Information about Trove user: Gato

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,410,839
2 NeilHamilton 2,430,184
3 annmanley 2,112,071
4 noelwoodhouse 1,959,903
5 maurielyn 1,526,917
...
46 Lucy1934 432,460
47 Juniris 426,367
48 cmdevine 420,312
49 Gato 417,275
50 johnfox 408,836
51 InstituteOfAustralianCulture 405,528

417,275 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2015 11,867
July 2015 21,409
June 2015 3,871
May 2015 103
April 2015 3,099
March 2015 8,405
February 2015 1,850
January 2015 3,298
December 2014 8,531
November 2014 8,299
October 2014 3,712
September 2014 1,169
August 2014 6,011
July 2014 1,808
June 2014 917
May 2014 3,056
April 2014 1,057
March 2014 2,596
February 2014 1,038
January 2014 9,217
December 2013 716
November 2013 1,507
October 2013 308
September 2013 578
August 2013 2,439
July 2013 3,547
June 2013 1,836
May 2013 2,673
April 2013 8,931
March 2013 6,881
February 2013 1,163
January 2013 11,847
December 2012 5,924
November 2012 19,160
October 2012 3,128
September 2012 13,779
August 2012 571
July 2012 340
June 2012 276
May 2012 135
April 2012 669
March 2012 336
February 2012 1,758
January 2012 93
December 2011 13,942
November 2011 3,711
October 2011 4,120
September 2011 2,645
August 2011 7,391
July 2011 3,395
June 2011 4,528
May 2011 19,249
April 2011 34,962
March 2011 27,797
February 2011 42,572
January 2011 18,683
December 2010 6,141
November 2010 9,571
October 2010 464
September 2010 1,799
August 2010 2,682
July 2010 846
June 2010 6,459
May 2010 4,356
April 2010 4,631
March 2010 883
February 2010 98
January 2010 173
December 2009 531
November 2009 36
October 2009 68
August 2009 1,098
July 2009 308
March 2009 79
December 2008 1,928
November 2008 865
September 2008 1,356

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
JAPAN. MURDER OF TWO BRITISH OFFICERS. (From the Calcutta Englishman.) (Article), The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Saturday 25 February 1865 page Article 2015-08-30 23:55 held by Mr. Kell, JA'., on Sntutlay evening last, on the
body of Eliza Ann Spargoe, ii Voting woman muoh re-
spected in the neighbourhood, particularly by her ranstor
arid mistress, and who was drovjied under most distress-
ing oiroumstonoesin a watorholein'the reserve near Wil-
lunga Township. Aftor a mostlespeotable jury was om
pannellod, and had taken a vie) of the body of the do
ooaBed, the following faots werojletailed in evidence :
The deoeased, accompanied hyjsorae members of her
master's family and their frieds, went to a neigh-
ment waterhole, whioh is supposed to be eight or
ten feet doep. Noar this lah Miss Love lost her
footing mid slipped in, wbn the deceased rushed
to her assistance, rescuing ber,| but most unfortunately
falling in herself, and before aBimanoe could be procured
was drowned. It further appearad that the young people
of the party got a stiok and exlpnded it so as to reaoh
the hand of the deceased, but froh some cause sho failed
to avail herself of it. Itnppoareitbat, the young people
went to the nearest neighbours fir assistance, and that
the Rev. E. K. Miller went into tlit waterhole, and by the
assistance of a rope to hold on w|h, and a garden rake,
after 10 minutes' search sucosededh findingand bringing
tho deoeised to tho bank. Altliot>h medioal ass'iBtanco
was at hand, and evory meanB fes'rted to to restore ani-
mation, it was all of no avail, the bdy had been too'long
undor waier. The verdiot was " Aoideutally drowned," I
-Adelaide Observer, Feb. li. j
held by Mr. Kell, J.P., on Saturday evening last, on the
body of Eliza Ann Spargoe, a young woman much re-
spected in the neighbourhood, particularly by her master
and mistress, and who was drowned under most distress-
ing circumstances in a waterhole in the reserve near Wil-
lunga Township. After a most respectable jury was em-
pannelled, and had taken a view of the body of the de-
ceased, the following facts were detailed in evidence:—
The deceased, accompanied by some members of her
master's family and their friends, went to a neigh-
ment waterhole, which is supposed to be eight or
ten feet deep. Near this hole Miss Love lost her
footing and slipped in, when the deceased rushed
to her assistance, rescuing her, but most unfortunately
falling in herself, and before assistance could be procured
was drowned. It further appeared that the young people
of the party got a stick and extended it so as to reach
the hand of the deceased, but from some cause she failed
to avail herself of it. It appeared that the young people
went to the nearest neighbours for assistance, and that
the Rev. E. K. Miller went into the waterhole, and by the
assistance of a rope to hold on with, and a garden rake,
after 10 minutes' search succeeded in finding and bringing
the deceased to the bank. Although medical assistance
was at hand, and every means resorted to to restore ani-
mation, it was all of no avail, the body had been too long
under water. The verdict was "Accidentally drowned."
—Adelaide Observer, Feb. 11.
JAPAN. MURDER OF TWO BRITISH OFFICERS. (From the Calcutta Englishman.) (Article), The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Saturday 25 February 1865 page Article 2015-08-30 23:32 Thexither items of nows with reforenoe to Japan em-
brace ¿lie report that the batteries at Shimonosako arein
course of being rebuilt, and (hut one of our gunboats has
gone to the Streits in order ti asoertuin tho truth of tho
report. Wo should not bo aj all surprised to learn that
the Princo of Nogato had ootlnienóed to reconstruct the
| forts which the allied squadron lately destroyed, for
I there appears to be a vein of good-humoured obstinaoy,
so to speak, running thrlugh the entire Japanese
oharaoter. ' And, moro thin this, there is reason
co bolievo that our late operations, instead of
subduing the Japanese spirit,|ian imbued it with a relish
for fighting whioh willprodnc|results notât presentfore
seen. Theoretically, the Jajanese have always been a
"warlike" raoe, but they ho/e never had a proper op-
portunity of putting thoir theory into prnctioe. For
co'nturies no onomy has merfcoed thom, >et they have
carried arms and maintained Military disoipline all the
time. It is by no means boyord the range of probability
that our late operations again* them'niay have stimu-
lated thoir latent appetite for jghting, and that we may
have much more trouble in Japn than many people ex-
pect. In the meantime, matbrs appotr very far from
pacific, and we can only adviBe'the English Government
not to underrate the Japanese (ifiioulty.
' Melancholy Dbatii by Dro,yí)I!ío.-An inquest was
The other items of news with reforenoe to Japan em-
brace the report that the batteries at Shimonosako are in
course of being rebuilt, and that one of our gunboats has
gone to the Straits in order to ascertain the truth of the
report. We should not be at all surprised to learn that
the Prince of Nagato had commenced to reconstruct the
forts which the allied squadron lately destroyed, for
there appears to be a vein of good-humoured obstinacy,
so to speak, running through the entire Japanese
character. And, more than this, there is reason
to believe that our late operations, instead of
subduing the Japanese spirit, has imbued it with a relish
for fighting which will produced results not at present fore-
seen. Theoretically, the Japanese have always been a
"warlike" race, but they have never had a proper op-
portunity of putting their theory into practice. For
centuries no enemy has menaced them, yet they have
carried arms and maintained military discipline all the
time. It is by no means beyond the range of probability
that our late operations against them may have stimu-
lated their latent appetite for fighting, and that we may
have much more trouble in Japan than many people ex-
pect. In the meantime, matters appear very far from
pacific, and we can only advise the English Government
not to underrate the Japanese difficulty. ||
MELANCHOLY DEATH BY DROWNING.—An inquest was
JAPAN. MURDER OF TWO BRITISH OFFICERS. (From the Calcutta Englishman.) (Article), The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Saturday 25 February 1865 page Article 2015-08-30 23:20 'that, as they wore attacked, they wero both leading their
horses ; there would havo been more blood if they had
been wounded whilst on their horses-thore was blood on
the noar side, and on the back of the saddle-oloth. Tho
horses themselves wero unhurt. My impression now, on
inspecting more olosoly the saddles and saddle-oloths, is
thut they may probably havo been riding. The nose-
band of Major Baldwin's pony ¡b covered with mud, as
though he had bean dojvn, bub that may have occurred in
bridle himself. Both tlieso gentlemen were wounded in
both arms. Mr. Bird had a wound on tho left knoe,
almost cutting it through. 1 think that could soarcely
have boen done on tho saddle without also cutting tho
saddle. It would have been a very clover ont to have
inlliotod that wound without injuring the Baddlo or stir-
"Mr. Charles Wirgman, being Bwprn, says :-I went
out on an excursion on Friday morning. On tho first
night I Blopt at Kanasnwa. Between Saturday and Sun-
Monday night it Fusisawa. My party consisted of my-
self, Mons. Beato, Major do Vccchy, the Marquis de
Bonnet, Mons. Ronssen, and Francisco, Major de Veoohy's
servant. During the two days 1 was at Kamakura, wo
lived at the first tea-houso. Wo had no difficulties-on
the contrary, they weio extremely polite. We saw ona
man, a Hotemtta, stopping with his retainers the first
night we were there, at the same toa-houso. He was
very polite to us, and left tho next (Saturday) morning,
starting apparently in tha direction of Daiboots. We
all spoke to tim, and all our intercourse was of a very
friendly oharcotor. We saw no olber parties of two
sworded men. -I was skotohing about the Great Temple,
Hatohi-mang-8»mo, tho avenue, and thereabouts, with-
out molostntion. Monsieur Rotissen and myself wero to-
gether principally. He is also a sketchor. I first saw
I was sitting on the stops leading down to the grotto at
Enosima ; it was about half-past ten or oleven.
Bird. Beato had his photographia apparatus at
be allowed, td sketch his tent. By and by I
Baw them agait as they wera going away, and they bade
us good by. 'lhere were two parties of Japanese oflioials.
Before I saw Major Bird I saw one party come up tho
main street of ICigosima, go up towards the red-wood
pagoda, and cone down again, but where they went I
don't know. Ii looked at them and stood on one side.
and threo sonants. Shortly aftor the first a sooond
party ascended the hill ; I met thom on the hill as I was
coming down. They stayed away a'long time. The
party oonsistod of four or fivo. They appeared to be
very quiet. So far as I know they showed no sißns of
displeasure or offence. Tho first party only had the
stolid look of Ylkomia, who don't care about foreigners.
I first hoard of this catastrophe m the evoning at Eusi
sawa, while I w»s in thetoa.bonso. Iwasinthotea-hoiiBO
about seven o'cfock. It was said'that two English ollioers
had boon attaohed ; ono hail his head out off-tho other
both his arms, hut he was not dead. We laughed
at the report. We madoj inquiries of our own Ja-
panese servant ; he said ho had hoard it from a Betto.
Next morning a YiVkonin oaiuodown from Yokohama and
said it was true We returned next morning to Yoko-
hama, along the Tooaido. ' The distance between the
parties of Yakonins had left tbout two hours before Major
Baldwin and Mr. Bird." . |
that, as they were attacked, they were both leading their
horses ; there would have been more blood if they had
been wounded whilst on their horses—there was blood on
the near side, and on the back of the saddle-cloth. The
horses themselves were unhurt. My impression now, on
inspecting more closely the saddles and saddle-cloths, is
that they may probably have been riding. The nose-
band of Major Baldwin's pony is covered with mud, as
though he had been down, but that may have occurred in
bridle himself. Both these gentlemen were wounded in
both arms. Mr. Bird had a wound on the left knee,
almost cutting it through. I think that could scarcely
have been done on the saddle without also cutting the
saddle. It would have been a very clever cut to have
inflicted that wound without injuring the saddle or stir-
"Mr. Charles Wirgman, being sworn, says:—I went
out on an excursion on Friday morning. On the first
night I slept at Kanasawa. Between Saturday and Sun-
Monday night at Fusisawa. My party consisted of my-
self, Mons. Beato, Major de Vecchy, the Marquis de
Bonnet, Mons. Roussen, and Francisco, Major de Vecchy's
servant. During the two days I was at Kamakura, we
lived at the first tea-house. We had no difficulties—on
the contrary, they were extremely polite. We saw one
man, a Hotemata, stopping with his retainers the first
night we were there, at the same tea-house. He was
very polite to us, and left the next (Saturday) morning,
starting apparently in the direction of Daiboots. We
all spoke to him, and all our intercourse was of a very
friendly character. We saw no other parties of two-
sworded men. I was sketching about the Great Temple,
Hatchi-mang-sama, the avenue, and thereabouts, with-
out molestation. Monsieur Roussen and myself were to-
gether principally. He is also a sketcher. I first saw
I was sitting on the steps leading down to the grotto at
Enosima ; it was about half-past ten or eleven.
Bird. Beato had his photographic apparatus at
be allowed to sketch his tent. By and by I
saw them again as they were going away, and they bade
us good by. There were two parties of Japanese officials.
Before I saw Major Bird I saw one party come up the
main street of Kagosima, go up towards the red-wood
pagoda, and come down again, but where they went I
don't know. I looked at them and stood on one side.
and three servants. Shortly after the first a second
party ascended the hill ; I met them on the hill as I was
coming down. They stayed away a long time. The
party consisted of four or five. They appeared to be
very quiet. So far as I know they showed no signs of
displeasure or offence. The first party only had the
stolid look of Yakomia, who don't care about foreigners.
I first heard of this catastrophe in the evening at Fusi-
sawa, while I was in the tea-house. I was in the tea-house
about seven o'clock. It was said that two English officers
had been attacked ; one had his head cut off—the other
both his arms, but he was not dead. We laughed
at the report. We made inquiries of our own Ja-
panese servant ; he said he had heard it from a Betto.
Next morning a Yakonin came down from Yokohama and
said it was true. We returned next morning to Yoko-
hama, along the Tocaido. The distance between the
parties of Yakonins had left about two hours before Major
Baldwin and Mr. Bird."
JAPAN. MURDER OF TWO BRITISH OFFICERS. (From the Calcutta Englishman.) (Article), The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Saturday 25 February 1865 page Article 2015-08-30 23:02 few drops of blood on tho left side of Major Baldwin's
saddle-bags. 1 did not see any blood on the horse
pointed out to mo aa Major Baldwin's ; the horses were
tied np and feeding. 1 did not notice that the reins of
either bridles were out. (Bridle produced, a few spotBof
blood found on it. Mr. Bird's saddle had mnoh blood on
it, especially on the left stirrup,) My impression, from
. the position in whioh I found, tlieso bodies, was that Ihoy
bad been carried lhere. I searched for traces of blood
olsowhore, and found, as has been already stated, on the
right side of tho road. On the side of the road, about
twenty or thirty yards, the leaves of troos wero marked
with traoes of blood. I stayed with the bodies. Tho
watohosof hotb thodcooased were going. Their shirt
pins were nil 'right. I did not search the pockets.
Major Baldwin's revolver was in the caso altaohod to his
woist, and all tho chambors undischarged. Mr. Bird's was
lying ns stated by 'Mr. Lindau. The pistol was so
smeared with mod and blood that'it was not possible to
tell if it had been reoently disohargod or not. There
woro no riding whips found, though I believe they
few drops of blood on the left side of Major Baldwin's
saddle-bags. I did not see any blood on the horse
pointed out to me as Major Baldwin's ; the horses were
tied up and feeding. I did not notice that the reins of
either bridles were cut. (Bridle produced, a few spots of
blood found on it. Mr. Bird's saddle had much blood on
it, especially on the left stirrup.) My impression, from
the position in which I found these bodies, was that they
had been carried there. I searched for traces of blood
elsewhere, and found, as has been already stated, on the
right side of the road. On the side of the road, about
twenty or thirty yards, the leaves of trees were marked
with traces of blood. I stayed with the bodies. The
watches of both the deceased were going. Their shirt
pins were all right. I did not search the pockets.
Major Baldwin's revolver was in the case attached to his
waist, and all the chambers undischarged. Mr. Bird's was
lying as stated by Mr. Lindau. The pistol was so
smeared with mud and blood that it was not possible to
tell if it had been recently discharged or not. There
were no riding whips found, though I believe they
JAPAN. MURDER OF TWO BRITISH OFFICERS. (From the Calcutta Englishman.) (Article), The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893), Saturday 25 February 1865 page Article 2015-08-30 22:33 MORDER OF TWO BRITISH OFFICERS.
In tho Japan Herald of 24th November to on account
evidence :
"Lieut. Wood, lieutenant of tho R.A., deposed : I was
ordered ont with a party of mounted artillery to bring
in the bodies of two foreigners reported to have beon
killed at Kamakurb. We started about four a.m., with
Mr. Hensman, assistant surgeon, and Mr. Fletoher, in-
terpreter. We arrived at Kumaktira shortly after day-
yards from the gate of the great temple, lhere is a
threefold road whioh divides. They were lying on tho
left hand side going down towards the boo, just where
tho roads to Daiboota turn off, on the road, in front of a
bamboo. I have heard the first evidence about tho posi-
tion in which tho bodies wore found. I can corroborate
IJiromthe Calcutta Englishman.)
MURDER OF TWO BRITISH OFFICERS.
In the Japan Herald of 24th November is on account
evidence:—
"Lieut. Wood, lieutenant of the R.A., deposed : I was
ordered out with a party of mounted artillery to bring
in the bodies of two foreigners reported to have been
killed at Kamakura. We started about four a.m., with
Mr. Hensman, assistant surgeon, and Mr. Fletcher, in-
terpreter. We arrived at Kamakura shortly after day-
yards from the gate of the great temple. There is a
threefold road which divides. They were lying on the
left hand side going down towards the sea, just where
the roads to Daiboots turn off, on the road, in front of a
bamboo. I have heard the first evidence about the posi-
tion in which the bodies were found. I can corroborate
(From the Calcutta Englishman.)
CHINA. (Article), South Australian Register (Adelaide, SA : 1839 - 1900), Thursday 10 October 1861 page Article 2015-08-30 21:26 Russell). Mr. Werguan, of the Illustrated
right and left at everything — they even cut all
requested not to do so."_
Russell), Mr. Werguan, of the Illustrated
right and left at everything—they even cut all
requested not to do so."
ATTACK ON THE BRITISH EMBASSY AT JAPAN. (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Wednesday 16 October 1861 page Article 2015-08-30 02:21 mitted the ' happy dispatch,' and one was severely
mitted the 'happy dispatch,' and one was severely
ATTACK ON THE BRITISH EMBASSY AT JAPAN. (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Wednesday 16 October 1861 page Article 2015-08-30 02:19 assassins had returned in farce, for we had no
assassins had returned in force, for we had no
ATTACK ON THE BRITISH EMBASSY AT JAPAN. (Article), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Wednesday 16 October 1861 page Article 2015-08-30 00:45 we kept watch every now and then, the watch
moil's two bits of wood heat quietly, and we
swords, and picturesque dresses — all tho officers
woTe knickerbockers — a Looning had been caught.
?under arms the whole night, and whpji daylight
filled with guards and watchmen in every direc
dead assassins lay about with their liends almost
severed from 'their bodies by ^rightful sword cuts ;
by a fine guard, and the scene was quite drama
Japanese Ministers came at five in tho morning to
smoked. A despatch had been sent in tho night
o'clock. A guard of murines and some dozen
Frenchmen reinforced us, and the variou3 rooms
in -so many ways without disturbing us at all.
Five of tho Loonings were killed, three com
were wounded, one dead — they say five of them,
whether wo shall ever hear who caused these
of Mito's retainers. Mr Harris, as usual, is per
Embassy that these attacks are directed — not
so that Mito may be revenged for having been de
DO at next Ulisr.iuun, unu u«vc utruii 111.-11= uvci
house was to be attacked was sent by the Gover
down. The Admiral hns not yet arrived, though
expected in a few day3.'
to his father, Mr Fesenmeyer, of Adelaide : —
' About the news of China, I think I can give
ground very fast. At present they are threaten
ing Ningpo. II. M.S. Reward has gone down
the Shaug-tsing rebals, but, notwit. standing,
'I told you some time ago that affairs in Japan
the whole of the British Legation arrived at Yeda
and, being much fatigued, were anxious lor rest.
noise below, when the awful truth flished upon
the party that they had been attacked by an over
to his muster, Mr Morrison, his sword and pistol ;
armed only with a heavy riding- whip, was calling
'Shanghai, 4th August, 1861.
for assistanco. He had fancied that it was a brawl,
and making a rush in the passage, received a sword
cut on his shoulder. Sir Morrison arrived at this
these ruffians, who were in armour. The re
to their assistanco. These were composed of Mr
fighting, in which Messrs Oiiphant and Morrison
killed, the wretches made off, afier having killed
five of tho guard and wounded seven, besides
They had extinguished all the lights ; and di
right and left fit everything — they even cut all
the beds to pieces, evidently ii-tending that not
to do so.'
we kept watch every now and then, the watch-
men's two bits of wood beat quietly, and we
swords, and picturesque dresses—all the officers
wore knickerbockers—a Looning had been caught.
under arms the whole night, and when daylight
filled with guards and watchmen in every direc-
dead assassins lay about with their heads almost
severed from their bodies by frightful sword cuts ;
by a fine guard, and the scene was quite drama-
Japanese Ministers came at five in the morning to
smoked. A despatch had been sent in the night
o'clock. A guard of marines and some dozen
Frenchmen reinforced us, and the various rooms
in so many ways without disturbing us at all.
Five of the Loonings were killed, three com-
were wounded, one dead—they say five of them,
whether we shall ever hear who caused these
of Mito's retainers. Mr Harris, as usual, is per-
Embassy that these attacks are directed—not
so that Mito may be revenged for having been de-
boat next afternoon, and have been here ever
house was to be attacked was sent by the Gover-
down. The Admiral has not yet arrived, though
expected in a few days."
to his father, Mr Fesenmeyer, of Adelaide:—
"About the news of China, I think I can give
ground very fast. At present they are threaten-
ing Ningpo. H.M.S. Reward has gone down
the Shang-tsing rebels, but, notwithstanding,
"I told you some time ago that affairs in Japan
the whole of the British Legation arrived at Yedo
and, being much fatigued, were anxious for rest.
noise below, when the awful truth flashed upon
the party that they had been attacked by an over-
to his master, Mr Morrison, his sword and pistol ;
armed only with a heavy riding-whip, was calling
"Shanghai, 4th August, 1861.
for assistance. He had fancied that it was a brawl,
and making a rush in the passage, received a sword-
cut on his shoulder. Mr Morrison arrived at this
these ruffians, who were in armour. The re-
to their assistance. These were composed of Mr
fighting, in which Messrs Oliphant and Morrison
killed, the wretches made off, after having killed
five of the guard and wounded seven, besides
They had extinguished all the lights ; and di-
right and left at everything—they even cut all
the beds to pieces, evidently intending that not
to do so."
SIR RUTHERFORD ALCOCK. LONDON, Nov. 2. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Thursday 4 November 1897 page Article 2015-08-30 00:30 Science Congress.] _
Science Congress.]

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. "The Vagabond's" Occident and Orient travel 1881
    List
    Public

    "Do you want a trip to China?" said my friend M—— to me one Friday afternoon in George-street, Sydney. "The Woodbine sails on Tuesday morning, and I am going in her. Will you come?"

    So begins a body of work that stands among the most vivid and insightful writing about travel in the Asia-Pacific region during the last two decades of the 19th century, and certainly by any Australia-based writer of the period.

    This list is the full sequence of 38 travel feature articles written for the Melbourne daily newspaper, The Argus, and its associated weekly, The Australasian, by Julian Thomas, known as "The Vagabond", about his sea journey of almost eight months in March-November 1881 around the Pacific rim from Sydney to Shanghai, Nagasaki, Yokohama, Victoria BC and the area of modern-day Vancouver BC, San Francisco, Honolulu, Auckland and back to Sydney. The series was compiled, edited and published in book form as 'Occident and Orient : sketches on both sides of the Pacific', (George Robertson, Melbourne, 1882).

    With the exception of one issue (27 May 1882) missing pages in the Trove collection, the list is the complete series as it was first published in The Argus. The missing Argus page in the list has been made up with the corresponding article published in The Australasian (3 June 1882).

    The author of this remarkable series of articles was an Englishman who sometimes claimed to be an American, or more specifically a Virginian. He called himself Julian Thomas, although that was not his real name. Under his sobriquet, “The Vagabond”, he became famous as a popular exponent of descriptive writing and investigative journalism for Australian newspapers from 1876 until his death in Melbourne in 1896. Yet in 1894 he was bankrupt.

    Julian Thomas was christened John Stanley James. He was born in 1843 in Walsall, Staffordshire. He seems now almost to have popped up in Australia from nowhere. At times through his years in Australia he claimed variously to have had medical training; to have graduated from the University of Virginia; to have fought for the Confederacy in the US Civil War; and to have been present, and imprisoned as a spy, during the Franco-Prussian War and the Paris Commune of 1871—none of which claims can yet be verified. Some of his claims—such as his occasional assertions he was Buddhist, Jewish, Gipsy, or abducted as an infant by Flathead Indians—were couched in irony, but in general he cultivated an air of mystery about his past as part of his "Vagabond" public persona. Indeed, everything about his past between the late 1860s (when by his account he was a journalist in London) and his 1875 arrival in Sydney remains mysterious—even the exact date, place and means of his arrival in Australia. He did not marry—at least not in Australia—and died alone, without children or close family, although he had many friends, including many in commerce, industry, government and public life. His particular enemies were missionaries, who he mocked in his writing and lectures, and sued for libel on at least one occasion. References to Freemasonry, and to hospitality received from prominent Masons, are scattered through his writing, in context suggesting he himself was a Mason. Clues to other aspects of his secretiveness are contained in two articles in this series (nos. 35 & 36, “San Francisco Revisited No. V”, and “At Honolulu”), which strongly hint he was homosexual—a condition which, if flaunted, in the late 19th century could lead to scandal and imprisonment, as Julian Thomas's younger contemporary, Oscar Wilde, was soon to demonstrate.

    Sydney James, secretary of the jockey club of Dunedin, New Zealand, identified himself publicly (in a speech to a Masonic Lodge function reported by the press) as Julian Thomas’s brother after his death, stating in part that “it was thought best at the time not to disclose his identity, but there was no reason why he should not be known by his real name, Stanley James.” His wide circle of friends and the public affection he achieved through his writing and lectures were demonstrated by his well-attended funeral, admiring obituaries, a grave monument erected by public subscription in Melbourne General Cemetery, and newspaper memorial notices.

    Sources
    —1887 'LIBEL ACTION AGAINST THE "WESLEYAN SPECTATOR.".', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), 20 September, p. 5, viewed 25 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7931902
    —1894 'NEW INSOLVENTS.', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), 20 December, p. 5, viewed 25 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8726424
    —1896 'DEATH OF A WELL-KNOWN JOURNALIST.', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), 5 September, p. 4, viewed 22 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9183574
    —1896 '"THE VAGABOND.".', Geelong Advertiser (Vic. : 1859 - 1926), 5 September, p. 4, viewed 22 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article150128246
    —1896 'AN ADVENTUROUS JOURNALIST.', The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), 7 September, p. 3, viewed 22 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9381144
    —1897 '"THE VAGABOND'S" TRUE NAME.', The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), 1 May, p. 36, viewed 22 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article139741091
    —1897 'Family Notices.', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), 4 September, p. 1, viewed 22 August, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9769879
    —John Barnes, 'James, John Stanley (1843–1896)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/james-john-stanley-3848/text6113, published first in hardcopy 1972, accessed online 21 August 2015

    Images
    — Brown, J 1860, [John Stanley James, alias] Julian Thomas [pen name "The Vagabond"], [ca. 1860-ca. 1900] http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/278471
    — Stewart & Co 1876, [John Stanley James, alias] Julian Thomas [pen name "The Vagabond"], [ca. 1876] http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/172507

    38 items
    created by: public:Gato 2015-08-02
    User data
    Tags:

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.