Information about Trove user: Gato

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 3,311,070
2 NeilHamilton 2,334,496
3 annmanley 2,081,836
4 noelwoodhouse 1,897,120
5 maurielyn 1,513,667
...
51 cjbrill 395,290
52 johnfox 388,868
53 vjkingsr 388,593
54 Gato 387,935
55 DonnaTelfer 374,825
56 IanAHawke 374,030

387,935 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

July 2015 3,936
June 2015 3,871
May 2015 103
April 2015 3,099
March 2015 8,405
February 2015 1,850
January 2015 3,298
December 2014 8,531
November 2014 8,299
October 2014 3,712
September 2014 1,169
August 2014 6,011
July 2014 1,808
June 2014 917
May 2014 3,056
April 2014 1,057
March 2014 2,596
February 2014 1,038
January 2014 9,217
December 2013 716
November 2013 1,507
October 2013 308
September 2013 578
August 2013 2,439
July 2013 3,547
June 2013 1,836
May 2013 2,673
April 2013 8,931
March 2013 6,881
February 2013 1,163
January 2013 11,847
December 2012 5,924
November 2012 19,160
October 2012 3,128
September 2012 13,779
August 2012 571
July 2012 340
June 2012 276
May 2012 135
April 2012 669
March 2012 336
February 2012 1,758
January 2012 93
December 2011 13,942
November 2011 3,711
October 2011 4,120
September 2011 2,645
August 2011 7,391
July 2011 3,395
June 2011 4,528
May 2011 19,249
April 2011 34,962
March 2011 27,797
February 2011 42,572
January 2011 18,683
December 2010 6,141
November 2010 9,571
October 2010 464
September 2010 1,799
August 2010 2,682
July 2010 846
June 2010 6,459
May 2010 4,356
April 2010 4,631
March 2010 883
February 2010 98
January 2010 173
December 2009 531
November 2009 36
October 2009 68
August 2009 1,098
July 2009 308
March 2009 79
December 2008 1,928
November 2008 865
September 2008 1,356

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
CHINESE SKETCHES. BY "THE VAGABOND." NO. VIII. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Saturday 24 December 1881 page Article 2015-07-06 06:59 The old proverb ia literally trne m this
country Death is all around Children play
and enjoy their happy young lives in the midat
of all their nmnterred relations All China ia
covered with mounds, which contain thecofunB
of the departed ancestors Tho reason, I am
none are to be bu'ied whilst the existing dy
naBty occupies the throne This would be a
open a quantity of valuable land to cultiva
tion Aa it is coffins are now deposited in
brick vaults built over the banks of rivers
which often get washed away by floods , or,
home paddock A mould accumulates by
degrees, and verdure grows over the corpae
Another collin may be planted thereon anda
it is only a question of time aa to when
nothing but the bonea of the departed ones
are left which can be sorted out and de
posited in an urn As it now ia children are
of death Go and play round your
aunt If you get climbing on the top
of your grandpa hell cave in And
dont you atop out late for your
chow, or you shall only go as far aa your little
brother another day That B what a Chinese
country housewife Bays to her children The
paddy fields are known by the namea of those
planted on them In some placea they tell
me the coffin mounds are used to measure
distancée I haven t seen a country funeral
n China, but obsequies in a city are a great
8>¡,ht A wedding is our great social show,
when we put, so to speak, all the goodB in
everything which will enhance oar import-
ance In China a funeral ia the event of a
man s life A Shanghai merchant lately thus
honoured his departed parent to tho extent
of 20 OOOdol We must admit that ia a liberal
Bum He called for the undertakers, and
planked SA 000 "There Baid he, "do the
thing well He waa a good father, and I
wiBh to show my appreciation of his worth
Put the old man through in style The
orders were efficiently carried out The
house, at the corner of the Keang se road,
to which I was directed by Mr Stripling,
was hung from top to bottom with Bilk and
tapestried banners coloured lanterna, flowers,
and having a moat charming effect All the
received and shown cer the place by some
mourners clothed in white A sort of altar
waa erected m one room A joss waa
enthroned here, before which Btickg and
prieBta were einging and praying These
Irish wake, they eat and drink of the beat
The old proverb ia literally true in this
country. Death is all around. Children play
and enjoy their happy young lives in the midst
of all their uninterred relations. All China is
covered with mounds, which contain the coffins
of the departed ancestors. The reason, I am
none are to be buried whilst the existing dy-
nasty occupies the throne. This would be a
open a quantity of valuable land to cultiva-
tion. Aa it is, coffins are now deposited in
brick vaults built over the banks of rivers,
which often get washed away by floods ; or,
home paddock. A mould accumulates by
degrees, and verdure grows over the corpse.
Another collin may be planted thereon, and a
it is only a question of time as to when
nothing but the bones of the departed ones
are left, which can be sorted out and de-
posited in an urn. As it now is, children are
of death. "Go and play round your
aunt. If you get climbing on the top
of your grandpa he'll cave in. And
don't you atop out late for your
chow, or you shall only go as far as your little
brother another day." That'a what a Chinese
country housewife says to her children. The
paddy fields are known by the names of those
planted on them. In some places they tell
me the coffin-mounds are used to measure
distances. I haven't seen a country funeral
in China, but obsequies in a city are a great
sight. A wedding is our great social show,
when we put, so to speak, all the goods in
everything which will enhance our import-
ance. In China a funeral is the event of a
man's life. A Shanghai merchant lately thus
honoured his departed parent to the extent
of 20,000dol. We must admit that is a liberal
sum. He called for the undertakers, and
planked £4,000. "There," said he, "do the
thing well. He waa a good father, and I
wish to show my appreciation of his worth.
Put the old man through in style." The
orders were efficiently carried out. The
house, at the corner of the Keang-se-road,
to which I was directed by Mr. Stripling,
was hung from top to bottom with silk and
tapestried banners, coloured lanterns, flowers,
and having a most charming effect. All the
received and shown over the place by some
mourners clothed in white. A sort of altar
waa erected m one room. A joss was
enthroned here, before which sticks and
priests were singing and praying. These
Irish wake, they eat and drink of the best.
CHINESE SKETCHES. BY "THE VAGABOND." NO. VIII. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Saturday 24 December 1881 page Article 2015-07-06 06:49 Tell any lady that her ugly young duckling
are cygnets of high promise, and youra wil
always be the warm reception, and you
praises will be sang evermore Intimât
that they are but du"ks, and your doom i
sealed for ever Lamentable fact that, througl
her misled affections, a woman, exeep
from lier ovm sex, hardly ever hears th
truth concerning any of the affairs ot he
life But m China, amongst the people,
believe, there ia a real love of children gene
rally One night I waa loafing in my jinrtcshi
in the back slums of Shanghai, when I cami
to what seemed a general grocery and cand;
store Piles of sweets and "goodies, con
fections of all sorts, were on the opei
counter, and some Chinese street boya am
girls stood wiBtfully watching them Thesi
w ere evidently of the very poorest class Then
waa the same expression on their faces whicl
I have seen in Whitechapel and St Giles a
ontBide cooksbop windows, on faces glued tx
the panes with eyea gloating on th<
pudding Childish nature is the aamt
all the world over So I Btopped Pat,
approached the round faced lady whe
Kept the atore I pointed to the lollies.
youngsters A foreign devil was about te
lay in a winter supply, but when I took oui
a handful and gave it to a little girl, and bj
BignB intimated that all were to be served
alike, I think they could scarcely believe it
The motherly storekeeper seemed particn
full value of my money She chattered so
seemed to intimate that I bad done him per
Bonally a particularly good turn, for which
he thanked me And for this paltry expendí
off, and Pat, on the strength of this, de
manded an extra 10 cents for bia work which
he didn t get So I am inclined to think that
their BignB of amity
Tell any lady that her ugly young ducklings
are cygnets of high promise, and yours will
always be the warm reception, and your
praises will be sung evermore. Intimate
that they are but ducks, and your doom is
sealed for ever. Lamentable fact that, through
her misled affections, a woman, exeept
from her own sex, hardly ever hears the
truth concerning any of the affairs of her
life. But in China, amongst the people, I
believe, there is a real love of children gene-
rally. One night I was loafing in my jinricsha
in the back slums of Shanghai, when I came
to what seemed a general grocery and candy
store. Piles of sweets and "goodies," con-
fections of all sorts, were on the open
counter, and some Chinese street boys and
girls stood wistfully watching them. These
were evidently of the very poorest class. There
waa the same expression on their faces which
I have seen in Whitechapel and St. Giles's,
outside cookshop windows, on faces glued to
the panes with eyea gloating on the
pudding. Childish nature is the same
all the world over. So I stopped Pat,
approached the round-faced lady who
kept the store. I pointed to the lollies ;
youngsters. A foreign devil was about to
lay in a winter supply, but when I took out
a handful and gave it to a little girl, and by
signs intimated that all were to be served
alike, I think they could scarcely believe it.
The motherly storekeeper seemed particu-
full value of my money. She chattered so
seemed to intimate that I bad done him per-
sonally a particularly good turn, for which
he thanked me. And for this paltry expendi-
off ; and Pat, on the strength of this, de-
manded an extra 10 cents for his work, which
he didn't get. So I am inclined to think that
their signs of amity.
CHINESE SKETCHES. BY "THE VAGABOND." NO. VIII. (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Saturday 24 December 1881 page Article 2015-07-06 02:13 A few days in the country are well spent i
I drive around peasants sometimes look i
me as if they wonder what the deuce is m
" pigeon, children'may follow curiously, i
country children will follow a stranger in at
part of the world fearsome are the!
younger ones, and although they Balute rx
at a distance with joyoas shouts and wavm
of bands, yet they have evidently heard grui
some tales of the cannibal propensities of m
race, and when I offer cash it ia with fee
and trembling and a pushing of eaahotht
forward that they approach to take the ama
coins Then, when the brass doea not bur
their fingers, nor change into dried leave:
but provea to be good boneat cash of th
empire, their joy is great, and they crow
around in numbera , but one can be generoa
on eo very little in China The olde
peasants look on and smile and langt
and the mothers are particularly pleased
The way to their hearts ia through thei
children It is the same all over the world
A few days in the country are well spent. As
I drive around peasants sometimes look at
me as if they wonder what the deuce is my
"pigeon ;" children may follow curiously, as
country children will follow a stranger in any
part of the world. Fearsome are these
younger ones, and although they salute me
at a distance with joyous shouts and waving
of bands, yet they have evidently heard grue-
some tales of the cannibal propensities of my
race, and when I offer cash it is with fear
and trembling and a pushing of each other
forward that they approach to take the small
coins. Then, when the brass does not burn
their fingers, nor change into dried leaves,
but proves to be good honest cash of the
empire, their joy is great, and they crowd
around in numbers ; but one can be generous
on so very little in China. The older
peasants look on and smile and laugh,
and the mothers are particularly pleased.
The way to their hearts is through their
children. It is the same all over the world.
A WAR STORY THAT CAN NOW BE TOLD Stalin's master spy in Tokio was a German (Article), The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954), Saturday 31 January 1948 page Article 2015-07-06 02:06 executed as "The Beast of War
executed as "The Beast of War-
Warsaw "Butcher" Becomes Cry Baby in Yokohama Gaol TOKYO, Friday. (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Saturday 6 October 1945 page Article 2015-07-06 01:03 ' Colonel Meisinger, the "butcher
of Warsaw " who pleads for
hanging of German war criminals.
BUDAPEST, Friday. The war
time Premier "(Szalasi) with 10 other
Colonel Meisinger, the "butcher
of Warsaw," who pleads for
hanging of German war criminals. ||
BUDAPEST, Friday. The war-
time Premier (Szalasi) with 10 other
Japanese Warned Russia Of German Attack (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 11 September 1945 page Article 2015-07-06 00:58 to Ott. Ott was subsequeitly re-
documents proving Otts indiscre-
tions
Peking where he is now Von Rib-
bentrops personal representative
Heinrich Stahmer present German
Ambassador replaced him in Tokyo
to Ott. Ott was subsequently re-
documents proving Ott's indiscre-
tions.
Peking where he is now. Von Rib-
bentrop's personal representative,
Heinrich Stahmer, present German
Ambassador, replaced him in Tokyo.
Japanese Warned Russia Of German Attack (Article), The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954), Tuesday 11 September 1945 page Article 2015-07-06 00:50 sador to Tokyo Eugen Ott told
Matsuoka of the proposed attack
Meisinger said Matsuoka on
lin made an unscheduled visit to
man plans
fight with the Allies or the Axis
pro American clique, including Prince
navy chiefs and pro Axis members of
General Tojo Meanwhile the Tokyo
Nazis realising that war was ap-
proaching wondered whether they
would be regarded as allies or in
ternees
materials from Japan
wanted as a war criminal
butcher of War saw but he admitted
September 1939 and March 1941 He
saw atrocities
He went to Japan in April 1941
bers of the Nazi Party for embezzle
ment ______________
NEW YORK, Sept. 10 (A.A.P.).— The former
sador to Tokyo, Eugen Ott, told
Matsuoka of the proposed attack,
Meisinger said. Matsuoka, on
lin, made an unscheduled visit to
man plans.
fight with the Allies or the Axis.
pro-American clique, including Prince
navy chiefs, and pro-Axis members of
General Tojo. Meanwhile the Tokyo
Nazis, realising that war was ap-
proaching, wondered whether they
would be regarded as allies or in-
ternees.
materials from Japan.
wanted as a war criminal.
butcher of Warsaw but he admitted
September, 1939, and March, 1941. He
saw atrocities.
He went to Japan in April, 1941,
bers of the Nazi Party for embezzle-
ment.
NEW YORK, Sept. 10 (A.A.P.).—The former
NAZI PLOTTERS TO MEET Far Eastern Agents Foregather From Our Special Representative MANILA, December 3. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954), Friday 5 December 1941 page Article 2015-07-05 22:33 Far East are divided broadly Into
German influence, and those as
recuirements.
Far East are divided broadly into
German influence, and those as-
requirements.
NAZI PLOTTERS TO MEET Far Eastern Agents Foregather From Our Special Representative MANILA, December 3. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954), Friday 5 December 1941 page Article 2015-07-05 22:28 Wiedemann, Dr. Walter Fuchs.
president of the tteutscbland Insti
tut, which aims, to establish an
China. Franz Hueber. a Gestapo
Saito. who was educated in Hono
Wiedemann, Dr. Walter Fuchs,
president of the Deutschland Insti-
tut, which aims to establish an
China, Franz Hueber, a Gestapo
Saito, who was educated in Hono-
NAZI PLOTTERS TO MEET Far Eastern Agents Foregather From Our Special Representative MANILA, December 3. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1931 - 1954), Friday 5 December 1941 page Article 2015-07-05 21:54 in Shanghai, who directs broad
will also have an important in
fluence on the conference. Hi?
chief aides are Herbert Moy. a
Rerben. an American who was a
United States for jewel robberies.
manager of the German Trans
ocear. Newsagency who was ex
Herr Aust. who until recently
in Shanghai, who directs broad-
will also have an important in-
fluence on the conference. His
chief aides are Herbert Moy, a
Rerben, an American who was a
United States for jewel robberies,
manager of the German Trans-
ocean Newsagency who was ex-
Herr Aust, who until recently

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.