Information about Trove user: Gato

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,802,853
2 NeilHamilton 2,716,174
3 noelwoodhouse 2,226,002
4 annmanley 2,176,757
5 TheWorldsGreatestTroveCorrector 1,863,379
...
48 rsisson 467,977
49 Juniris 464,678
50 diaper 459,601
51 Gato 459,126
52 mike.connors 452,906
53 Lucy1934 441,013

459,126 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2016 183
April 2016 737
March 2016 1,435
February 2016 1,482
January 2016 8,863
December 2015 2,088
November 2015 2,947
October 2015 12,297
September 2015 11,819
August 2015 11,867
July 2015 21,409
June 2015 3,871
May 2015 103
April 2015 3,099
March 2015 8,405
February 2015 1,850
January 2015 3,298
December 2014 8,531
November 2014 8,299
October 2014 3,712
September 2014 1,169
August 2014 6,011
July 2014 1,808
June 2014 917
May 2014 3,056
April 2014 1,057
March 2014 2,596
February 2014 1,038
January 2014 9,217
December 2013 716
November 2013 1,507
October 2013 308
September 2013 578
August 2013 2,439
July 2013 3,547
June 2013 1,836
May 2013 2,673
April 2013 8,931
March 2013 6,881
February 2013 1,163
January 2013 11,847
December 2012 5,924
November 2012 19,160
October 2012 3,128
September 2012 13,779
August 2012 571
July 2012 340
June 2012 276
May 2012 135
April 2012 669
March 2012 336
February 2012 1,758
January 2012 93
December 2011 13,942
November 2011 3,711
October 2011 4,120
September 2011 2,645
August 2011 7,391
July 2011 3,395
June 2011 4,528
May 2011 19,249
April 2011 34,962
March 2011 27,797
February 2011 42,572
January 2011 18,683
December 2010 6,141
November 2010 9,571
October 2010 464
September 2010 1,799
August 2010 2,682
July 2010 846
June 2010 6,459
May 2010 4,356
April 2010 4,631
March 2010 883
February 2010 98
January 2010 173
December 2009 531
November 2009 36
October 2009 68
August 2009 1,098
July 2009 308
March 2009 79
December 2008 1,928
November 2008 865
September 2008 1,356

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,802,852
2 NeilHamilton 2,716,174
3 noelwoodhouse 2,226,002
4 annmanley 2,176,757
5 TheWorldsGreatestTroveCorrector 1,863,211
...
48 rsisson 467,977
49 Juniris 464,678
50 diaper 459,601
51 Gato 459,126
52 mike.connors 452,906
53 Lucy1934 441,013

459,126 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2016 183
April 2016 737
March 2016 1,435
February 2016 1,482
January 2016 8,863
December 2015 2,088
November 2015 2,947
October 2015 12,297
September 2015 11,819
August 2015 11,867
July 2015 21,409
June 2015 3,871
May 2015 103
April 2015 3,099
March 2015 8,405
February 2015 1,850
January 2015 3,298
December 2014 8,531
November 2014 8,299
October 2014 3,712
September 2014 1,169
August 2014 6,011
July 2014 1,808
June 2014 917
May 2014 3,056
April 2014 1,057
March 2014 2,596
February 2014 1,038
January 2014 9,217
December 2013 716
November 2013 1,507
October 2013 308
September 2013 578
August 2013 2,439
July 2013 3,547
June 2013 1,836
May 2013 2,673
April 2013 8,931
March 2013 6,881
February 2013 1,163
January 2013 11,847
December 2012 5,924
November 2012 19,160
October 2012 3,128
September 2012 13,779
August 2012 571
July 2012 340
June 2012 276
May 2012 135
April 2012 669
March 2012 336
February 2012 1,758
January 2012 93
December 2011 13,942
November 2011 3,711
October 2011 4,120
September 2011 2,645
August 2011 7,391
July 2011 3,395
June 2011 4,528
May 2011 19,249
April 2011 34,962
March 2011 27,797
February 2011 42,572
January 2011 18,683
December 2010 6,141
November 2010 9,571
October 2010 464
September 2010 1,799
August 2010 2,682
July 2010 846
June 2010 6,459
May 2010 4,356
April 2010 4,631
March 2010 883
February 2010 98
January 2010 173
December 2009 531
November 2009 36
October 2009 68
August 2009 1,098
July 2009 308
March 2009 79
December 2008 1,928
November 2008 865
September 2008 1,356

No text corrections for 'Government Gazettes'


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
VICTORIA. SENTENCED TO DEATH. (Article), Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), Saturday 28 October 1916 [Issue No.3,036] page 34 2016-05-02 02:48
"NOT A FAIR-GO," SAY OUR WIVES IN MALAYA (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wednesday 25 April 1956 page 5 2016-05-02 02:40 -Reuter's.
"NOT A FAIR-GO," SAY OUR WIVES IN MALAYA (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Wednesday 25 April 1956 page 5 2016-05-02 02:35 j WIVES IN MALAYA
PENANG, Tuesday: Wives of Australian servicemen, staying qt
th e fa mi I y ' hos te I nea r Penang, dre complaining that their children;
Mrs. Edna Ommund
son, pf Sydney, said to
been told that if chil
to bring the issue before thc
Mrs. Heather- Irwin, of
mother or Tour, said she still
who was away sick in Tai
I j "army, discipline" for their
I ' children. . . . "
They say the children are.
the front garden bf the
hostel,, a luxurious, converted
noise in. the. afternoons.
The: children also have to
by 9 p.m. every night. .
on . the complaints today.
The Australian Commis
sioner to Malaya. Mn T. K.
k
Critchley, is expected to dis
cuss the complaints with the .
Second Battalion com
-A.A.P.
[-Reuters. :
i ' i
WIVES IN MALAYA
PENANG, Tuesday: Wives of Australian servicemen, staying at
the famiIy hosteI near Penang, are complaining that their children
Mrs. Edna Ommund-
son, of Sydney, said to-
been told that if chil-
to bring the issue before the
Mrs. Heather Irwin, of
mother of four, said she still
who was away sick in Tai-
"army, discipline" for their
children.
They say the children are
the front garden of the
hostel, a luxurious, converted
noise in the afternoons.
The children also have to
by 9 p.m. every night.
on the complaints today.
The Australian Commis-
sioner to Malaya. Mr. T. K.
Critchley, is expected to dis-
cuss the complaints with the
Second Battalion com-
—A.A.P.

Diplomat for Malaya (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Saturday 12 November 1955 page 2 2016-05-02 02:25 Diplomat'

CANBERRA, Friday: Aus
tralia bad appointed a Qom-,
missioner to conduct Us re
of Malaya; Mr. Casey, Ex
He is Mr. T.K. Critchley,
now head of thc Pacific and
American branch of the Ex
Diplomat

CANBERRA, Friday: Aus-
tralia had appointed a Com-
missioner to conduct its re-
of Malaya, Mr. Casey, Ex-
He is Mr. T. K. Critchley,
now head of the Pacific and
American branch of the Ex-
THE MARQUIS TSENG. (Times.) (Article), The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Thursday 6 March 1884 [Issue No.8,160] page 6 2016-05-02 02:02 Unfortunately the members of the Tsuml,
Yamen and the other ¡neat administernr
boards have not the same knowledge but when
assumes that prominent position m the ad
ministiationof affairs at Pekin, which will K
his right there will be a moie favourable
of giung pratical effect to those schemes of
of the people or the fame of the Bmpire will
desire ror that great task the MaiquisTscne
will be found, if we mistake not, pre eminently"
adapted by his personal ability as well as bv
the great position which ho has inherited
among his class
Unfortunately the members of the Tsungli
Yamen and the other great administering
boards have not the same knowledge, but when
assumes that prominent position in the ad-
ministration of affairs at Pekin, which will be
his right, there will be a more favourable
of giving pratical effect to those schemes of
of the people or the fame of the Empire will
desire. For that great task the Marquis Tseng
will be found, if we mistake not, pre-eminently
adapted by his personal ability as well as by
the great position which he has inherited
among his class.
THE MARQUIS TSENG. (Times.) (Article), The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Thursday 6 March 1884 [Issue No.8,160] page 6 2016-05-02 02:00 not onlj in its present foi m, but in tho s ai ions
phases through which the symbols oi signs have
pissed dining the course of man j centimes
He might bo called-weie the ssoid applicable
to a language tho characters of which aie com
posed of innumerable signs antUben combine
dons-a great Chinese etymologist He "£
^f? '»P'S f01 ms «ahfijapliy, bong considwed
one of tho voiy best penmen, °0i wièE
of the pencil ni China wheio so n S
more importante is attached to S
than in other countries To conimih
his hteraiy accomplishments, the AlZ.i »
Tseng is an author and a poet A\hnV fe

ncouls in plain piose his iiiipiessio,3 of
Emopeans anti their countries ho give Lm,
poitiou of Ins leisure, brief as it is now, to cm
tv itnigtho muses In h,s own donustic hfe
the Marquis Tseng furnishes nu example of th.
vu tues most admired in Europe He maiY,^
m my xears ago the daughter of Liu Tang tho
Governor of Shansi, and he is not a $hTe
mist He has tinco sons and two daSl
living, some of whom arc gi own up, and th,
youngest of whom waa bom m Londoifo»
years ago No one can como into close ich
dons with the Marquis Tseng without perce?
ing that la is not merely a most accompUshe.l
man, but a very amiable one \n
other Chinese Minister has ntquued the sT?
accurate peiception of the need China hus/rf
imitating some of the betta piactices of
^mxlrc',&!ià °f P^curing fioin the peoples of
the West the means of ictammg independence
and self i espect He says himself that ho Tn
true son of Hoonan, whoso natives aro describe
as "men of hrmness tood hateis andstawh
friends, mon of a will, when against you rcniiv
against you but none the less open to com ó
tion, and then throwing all then onerT into
the woik of progiess" If the rfai-qiul
Tseng may bo taken as a fair sieeimèn
of the Hoonanese, the descnption mav ho
accepted as accurate The knowledge h"
has acquit ed during his icsidence m
change, and progress m China has now no
more sincere friend or well wishci that ho .,
not only in its present form, but in the various
phases through which the symbols or signs have
passed during the course of many centuries.
He might be called—were the word applicable
to a language the characters of which are com-
posed of innumerable signs and their combina-
dons—a great Chinese etymologist. He is
also famed for his caligraphy, being considered
one of the very best penmen, or wielders
of the pencil, in China, where so much
more importance is attached to form
than in other countries. To complete
his literary accomplishments, the Marquis
Tseng is an author and a poet. While he

records in plain prose his impressions of
Europeans and their countries, he gives some
portion of his leisure, brief as it is now, to cul-
tivating the muses. In his own domestic life
the Marquis Tseng furnishes an example of the
virtues most admired in Europe. He married
many years ago the daughter of Liu Tang, the
Governor of Shansi, and he is not a polyga-
mist. He has three sons and two daughters
living, some of whom are grown up, and the
youngest of whom was born in London four
years ago. No one can come into close rela-
tions with the Marquis Tseng without perceiv-
ing that he is not merely a most accomplished
man, but a very amiable one. No
other Chinese Minister has acquired the same
accurate periception of the need China has of
imitating some of the better practices of
Europe, and of procuring from the peoples of
the West the means of retaining independence
and self-respect. He says himself that he is a
true son of Hoonan, whose natives are described
as "men of firmness, good haters and staunch
friends, men of a will, when against you really
against you, but none the less open to convic-
tion, and then throwing all their energy into
the work of progress." If the Marquis
Tseng may be taken as a fair specimen
of the Hoonanese, the description may be
accepted as accurate. The knowledge he
has acquired during his residence in
change, and progress in China has now no
more sincere friend or well-wisher that he is.
THE MARQUIS TSENG. (Times.) (Article), The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Thursday 6 March 1884 [Issue No.8,160] page 6 2016-05-02 00:59 All Chinese officials ai c presumablj well read
and tleeplj scrscdm thee issic-> of their lan
guage, but tho Alaiquis Iscng is espcciallj
leal ned on the subject of the Chinese tongue
No one has ":> gie it a îeputatioii as he toi a
complete mastcij of the mitten chaiactci, and
All Chinese officials are presumably well read
and deeply versed in the classics of their lan-
guage, but the Marquis Tseng is especially
learned on the subject of the Chinese tongue.
No one has as great a reputation as he for a
complete mastery of the written character, and
THE MARQUIS TSENG. (Times.) (Article), The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Thursday 6 March 1884 [Issue No.8,160] page 6 2016-05-02 00:56 selves as perfect masters of the art of states
nianship as the Alarqms l^eng has been skilful
in the conduct of Chinese diplomaej, despite
the disadvantage ho has been under of dealing
vv ith strange forms and languages tho settle
ment of tho difficult) between Iranco and
China is still remote It is sv orthv of special
notice that while tho Alaiquis Tseng has faith
full) cxpresscil the instructions of the Tsungh
Yamon, he has neiei waseied on the one point
that Tommin, eithei independent or Chinese,
is neccssnrj to the secuntj of the Chinese
fioutiei, and that even the utmost tlesne to
obt un peace bj nieuns of a compromise de
pends on the assumi tion that a new frontier
could he tics iscd adequate to the militai j e\i
gcneics of China
selves as perfect masters of the art of states-
manship as the Marquis Tseng has been skilful
in the conduct of Chinese diplomacy, despite
the disadvantage he has been under of dealing
with strange forms and languages, the settle-
ment of the difficulty between France and
China is still remote. It is worthy of special
notice that while the Marquis Tseng has faith-
fully expressed the instructions of the Tsungli
Yamen, he has never wavered on the one point
that Tonquin, either independent or Chinese,
is necessary to the security of the Chinese
frontier, and that even the utmost desire to
obtain peace by means of a compromise de-
pends on the assumption that a new frontier
could be devised adequate to the military exi-
gencies of China.
THE MARQUIS TSENG. (Times.) (Article), The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Thursday 6 March 1884 [Issue No.8,160] page 6 2016-05-02 00:50 Yellow-book. Prom the first expression of
opinion contained m a despatch to Al Bar
thelni) Saint Hailiure, written from St.
Pctcrsbmg on the 10th of Nos ember, 1SS0,
the desp itches of the Alarqms Tseng has o been
fence and m meeting each move of the 1 ronch
Government with promptitude and address
Were tho question of Tonqnin to bo decided by
the relatise skill of the disputants and by the
logical eleductions to he drawn from 1 ronch
admissions md contiadictions as recorded in
the ellow book, no Court of Appeal would
Al lrquis Tseng w ould be permanently insured
as a Chinese Tille)rand The question does
not howcvei, depend on the moral right in the
Alni quia Tseng and tho agents of the Kepublic
m the scieiico of diplomaej It depends on
the degree of obstmac) with which the trench
their plans when they discos er hosv much
remains to bo done and also on the vet unrc
vealcd detciinitiation of the Pekin Govern
mont Wli itev cr the issue maj be it is onlv
light to sax that if the Isnngh "\anicii and
selves as pcifect masters of the art of states
Yellow-book. From the first expression of
opinion contained in a despatch to M. Bar-
thélmy Saint Hailaire, written from St.
Petersburg on the 10th of November, 1880,
the despatches of the Marquis Tseng have been
fence and in meeting each move of the French
Government with promptitude and address.
Were the question of Tonquin to bo decided by
the relative skill of the disputants and by the
logical deductions to be drawn from French
admissions and contradictions as recorded in
the Yellow-book, no Court of Appeal would
Marquis Tseng would be permanently insured
as a Chinese Talleyrand. The question does
not however, depend on the moral right in the
Marquis Tseng and the agents of the Republic
in the science of diplomacy. It depends on
the degree of obstinacy with which the French
their plans when they discover how much
remains to be done, and also on the yet unre-
vealed determination of the Pekin Govern-
ment. Whatever the issue may be, it is only
right to say that, if the Tsungli Yamen and
the young Emperor's near relatives show them-

selves as perfect masters of the art of states
THE MARQUIS TSENG. (Times.) (Article), The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 - 1933), Thursday 6 March 1884 [Issue No.8,160] page 6 2016-05-02 00:43 How was sent to St Petersburg in order to
Duectoi of the Impel ml Clan Couit The
functions of this office ai o somewhat peculiar
offences committed bj tho Punces and other
membei a of the Iinpcnal familj who aie not
amenable to the oitlinaiy eouits and who form
a largo colonj in the palace at Pekin
The nextqiustion with which the Marquis
Tseng has had to deal is one that piesents
greater difficulties, and that is still far fiom
a sntisfaetoi j solution 1 rauco, unlike
lltissui ia huppilj ignorant of the embar
raasment8 that in iy bo caused by the pos
session of a disjointed and uneleveloped Asiatic
Empire She has nov er felt mj apprehension
as to tho measures of retaliation which China
might devise and cairj out The Marquis
Tseng has been at a considei able disadvantage
in negotiating with Prance as compared with
his position in regai d to Btiasia Ho has
possessed no means even of binding the Prench
Government to stnet adherence to its own
protestations, ns ma) be seen by the most
How was sent to St. Petersburg in order to
Director of the Imperial Clan Court. The
functions of this office are somewhat peculiar.
offences committed by the Princes and other
members of the Imperial family who are not
amenable to the ordinary courts, and who form
a large colony in the palace at Pekin.
The next question with which the Marquis
Tseng has had to deal is one that presents
greater difficulties, and that is still far from
a satisfactory solution. France, unlike
Russia, is happily ignorant of the embar-
rassments that may be caused by the pos-
session of a disjointed and undeveloped Asiatic
Empire. She has never felt any apprehension
as to the measures of retaliation which China
might devise and carry out .The Marquis
Tseng has been at a considerable disadvantage
in negotiating with France as compared with
his position in regard to Russia. He has
possessed no means even of binding the French
Government to strict adherence to its own
protestations, as may be seen by the most
Yellow-book. Prom the first expression of

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. "The Vagabond's" Occident and Orient travel 1881
    List
    Public

    "Do you want a trip to China?" said my friend M—— to me one Friday afternoon in George-street, Sydney. "The Woodbine sails on Tuesday morning, and I am going in her. Will you come?"

    So begins a body of work that stands among the most vivid and insightful writing about travel in the Asia-Pacific region during the last two decades of the 19th century, and certainly by any Australia-based writer of the period.

    This list is the full sequence of 38 travel feature articles written for the Melbourne daily newspaper, The Argus, and its associated weekly, The Australasian, by Julian Thomas, known as "The Vagabond", about his sea journey of almost eight months in March-November 1881 around the Pacific rim from Sydney to Shanghai, Nagasaki, Yokohama, Victoria BC and the area of modern-day Vancouver BC, San Francisco, Honolulu, Auckland and back to Sydney. The series was compiled, edited and published in book form as 'Occident and Orient : sketches on both sides of the Pacific', (George Robertson, Melbourne, 1882).

    With the exception of one issue (27 May 1882) missing pages in the Trove collection, the list is the complete series as it was first published in The Argus. The missing Argus page in the list has been made up with the corresponding article published in The Australasian (3 June 1882).

    The author of this remarkable series of articles was an Englishman who sometimes claimed to be an American, or more specifically a Virginian. He called himself Julian Thomas, although that was not his real name. Under his sobriquet, “The Vagabond”, he became famous as a popular exponent of descriptive writing and investigative journalism for Australian newspapers from 1876 until his death in Melbourne in 1896. Yet, despite public acclaim and professional success, in 1894 he was bankrupt.

    Julian Thomas was christened John Stanley James. He was born in 1843 in Walsall, Staffordshire. He seems now almost to have popped up in Australia from nowhere. At times through his years in Australia he claimed variously to have had medical training; to have graduated from the University of Virginia; to have fought for the Confederacy in the US Civil War; and to have been present, and imprisoned as a spy, during the Franco-Prussian War and the Paris Commune of 1871—none of which claims can yet be verified. Some of his claims—such as his occasional assertions he was Buddhist, Jewish, Gipsy, or abducted as an infant by Flathead Indians—were plainly ironical, but in general he cultivated an air of mystery about his past as part of his "Vagabond" public persona. Indeed, everything about his past between the late 1860s (when by his account he was a journalist in London) and his 1875 arrival in Sydney remains mysterious—even the exact date, place and means of his arrival in Australia. He did not marry—at least not in Australia—and died alone, without children or close family, although he had many friends, including many in commerce, industry, government and public life. His particular enemies were missionaries, who he mocked in his writing and lectures, and sued for libel on at least one occasion. References to Freemasonry, and to hospitality received from prominent Masons, are scattered through his writing, in context suggesting he himself was a Mason. Clues to other aspects of his secretiveness are contained in two articles in this series (nos. 35 & 36, “San Francisco Revisited No. V”, and “At Honolulu”), which strongly hint he was homosexual—a condition which, if flaunted, in the late 19th century could lead to scandal and imprisonment, as Julian Thomas's younger contemporary, Oscar Wilde, was soon to demonstrate.

    Sydney James, secretary of the jockey club of Dunedin, New Zealand, identified himself publicly (in a speech to a Masonic Lodge function reported by the press) as Julian Thomas’s brother after his death, stating in part that “it was thought best at the time not to disclose his identity, but there was no reason why he should not be known by his real name, Stanley James.” His wide circle of friends and the public affection he achieved through his writing and lectures were demonstrated by his well-attended funeral, admiring obituaries, a grave monument erected by public subscription in Melbourne General Cemetery, and newspaper memorial notices.

    Sources
    —1887 'LIBEL ACTION AGAINST THE "WESLEYAN SPECTATOR.".', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), 20 September, p. 5, viewed 25 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7931902
    —1894 'NEW INSOLVENTS.', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), 20 December, p. 5, viewed 25 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8726424
    —1896 'DEATH OF A WELL-KNOWN JOURNALIST.', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), 5 September, p. 4, viewed 22 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9183574
    —1896 '"THE VAGABOND.".', Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1926), 5 September, p. 4, viewed 22 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article150128246
    —1896 'AN ADVENTUROUS JOURNALIST.', The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), 7 September, p. 3, viewed 22 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9381144
    —1897 '"THE VAGABOND'S" TRUE NAME.', The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), 1 May, p. 36, viewed 22 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article139741091
    —1897 'Family Notices.', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), 4 September, p. 1, viewed 22 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9769879
    —John Barnes, 'James, John Stanley (1843–1896)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/james-john-stanley-3848/text6113, published first in hardcopy 1972, accessed online 21 August 2015

    Images
    — Brown, J 1860, [John Stanley James, alias] Julian Thomas [pen name "The Vagabond"], [ca. 1860-ca. 1900] http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/278471
    — Stewart & Co 1876, [John Stanley James, alias] Julian Thomas [pen name "The Vagabond"], [ca. 1876] http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/172507

    38 items
    created by: public:Gato 2015-08-02
    User data
    Tags:
  2. "The Vagabond's" travel in Canada 1886
    List
    Public

    Articles by Julian Thomas "The Vagabond" for The Argus about his travel in Canada during 1886. These are not as ground-breaking as his 38 articles on his round-Pacific "Orient to Occident" trip of 1881, but they still offer remarkable insight on the places and times. Canadians particularly may be surprised by glimpses of some locally famous people of politics, commerce and literature, and of disappeared establishments like the Windsor Hotel of Montreal, the St Louis Hotel of Quebec, and the Queen's Hotel in Winnipeg.

    10 items
    created by: public:Gato 2015-10-25
    User data
  3. John Henry Brooke in Tokugawa Japan
    List
    Public

    The dates and circumstances reveal the pseudonymous author of these articles, using the pen-name "An Australian Colonist", as John Henry Brooke 1826-1902.

    Brooke, an English-born journalist who became a prominent colonial Victorian politician and a leading player in bitter political battles of the 1860s over land tenure, moved to Yokohama, Japan, in 1867 after suffering reverses in his political fortunes. His biggest problem was that he had made too many powerful enemies in the turbulent colonial political scene. On 26 February 1867 Brooke left Melbourne for eastern ports in the P&O mail steamer, Bombay, saying he intended "to take stock of the Japanese" and hinting that he might return in a few months. He stayed in Japan, where he became proprietor and editor of an English-language local newspaper, the Japan Daily Herald, and resided for the rest of his life. He died at Yokohama on 8 January 1902 and was buried in the foreigners' cemetery there.

    These articles, which Brooke dispatched for publication in The Argus and its associated weekly publication, The Australasian, in 1867, under the pen-name "An Australian Colonist", describe Japan in the pivotal last year of the Tokugawa shogunate, on the brink of the Meiji era which introduced sweeping modernisation, reform, industrialisation, global engagement—and militarist ambitions for imperial expansion.

    Sources
    —1867 'MELBOURNE...The intended departure of Mr J. H. Brooke for the China Seas...', Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 - 1918), 25 February, p. 2, viewed 8 September, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87950316
    —1867 'Yesterday a number of gentlemen met at Scott's Hotel, for the purpose of taking leave of the Hon. J. H. Brooke...', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), 27 February, p. 5, viewed 8 September, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5787152
    —1867 'TOWN NEWS... Mrs. Brooke intends shortly to join her husband in Japan...', The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), 14 December, p. 18, viewed 13 September, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article137569386
    —1902 'AN OLD GEELONG IDENTITY. Mr J. H. Brooke, who formerly took a prominent part in Victorian politics, and was for a period a member of the Cabinet, but more recently the founder, proprietor and editor of the "Japan Daily Herald," died on 8th January last...', Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1926), 22 February 1902, p. 6, viewed 13 September, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article149753369
    —Michael Migus, 'Brooke, John Henry (1826–1902)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/brooke-john-henry-3065/text4521, published first in hardcopy 1969, accessed online 7 September 2015.
    —Jim Tipton (founder), “Find A Grave,” http://www.findagrave.com/, 1995-. (Monument transcription of grave of John Henry Brooke 1826-1902 in Yokohama Foreign General Cemetery, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=79274895 viewed 7 September 2015.)

    10 items
    created by: public:Gato 2015-09-06
    User data
    Tags:
  4. The Burrcutter and His Mate
    List
    Public

    This column of whimsical anecdote was written by William Redford (Bill) Cameron 1883-1960 under his pseudonym, Swinglebar, over more than 30 years in which he worked as a journalist for The Land newspaper.

    21 items
    created by: public:Gato 2016-01-24
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.