Information about Trove user: Gato

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,207,077
2 NeilHamilton 2,237,632
3 annmanley 2,041,990
4 noelwoodhouse 1,821,987
5 maurielyn 1,449,761
...
50 cjbrill 394,600
51 InstituteOfAustralianCulture 389,254
52 vjkingsr 387,188
53 Gato 380,025
54 johnfox 371,129
55 graham.pearce 370,490

380,025 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2015 3,099
March 2015 8,405
February 2015 1,850
January 2015 3,298
December 2014 8,531
November 2014 8,299
October 2014 3,712
September 2014 1,169
August 2014 6,011
July 2014 1,808
June 2014 917
May 2014 3,056
April 2014 1,057
March 2014 2,596
February 2014 1,038
January 2014 9,217
December 2013 716
November 2013 1,507
October 2013 308
September 2013 578
August 2013 2,439
July 2013 3,547
June 2013 1,836
May 2013 2,673
April 2013 8,931
March 2013 6,881
February 2013 1,163
January 2013 11,847
December 2012 5,924
November 2012 19,160
October 2012 3,128
September 2012 13,779
August 2012 571
July 2012 340
June 2012 276
May 2012 135
April 2012 669
March 2012 336
February 2012 1,758
January 2012 93
December 2011 13,942
November 2011 3,711
October 2011 4,120
September 2011 2,645
August 2011 7,391
July 2011 3,395
June 2011 4,528
May 2011 19,249
April 2011 34,962
March 2011 27,797
February 2011 42,572
January 2011 18,683
December 2010 6,141
November 2010 9,571
October 2010 464
September 2010 1,799
August 2010 2,682
July 2010 846
June 2010 6,459
May 2010 4,356
April 2010 4,631
March 2010 883
February 2010 98
January 2010 173
December 2009 531
November 2009 36
October 2009 68
August 2009 1,098
July 2009 308
March 2009 79
December 2008 1,928
November 2008 865
September 2008 1,356

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
HITLER GROOMS A LEADER FOR POSTWAR GERMANY (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 27 May 1944 page Article 2015-04-16 15:59 solace in the churches, since' this is
seldom appears at public demonstra
Boring from within, treachery, mur
der-mingled with a fanatic loyalty
to Hitler-this is Bormann's record.
Party, a streamlined underground S3
to write a new chapter in the mon
strous story of Nagiism.
solace in the churches, since this is
seldom appears at public demonstra-
Boring from within, treachery, mur-
der—mingled with a fanatic loyalty
to Hitler—this is Bormann's record.
Party, a streamlined underground SS
to write a new chapter in the mon-
strous story of Naziism.
HITLER GROOMS A LEADER FOR POSTWAR GERMANY (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 27 May 1944 page Article 2015-04-16 15:58 mysterious Partei - Hilfskasse (Party
among Germany's great mass of un
Prom the "Relief Fund" came the
public were bribed and Nazi provoca
business for itself, buying up news
Be still holds the defaulted promis
Rudolf Hess, ex-Deputy-Fu«Hrer of
scry notes of many of them. These
he can use at any time to keep recal
Catholic CHurch were Bormann's Idea.
Germany, who fled to England.
Now "Head of the Party Chancel
^ I
mysterious Partei-Hilfskasse (Party
among Germany's great mass of un-
From the "Relief Fund" came the
public were bribed and Nazi provoca-
business for itself, buying up news-
He still holds the defaulted promis- ||
Rudolf Hess, ex-Deputy-Fuehrer of
sory notes of many of them. These
he can use at any time to keep recal-
Catholic Church were Bormann's idea.
Germany, who fled to England. ||
Now "Head of the Party Chancel-

HITLER GROOMS A LEADER FOR POSTWAR GERMANY (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 27 May 1944 page Article 2015-04-16 15:54 flight Nazi-misfit, adventurer, des-
The 44-year-old Deputy Fuehrer as
bis vocation.
the law. But in 1923, when an out
rageously brutal murder was com
of Thuringia under Dr. Wilhelm Prick,
Shirts, who were to play such an im
portant role in Hitler's rise to power.
Bormann, Nflzi No. 2, who is being
groomed by Hitler for the postwar.
flight Nazi—misfit, adventurer, des-
The 44-year-old Deputy Fuehrer was
his vocation.
the law. But in 1923, when an out-
rageously brutal murder was com-
of Thuringia under Dr. Wilhelm Frick,
Shirts, who were to play such an im-
portant role in Hitler's rise to power. ||
Bormann, Nazi No. 2, who is being
groomed by Hitler for the postwar. ||
HITLER GROOMS A LEADER FOR POSTWAR GERMANY (Article), The World's News (Sydney, NSW : 1901 - 1955), Saturday 27 May 1944 page Article 2015-04-16 15:50 siven a special mission by Hitler.
It is to secretly purge and reorgan
Bormann, such an underground move
who played along with the Nazis, He
born of a middle-class family an as
TOR POSTWAR GERMANY
When Rudolph Hess fled the Third Reich, Hitler appointed on unknown Party thug, Martin
in his long experience as ah under
A DRAFT DODGER y
organisers who ever made mur
Knowing intimately the party mem
Useful in lecruiting Nazis for his
follows the pattern of many a top
flight Nazi-misfit, adventurer, des
ground wrecker of democratic govern
Germany's political scene, he had al
The 44-year-old Deputy Fuehrer * as
well educated. At 18, he found hi. self
in the army after trying to dodge con
[ante, and showed no more signs of
However; when he became a Nazi l\e
ne migrated to Mecklenburg, an
At 19. Martin Bormann became a
professional reactionary-and found
He was hired by Mecklenburg land
r*onS with other footloose ex-service
inese rootless ex-soldiers were secretly
or|anised' on Junkers' farms.
nii(?rmaim rose high in these outlaw
S11 He was an intimate friend
r\th!ranfred von Kil linger, Hemes, and
tViJet was he who later gathered
as an underground desperado,
e evidence which convicted the
remain unrecognised. Here is the reason for his un-Nazi modesty.
given a special mission by Hitler. ||
It is to secretly purge and reorgan-
Bormann, such an underground move-
who played along with the Nazis, he
born of a middle-class family and was
FOR POSTWAR GERMANY
When Rudolph Hess fled the Third Reich, Hitler appointed an unknown Party thug, Martin
in his long experience as an under-
A DRAFT DODGER
organisers who ever made mur-
Knowing intimately the party mem-
Useful in recruiting Nazis for his
follows the pattern of many a top-
flight Nazi-misfit, adventurer, des-
ground wrecker of democratic govern-
Germany's political scene, he had al-
The 44-year-old Deputy Fuehrer as
well educated. At 18, he found himself
in the army after trying to dodge con-
ranks, and showed no more signs of
However, when he became a Nazi he
he migrated to Mecklenburg, an
At 19, Martin Bormann became a
professional reactionary—and found
He was hired by Mecklenburg land-
along with other footloose ex-service-
These rootless ex-soldiers were secretly
organised on Junkers' farms.
Bormann rose high in these outlaw
killer gangs. He was an intimate friend
of Manfred von Killinger, Heines, and
Yet it was he who later gathered
men, as an underground desperado.
the evidence which convicted the
remain unrecognised. Here is the reason for his un-Nazi modesty. ||
VON GRAMM GAOLED FOR YEAR Trial Over in Half an Hour (Article), Advocate (Burnie, Tas. : 1890 - 1954), Monday 16 May 1938 page Article 2015-04-16 15:38 BERLIN, Saturday. - The trial of
The iudge, Herr Sponer, announced
Tho public prosecutor applied for
The judge stated that von Crnmm
unfaithful. Ho visited homo-sexual
Judge Sponer, though ho is very gen-
Tho prosecutor left tho court a
BERLIN, Saturday.—The trial of
The judge, Herr Sponer, announced
The public prosecutor applied for
The judge stated that von Cramm
unfaithful. He visited homo-sexual
Judge Sponer, though he is very gen-
The prosecutor left the court a
GERMANY'S NEW BASE. (Article), The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Wednesday 13 October 1909 page Article 2015-04-15 03:38 GERMANY'S NEW BASE, '
* -4=---
For more than five years now the wind
swept sand dunes of Wilhelmshavesi and
transforming this most unnatural port into.
the strongest naval base between Copen
to the great port; but it is completed suffi
in September or October of the entire Ger
man high seas fleet, including .all the latest
battle-ships,,. armoured cruisers, light. pro
Wilhelmshaven in future will quite over
that. once the fleet is in the North Sea,
broadened and deepened to allow of the pas
sage-of the Nassau and larger. ships. The
modern accessory for the prompt execntion
new tail-shaft to the Ealving of a sunken
German 18,000-ton warship. Detailed de
with the chilliest of receptions in that dis
trict. Inspection from seaward is practi
cally impossible, owing to the natural battle
meats of sand that overlap the tidal har
bour mouth and present from i distance
three immense dry docks, capable of accom
modating warships much larger than Dread
n'oughts. The first was completed some
months ago; the seyond will be ready next
of Wilhelmshaven are on a scle proportion
millions sterling having so far been expend
rewly-fledged maritime aspirations, dearly
loves brick-and-mortar defences, and conse
guns of all descriptions--witness the string
GERMANY'S NEW BASE.

For more than five years now the wind-
swept sand dunes of Wilhelmshaven and
transforming this most unnatural port into
the strongest naval base between Copen-
to the great port; but it is completed suffi-
in September or October of the entire Ger-
man high seas fleet, including all the latest
battle-ships, armoured cruisers, light pro-
Wilhelmshaven in future will quite over-
that, once the fleet is in the North Sea,
broadened and deepened to allow of the pas-
sage of the Nassau and larger ships. The
modern accessory for the prompt execution
new tail-shaft to the salving of a sunken
German 18,000-ton warship. Detailed de-
with the chilliest of receptions in that dis-
trict. Inspection from seaward is practi-
cally impossible, owing to the natural battle-
ments of sand that overlap the tidal har-
bour mouth and present from a distance
three immense dry docks, capable of accom-
modating warships much larger than Dread-
noughts. The first was completed some
months ago; the second will be ready next
of Wilhelmshaven are on a scale proportion-
millions sterling having so far been expend-
newly-fledged maritime aspirations, dearly
loves brick-and-mortar defences, and conse-
guns of all descriptions—witness the string
GERMANY AS A MENACE. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 3 April 1909 page Article 2015-04-15 03:33 out a fleet In any serious sense, would have
leapt Into the position formerly occupied
by France,'and be determined on assert-
be considered In world affairs. The Russo
Japuuese war changed the land position
throughout Asia, aird in a measure
as far as the Pacllic .Is concerned.
lenge to the enormous Increase of the Brit-
ish licet. It Is the challenge again to the
building of the United Slates navy, and
the United Kingdom it Is taken for gran
led that Germany is preparing to strike a
she seems to have nt present Is Austria,
and there only that part of Austria that Is
she can only thank tho shiftiness and
brusquerie of her diplomacy that sho Is
looms very large in tho international scnle
of things. But yy-c need not 'see her
powerful nation, yy'Iio has-made Immense
gramme of Dreadnought building, yvc must
not assume that she Is going to carry out
this programme without difliculty, al-
yvIII. Dreadnoughts, however, take money,
and Germany lins not yet arrived at a
money as Britain. She lias reached
a point at Yvhich slic builds one
Dreadnought moro easily than Britain can
pared lo bear a proportionate share. Bul,
do not lot us underrate the qualities of the
nation or Yvliich yy*o ure pnrl. "lu Yvnr,"
said Napoleon, "you see your oyvh trou-
bles;, those of the enemy you cannot see."
us great. When King MdYvnrd went to Ber-
lin the populace received iiim Yvilh great
ent of Hie "Nation" lins said, "behind the
luxury of Unter don Linden and the neigh-
bouring streets Yverc concealed the hard-
Germany no less Ilion other countries. In
the building on the lefl-htind side of the
Yvhich EdYvaid VII. passed in enter-
ing Berlin, the representatives of Hie
nation delibéralo anxiously on the
burning question-how to cover the
deficit of DOO to COO millions nf
marks In the Imperial Exchequer.". Fi-
nance YVith Germany is already a thorny
question, Yvhich the fierce building of
less difficult. The expansionists-the "bluo
Yvatcr" party, that is-Yvho want n big
navy, and intend lo use It when they get
it-draw few of their adherents either from
Yvhich this fatuous Dreadnought competi-
tion involves. Aud it so happens that
these classes are very much on the Increase.
industrial and less nn agrarian country.
At the present moment it Is two-thirds In-
dustrial. The "social democrats," Yvho aro
Yvant Yvar if it can be avoided. The surest
way, however, to provont Yvar is for Bri-
doing as great n service to the mass of the
German people ns to_hcr oyvd.
out a fleet in any serious sense, would have
leapt into the position formerly occupied
by France, and be determined on assert-
be considered in world affairs. The Russo-
Japanese war changed the land position
throughout Asia, and in a measure
as far as the Pacific is concerned.
lenge to the enormous increase of the Brit-
ish fleet. It is the challenge again to the
building of the United States navy, and
the United Kingdom it is taken for gran-
ted that Germany is preparing to strike a
she seems to have at present is Austria,
and there only that part of Austria that is
she can only thank thr shiftiness and
brusquerie of her diplomacy that she is
looms very large in the international scale
of things. But we need not see her
powerful nation, who has made immense
gramme of Dreadnought building, we must
not assume that she is going to carry out
this programme without difficulty, al-
will. Dreadnoughts, however, take money,
and Germany has not yet arrived at a
money as Britain. She has reached
a point at which she builds one
Dreadnought more easily than Britain can
pared to bear a proportionate share. But,
do not let us underrate the qualities of the
nation of which we are part. "In war,"
said Napoleon, "you see your own trou-
bles; those of the enemy you cannot see."
as great. When King Edward went to Ber-
lin the populace received him with great
ent of the "Nation" has said, "behind the
luxury of Unter den Linden and the neigh-
bouring streets were concealed the hard-
Germany no less than other countries. In
the building on the left-hand side of the
which Edward VII. passed in enter-
ing Berlin, the representatives of the
nation deliberate anxiously on the
burning question—how to cover the
deficit of 500 to 600 millions of
marks in the Imperial Exchequer." Fi-
nance with Germany is already a thorny
question, which the fierce building of
less difficult. The expansionists—the "blue
water" party, that is—who want a big
navy, and intend to use it when they get
it—draw few of their adherents either from
which this fatuous Dreadnought competi-
tion involves. And it so happens that
these classes are very much on the increase.
industrial and less an agrarian country.
At the present moment it is two-thirds in-
dustrial. The "social democrats," who are
want war if it can be avoided. The surest
way, however, to prevent war is for Bri-
doing as great a service to the mass of the
German people as to her own.
GERMANY AS A MENACE. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 3 April 1909 page Article 2015-04-15 03:24 What is of broadest Interest, however,
Is the chango which has beeil «Tonght im
decade. First, by the war YVith Japan,
soniewhnt vague character ns the arbiter
back yy'o had been told that Russia Yvould
Asiatie_ Power, and then to n European
neighbour, it would have been thought In-
credible. Similarly ii would have been
hard to believe that Franco, a decade ago
the second navol ToYver of the world-the
Power YY'hom the British Admiralty
watched Yvllh the most concern-would
even say, the fltlh, place in sea strength.
Or that the United States, previously YVith
What is of broadest interest, however,
is the change which has been wrought in
decade. First, by the war with Japan,
somewhnt vague character as the arbiter
back we had been told that Russia would
Asiatic Power, and then to a European
neighbour, it would have been thought in-
credible. Similarly it would have been
hard to believe that France, a decade ago
the second naval Power of the world—the
Power whom the British Admiralty
watched with the most concern—would
even say, the fifth, place in sea strength.
Or that the United States, previously with-
GERMANY AS A MENACE. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 3 April 1909 page Article 2015-04-15 03:21 "Just at the moment Germany seems to
Just at the moment Germany seems to
GERMANY AS A MENACE. (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 3 April 1909 page Article 2015-04-15 03:19 dominate the Interest of the world, Brit-
ish naval policy Is conditioned by German
activity. Tho Balkan position has under-
gone vital change In obedience to German
Influence. Ey'Oii Russia is smarting under
a humiliation Inflicted by Germany. Only
tlic other day it Yvas Germany who
prepared now, suffering tue after-effeetá of
a great war, and therefore Yvithout the
money lo risk another and greater cam-
we arc entitled to assume, not merely re-
lo a spirit of positivo hostility to pomany,
Yvhlch may bring about changes in the
European position at present uulookcd for.
ment settled. But yvo can seo now how
ter Britain apparently had not. Tier active
In an act of spoliation. True, she was In-
terested, as every other civilised PoYver is
Interested, in Hie observance of terms of n
treaty by the nations Yvho were parties
to it. Bul Russia having obeyed the rattle
of the German SYVord in Its scabbard, to
llave Insisted upon the observance of
(ho treaty Yvould have been too much
Uko a single-handed task for Britain
io ' undertake. The humiliation of Rus-
sia. hoYvovor, Is something of an affront
ing in concert willi her. We have only lo
imagine what '--ould have happened to
adopted the same alttlude io Germany as
.the latter adopted toYvards Russia. Had
text for n quarrel she could have destroyed
tho German navy YVith lier home fleet
alone. Tluit she has not done so is the an-
swer to the German Anglophobes yvIio
ngninst n misuse of the nnY-nl power of
dominate the interest of the world, Brit-
ish naval policy is conditioned by German
activity. The Balkan position has under-
gone vital change in obedience to German
influence. Even Russia is smarting under
a humiliation inflicted by Germany. Only
the other day it was Germany who
prepared now, suffering the after-effects of
a great war, and therefore without the
money to risk another and greater cam-
we are entitled to assume, not merely re-
to a spirit of positive hostility to Germany,
which may bring about changes in the
European position at present uulooked for.
ment settled. But we can see now how
ter Britain apparently had not. Her active
in an act of spoliation. True, she was in-
terested, as every other civilised Power is
interested, in the observance of terms of a
treaty by the nations who were parties
to it. But Russia having obeyed the rattle
of the German sword in its scabbard, to
have insisted upon the observance of
the treaty would have been too much
like a single-handed task for Britain
to undertake. The humiliation of Rus-
sia, however, is something of an affront
ing in concert with her. We have only to
imagine what would have happened to
adopted the same attitude to Germany as
the latter adopted towards Russia. Had
text for a quarrel she could have destroyed
the German navy with her home fleet
alone. That she has not done so is the an-
swer to the German Anglophobes who
against a misuse of the naval power of

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.