brokers. . ,
. . with the result that when it's
our family before. My Uncle Gaily
was In love with some niri on the
formed n wedge and bust the thing
nn and shipped him off V.o Couth
Africa or somewhere to forget her.
"My
complexion ia nwful." ,,
'Must be one of those 'inferiority' complexions.
,}°0^ ^ him: Drew three sober
j V? 1 the near nineteen-hundred
ana then decided that was pimn-h J
take to drink, cooped up at Bland
lnss a hundred miles away front you,
I shall be vastly surprised. it's all
any patience with it. I've i jollv
good mind to so to Uncle Clarence to
night. a^itd simply tell hint that I'm in
you. and that if the family don't like
Ronnie -simmered down.
me. ne certainly won't give you your
money _ Whereas if he doesn't, he
may. What sort, of a man is he?"
"Uncle Clarence? Oh, a. mild,
dreamy old boy. Mad about garden
ing', and all that. At the moment, 1
"I'd feel a lot easier in my mind.
tackle him, if I were n pig. I'd ex
"You were rather a pig .just now.
weren't you V"
down, I'd ... 1 don't i'nu.v vh.'t I'd
do. 13r—Sue!"
"Swear that, while I'm at •.-Hand
ings, you won't go out with a oul.
Mot even to a dance."
"Mot even to a dance?"
"Mo."
".Especially this man L'ilbcam. '
"I'm not worrying' about Hugo,
lie's safe at Blandings."
L'ncle Clarence. I made my mother
get hint the .1ob when the Hot Spot
and Miss Schoonmnker there to keep
vou company! How nice for you."
like that. If you ask mc, I think
you with big. dreamy eyes. . ."
vou my honest word. . . ."
He became lyrical. Sue, loaning'
back. listened contentedly. The cloud
had been a threatening cloud, black
"Oh, your mother is —er—no longer
"Too bad," said Ronnie, brighten-
"My father's name was Cotter-
leigh. He was in the Irish Guards."
Ronnie's ecstatic cry seriously in-
the exercise of his duties.
It doesn't matter to me, of course,
jellied eels. But think what an enor-
"But it will. We must get him
about him," he urged, recovering.
his mother, he thought of his Aunt
Constance, and reason told him that
"Spending her life dancing on sup-
per tables with tight stock-
brokers. . ."
". . . with the result that when it's
our family before. My Uncle Gally
was in love with some girl on the
formed a wedge and bust the thing
up and shipped him off to South
Africa or somewhere to forget her. ||
"My complexion is awful."
"Must be one of those 'inferiority' complexions."
|| And look at him! Drew three sober
breaths in the near nineteen-hundred
and then decided that was enough. I
take to drink, cooped up at Bland-
ings a hundred miles away from you,
I shall be vastly surprised. It's all
any patience with it. I've a jolly
good mind to go to Uncle Clarence to-
night and simply tell him that I'm in
you, and that if the family don't like
Ronnie simmered down.
me, he certainly won't give you your
money. Whereas if he doesn't, he
may. What sort of a man is he?"
"Uncle Clarence? Oh, a mild,
dreamy old boy. Mad about garden-
ing, and all that. At the moment, I
"I'd feel a lot easier in my mind,
tackle him, if I were a pig. I'd ex-
"You were rather a pig, just now,
weren't you?"
down, I'd . . . I don't know what I'd
do. Er—Sue!"
"Swear that, while I'm at Bland-
ings, you won't go out with a out.
Not even to a dance."
"Not even to a dance?"
"No."
"Especially this man Pilbeam."
"I'm not worrying about Hugo.
He's safe at Blandings."
Uncle Clarence. I made my mother
get hint the job when the Hot Spot
and Miss Schoonmaker there to keep
you company! How nice for you."
like that. If you ask me, I think
you with big, dreamy eyes. . ."
you my honest word. . . ."
He became lyrical. Sue, leaning
back, listened contentedly. The cloud
had been a threatening cloud, black-
Road the Synopsis of the Opening Chapter on Page 42, and Commence Reading this Humorous Serial, Now! Summer Lightning CHAPTER II. (Article), Table Talk (Melbourne, Vic. : 1885 - 1939), Thursday 23 May 1929 [Issue No.3185] page 17 2017-03-24 16:32 him Somehow or other, he had never
thought of Sue as having- encumbrances
in tlie shape of relatives; and he
that n pink-tighted Serio might stir
"Knglish, do you mean? On the
• Tes. Her stage name was Lolly
T dare say not. But she was the
• I always thought you were Ame
him. Somehow or other, he had never
thought of Sue as having encumbrances
in the shape of relatives; and he
that a pink-tighted Serio might stir
"English, do you mean? On the
"Yes. Her stage name was Dolly
"I dare say not. But she was the
"I always thought you were Ame-

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Three-Minute Thrillers
    List
    Public

    Sub-title of a series of 126 short crime fiction stories appearing irregularly in the Sydney Morning Herald during 1954 (21 Jan to 23 Dec). Includes contributions from a number of leading contemporary UK crime fiction authors, e.g., Michael Innes, Cyril Hare, Edmund Crispin, Gladys Mitchell, etc..

    126 items
    created by: public:JPEditor 2014-03-24
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.