Information about Trove user: DiNichol

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,737,947
2 NeilHamilton 3,211,598
3 noelwoodhouse 3,195,598
4 John.F.Hall 2,458,864
5 annmanley 2,277,348
...
1669 Albert1595 15,750
1670 junexi 15,708
1671 GroupLeader 15,700
1672 DiNichol 15,699
1673 RayH 15,698
1674 pcav3473 15,684

15,699 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2017 3,459
October 2017 1,490
September 2017 474
July 2017 360
October 2016 2,995
September 2016 738
August 2016 2,983
July 2016 3,142
June 2016 58

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,737,894
2 NeilHamilton 3,211,598
3 noelwoodhouse 3,195,598
4 John.F.Hall 2,458,858
5 annmanley 2,277,278
...
1673 KBAN 15,672
1674 Mezza 15,667
1675 ngcha77 15,657
1676 DiNichol 15,655
1677 kmart2110 15,649
1678 NCKurn 15,610

15,655 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

November 2017 3,459
October 2017 1,490
September 2017 458
July 2017 360
October 2016 2,967
September 2016 738
August 2016 2,983
July 2016 3,142
June 2016 58

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 103,705
2 mickbrook 99,971
3 murds5 61,555
4 PhilThomas 46,274
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
375 stephna 45
376 Apek 44
377 DimityBlue 44
378 dinichol 44
379 DiorNoki 44
380 dswes 44

44 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

September 2017 16
October 2016 28


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
A Fantasy of M s End. (Article), Coolgardie Mining Review (WA : 1895 - 1897), Saturday 9 May 1896 [Issue No.31] page 17 2017-11-24 20:43 miles deeper into the better coun
A Fantasy of M s End. (Article), Coolgardie Mining Review (WA : 1895 - 1897), Saturday 9 May 1896 [Issue No.31] page 17 2017-11-24 20:42 out 'as many hands as civilization—you
One of the plain-men onee told me
good
country
before
it,
the
good
attempt at .self-compensation.
goes on for quite 40 miles.
The loneliness
of the region to the imaginative
bushman—and
that includes
nearly
all—has a wonderful influence for illusion,
especially when it is mixed with
the
unspeakable
damper
and
the
that dieth
not
for
fixity
of
tenure.
And one bush
hallucination is this.
pines, and from the centre of-this dull
furnace in blast, but when you
get
within 30yds. of the pines, ihe
flames
are not—they
vanish.
I
have
Irving did not see this as,he rode
towards the outstation of God's
End,
because he had a stomach
used
to
loneliness long enough to imagine such,
tilings.
He
rode on for half-a-dozen
miles
deeper
into the better
country,
and at aboot
nine o'clock
his
horse
grunted
at
the
light
in
the
hut at God's
End and changed
his
out as many hands as civilization—you
One of the plain-men once told me
good country before it, the
country before it, the good
attempt at self-compensation.
goes on for quite 40 miles. The lone
liness of the region to the imaginative
bushman—and that includes nearly
sion, especially when it is mixed with
the unspeakable damper and the
that dieth not for fixity of tenure.
And one bush hallucination is this.
pines, and from the centre of this dull
furnace in blast, but when you get
within 30yds. of the pines, the flames
are not—they vanish. I have seen
Irving did not see this as he rode
towards the outstation of God's End,
because he had a stomach used to
loneliness long enough to imagine such
things. He rode on for half-a-dozen
miles deeper into the better coun
try, and at about nine o'clock his
horse grunted at the light in the
the hut at God's End and changed his
A Fantasy of M s End. (Article), Coolgardie Mining Review (WA : 1895 - 1897), Saturday 9 May 1896 [Issue No.31] page 17 2017-11-24 18:32 into dusty sagehlied
sallbcsh,
with
livid wounds, and on to sand and barb-
.bladed spinifiex, and then more
saltbush
and dust, and more sand
and
spinifex.
In
the sky a
sun with a
cynical
face
dull gleaming—the only
eyelid
better
than either.
And
by
and bye the fly 'eaves you, and
you
cross the woved and billowed ridges of
Verily, it is
the end of God—the
condemned cell
of all creation.
This
"devil-devil" country throws
into dusty sage hued saltbush, with
livid wounds, and on to sand and barb
bladed spinifiex, and then more salt
bush and dust, and more sand and
spinifex. bIn the sky a sun with a
cynical face dull gleaming—the only
eyelid better than either. And by
and bye the fly leaves you, and
you cross the woved and billowed ridges of
Verily, it is the end of God—the
condemned cell of all creation.
This "devil-devil" country throws
A Fantasy of M s End. (Article), Coolgardie Mining Review (WA : 1895 - 1897), Saturday 9 May 1896 [Issue No.31] page 17 2017-11-24 18:25 A Fantasy of M s End.
+—
Edward Irving, who was a fort of
Britieist, Andrew Hurst, owner of Restdown,
and Chairman of the I^achlan
lie furthermore held a patent over such
one ; the silken bonds,' 4 the great
lie cut up for half a milliom, most
symptoms If old man Hurst had
failed. He had recured callosilies on
and therefore he filled worthily- the
and that after seventy or mere dirtinct
-horse loped wearily through the
•ordered him to boundary ride the
fences of the out paddock's of (lod's
with a little malicious smile.
4 and a
pain in it. In kis two day's ride over
pity himself—and Alice ;. but himself
- It was all so awsomely sudden. He
wasamanof thecities—born toaudborn
for much l>uman compansionship—
and here he was loping along a.powdered
horse, the pungent dust in his nostrils .
as if he--were already dead on the
track| and the crows >erecirclmg for
^ui sffipetfte. ^jgj^jg^fcgy nained
A Fantasy of God's End.

Edward Irving, who was a sort of
down, and Chairman of the Lachlan
he furthermore held a patent over such
one; 'the silken bonds,' ' the great
he cut up for half a million, most
symptoms. If old man Hurst had
failed. He had recured callosities on
and therefore he filled worthily the
and that after seventy or mere distinct
horse loped wearily through the
ordered him to boundary ride the
fences of the out paddocks of God's
with a little malicious smile, 'and a
pain in it. In his two day's ride over
It was all so awsomely sudden. He
was a man of the cities—born to and born
for much human companionship—
and here he was loping along a powdered
horse, the pungent dust in his nostrils
as if he were already dead on the
track, and the crows were circling for
an appetite. rightly had they named
the black station of Restdown, You
leave the river flats and the gracious
green fringes of white gum and pepper
AMUSEMENTS. MUSIC AND DRAMA. (Article), The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912), Wednesday 4 October 1911 [Issue No.2604] page 46 2017-11-24 17:55 _Referring to Mr. Randolph Bedford's new
Australian play, 'The Lady of the Pluck-up,'
which is being performed in ' ' Melbourne,
'Punch' sp.ys:— 'Mr. Bedford: is a clever
paragement of Mr. Bedford's literary ability. '
appear as necessary^ portions of one homo
managerial -faculty. Mr. Bedford would un
need not take this suggestion as a slur upon'
two they produced *The Silver King.' Jones
broke away afterwards, and produced bril- ,
' The Silver King,' Drobably the most suc
quarter of a century.'
Referring to Mr. Randolph Bedford's new
Australian play, "The Lady of the Pluck-up,"
which is being performed in Melbourne,
"Punch" says:— "Mr. Bedford is a clever
paragement of Mr. Bedford's literary ability.
appear as necessary portions of one homo
managerial faculty, Mr. Bedford would un
need not take this suggestion as a slur upon
two they produced "The Silver King." Jones
broke away afterwards, and produced bril
"The Silver King, probably the most suc
quarter of a century."
TEHATRICAL TITBITS. (Article), Sydney Sportsman (Surry Hills, NSW : 1900 - 1954), Wednesday 3 July 1907 [Issue No.362] page 5 2017-11-23 21:05 « ? » ?
dian weil-kuown in Sydney, -his last
but oh other matters he sometimes
she was a credit to the Anstralian-born
accepted- the invitation, but judge of
the. kerb-stone in front of Teadv's
side! . Atkins explained the situation
to me. He1 had acepted Teddy's invi
tation, had duly arrived, and lot and
tion to us, for he said, 'What the
blanketty-hlank-blank are you two
coves doing up here?' We explained.
'No, I'll take my blooming oath I
to dinner to-day I' said Teddy, clinch
ing the argument', 'and there's no
blooming dinner at mv place to-day.'
with 'portmanteau in hand, had evi
ent invitation. 'However, continued
be cornered) 'come in, and I'll see
what's to be done, but boys,' he ad
'walk on your tip Iocs, for the old
poor fellow, and I wouldn't for -worlds
have the .least noise made. Teddy
on sahead of liim, 'to mother's to din
ner.' The comedian then asking us
an^- then cooked thom. In due
Toddy was, at heart, one of the kind
before we sat down to 'the feast,' he
plate, lie daintily laid his tray, which
picking up, he whispered, 'I'll be
to eat.ia morsel.' Ho went next
door., left the tray-load, and returned,
and wq commenced our meal. » 'Do
you think.' said I to Teddy, on his
return, 'do you think the pooh old
the fowl?' 'Well, the ? ?
ought,' said. Teddy, 'they were his
own — — fowls!'
* * *
dian well-known in Sydney, his last
but on other matters he sometimes
she was a credit to the Australian-born
accepted the invitation, but judge of
the kerb-stone in front of Teddy's
side. Atkins explained the situation
to me. He had accepted Teddy's invi
tation, had duly arrived, and lo! and
tion to us, for he said, "What the
blanketty-blank-blank are you two
coves doing up here?" We explained.
"No, I'll take my blooming oath I
to dinner to-day !" said Teddy, clinch
ing the argument, "and there's no
blooming dinner at my place to-day."
Atkins and myself didn't know what
with portmanteau in hand, had evi
ent invitation. "However, continued
be cornered) "come in, and I'll see
what's to be done, but boys" he ad
"walk on your tip toes, for the old
poor fellow, and I wouldn't for worlds
have the least noise made. Teddy
on ahead of him, "to mother's to din
ner." The comedian then asking us
and then cooked them. In due
Teddy was, at heart, one of the kind
before we sat down to "the feast," he
plate, he daintily laid his tray, which
picking up, he whispered, "I'll be
to eat a morsel." He went next
door, left the tray-load, and returned,
and we commenced our meal. "Do
you think," said I to Teddy, on his
return, "do you think the poor old
the fowl?" "Well, the — —
ought," said. Teddy, "they were his
own — — fowls!"
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Saturday 7 October 1911 [Issue No.17,647] page 5 2017-11-23 20:47 ARROWSMITH.--On the 6th October,. William
ARROWSMITH.--On the 6th October, William
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954), Monday 30 December 1889 [Issue No.10,873] page 1 2017-11-23 20:40 Bedford.— On tho 27th December, at hor residence, 23
Cburch-atreet, Abbotsford, tlio wife of Randolph Bedford
of a (laughter.
BEDFORD.— On the 27th December, at her residence, 23
Church-street, Abbotsford, the wife of Randolph Bedford
of a daughter.
OF INTEREST TO WOMEN In and Out of Brisbane Brisbane Rendezvous For "Sydney-Siders" (Article), The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954), Thursday 13 March 1947 [Issue No.3214] page 6 2017-11-23 20:33 ?*??*??
PAIR-HAIRED Sydney girl who will leave
* Brisbane by to-day's train to return home
IUIOi i^«l l\j iJCUKJIU VLIIU1I11V J_»«,T )
to Brisbane last Tuesday Bris
will embarb on her second year of
? * *
* * *
FAIR-HAIRED Sydney girl who will leave
Brisbane by to-day's train to return home
Mrs. Eric Bedford, (Lurline Bay,
to Brisbane last Tuesday. Bris
will embark on her second year of
* * *
IN A FEW LINES (Article), The Courier-Mail (Brisbane, Qld. : 1933 - 1954), Monday 10 June 1946 [Issue No.2978] page 7 2017-11-23 20:18 ? * ?
'?\YE had a little gloat over the
* * *
We had a little gloat over the

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

No lists created yet

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.