Information about Trove user: Gato

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,745,478
2 annmanley 1,967,155
3 NeilHamilton 1,746,553
4 noelwoodhouse 1,325,593
5 maurielyn 1,321,300
...
48 cjbrill 359,045
49 graham.pearce 351,767
50 InstituteOfAustralianCulture 347,302
51 Gato 341,662
52 Ronda.SHambrook 335,472
53 vjkingsr 331,658

341,662 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

August 2014 6,011
July 2014 1,808
June 2014 917
May 2014 3,056
April 2014 1,057
March 2014 2,596
February 2014 1,038
January 2014 9,217
December 2013 716
November 2013 1,507
October 2013 308
September 2013 578
August 2013 2,439
July 2013 3,547
June 2013 1,836
May 2013 2,673
April 2013 8,931
March 2013 6,881
February 2013 1,163
January 2013 11,847
December 2012 5,924
November 2012 19,160
October 2012 3,128
September 2012 13,779
August 2012 571
July 2012 340
June 2012 276
May 2012 135
April 2012 669
March 2012 336
February 2012 1,758
January 2012 93
December 2011 13,942
November 2011 3,711
October 2011 4,120
September 2011 2,645
August 2011 7,391
July 2011 3,395
June 2011 4,528
May 2011 19,249
April 2011 34,962
March 2011 27,797
February 2011 42,572
January 2011 18,683
December 2010 6,141
November 2010 9,571
October 2010 464
September 2010 1,799
August 2010 2,682
July 2010 846
June 2010 6,459
May 2010 4,356
April 2010 4,631
March 2010 883
February 2010 98
January 2010 173
December 2009 531
November 2009 36
October 2009 68
August 2009 1,098
July 2009 308
March 2009 79
December 2008 1,928
November 2008 865
September 2008 1,356

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
THE CIRCLED CONTINENT THE MARTYRS OF THE DRIFTS. [ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Saturday 16 December 1905 page Article 2014-08-31 23:48 THE CIRCLED
THE MARTYRS OF THE DRIFTS,
From tho cool, rnln-snturatcd, dew-soaked
ljunglos of tho Mambarb, tho Kumusi, and tho
und lawyorvlno, holds off the Bun's rays, but
fover; whoro Iho mnzo of creopers and Bap
for the cutting of trackn, and limits the leafy
quinipo temporarily inefilcncloua, comos for
grass beach, and croton, which Is Samarai.
-Iho avorngo miner lu too clnchonlHud for
man. Thero Is one man who occasionally
again botoro returning to his golden jungle.
[ALL RIGUT9 RESERVED.»
"" BY RANDOLPH BEDFORD. I
I Gira, where tho denso tropical growth of
allows tho noon heat to draw up steam and
lings calls for tho cane killie and tomahawk
moro thau lils usual doso of malaria, and finds
rest and health to tho little jewel of palms,
Tho fever of Papua docs no1 n3 a rulo kill
that-but It weakens deplorably and malms a
conies to Samarai to make himself half well
Ho is vory thin and very bright of e-yo; tho
skin of his face, Uko the skin of lils logs,
burned to tho colour of mahogany. Ho is so
skln-tondcr as to find oven allppors painful,
aud spends IiIb respite from gold-golllng in
bocIcb and pyjamas; and nu soon as ho fools a
little bottor, and tho highest poignancy of
ncho has left his bones, hack ho goes to tho
jungle, and takes up again tho llfo of gold
getting on tho deep fuces of alluvium, topped
chaotic destruction tho nuriforous old river
beds and torracos, aud the wall of junglo
which crowned them, mining tho gold and tho
heavy, groy-whlto and lustreless osmiridium
Ab goldfields, tho Gira and tho Yodda havo
boon merely scratched. Thero Is an auriferous
bolt of country thirty-fivo milos wide from
oast to west, and fifty miles from north to
south. Tho last year's export of declared
gold was £52,000 of value; hut naturally, and
outside of tho risk of fever nnd tho perma-
nent breaking of n man by continuous attacks
thereof, thero Is an obvorso to tho picture
CONTINT^
THE CIRCLED CONTINENT
THE MARTYRS OF THE DRIFTS.
From the cool, rain-saturated, dew-soaked
jungles of the Mambare, the Kumusi, and the
and lawyervine, holds off the sun's rays, but
fever; where the maze of creepers and sap-
for the cutting of tracks, and limits the leafy
quinine temporarily inefficacious, comes for
grass beach, and croton, which is Samarai.
—the average miner is too cinchonised for
man. There is one man who occasionally
again before returning to his golden jungle.
[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.]
BY RANDOLPH BEDFORD.
Gira, where the dense tropical growth of
allows the noon heat to draw up steam and
lings calls for the cane knife and tomahawk
more than his usual dose of malaria, and finds
rest and health to the little jewel of palms,
The fever of Papua does not as a rule kill
that—but it weakens deplorably and maims a
comes to Samarai to make himself half well
He is very thin and very bright of eye; the
skin of his face, like the skin of his legs,
burned to the colour of mahogany. He is so
skin-tender as to find even slippers painful,
and spends his respite from gold-getting in
socks and pyjamas; and as soon as he feels a
little better, and the highest poignancy of
ache has left his bones, back he goes to the
jungle, and takes up again the life of gold-
getting on the deep faces of alluvium, topped
chaotic destruction the auriferous old river
beds and terraces, and the wall of jungle
which crowned them, mining the gold and the
heavy, grey-white and lustreless osmiridium
As goldfields, the Gira and the Yodda have
been merely scratched. There is an auriferous
belt of country thirty-five miles wide from
east to west, and fifty miles from north to
south. The last year's export of declared
gold was £52,000 of value; but naturally, and
outside of the risk of fever and the perma-
nent breaking of a man by continuous attacks
thereof, there is an obverse to the picture.

THE CIRCLED CONTINENT. (All Rights Reserved.) THE MARTYRS OF THE DRIFTS. (Article), Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA : 1896 - 1916), Tuesday 2 January 1906 page Article 2014-08-31 23:39 "boys,"' many of them afflicted with
diseases, each carry Solb. weight of
?.. -, .. the way.
stores from the coast or -the river
:heads of navigation, but their main
Deaths among the carriers are com-.
anon. In 3903-4 the mortality ;nd de
sertionk amounted to 23 per cent.; this
year it is down to 4. It is not a ques
the latter half of 3902-4 were in the
=: same ratio as the deaths of the miners
--zoo per thousand per annum. The
- wages paid to carriers. average zos.
:sod. per month, but each native costs
. ? a week to feed. And in almost
any; sensible man would treat a valuable
m~ployed many hundreds of natives,
S: and has never had one desertion.
This condition is the result of just,
h .e Papuan will desert his service .for
/. treatment, but also of some luck, asl
the most trivial of reasons, or. for no I
reason at all. He may dream- that his
S father or mother is calling him, and
then, his inclination jumping widh his
superstition, Ihe deserts at the first olp
or he dreams that h·is wife has gone
wrong, and goes; and worst of all, I
through country Iheld by hostile tribes,
he persuades orther carriers to go with
bim--"oys" who, if left untenmpted,
would stay at work in absolute con
Without carriers no maan can safely
"boys," many of them afflicted with
diseases, each carry 50lb. weight of
the way.
stores from the coast or the river
heads of navigation, but their main-
Deaths among the carriers are com-
mon. In 1903-4 the mortality and de-
sertions amounted to 23 per cent.; this
year it is down to 4. It is not a ques-
the latter half of 1902-4 were in the
same ratio as the deaths of the miners
—100 per thousand per annum. The
wages paid to carriers. average 10s.
10d. per month, but each native costs
£1 a week to feed. And in almost
any sensible man would treat a valuable
employed many hundreds of natives,
and has never had one desertion.
This condition is the result of just
the Papuan will desert his service for
treatment, but also of some luck, as
the most trivial of reasons, or for no
reason at all. He may dream that his
father or mother is calling him, and
then, his inclination jumping with his
superstition, he deserts at the first op-
or he dreams that his wife has gone
wrong, and goes; and worst of all,
through country held by hostile tribes,
he persuades other carriers to go with
him—"boys" who, if left untempted,
would stay at work in absolute con-
Without carriers no man can safely
THE CIRCLED CONTINENT. (All Rights Reserved.) THE MARTYRS OF THE DRIFTS. (Article), Kalgoorlie Western Argus (WA : 1896 - 1916), Tuesday 2 January 1906 page Article 2014-08-31 23:34 Y:;:-' :tlkitender as to find even sliappers i
THlE CiAIRTYRS OF THE DRI:FTS.
S . Fom the cool, rain-saturated, dew- .
soaked jungles of the MCambare, the
dense tro?pical growth of scrub, cane (
4 l'awyeavine, holds off the sun's rays, but z
` allows the noon heat to draw up .steam t
- and fever; where the maize of creepers f
and .tomahawk for the cutting of
- and saplings calls for the cane knife r
tracks, and limits the leafy horizon to a
- 6ft or so, the miner who has had more
than his usual dose of malaria, and c
' nd fs quinine temporarily inefficacious, '
comes for rest and health to the little i
.` jewel of palms, grass beach, and cro
ton, which is Samarai. -
The fever of Papua does nut as a
rule kill-the average miner is too
S ichonised for that--but it weakens '
: deplorably and maims a man. There -
.. 's one man who occasionally comes to
Samamii to make himself half-well t
: Jungle. He is very- thin and veryt
a? gain before returning to his golden
right of eye; the skin of his face,
' like the skin of his legs, contracted;
V A tie color of mahogany. He, is so
?: painful, and spends his respite from
slmost to bursting point, and burned
: gold-getting in socks and pyjamas;
S.:.ad as soon as he feels a little better ,
S and " the highest poignancy. of ache has
left his bones, back he goes to the:
j" alluvium, to ped with much barren
"- and terraces, and the wall of jungle
.Y.:: ` permanent breaking of a man by con
over-burden, bringing to chaotic de
.struction the auriferous old river beds
.: miles wide from east to west, and So
a" nd te heavy, gray-white and lustre
As goldfields, the Gira and the Yod
da haie been merely scratched. There
, is an auriferous belt of country 35
- year's export of declared gold was
£5s,ooo of value; but naturally, and
outride of the risk of fever and- the
:tinuous attacks thereof, there is an
s?" epoarno, kuri kuri, and other skin
There are almost Himalayan diffi
ctilties of prospecting by reason of the
t.rrpical nature of the country. The
toots the camps: the. weary brown ?
His insanitary aet'ipue of carrier
-"*boys,"' many of them 'afflicted w ith
_ diseases, each carry Solb. weight of
(All Rights -Reserved.)
skin-tender as to find even slippers
THE MARTYRS OF THE DRIFTS.
From the cool, rain-saturated, dew-
soaked jungles of the Mambare, the
dense tropical growth of scrub, cane
lawyervine, holds off the sun's rays, but
allows the noon heat to draw up steam t
and fever; where the maize of creepers
and tomahawk for the cutting of
and saplings calls for the cane knife
tracks, and limits the leafy horizon to
6ft or so, the miner who has had more
than his usual dose of malaria, and
finds quinine temporarily inefficacious,
comes for rest and health to the little
jewel of palms, grass beach, and cro-
ton, which is Samarai.
The fever of Papua does not as a
rule kill—the average miner is too
cinchonised for that—but it weakens
deplorably and maims a man. There
is one man who occasionally comes to
Samarai to make himself half-well
jungle. He is very thin and very
again before returning to his golden
bright of eye; the skin of his face,
like the skin of his legs, contracted
to the color of mahogany. He is so
painful, and spends his respite from
almost to bursting point, and burned
gold-getting in socks and pyjamas;
and as soon as he feels a little better
and the highest poignancy of ache has
left his bones, back he goes to the
alluvium, topped with much barren
and terraces, and the wall of jungle
permanent breaking of a man by con-
over-burden, bringing to chaotic de-
struction the auriferous old river beds
miles wide from east to west, and 50
and the heavy, gray-white and lustre-
As goldfields, the Gira and the Yod-
da have been merely scratched. There
is an auriferous belt of country 35
year's export of declared gold was
£52,ooo of value; but naturally, and
outside of the risk of fever and the
tinuous attacks thereof, there is an
seporno, kuri kuri, and other skin
There are almost Himalayan diffi-
culties of prospecting by reason of the
tropical nature of the country. The
loots the camps; the weary brown
His insanitary retinue of carrier
"boys,"' many of them afflicted with
diseases, each carry Solb. weight of
(All Rights Reserved.)
"THE DARK ISLE." SOME MINOR PAPUAN MYSTERIES PROSPECTORS IN ARMOR THE LOST BLACK-TRACKERS. (Article), Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), Sunday 14 June 1914 page Article 2014-08-31 23:22 date, occurred. the case of Joe O'Brien. 'Joe''
and wan arrested or. a serious charge. ( An
Assistant Magistrate ironed him,- and set him 19
O'Brien wrenched his, guardian's rifle from; him,
was seen at a couple of isolated 'prospectors' I
reward was offered for him, 'alive or dead,'
while every path' and track on the country-side
tvas watched -arid warded, with n'o'rfestilt.J'Np.'
white man has ever 'set eyes on O'Brien . since,
it. ' ?' ; '
_ One day in 1905 there came to Tamata sta
tion, up on the Mamba. River, a queer-looking
16ft cutter- rigged craft, carrying six men in the
last stages of starvation. They were ? escapees
were 'Liberes' working at a lonely nickel mine
? Papua, over 1500 miles away from their starting
of Papua, visited Tamata shortly after, their ar
territory, their boat being refitted and provi*
with his- own pick-handles. His native wife,
'Bi,' was a witness of the murder, and she
'Bi' and her native friends. The men were
acquitted and left the country, but 'Bi' was
sentenced to a-.long term in Samarai gaol, where
she died not long . ago.
Another sensation -of the Northern Division,
which has had more than' its share of them,
were the two gold 'robberies from Whitten
gold stolen was the same quantity (ioooz.) on
' all had good parcels of alluvial gold. The
cashbox in whveh the gold had been kept
was found near the store later,: .but no case
present. Some years later Whitten Bros, lost
those days the depot for- the Yodda goldfkid.
When the gold was missed all swags ^veic
found. There was great excitement among the.
mining population of the _ north. Everyone
until a- considerable acreage had been turned
over in vain. One enthusiast of Scottish ex
He had got what he thought was the 'office'
up1 the posts which remained, he did not locate
the plant
sort, but- space forbids their recital'. Among
doing: to death of a Government agent named
friends, at Rigo. In these cases the perpetra
are' unknown to this day.
and chequered one, and because . of isolation
and judicious suppression in' the old days, little
realised by the outside .world. Times have
?changed mighlily, however, and other men and
things, and lighting . up^the hidden places of
what was once the Darlrtsle.
date, occurred the case of Joe O'Brien. "Joe''
and was arrested on a serious charge. An
Assistant Magistrate ironed him, and set him to
O'Brien wrenched his guardian's rifle from him,
was seen at a couple of isolated prospectors'
reward was offered for him, "alive or dead,"
while every path and track on the country-side
was watched and warded, with no result. No
white man has ever set eyes on O'Brien since,
it.
One day in 1905 there came to Tamata sta-
tion, up on the Mamba River, a queer-looking
16ft cutter-rigged craft, carrying six men in the
last stages of starvation. They were escapees
were "Liberes" working at a lonely nickel mine
Papua, over 1500 miles away from their starting
of Papua, visited Tamata shortly after their ar-
territory, their boat being refitted and provi-
with his own pick-handles. His native wife,
"Bi," was a witness of the murder, and she
"Bi" and her native friends. The men were
acquitted and left the country, but "Bi" was
sentenced to a long term in Samarai gaol, where
she died not long ago.
Another sensation of the Northern Division,
which has had more than its share of them,
were the two gold robberies from Whitten
gold stolen was the same quantity (100oz.) on
all had good parcels of alluvial gold. The
cashbox in which the gold had been kept
was found near the store later, but no case
present. Some years later Whitten Bros. lost
those days the depot for the Yodda goldfield.
When the gold was missed all swags were
found. There was great excitement among the
mining population of the north. Everyone
until a considerable acreage had been turned
over in vain. One enthusiast of Scottish ex-
He had got what he thought was the "office"
up the posts which remained, he did not locate
the plant.
sort, but space forbids their recital. Among
doing to death of a Government agent named
friends, at Rigo. In these cases the perpetra-
are unknown to this day.
and chequered one, and because of isolation
and judicious suppression in the old days, little
realised by the outside world. Times have
changed mightily, however, and other men and
things, and lighting up the hidden places of
what was once the Dark Isle.
"THE DARK ISLE." SOME MINOR PAPUAN MYSTERIES PROSPECTORS IN ARMOR THE LOST BLACK-TRACKERS. (Article), Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 - 1930), Sunday 14 June 1914 page Article 2014-08-31 23:13 ^THE DARK ISEE.'
? THE LOST BLACK-TRACKERS. V
and the as yet unwritten history of tfye earlier
man is full of these. For. instance, on the
north-east coast great middens are found con
taining broken' pottery of a shape and design
is the great mortar and pestle found on the;
ihiF' things the Papuan knows nothing, nor has
i ? record of a superior race which may
! : copied the land before him.
o.ic Rochfort and his mate is one of these.
in Cloudy Bay. The district had — and indeed
themselves armor out of boat 'copper.' Fit
record of the armor ever having been recovered;
two Australian 'black-trackers. When' the
and though ,the writer has questioned many na
tives on the matter,- including men who took'
?: there are unsolved mysteries of strange
. .. ,'srances, or sudden death. The case of
still has — a 'nasty reputation. As a protection
In the middle 'go's Clark, one of the dis
Later, when the same .Mamba .natives snur
dered Green, th.e ]? Resident - Magistrate, with
his poiice, they took his head as a 'trophy. This
was jealously guarded _.as, a priceless ?relic, and
to recover it, they- were unsuccessful. The
writer thought he had located the skull, .after
rnuch trouble,, in the house of a sorcerer in a
village on the Gira- River. The place was
raided, but with no result, save. : that ihc sor
was- found in his possession, he' had hu-Isd it
into the, Seep arid .rapid river which ran before
other hand, the .'Government's' head may yet
produced at times of festival;; and boasting.-' Aiir
other official attempted ' to -regaiii the grisly relic
by offering a liberal- reward ; but,; though the
guih'ess natives brought him s.kulls of all a^es,
ou: to be 'Papuan ones... ? . '.????' , ?
(By 'BOURAGI.')
"THE DARK ISLE."
THE LOST BLACK-TRACKERS.
and the as yet unwritten history of the earlier
man is full of these. For instance, on the
north-east coast great middens are found con-
taining broken pottery of a shape and design
is the great mortar and pestle found on the
these things the Papuan knows nothing, nor has
|| record of a superior race which may
|| cupied the land before him.
one Rochfort and his mate is one of these.
in Cloudy Bay. The district had—and indeed
themselves armor out of boat "copper." Fit-
record of the armor ever having been recovered,
two Australian black-trackers. When the
and though the writer has questioned many na-
tives on the matter, including men who took
|| there are unsolved mysteries of strange
|| earances, or sudden death. The case of
still has—a nasty reputation. As a protection
In the middle '90's Clark, one of the dis-
Later, when the same Mamba natives mur-
dered Green, the Resident Magistrate, with
his police, they took his head as a trophy. This
was jealously guarded as a priceless relic, and
to recover it, they were unsuccessful. The
writer thought he had located the skull, after
much trouble, in the house of a sorcerer in a
village on the Gira River. The place was
raided, but with no result, save that the sor-
was found in his possession, he had hurled it
into the deep and rapid river which ran before
other hand, the "Government's" head may yet
produced at times of festival and boasting. An-
other official attempted to regain the grisly relic
by offering a liberal reward ; but, though the
guileless natives brought him skulls of all ages,
out to be Papuan ones.
(By "BOURAGI.")
DESCRIPTION OF WOODLARK ISLAND MINES, [?]APU[?]. (Article), The Northern Miner (Charters Towers, Qld. : 1874 - 1954), Friday 7 July 1911 page Article 2014-08-31 23:05 OESCRIPTION OF WOODLARK
ISLAND MINES, PAPM.
(By P. X. Chr.riiiiEtler).
Within the last six months the min
ing public have bees astonished at tha
(ram Wcodlark IslErad, Papua. Per
haps, therefore,, your readers may ho
Interested in a brief description of the
principal reefs. ;
Gold was first discovered In June,
1896, by Chli. Lobl) and Richard Etlp.
The results were bo good that it soon
'attracted some BOO'to 700 diggers. Ow
ing to the Island being covered by a.
dense tifoplcal linflergrowtsi, prospect-*
Ing proved to be both . arduous and
difficult, and It waa only by sluicing oft
the heavy Overburden down to bedrock
that the reefs were-originally discov
ered, even then the Burfaco Indication
being composed nf decomposed ferru
ginous quartz rubbly leadirs, It was
some Ume before the prospectors
deposits. In fact It was only when
the first attention. It.was a large de
composed lime and chlorltlc forma
tion with seams of rich rubbly leaders'
running through it, taking a course ot
fifleg. west of north, with an approxi
mate width of from 15 to 20ft
DESCRIPTION OF WOODLARK
ISLAND MINES, PAPUA.
(By P. N. Charpentier).
Within the last six months the min-
ing public have been astonished at the
from Woodlark Island, Papua. Per-
haps, therefore, your readers may be
interested in a brief description of the
principal reefs.
Gold was first discovered in June,
1896, by Chas. Lobb and Richard Ede.
The results were so good that it soon
attracted some 600 to 700 diggers. Ow-
ing to the island being covered by a
dense tropical undergrowth, prospect-
ing proved to be both arduous and
difficult, and it was only by sluicing off
the heavy overburden down to bedrock
that the reefs were originally discov-
ered, even then the surface indication
being composed of decomposed ferru-
ginous quartz rubbly leaders, it was
some time before the prospectors
deposits. In fact it was only when
the first attention. It was a large de-
composed lime and chloritic forma-
tion with seams of rich rubbly leaders
running through it, taking a course of
5deg. west of north, with an approxi-
mate width of from 15 to 20ft.
TROPICAL DISEASES. TO THE EDITOR. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Saturday 31 August 1907 page Article 2014-08-31 22:59 Sir,-There can be little question but
An old saying among the Australian;
racing fraternity is—" money talks." I
my example.—l am, sir, &c, F.W.C. ROCH. Yodda Valley, Papua, 6th July.
Yodda Valley, Papua, 6th July.
F.W.C. ROCHFORT.
Sir,—There can be little question but
An old saying among the Australian
racing fraternity is—"money talks." I
my example.—I am, sir, &c, F.W.C. ROCHFORT. Yodda Valley, Papua, 6th July.


Mr. F. A. Rochfort. (Article), The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939), Thursday 24 December 1931 page Article 2014-08-31 22:53 don Mining News."
A dahlia measuring 32 inches In cir
cumference, the colour dull jettaw
don Mining News." ||
A dahlia measuring 32 inches in cir-
cumference, the colour dull yellow
OBITUARY. Mr. F. A. Roch fort (Article), Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1885 - 1954), Tuesday 15 December 1931 page Article 2014-08-31 22:45 Mr Francis Augustine Rochfort, one
ot the Dionesrs of Papua, died at
Woodlarfi Island, last month, at the
slightly bulH, weighing about 8st., and
C. B. Fisher, and arrived in Towns
vllle about 1886. He bought the 'Nor-
thern Daily Standard,' wblch was
then published on a Bite now cover d
bought the properly now occupied and
The boom was fading when be
went to Croydon goldfleld, where he
Horace W. Harris, in the 'Croydon
Mining News.' About 1890 he went
rushes all over Papua In the company
Crow, the Prykes, Moses and Sam Me- j
Lelland, and others. Mr. Rochfort j
was on the Glra, Mombare, Todda,andd
other fields, and later employed a force*
of aborigines on the Lake Kamu ftoId-«
field. Later be settled on Woodta-fl
Island, and there passed away. Al-JH
tbougb pioneering Is rough, It Is ex- 1
traordinary how long men live Who ~3
follow It Mr. Rochfort, 60 years ago, ?
at one time he was lost tor a fortnight
first beard of the discovery of the
Mr. Rochfort, stating gold had beau
found on his .Wallabadah Station.
Mr. Francis Augustine Rochfort, one
of the pioneeers of Papua, died at
Woodlark Island, last month, at the
slightly built, weighing about 8st., and
C. B. Fisher, and arrived in Towns-
ville about 1886. He bought the "Nor-
thern Daily Standard," which was
then published on a site now covered
bought the property now occupied and
The boom was fading when he
went to Croydon goldfield, where he
Horace W. Harris, in the "Croydon
Mining News." About 1890 he went
rushes all over Papua in the company
Crow, the Prykes, Moses and Sam Mc-
Lelland, and others. Mr. Rochfort
was on the Gira, Mambare, Yodda, and
other fields, and later employed a force
of aborigines on the Lake Kamu gold-
field. Later he settled on Woodlark
Island, and there passed away. al-
though pioneering is rough, it is ex-
traordinary how long men live who
follow it. Mr. Rochfort, 50 years ago,
at one time he was lost for a fortnight
first heard of the discovery of the
Mr. Rochfort, stating gold had been
found on his Wallabadah Station.
WHITES AND NATIVES IN PAPUA. TO THE EDITOR OF THE AUSTRALASIAN. (Article), The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 - 1946), Saturday 3 September 1904 page Article 2014-08-31 22:34 This is only one of many illustrations, that
could be given, and' the effect of such treat
case, either by hearsay or experience,' in
task was therefore no bed of roses in try
ing to repair the discredit that the Govern
friendly spirit, it was a mistake, but can
little .we. mav appreciate the missionaries
with whom Mr. Robinson adopted an inde
bodies of Papua are JSO anxious to obtain.
fim.&c., F. A. BOCHFORT.
\ oddq, Valley, Samarai, B. New Guinea.
-I
This is only one of many illustrations that
could be given, and the effect of such treat-
case, either by hearsay or experience, in
task was therefore no bed of roses in try-
ing to repair the discredit that the Govern-
friendly spirit, it was a mistake, but can-
little we may appreciate the missionaries
with whom Mr. Robinson adopted an inde-
bodies of Papua are so anxious to obtain.—I
am, &c., F. A. ROCHFORT.
Vodde Valley, Samarai, B. New Guinea,

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.