Information about Trove user: Gato

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

RankCorrectorLines corrected
1 JohnWarren 2,943,394
2 annmanley 2,009,268
3 NeilHamilton 1,943,120
4 noelwoodhouse 1,549,889
5 maurielyn 1,377,788
...
50 vjkingsr 365,921
51 graham.pearce 363,708
52 InstituteOfAustralianCulture 358,374
53 Gato 353,640
54 Ronda.SHambrook 340,835
55 Stanj 332,826

353,640 lines corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2014 7,097
October 2014 3,712
September 2014 1,169
August 2014 6,011
July 2014 1,808
June 2014 917
May 2014 3,056
April 2014 1,057
March 2014 2,596
February 2014 1,038
January 2014 9,217
December 2013 716
November 2013 1,507
October 2013 308
September 2013 578
August 2013 2,439
July 2013 3,547
June 2013 1,836
May 2013 2,673
April 2013 8,931
March 2013 6,881
February 2013 1,163
January 2013 11,847
December 2012 5,924
November 2012 19,160
October 2012 3,128
September 2012 13,779
August 2012 571
July 2012 340
June 2012 276
May 2012 135
April 2012 669
March 2012 336
February 2012 1,758
January 2012 93
December 2011 13,942
November 2011 3,711
October 2011 4,120
September 2011 2,645
August 2011 7,391
July 2011 3,395
June 2011 4,528
May 2011 19,249
April 2011 34,962
March 2011 27,797
February 2011 42,572
January 2011 18,683
December 2010 6,141
November 2010 9,571
October 2010 464
September 2010 1,799
August 2010 2,682
July 2010 846
June 2010 6,459
May 2010 4,356
April 2010 4,631
March 2010 883
February 2010 98
January 2010 173
December 2009 531
November 2009 36
October 2009 68
August 2009 1,098
July 2009 308
March 2009 79
December 2008 1,928
November 2008 865
September 2008 1,356

Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
CHINA AWAKENING RISE TO POWER PREDICTED Return of Dr. Stuckey (Article), News (Adelaide, SA : 1923 - 1954), Thursday 1 January 1925 page Article 2014-11-28 03:59 CHINA AWAEININIi
Chin:g is slowly awakening and although
warring factions are devastating the coun
Dr. E. J. Stuckey of the London Mhission
Dr. Stuckey went to China from Ade
laide 20 years ago on behalf of the Mis
He believes that the Chinese will even
assertion of Mr. G. C. Dixon, the Mel
bourne journalist, that the Chinese are in
solent. Cruel, and dirty.
caused by the struggles of the various poli
tical! parties for pow'er and the right to
the situation could be gained by associ;a
of their leading men. They were the Pei
3ang or .Northern Party, leg by Gen. .Vu
Chang So-Lin: the Canton Party, led by
Dr. Sun Yat-Sei; and .the Old Anfu, or
past Chinla Party, led by Gen. TItan Chi
"Up to 1919," said Dr. Stuckey;, "'the
war Gen. ,Vu returned to his headquar
one of 'unifidation by force,'"' observed
DRAMATIC CHANGES:- "/
CHINA AWAKENING
China is slowly awakening and although
warring factions are devastating the coun-
Dr. E. J. Stuckey of the London Mission
Dr. Stuckey went to China from Ade-
laide 20 years ago on behalf of the Mis-
He believes that the Chinese will even-
assertion of Mr. G. C. Dixon, the Mel-
bourne journalist, that the Chinese are in-
solent, cruel, and dirty.
caused by the struggles of the various poli-
tical parties for power and the right to
the situation could be gained by associa-
of their leading men. They were the Pei-
yang or Northern Party, led by Gen. Wu-
Chang So-Lin; the Canton Party, led by
Dr. Sun Yat-Sen; and the Old Anfu, or
East China Party, led by Gen. Tuan Chi-
"Up to 1919," said Dr. Stuckey, "'the
war Gen. Wu returned to his headquar-
one of 'unification by force,' " observed
DRAMATIC CHANGES
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Register (Adelaide, SA : 1901 - 1929), Monday 23 April 1917 page Family Notices 2014-11-28 02:09 STUCKEY.-pOa the 22nd April, at Wakefleld
street, Adelaide, Joseph James, beloved hu&and
of Alice Stuckey, aged 74 yean. 113*1
STUCKEY.—On the 22nd April, at Wakefield
street, Adelaide, Joseph James, beloved husband
of Alice Stuckey, aged 74 years. 113'4
Family Notices (Family Notices), The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889), Thursday 21 January 1875 page Family Notices 2014-11-28 02:00 STUCKEY—MANN.—On the 19th January.
at Stow Church, by the Rey. C. B. Symes,
second daughter of the late Charles Mann. Esq.
BONOABTS.—Of your charity pray for the
soul of the Bey. Thendore Bongarta, who died
RILEY.—On tbe 17th January, at Btrasg
ways-terraee, North Adelaide, Daniel Arthm
Buey, beloved child of Daniel and Annie RSey,
aged eleven men aha and two weeks,
BELL.—On the 20* January, at the Obser
Edward Bell, of Cambridge, aud mother of
Mrs. Charles Todd, in her 76th year.
FIELD.-On the 20th January, at Glenelg.
John Bentham, twin eon of Bey. Thomas and
Elisabeth BentHsm field, aged five months.
PARSONS.—On the 19th January, at Bed
mi, from sunstroke, William, son of J. W.
Parson*, of Nebs*.
DIED. *
STUCKEY—MANN.—On the 19th January,
at Stow Church, by the Rev. C. B. Symes,
second daughter of the late Charles Mann, Esq.
BONGARTS.—Of your charity pray for the
soul of the Rev. Theodore Bongarts, who died
RILEY.—On the 17th January, at Strang-
ways-terrace, North Adelaide, Daniel Arthur
Riley, beloved child of Daniel and Annie Riley,
aged eleven months and two weeks.
BELL.—On the 20th January, at the Obser-
Edward Bell, of Cambridge, and mother of
Mrs. Charles Todd, in her 75th year.
FIELD.—On the 20th January, at Glenelg,
John Bentham, twin son of Rev. Thomas and
Elizabeth Bentham Field, aged five months.
PARSONS.—On the 19th January, at Red-
hill, from sunstroke, William, son of J. W.
Parsons, of Nairue.
DIED.
MRS. J. J. STUCKEY. (Article), Chronicle (Adelaide, SA : 1895 - 1954), Saturday 3 March 1928 page Article 2014-11-28 01:36 - Mrs. J. J. Stuckey died at tbe age
of 83 years at her home in Wakefie.d
* « 1 * Van UMntltAWn nTHUa AIT*
and Treasurer, and Mr. John Alann, bee
listen to her talk, especially when, wito
do to the very early days of South Aus
tralia. ? Mrs. Stuckey was born
in Adelaide, where- she resided al!
was a member of the Gongregational
Church in Hindmarsh-square. She took
Woman's Christian ? Temperance Union
enthusiastic support, and she readily as
assistance was given in a quiet and un
assuming way. .Mrs. Stuckey leaves
four sons, Messrs. R. R. Stuckey (Under
who is a medical missionary of the Lon
Tientsin, 'China, and Dr. F. S. Stuekey,
Mrs. Stuckey,
Mrs. J. J. Stuckey died at the age
of 83 years at her home in Wakefield-
Australia. Her brothers were Mr.
and Treasurer, and Mr. John Mann, Sec-
listen to her talk, especially when, with
do to the very early days of South Aus-
tralia. Mrs. Stuckey was born
in Adelaide, where she resided all
was a member of the Congregational
Church in Hindmarsh-square. She took ||
Woman's Christian Temperance Union
enthusiastic support, and she readily as-
assistance was given in a quiet and un-
assuming way. Mrs. Stuckey leaves
four sons, Messrs. R. R. Stuckey (Under-
who is a medical missionary of the Lon-
Tientsin, China, and Dr. F. S. Stuckey,
Mrs. Stuckey. ||
CIVIL WAR IN NORTH CHINA. By dr. E. J. Stuckey. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 15 July 1922 page Article 2014-11-28 01:29 General Fenr ha* been WMno4??d from
the position of Tuchim of Shengi to be
Tuchun of Hooin. He ha? taken up bis
new office and ba? promptly dismissed
the old gang of official* ani ha? repliced
them by men of his own choosing. I n hi*
proclamation be has explained that he ha*
no relatives to put into official posit-on*.
and that all oflida's will be secure in their
officee so long as they do their work faith
fully and honestly, but gambling, ooiujn-
MHokins, and ?ther rices are abtalut^y
torbidaen. Bveryone is following his
rapid promotion with the crsatest inte
??*, and it win give a trem*adoui> im
petoa to the forces of righteousness iv
this land if bfestaads firm among the mani
fold tnnptaaons of his high offior. and
cut show in high politics, as he has in
his own .army, that Christianity ran im
pel men to pore lives and unselfish ser
vice. ? J
General Feng has been promoted from
the position of Tuchun of Shensi to be
Tuchun of Honan. He has taken up his
new office and has promptly dismissed
the old gang of officials and has replaced
them by men of his own choosing. In his
proclamation he has explained that he has
no relatives to put into official positions,
and that all officials will be secure in their
offices so long as they do their work faith-
fully and honestly, but gambling, opium-
smoking, and other vices are absolutely
forbidden. Everyone is following his
rapid promotion with the greatest inte-
rest, and it will give a tremendous im-
petus to the forces of righteousness in
this land if he stands firm among the mani-
fold temptations of his high office, and
can show in high politics, as he has in
his own army, that Christianity can im-
pel men to pure lives and unselfish ser-
vice.
CIVIL WAR IN NORTH CHINA. By dr. E. J. Stuckey. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 15 July 1922 page Article 2014-11-28 01:18 IJ*.1 J*.- rail?-ay line wa< repairer), and trains
f*san running a^ain. By Tharsday ?!li
the refugees in our compound tia re- '
turned home,' and on Friday I -?-a3
a'ile to leave for Pekin ta "fee Mrs.
Stucke>- and my thrw week?1 oj "iwtr j
baby," Jean. I missed Uw inevitable I
c-osinj; .?f tbe activrtie* of the Red Crow*
on the Saturday. In the hospital we hi-t
reoHvod motive 50 seriaa'ly wounded sol
diers: *c lo?J. thiee of the abdomina!
o"w. ai.d one of the jrain cases, but tlie
remainder did welL
Caild-like Trust in Foreigners.
one's mind by thp experiences of these
week* is the child-Uke trust which the
theae days. What a. contra*-, to the con
ditions o: 1900* Then ewn the slightest
asscuaJion ?ith the "foreign devil*"
meant death. Xow a: any sign, of trouble
they Kirn to us in crowds, and the rich
to ask ior the use of the pooresli accom
modation, provided it be within our com
pound. One day dmiar these receni
tronMes I found the hoopitaJ gate crowded
with men. I asked the gatekeeper sr'ne
the consultation hour. He explained thuit
the presMang wag ?ut along all the roads
leaduur from the city, impressing men U>
dras the boats for the military, and these
men had eouchtt asylum inside our gate*
most anxious that we and oar preachers
fcbould take the leading part in the or- I
icaniaation of any society for soaal ser
of panic they watch cor doings as anx:- !
onsly as the captain af a ship witches
trs barometer when be is in the ty
phoon area: the calm continnance of our
ordinary duties gives them come measure
nays is the reputation gained by the
??Chrietian" General, Fet? Yuhfimg. and
Jus soldiers. TUe foreign newspapers are '
beginning to omit, the inverted commas
from the "C3m?ti*n/' At the beginning
of the fightjiK near Pafcin the other
tTiih-Ii troops bad made frontal attacks on. i
the portions of Uie Manchurian troops,
?n<l had been driven hack with heavy
louses. The arrival of General Fentf's
men restored thfjr "brok?n morale, for
they said- "Tliese men have never been ?
beaten." The Comman<Jer-in-Ohie: (Gore al
??) himiielf led Feng's men in a flanking
movement, which wa? so rapid and f=oe
ceraful that the Manchurian troops were
retreat in the ffreatrst confusion, l/rter
the remnant of the Manchurian army-were
entrenched in strong positions oa the
liiver lan. near Pettiiho. bat the news
that Feme's nieu were again inarchinX
round their fUnk nn the north caused
them to retreat without Brini a shot
the railway line was repaired, and trains
began running again. By Thursday all
the refugees in our compound had re-
turned home, and on Friday I was
able to leave for Pekin to see Mrs.
Stuckey and my three weeks' old "war
baby," Jean. I missed the inevitable
closing of the activities of the Red Cross
on the Saturday. In the hospital we had
received some 50 seriously wounded sol-
diers; we lost three of the abdominal
cases, and one of the brain cases, but the
remainder did well.
Child-like Trust in Foreigners.
one's mind by the experiences of these
weeks is the child-like trust which the
these days. What a contrast to the con-
ditions of 1900! Then even the slightest
association with the "foreign devils"
meant death. Now at any sign of trouble
they come to us in crowds, and the rich
to ask for the use of the poorest accom-
modation, provided it be within our com-
pound. One day during these recent
troubles I found the hospital gate crowded
with men. I asked the gatekeeper whe-
the consultation hour. He explained that
the press-gang was out along all the roads
leading from the city, impressing men to
drag the boats for the military, and these
men had sought asylum inside our gates
most anxious that we and our preachers
should take the leading part in the or-
ganisation of any society for social ser-
of panic they watch our doings as anxi-
ously as the captain af a ship watches
his barometer when he is in the ty-
phoon area; the calm continuance of our
ordinary duties gives them some measure
days is the reputation gained by the
"Christian" General, Feng Yuhsiang, and
his soldiers. The foreign newspapers are
beginning to omit the inverted commas
from the "Christian." At the beginning
of the fighting near Pekin the other
Chih-li troops had made frontal attacks on
the positions of the Manchurian troops,
and had been driven back with heavy
losses. The arrival of General Feng's
men restored their broken morale, for
they said, "These men have never been
beaten." The Commander-in-Chief (General
Wu) himself led Feng's men in a flanking
movement, which was so rapid and suc-
cessful that the Manchurian troops were
retreat in the greatest confusion. Later
the remnant of the Manchurian army were
entrenched in strong positions on the
River Lan, near Peitaiho, but the news
that Feng's men were again marching
round their flank on the north caused
them to retreat without firing a shot.
CIVIL WAR IN NORTH CHINA. By dr. E. J. Stuckey. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 15 July 1922 page Article 2014-11-28 00:58 Wn had a -very busy time in the hospital
ttteutlinit to Uie woiim!?-<l ooKiicrs. The
army doctor at th?. ?tauon luul only the
mn? tqeazre equrjimeut; h? qu;tru>rod the
minor numaltie^ in the inns near th?
stiitioii. aJid iHMit aJlthe serimu ia<^ to
v*. We ?>t ?""i?irt-hin V?i .?< in- "f n.ir
?Miatanta had iwent'.y resigned, and our
bf.v;)-vIWA4>m tliitioi*; <iuci >r ha?l 1>:??
Vrt-ventnl from joining u< ->y Uie ciittanc
of the line. On tbe Monday we nnLshed
opt-raring about" 11 o'cl?K-k at night. By
Tuesday we were crowded out and were
unable to deal with oil thp cases that
needed operation. So ire deckled 1* tell
the army authorities that we could Uke
ntt more casm fw a day or two. and that
ffcev irowt ?emS the -rounded "further ?>u£h
to Teelww. Our Chinese friends were very
dtaavbod when they heard of our deciAon.
and baf?cd ua to tut all the wounded
sent to iM, a? they regarded the work of
the hoMjilal as the heft safeguard to the
whole city. They donated a airpply of
?Bum and bandage-cloth, and lent :is pole*
mid, tarpaulins for' the erection of
, naan^iieas and planks for mining v > extri
Mdr. We sent * telegram to Dr. Tu?'*r r.
$$ wlmm, oa Wadhqaaay mornia^, tsk-inf
to ??n?e g^ We morpd ?11
our ortf:nary hospital patients into th<*
waitin?-rooni, -where we had erected in?
provwed beds. By Wednesday tlie rt^ii
or wounded sildVrs had begun to sJacb&n,
?o that by the evening we had tiring.*
Pretty well straightened oat again. Dr.
PeiU did the sargical wort. irhi> Miss
UirurtanaTi and I took charge of tie
hospital and the records. By Wr.viaesdiy
nurh; Miss Christiansen was ner.rly worn
out, but was called at mignighr to a case
in tlie wompn'a hospital. Dr.' Tucker ar
rived on Thursday morniny with taro
dn?prs, and stayed with us till the follow
number of cases which -re evacuated to
lunan for \-ray rxaminr'tion and for the
location of retained bull/.-tj which he had
cases with a wound of entrance i n the
hip, objected to being sent to Tf^nan- he
confessed to us that far- had diaocwered the
bullet under his btlt. He bad bom
???mg,ng the lead" to get a**y from the
nring-ljne.
Another heavy engagement for the re
*ovcry of Michanjr was expeAed on the
oaturdav. and wo made every preparation
for a big rufh of work. Koswer. tie
Uanonunan rr.eops near Pekrn had in the
meantime rfjcojved ?. very Wavy defeat,
and retreated pell-mdl eaut of Tientsin.
ihK r^ji.ired the e\-acnati<>n in a hurry
of a.I Vje p-witionii on the Ticnttin-Piikon
line M d the Chihli troops enterel
I'acijsng unopposed.
l/r Wednesday of the ?fallowing we-k
We had a very busy time in the hospital
attending to the wounded soldiers. The
army doctor at the station had only the
most meagre equipment; he quartered the
minor casualties in the inns near the
station, and sent all the serious cases to
us. We were short-handed as one of our
assistants had recently resigned, and our
newly-engaged Chinese doctor had been
prevented from joining us by the cutting
of the line. On the Monday we finished
operating about 11 o'clock at night. By
Tuesday we were crowded out, and were
unable to deal with all the cases that
needed operation. So we decided to tell
the army authorities that we could take
no more cases for a day or two, and that
they must send the wounded further south
to Techow. Our Chinese friends were very
disturbed when they heard of our decision,
and begged us to take all the wounded
sent to us, as they regarded the work of
the hospital as the best safeguard to the
whole city. They donated a supply of
gauze and bandage-cloth, and lent us poles
and tarpaulins for the erection of
marquees and planks for making up extra
beds. We sent a telegram to Dr. Tucker
at Techow, on Wednesday morning, asking
him to come to our aid. We moved all
our ordinary hospital patients into the
waiting-room, where we had erected im-
provised beds. By Wednesday the rush
of wounded soldiers had begun to slacken,
so that by the evening we had things
pretty well straightened out again. Dr.
Peill did the surgical work, while Miss
Christiansen and I took charge of the
hospital and the records. By Wednesday
night Miss Christiansen was nearly worn
out, but was called at midnight to a case
in the women's hospital. Dr. Tucker ar-
rived on Thursday morning with two
dressers, and stayed with us till the follow-
number of cases which we evacuated to
Tsinan for X-ray examination and for the
location of retained bullets which he had
cases, with a wound of entrance in the
hip, objected to being sent to Tsinan; he
confessed to us that he had discovered the
bullet under his belt. He had been
"swinging the lead" to get away from the
firing-line.
Another heavy engagement for the re-
covery of Machang was expected on the
Saturday, and we made every preparation
for a big rush of work. However, the
Manchurian troops near Pekin had in the
meantime received a very heavy defeat,
and retreated pell-mell east of Tientsin.
This required the evacuation in a hurry
of all the positions on the Tsientsin-Pukow
line, and the Chihli troops entered
Machang unopposed.
By Wednesday of the following week
CIVIL WAR IN NORTH CHINA. By dr. E. J. Stuckey. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 15 July 1922 page Article 2014-11-27 23:52 On tne Wednesday following the cutting
On the Wednesday following the cutting
CIVIL WAR IN NORTH CHINA. By dr. E. J. Stuckey. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 15 July 1922 page Article 2014-11-27 23:48 On Monda. wounded soldiers benui to
B?wr in, *<> I ??? tn> Inisy ?;. the hospital
t? *|iare time to at lend the meeting ca'led
fin- niM-tlay. I prime.l Mr. Ch'en aith
tlu' Hn;wnaiit )H>it.t?, and urged on him
that tlic utrurwt c<uv must U- i-x&nited in
the imie of R?"d i'roa* flag* and armlets.
I I arncd after ?T(fJ>( tlmt that ncirlv
Invite v:> <hi- ?m4ety. The rush to be
eonitt mb^iTiber*' -vas due to tile fact ihat
pact aiilwiilHT PxiKvted to \\\\ c an armlet
for hi* own individual protection, and th-v
ra-.her ho;?Kl they mig'.tt get ;i flair t?? fly
owor their botijcs. Howesvr. I h\A in
?iat?d 'Jial I iio'.ild remun if they iirfringed
tin- rulea,' ?> finally they ronipromised on
? -badge for each subscriber and an armlet
lor the or?ani*T? of the refuge;.
On Monday wounded soldiers began to
pour in, so I was too busy at the hospital
to spare time to attend the meeting called
for mid-day. I primed Mr. Ch'en with
the important points, and urged on him
that the utmost care must be exercised in
the issue of Red Cross flags and armlets.
I learned afterwards that that nearly
broke up the society. The rush to be-
come subscribers was due to the fact that
each subscriber expected to have an armlet
for his own individual protection, and they
rather hoped they might get a flag to fly
over their houses. However, I had in-
sisted that I would resign if they infringed
the rules, so finally they compromised on
a badge for each subscriber and an armlet
for the organisers of the refuges.
CIVIL WAR IN NORTH CHINA. By dr. E. J. Stuckey. (Article), The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889 - 1931), Saturday 15 July 1922 page Article 2014-11-27 23:42 In. view of "toe number of people e>.a
gnnpted in our compound three night
Wltiliraen ware employed, whose duty it
tor to ak* turns patrolling the compound,
hgatinff a wooden gong to let all thieves
know Uwt tJiev -were on the watch. On
the ?Bound night a thief entered the
wVMtsn'* quartern ani *tfAp. their clothes,
Tw wen too frightened to ?ive the alarm
?nW aow? time after the thief fad de
rflfen; tna thre? watchman Tere then dis
<?rei?d ilaepiiw peaeefnlly together. So
tima new watchmen were appointed, and
tlWw Qf the reapttnuible Cbmeae of the oora
po?nd -were appointed to take turn*
thrauSh th e Bigut at notching the watch-
Xhe nriiradiVffeneral in charge of the
C^Okli trao|>? on our sector aent n aubal
teni to ti with a box of hia valuables, aric-
JM ua to ototy. it for him in our hospital.
'Y? politely explained that we had no plac;
tn store any valuables, and told kirn m the
adventure with the thief aa a proof that
Wjp could five no jnuraotee of aafety.
Oh tbe Weinesuay following the cutting
of the line, the Bry*on frnnilr tmvelled to
Maehang ny btunrv, and then by train to
Tjent?in, in order to enable Mr. Bry?on ta
attend the National Conference ?t Shaaj
hll, end Mra. Brvwn to escort David t.t
aihool at Chefoo. The fact of their lrfiv-ini
tt?Mt the people in the ei-ly for a xiay;
tiitjr ar?unt that if the foreigner! were flee
mt, ma*ter? miut be really dangerous.
Soon after the interruption of tb P line,
I had written to the ?c<l Crosa Society in
Tifhtmu Mkiug them to rac4gni?e our mi?
e'iou botpit?l *t Tstagchow ?c \ K?d Ctor?
li>/*nita> in fhp went of hnstjlitica. Folk
in the cily with onr preachen in the lead
had ?&praat*d a dtsire to organise Red
Croat fefnges for. the women an 4 children
of Urn city. They cam* to us for advice,
and, we explained to them that Red Cru?s
actjvitie* in n-ar time mutt .follow c-Prtain
atrii't rules, and must be properly 'recog-
Wta^J by thp belliaerents. Tbia wae nthvt
a damper on th?ir enthusiasm. However,
tkfur nrocended whh tlieir nrysimttkm,
and elected me president. W,uibp I -?-aa
?n|tnoc(>d to liave ?ome 'iml'" with the
Itad (Viwa .Socieiv; ouV bead preacher. Mr.
Cb en, wo* v]e<*ed vire^trniJeni.
On the afternoon of Saturday, April 29.
fcntvr inmnre M-as heard to tlie north of
2*. Thi? hurried thing* along, and on the
Sundty Afternoon a moetina of all th<?e
Isieroxted wa* held in the police magis
trate's nftVe. I presided -over this rotlier
wg, which indtidel the ?>unty magie'rai*,
tike salt oommintioiier. Hie police ntagis
trntp. and ail th> gentry of .the city. At
?ni? mertiug 1 again insisted on dur secur
' inir profier r?y>;iiitioT? from the iwadqimr
tws of die RfJ (it*i Socipty. so then
a?d tl?H> I wat- ?pkrj to writ*" out a long
nlr/ram t? the tmid<|iiarter? of tlie society
in Sbanahai. l'"our plscv* in Hie tkv were
adot-tcvi rk rotujKs -tlire* <?f the liovern
mrflt H'liikil liuil.iiius and tlr> ciiirf Mo
nummednn m<is<|ue. Mkm 'Jhristians-n
*?? npitointod wiperintciident of ail the
nmiijp*, and Mim Ov?k ?nd Miws Lives;y
mm Mfced (n resklo in ;ind take chanie of
?hi> t*o refiign in the south suburb of the
Busy Time at tlie Hospital.
In view of the number of people con-
gregated in our compound three night
watchmen ware employed, whose duty it
was to take turns patrolling the compound,
beating a wooden gong to let all thieves
know that they were on the watch. On
the second night a thief entered the
women's quarters and stole their clothes.
They were too frightened to give the alarm
until some time after the thief had de-
parted; the three watchman were then dis-
covered sleeping peacefully together. So
three new watchmen were appointed, and
three of the responsible Chinese of the com-
pound were appointed to take turns
through the night at watching the watchmen!
The brigadier-general in charge of the
Chih-li troops on our sector sent a subal-
tern to us with a box of his valuables, ask-
ing us to store it for him in our hospital.
We politely explained that we had no place
to store any valuables, and told him of the
adventure with the thief as a proof that
we could give no guarantee of safety.
On tne Wednesday following the cutting
of the line, the Bryson family travelled to
Machang by buggy, and then by train to
Tientsin, in order to enable Mr. Bryson to
attend the National Conference at Shang-
hai, and Mrs. Bryson to escort David to
school at Chefoo. The fact of their leaving
upset the people in the city for a day;
they argued that if the foreigners were flee-
ing, matters must be really dangerous.
Soon after the interruption of the line,
I had written to the Red Cross Society in
Tientsin asking them to recognise our mis-
sion hospital at Tsangchow as a Red Cross
hospital in the event of hostilities. Folk
in the city with our preachers in the lead
had expressed a desire to organise Red
Cross refuges for the women and children
of the city. They came to us for advice,
and we explained to them that Red Cross
activities in war time must follow certain
strict rules, and must be properly recog-
nised by the belligerents. This was rather
a damper on their enthusiasm. However,
they proceeded with their organisation,
and elected me president, because I was
supposed to have some "pull" with the
Red Cross Society; our head preacher, Mr.
Ch'en, was elected vice-president.
On the afternoon of Saturday, April 29,
heavy gunfire was heard to the north of
us. This hurried things along, and on the
Sunday afternoon a meeting of all those
interested was held in the police magis-
trate's office. I presided over this gather-
ing, which included the county magistrate,
the salt commissioner, the police magis-
trate, and all the gentry of the city. At
this meeting I again insisted on our secur-
ing proper recognition from the headquar-
ters of the Red Cross Society, so then
and there I was asked to write out a long
telegram to the headquarters of the society
in Shanghai. Four places in the city were
selected as refuges—three of the Govern-
ment school buildings and the chief Mo-
hammedan mosque. Miss Christiansen
was appointed superintendent of all the
refugees, and Miss Cook and Miss Livesey
was asked to reside in and take charge of
the two refuges in the south suburb of the
Busy Time at the Hospital.

Counts updated hourly

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.