Information about Trove user: Gato

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,504,773
2 annmanley 1,833,444
3 NeilHamilton 1,503,439
4 John.F.Hall 1,272,813
5 maurielyn 1,181,936
...
42 cvening 372,371
43 Ronda.SHambrook 333,665
44 wattlesong 330,944
45 Gato 329,665
46 cjbrill 323,627
47 Juniris 321,610

329,665 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

April 2014 852
March 2014 2,596
February 2014 1,038
January 2014 9,217
December 2013 716
November 2013 1,507
October 2013 308
September 2013 578
August 2013 2,439
July 2013 3,547
June 2013 1,836
May 2013 2,673
April 2013 8,931
March 2013 6,881
February 2013 1,163
January 2013 11,847
December 2012 5,924
November 2012 19,160
October 2012 3,128
September 2012 13,779
August 2012 571
July 2012 340
June 2012 276
May 2012 135
April 2012 669
March 2012 336
February 2012 1,758
January 2012 93
December 2011 13,942
November 2011 3,711
October 2011 4,120
September 2011 2,645
August 2011 7,391
July 2011 3,395
June 2011 4,528
May 2011 19,249
April 2011 34,962
March 2011 27,797
February 2011 42,572
January 2011 18,683
December 2010 6,141
November 2010 9,571
October 2010 464
September 2010 1,799
August 2010 2,682
July 2010 846
June 2010 6,459
May 2010 4,356
April 2010 4,631
March 2010 883
February 2010 98
January 2010 173
December 2009 531
November 2009 36
October 2009 68
August 2009 1,098
July 2009 308
March 2009 79
December 2008 1,928
November 2008 865
September 2008 1,356

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
JAPAN IN WAR-TIME A FATAL CELEBRATION. THE LOSS OF THE HATSUSE (From our Special Correspondent.) Tokio, May 13. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 6 July 1904 page Article 2014-04-20 18:30 is to be beard about it. The people shake
sion, and it waa only stopped as the proces-
;. Theo, the fat was in the fire. The corres-
. powers that bo to relent. They only) re
lented to this extent though-the men who
, had been to the front could return, but
' any others who came back would not be
Küre altogether, and that is not what men
¡who have been endeavoring to are t out to
-toa fighting line for BO long are desirous of
'doing.. Sd far only one batch has been al-
lowed-to leaye'Tofcio., AIL the others are
there yety though they are given to under
etand» in a.semi-official sort of way, that
?> they will be allowed to move some tune in
Juné. The'Japanese are taking all sorts
¡ ¡of-good care that the correspondents don't
ran the show, and to ensure that they are
, going a little beyond what seems to be just.
¡the other day one correspondent of a pro
toinent, American paper/ decided that he
,wbuld make an endeavor tojoin the Rus
* »ians. "£Ie weat to the ¿War Office and
* «Ç8u*uy! made that fact known. "Oh,"
'? «aid , the little captain, who always acts\ as
-.interpreter,' "just wait a while." He dodged
through a* door, and presently lcame back
/With a serious look on his face.' "Please
step-this way," he said. "This way" was
> into the apartments of the Minister of War.
" The Minister eyed the correspondent coldly
^Russians, I believe," he said to the corres-
() Jor£& ïnoment "You intend to join the
Pi do not see much chance of joining the
'Japanese." "Well," answered the Minis
, ter, "if you persist in doing that I' will
* feeLcompelled to cancel the permit just is-
: other man connected with your paper." The
you do,"' 'I reckon the Japanese have npt
treated me properly, and I'm going to se»
srhat? the other side will do." "Good even
t tag" said the Minister. The correspondent
,- «&T route to Newchwang, and the following
¿day a cablegram came from his paper m
".NewYork.^ It read-"If yon join theBns
pjans you jeopardise the chances of all our
correspondente with the Japanese. Do not
.proceed under our credentials." That cable
/ gram showed that the authorities had gone
» to the expense of cabling to the correspon-
dence newspaper, and will serve to indicate
tst how the Japanese are watching over
e newspaper men. The cablegram was
dents who have been m the capital for the
ever seeuig the front, and many are drift-
"Smiler" Hales, who strove for á long
lo try and get with the Russians. "Smiler"
had, the British Legation working against
hi' ' on account of his South African writ
i«#Js, and that explains his failure to get
or >else the Japanese wall not recognise
commend "SmUer." He wandered round
r_nks of the inburgents there, and says he
has heaps of good stor.es to tell of his ad-
interview with him.. 'General,' says I,
'we want news. Can you* not put some in
our way? 'There's only way to get news
«What's thatr" I asked. *By taking a car-
'All right.' the general said, 'then if you
our army we will shoot you on the spot/ "
anv Australian goes to the Balkans now he
will get a right royal welcome." "Smfler"
getting himself into the çood graces of all
!Tne colonel is a soldier to the backbone,
is to be heard about it. The people shake
sion, and it was only stopped as the proces-
Then the fat was in the fire. The corres-
powers that be to relent. They only re-
lented to this extent though—the men who
had been to the front could return, but
any others who came back would not be
retire altogether, and that is not what men
who have been endeavoring to get out to
the fighting line for so long are desirous of
doing. So far only one batch has been al-
lowed to leave Tokio. All the others are
there yet, though they are given to under-
stand, in a semi-official sort of way, that
they will be allowed to move some time in
June. The Japanese are taking all sorts
of good care that the correspondents don't
run the show, and to ensure that they are
going a little beyond what seems to be just.
The other day one correspondent of a pro-
minent American paper decided that he
would make an endeavor to join the Rus-
sians. He went to the War Office and
casually made that fact known. "Oh,"
said the little captain, who always acts as
interpreter, "just wait a while." He dodged
through a door, and presently came back
with a serious look on his face. "Please
step this way," he said. "This way" was
into the apartments of the Minister of War.
The Minister eyed the correspondent coldly
Russians, I believe," he said to the corres-
for a moment. "You intend to join the
"I do not see much chance of joining the
Japanese." "Well," answered the Minis-
ter, "if you persist in doing that I will
feel compelled to cancel the permit just is-
other man connected with your paper." The
you do. I reckon the Japanese have not
treated me properly, and I'm going to see
what the other side will do." "Good even-
ing," said the Minister. The correspondent
en route to Newchwang, and the following
day a cablegram came from his paper in
New York. It read—"If you join the Rus-
sians you jeopardise the chances of all our
correspondents with the Japanese. Do not
proceed under our credentials." That cable-
gram showed that the authorities had gone
to the expense of cabling to the correspon-
dent's newspaper, and will serve to indicate
just how the Japanese are watching over
the newspaper men. The cablegram was
dents who have been in the capital for the
ever seeing the front, and many are drift-
"Smiler" Hales, who strove for a long
to try and get with the Russians. "Smiler"
had the British Legation working against
him on account of his South African writ-
ings, and that explains his failure to get
or else the Japanese will not recognise
commend "Smiler." He wandered round
ranks of the insurgents there, and says he
has heaps of good stories to tell of his ad-
interview with him. 'General,' says I,
'we want news. Can you not put some in
our way?' 'There's only way to get news
"What's that?" I asked. 'By taking a car-
'All right,' the general said, 'then if you
our army we will shoot you on the spot.' "
any Australian goes to the Balkans now he
will get a right royal welcome." "Smiler"
getting himself into the good graces of all
The colonel is a soldier to the backbone,
JAPAN IN WAR-TIME A FATAL CELEBRATION. THE LOSS OF THE HATSUSE (From our Special Correspondent.) Tokio, May 13. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 6 July 1904 page Article 2014-04-20 18:15 from Chinnampo, and belonged to the Im
r Jienaj Guards of Tokio. They were band-
their, feet in slings, some their hands and
some. were laid prostrate; but all smiled
None seemed to b« distressed, and many ap-
1 They were all taken to the hospital near
the -General Staff Office in rickshas or
/they carried a red blanket, and that lent
' picturesqaeness to the scene. These men
arc anxious to get to the war again, and
^disgrace to be wounded, but they feel it is
undignified, to be BO far away from the
Doings of, the War Correspondents.
'A number of the correspondents who
«turn to try and have them rectified.
t When they first set out they were compel
' \s_ to sign a contract with a caterer for the
"supply of provisions. The army would' not
' undertake to_ ration them, ana would not
allowi them "personally to carry stores.
For a deposit of SOO yen and the monthly
payment in advance oi 15 yen per day (30a.),
Seals, but it was not long before they found
t lat the,three meals were. delusions and
.snares, The.contractor could not keep up
to the column,.and .at times the corres
i-, pándente would be 20 miles or more ahead
' of their commissariat. , At last food ran
.ny more in the country. Then the cor
' respondents were compelled to shift for
' "themselves, and> after foraging about hope
' lessljr lor some time they decided to make
imagined that (they had come back because
^tff'îAexjgoTÇUB censorshio at the front, and
?"-they promptly took the opportunity to
. warn them that they would not be allowed
lo return.->. _,
from Chinnampo, and belonged to the Im-
perial Guards of Tokio. They were band-
their feet in slings, some their hands and
some were laid prostrate; but all smiled.
None seemed to be distressed, and many ap-
They were all taken to the hospital near
the General Staff Office in rickshas or
they carried a red blanket, and that lent
picturesqueness to the scene. These men
are anxious to get to the war again, and
disgrace to be wounded, but they feel it is
undignified to be so far away from the
Doings of the War Correspondents.
A number of the correspondents who
return to try and have them rectified.
When they first set out they were compel-
led to sign a contract with a caterer for the
supply of provisions. The army would not
undertake to ration them, and would not
allow them personally to carry stores.
For a deposit of 500 yen and the monthly
payment in advance of 15 yen per day (30s.),
meals, but it was not long before they found
that the three meals were delusions and
snares. The contractor could not keep up
to the column, and at times the corres-
pondents would be 20 miles or more ahead
of their commissariat. At last food ran
any more in the country. Then the cor-
respondents were compelled to shift for
themselves, and after foraging about hope-
lessly for some time they decided to make
imagined that they had come back because
of the rigorous censorship at the front, and
they promptly took the opportunity to
warn them that they would not be allowed
to return.
JAPAN IN WAR-TIME A FATAL CELEBRATION. THE LOSS OF THE HATSUSE (From our Special Correspondent.) Tokio, May 13. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 6 July 1904 page Article 2014-04-20 17:07 front, have predicted that once they re
«eived a serious reverse their whole at-
Would bewail their loises more demonstra-
on the point, and tbey have been compel-
»ny note of despondency. In one day-the
nation ha» been bereft of unreplaceable ma-
is to be beard about it. The people tliake
been worse," and that is about ah" that can
. bad moral effect upon the nation, and
and thev consequently withheld it for four
liold another big lantern procession to cele-
brate the further successes of the anny. In
feme to let the people know that they j
?hould be mourning instead of rejoicing,
«nergy in that respect. It went through
the citv like a fire, and it was not long be-
In which they have taken the disaster is
«s commendable as it is surprising, and will
'do much to keep up confidence in the
front, have predicted that once they re-
ceived a serious reverse their whole at-
would bewail their losses more demonstra-
on the point, and they have been compel-
any note of despondency. In one day the
nation has been bereft of unreplaceable ma-
is to be beard about it. The people shake
been worse," and that is about all that can
a bad moral effect upon the nation, and
and they consequently withheld it for four
hold another big lantern procession to cele-
brate the further successes of the army. In
time to let the people know that they
should be mourning instead of rejoicing,
energy in that respect. It went through
the city like a fire, and it was not long be-
in which they have taken the disaster is
as commendable as it is surprising, and will
do much to keep up confidence in the
JAPAN IN WAR-TIME A FATAL CELEBRATION. THE LOSS OF THE HATSUSE (From our Special Correspondent.) Tokio, May 13. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 6 July 1904 page Article 2014-04-20 17:04 Many people who have been in JapaS
long enough to observe-the calmness witli
which ithe Japanese receive vnéws?'? *o£
Japan and Its Reverses. ' T^
\ Jokio,May^2i.^
Many people who have been in Japan
long enough to observe the calmness with
which the Japanese receive news of
Japan and Its Reverses.
Tokio, May 24.
JAPAN IN WAR-TIME A FATAL CELEBRATION. THE LOSS OF THE HATSUSE (From our Special Correspondent.) Tokio, May 13. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Wednesday 6 July 1904 page Article 2014-04-20 17:02 -v. The sight of the prMessión7was,'s%en>1>¡
As; a spectacle no one ^OTuld-lde^^mgr-ei^
but from a city -of .rjejoïcing7Tôkip;naa 'rjeëj4i
turned into a city of mburiiin¿;án"d ïhéfe
police aré despondent. . V They-,'hai^béeïi:'
hauled\byér'iheebals/sind; áf^übyéjhgítif-?
tion is springingtip/for révênjgë7The people"
want themen-respobsibl^ffö'.th'e-äftdäliögi
removed, but they, are likely to-írafatífíThe
authorities! have ' endeavor»!^o¡merid^inaí»
tersbyissuing ^ae^';oid^^6i^the^^ii^
trbl of sfeeet prôcèssibnsp<. ÍSáine *öldr étpfyí
of shutting the stable doorsafter iíthe'hbrge.;
has boltéd. The~fátal itiesults b£^ë'7çr<)î'
cession did ' .nótj.' however, deter iotnem1'
from having similar -'affairs, on; the same,'
lines, foft the wrestlers and "thè^fisUéraiea;;
arid other tradesmen;;had ,one'¿Jeicii'iovjl
themselves; ori.;;SÜbseq\ient77riíghw^^
tradesmen carried»! little^'black; pigeons:.-;in;
cages^ and aftèrwaïds íAyria^'jthéifth^kBí'
just to show their,:cohtempt;föi?'the7iRüssiäti-;
Commarider-in-Ghië£.'.' Tfiêjfact!of .Russia's
commander being 7named 7 Kúíopatkitf Çis7
serious' for the charmless aüd.irinqcént.blaiílcí
pigeon .It never gets; fed'; "it.: ia maltreated*
and its neck is7 wrung in "public. (Whenever
the circumstances";appear to;'deraaíiá. ifej .'?'?
The reason -is because the Ja'paneàe, "al*
ways fond of puns, see-in its name a re-
mander. The. Japanese ;for "black pigeoh?
is "kuro bato," and the similarity 7bf¿¿the
words to the enemy's generàl's^Vname^s
fatal to the poor birds. 'In^the^PûîaonéhÉ;
public parks, where thè^pigeQhs^afé 'toíb^r
found in flocks, and where .the people IpirB
in. the habit of .buying7whéàt :tp ífeéa ^hen»:
with, the feeling evniced7a^instvth«a''Jg
particularly 'noticeable. ' White7pigeoris7aïë
flattened up to their hearts' content; but ifi
possible the unfortunate; black birds"j aro
not allowed to get,one grain; They a.rô
driven from pillar to post, y Small'bo'ys pëlô
stones at .thepa unmercifully^. jmd;.:'.|*ïètt
wring their necks if ;they can catch. ïhènïîM
is a peculiar manifestation pn;t^:,pjírt:^í|
the Japanese, arid one that is '.énfifèly afr
variance with their énlightenméntíin,'oÜitfi:
directions. The Buddhist priests ; teacS
them that they, must not needlessly»^äay^
or elay at all-but ttey do; not seem-to
take much notice of the exhortations. ;.They
do not seem to mind what they dáío;!^
kuro baios..'"-...' ."'..'. '¿'..'¿ïri
The sight of the procession was superb.
As a spectacle no one could desire more,
but from a city of rejoicing Tokio has been
turned into a city of mourning, and the
police are despondent. They have been
hauled over the coals, and a public agita-
tion is springing up or revenge. The people
want the men responsible for the muddling
removed, but they are likely to want. The
authorities have endeavored to mend mat-
ters by issuing new orders for the con-
trol of street processions. Same old story
of shutting the stable doors after the horse
has bolted. The fatal results of the pro-
cession did not, however, deter others
from having similar affairs on the same
lines, for the wrestlers and the fishermen
and other tradesmen had one each for
themselves on subsequent nights. The
tradesmen carried little black pigeons in
cages, and afterwards wrung their necks
just to show their contempt for the Russian
Commander-in-Chief. The fact of Russia's
commander being named Kuropatkin is
serious for the harmless and innocent black
pigeon. It never gets fed; it is maltreated,
and its neck is wrung in public whenever
the circumstances appear to demand it.
The reason is because the Japanese, al-
ways fond of puns, see in its name a re-
mander. The. Japanese for "black pigeon"
is "kuro bato," and the similarity of the
words to the enemy's general's name is
fatal to the poor birds. In the prominent
public parks, where the pigeons are to be
found in flocks, and where the people are
in the habit of buying wheat to feed them
with, the feeling evinced against them is
particularly noticeable. White pigeons are
fattened up to their hearts' content, but if
possible the unfortunate black birds are
not allowed to get one grain. They are
driven from pillar to post. Small boys pelt
stones at them unmercifully, and men
wring their necks if they can catch them. It
is a peculiar manifestation on the part of
the Japanese, and one that is entirely at
variance with their enlightenment in other
directions. The Buddhist priests teach
them that they must not needlessly slay—
or slay at all—but they do not seem to
take much notice of the exhortations. They
do not seem to mind what they do to the
kuro batos.
JAPAN Wreckage of history's largest battleship found (Article), The Canberra Times (ACT : 1926 - 1995), Sunday 4 August 1985 page Article 2014-04-20 16:47 Japanese salvage team announced to
The Japan Broadcasting Corpo
calibre guns and the imperial chrysan
was regarded by its builders as un
The Musashi was sunk by US car
October, 1944.
the remains of a natch found in
Japanese salvage team announced to-
The Japan Broadcasting Corpo-
calibre guns and the imperial chrysan-
was regarded by its builders as un-
The Musashi was sunk by US car-
October, 1944. ||
the remains of a watch found in
A Fine Feat of Airmanship (Article), Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (NSW : 1876 - 1954) , Tuesday 10 April 1945 page Article 2014-04-20 16:42 a fine feat of American airman
no aircraft-carriers, to the Ryu
kyls. The enemy apparently de
hit-and-run attack against Amerl.
to escape before the Americalis
bombs was a remarkable perform
ance. When the German battle
shells before she sank. The Bis
purpose of increasing the dis
warships. leaving the Japanese
naval and air power has pro
nothing either in skill or daring
a fine feat of American airman-
no aircraft-carriers, to the Ryu-
kyus. The enemy apparently de-
hit-and-run attack against Ameri-
to escape before the Americans
bombs was a remarkable perform-
ance. When the German battle-
shells before she sank. The Bis-
purpose of increasing the dis-
warships, leaving the Japanese
naval and air power has pro-
nothing either in skill or daring.
ALL LESSER SHIPS WITH YAMATO SUNK From Australian Associated Press, Ne[?] York (Article), The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), Tuesday 10 April 1945 page Article 2014-04-20 16:38 force coujd steam westward into the
riers in the Inland Sea shipyards In
force could steam westward into the
riers in the Inland Sea shipyards in
WHEN JAPAN WAS NEARLY OUT. (Article), The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Wednesday 24 April 1946 page Article 2014-04-20 16:31 23.-A naval technical mis
months' study of the Japon
Japan. Illumination for read
night was provided by grind
23.—A naval technical mis-
months' study of the Japan-
Japan. Illumination for read-
night was provided by grind-
JAPAN MAY SALVAGE BATTLESHIP (Article), The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 - 1954), Saturday 7 February 1953 page Article 2014-04-20 16:29 :SALVAGE
TOKYO, Fri.-:apanese Sal
asked. permission from the Fi
nance Ministry to conduct sal.
60,000-ton battleship . Yamato,
The Finance Ministry authori
must be studied carefully be
aboard the battleship.-.
A.super-dreadnought, she is
at present lying about .43 fath
south-west, .tip of Kagoshima,
American aircraft 'sunk the
ship in April,. 1945, while she
for Okinawa.--A.A.P.-Reuters.
SALVAGE
TOKYO, Fri.—Japanese Sal-
asked permission from the Fi-
nance Ministry to conduct sal-
60,000-ton battleship, Yamato,
The Finance Ministry authori-
must be studied carefully be-
aboard the battleship.
A super-dreadnought, she is
at present lying about 43 fath-
south-west tip of Kagoshima,
American aircraft sunk the
ship in April, 1945, while she
for Okinawa.—A.A.P.-Reuters.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.