Information about Trove user: DebbieK

View user profile in the Trove forum

Tags

Display options

top tags

Recent comments

Display options

Text corrections

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,464,918
2 NeilHamilton 3,066,294
3 noelwoodhouse 2,928,942
4 annmanley 2,239,409
5 John.F.Hall 2,155,236
...
1457 Kazzie 17,633
1458 sb.mcgowan 17,620
1459 IWalrus 17,616
1460 DebbieK 17,588
1461 Rossol 17,534
1462 philG 17,524

17,588 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 6,059
April 2017 7,947
November 2016 230
October 2016 331
September 2016 2,140
May 2016 4
April 2016 520
September 2015 61
April 2015 37
March 2015 6
December 2013 33
August 2013 220

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 JohnWarren 4,464,887
2 NeilHamilton 3,066,294
3 noelwoodhouse 2,928,942
4 annmanley 2,239,339
5 John.F.Hall 2,155,231
...
1453 IWalrus 17,616
1454 sb.mcgowan 17,615
1455 golfer 17,612
1456 DebbieK 17,583
1457 philG 17,524
1458 gillymegs 17,519

17,583 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 6,056
April 2017 7,945
November 2016 230
October 2016 331
September 2016 2,140
May 2016 4
April 2016 520
September 2015 61
April 2015 37
March 2015 6
December 2013 33
August 2013 220

Hall o' fame ranking

Rank Corrector Lines corrected
1 jaybee67 85,059
2 mickbrook 82,670
3 murds5 54,198
4 PhilThomas 24,580
5 EricTheRed 20,242
...
1121 cloughie 5
1122 cotteemilt 5
1123 darvall 5
1124 DebbieK 5
1125 diggingupmarkcrows 5
1126 DiGillespie 5

5 line(s) corrected.

Corrections by month

May 2017 3
April 2017 2


Recent corrections

Article Changed Old lines New lines
South Lismore Creamery. (Article), The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 - 1942), Friday 12 March 1897 [Issue No.569] page 5 2017-05-27 22:10 Last Mumluy afternoon tlio N.S.W. Creamery
Co.'s (south' Lismore orcamery was formully
oponud by.Mayor O'Flynn. It la created.. 011 ,1
the bank ot Loyccster Creek, south of the |
railway bridge and closo to the railway station.
After tho formal opening, refreshments —
— were nnrEakarn nf. and -1 number of toasts
were doult with. Responding to the toast
of bis health, the district manager (Mr. J.
GiIiboii) stud that it. was just two years ago on
tho 18th of this month that ho first camo to
the district. Ho knew it was a very bard thing
to please every one of their patrons. He en
deavoured to do so as fjir as was consistent
with Ins duty to bis employers. (Hear, hear. )
Aud hu would never shrink from what was his
duly uliko to both. (Applause.) He was very
pleaaed to hoar the enterprise of his company
spoken of so highly, and lie thought lie could
sufely say lliey were prepared sliU to advance
with the limes. Willi regard lo the reference
Last Monday afternoon the N.S.W. Creamery
Co.'s South' Lismore creamery was formally
opened by.Mayor O'Flynn. It is erected on
the bank ot Leycester Creek, south of the
railway bridge and close to the railway station.
After the formal opening, refreshments —
— were partaken of, and a number of toasts
were dealt with. Responding to the toast
of his health, the district manager (Mr. J.
Gibson) said that it. was just two years ago on
the 18th of this month that he first came to
the district. He knew it was a very hard thing
to please every one of their patrons. He en-
deavoured to do so as far as was consistent
with his duty to his employers. (Hear, hear. )
And he would never shrink from what was his
duly alike to both. (Applause.) He was very
pleased to hear the enterprise of his company
spoken of so highly, and he thought he could
safely say they were prepared sill to advance
with the ltmes. With regard lo the reference
The N.S.W. Police AND SOME MEMORIES. (Article), The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 - 1942), Friday 10 December 1937 page 2 2017-05-27 22:02 , . : : ??R.lt. Herald.')
I have been mixed up with tho x)olice,
All ..these men had come from the
jobs, but they wero vory keen to sco
that their force was thoroughly effi
I rnoye about Sydney quite a lot in
sticks, t'hey will escort me across the
road and in every way thoy have al
ways given me every possiblo help. Out
men will forget their duty to tho pub
absurd to condemn tho force . on this
does not treat tho force fairly. They
have made it largoly a - force to ex
week in fines. I saw a report in ono
paper that oach owner of a car, or
rol duty. The Government is not satis
of men to squeeze more out of the peo
The police are courageous and effi
to have them after mo for anything.
?shot his wife and her sister. They
went straight up from tho shop. The
constable on the beat' walked straight
up tho stairs in the face of. what look
Thore are numerous instances of the
and dangerous underworld. If wo are
equftlly eleypr police. Hah'e we got
men studying maps. Thee were standing
body, but they arrosted and had the
Thoy should have sent him to some
scientist, and had his glands examin
ed, and then put him in Batliurst gaol
m company at a certain time, and one
within a radius of one milo of the camp
a lot of police, and subsequently offer
job. .An old bushman, named James
what I10 did not know about tho moun
botherine about, and it was the latter
body. Woods was working at Spring
work, and join tho search. On the day
tho man was murdered, Joe Woods met
(WoodB's) paddock. Joo heard the shot
the murderor, had dug a hole, or induc
ed Lo Weller to dig one, in pure sand,
spur 'running- into Glenbrook Gully. Ho
then' shot Lb Weller and rammed him
into tho hole, and put about a foot of
walking about this ledge, saw a pieco
of bush . wood upside down. When a
pieco of wood is lying half buried on
tho mountains it 'gets certain markings.
thrown to where it w/»s. He prodded'
once got results and the reward, half of 1
which he gave liig mate.
Tho police found that a man had
tinder the name of Lc Weller. Thoy
to 'Frisco. He was just in time to ar
ler murdered, but oiie of his yictinjs
writing from memory. Preston disap
peared at Lindon, and Linden is rough
body. Theso gorges: aro ,':l.'jut a thou
cliffs above. Among: thess ^'ocks is a
thick growth of sally :bu9h; and other
along tlio* creek bod, ? and difficult to
cross it, and you cannot see any one 011
the other side. The .policc were hunt
ing in couples, and one had. come to a
place where he could see across and ho
stood waiting for; his '.-mate to pass,
Glancing down, lie saw lie was 'standing
011 a track which led from the water
had been sitting with his feet- in tho
water. Ho had been shot from the
and buried against the rock. The c«ns
tablo had been standing right 011 the
Ho took a plough coulter and visited
an old man early one morning at tlio
tho old man for sale, and while the old
the elue the police had was that a wo
was very early in tho morning. Yet
fobbed the old man he got married and
also sentenced to death and tho penalty
remitted. ,
Soon .after this a woman was mur
dered at Leielihardt. As soon as the
two murders would not have been com
only deterrent is tho rope.
of the police to arrest any of those cul
force we can sleop safely in our beds
"R.R. Herald")
I have been mixed up with the police,
All these men had come from the
jobs, but they were very keen to see
that their force was thoroughly effi-
I rnove about Sydney quite a lot in
sticks, t'ey will escort me across the
road and in every way they have al-
ways given me every possible help. Out
men will forget their duty to the pub-
absurd to condemn the force on this
does not treat the force fairly. They
have made it largely a force to ex-
week in fines. I saw a report in one
paper that each owner of a car, or
rol duty. The Government is not satis-
of men to squeeze more out of the peo-
The police are courageous and effi-
to have them after me for anything.
shot his wife and her sister. They
went straight up from the shop. The
constable on the beat walked straight
up the stairs in the face of.what look-
There are numerous instances of the
and dangerous underworld. If we are
equally clever police Have we got
men studying maps. They were standing
body, but they arrested and had the
They should have sent him to some
scientist, and had his glands examin-
ed, and then put him in Bathurst gaol
in company at a certain time, and one
within a radius of one mile of the camp
a lot of police, and subsequently offer-
job. An old bushman, named James
what he did not know about the moun-
bothering about, and it was the latter
body. Woods was working at Spring-
work, and join the search. On the day
the man was murdered, Joe Woods met
(Wood's) paddock. Joe heard the shot
the murderer, had dug a hole, or induc-
ed Le Weller to dig one, in pure sand,
spur 'running- into Glenbrook Gully. He
then shot Le Weller and rammed him
into the hole, and put about a foot of
walking about this ledge, saw a piece
of bush wood upside down. When a
piece of wood is lying half buried on
the mountains it gets certain markings.
thrown to where it was. He prodded
once got results and the reward, half of
which he gave his mate.
The police found that a man had
under the name of Le Weller. They
to 'Frisco. He was just in time to ar-
ler murdered, but one of his victims
writing from memory. Preston disap-
peared at Linden, and Linden is rough-
body. These gorges: are about a thou-
cliffs above. Among: thess rocks is a
thick growth of sally busk; and other
along the creek bed, and difficult to
cross it, and you cannot see any one on
the other side. The police were hunt-
ing in couples, and one had come to a
place where he could see across and he
stood waiting for; his mate to pass,
Glancing down, he saw he was standing
on a track which led from the water
had been sitting with his feet-in the
water. He had been shot from the
and buried against the rock. The cons-
table had been standing right on the
He took a plough coulter and visited
an old man early one morning at the
the old man for sale, and while the old
the clue the police had was that a wo-
was very early in the morning. Yet
robbed the old man he got married and
also sentenced to death and the penalty
remitted.
Soon .after this a woman was mur-
dered at Leichhardt. As soon as the
two murders would not have been com-
only deterrent is the rope.
of the police to arrest any of those cul-
force we can sleep safely in our beds
Famous N.S.W. Case Recalled. (Article), The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 - 1942), Tuesday 28 March 1916 [Issue No.1835] page 4 2017-05-27 21:24 by reading, in late Euglish files, that
at, the annual general meeting- of the
snangnai, as to wnar, a counsel wn-?
?that ir a lionTcssion or guilt was maul'
to the advocate betore proceedings had '
that lie should undertake the defence;
but that if it was made during1 the
that the aclvocate retained for tlie 'de-
without seriously compromising the ?
duty was to protect his client as fat
as possible Trom being convicted, ex- -
cept by a Competent tribunal and upon'
legal evidence sufficient to support ;.i
conviction for the offence with wliicli
Sir Harry Poland,' ?'K.C., recalled tho
case ot Lord AVilliam Russell, mur
dered in 1840 by his valet Courvoisior.
Air. Charles Phillips with Mr. AVilliam
of the trial Courvoisior soiit tor his
counsel and told them that he had com
mitted the murder. He said that he -
would not plead guilty, and that lie
Counsel was for throwing up the case., .
but liis junior told him that this would
not be right, and ultimately tliey de
termined to consult Baron Parke, lie
before whom and the Lorli Chief Justice ?
the trial was taking place. Baron Par
ke's first question A\as 'Does tho prison
er require you to go 011 defending liim?'
that counsel must not throw the case -
to go 011 with it, taking care, of course,
as to what lie said and seeing that
he did not incriminate any other per
and properly upon the c.videnec. After
wards Mr. Phillips was attacked in- tho
when it leaked out that the conles
heard the speech, tor the defence, ^sta-
ted 'chat Mr. Phillips did not exceed'
his duty in what lie said to the jury..
med ? up (and who did not know any
do as an advocate instructed to de
fend fii| prisoner. Sir Harry Poland
added that the report of the Bar Coun
placcd in a position of similar em
by reading, in late English files, that
at, the annual general meeting of the
Shanghai, as to what, a counsel who
that if a confession or guilt was made
to the advocate betore proceedings had
that he should undertake the defence;
but that if it was made during the
that the aclvocate retained for the 'de-
without seriously compromising the
duty was to protect his client as far
as possible from being convicted, ex-
cept by a Competent tribunal and upon
legal evidence sufficient to support a
conviction for the offence with which
Sir Harry Poland,' K.C., recalled the
case ot Lord William Russell, mur-
dered in 1840 by his valet Courvoisier.
Mr. Charles Phillips with Mr. William
of the trial Courvoisier sent for his
counsel and told them that he had com-
mitted the murder. He said that he
would not plead guilty, and that he
Counsel was for throwing up the case,
but his junior told him that this would
not be right, and ultimately they de-
termined to consult Baron Parke, he
before whom and the Lord Chief Justice
the trial was taking place. Baron Par-
ke's first question was 'Does the prison-
er require you to go on defending him?'
that counsel must not throw the case
to go on with it, taking care, of course,
as to what he said and seeing that
he did not incriminate any other per-
and properly upon the evidenec. After-
wards Mr. Phillips was attacked in the
when it leaked out that the confes-
heard the speech, tor the defence, sta-
ted 'that Mr. Phillips did not exceed
his duty in what he said to the jury..
med up (and who did not know any
do as an advocate instructed to de-
fend his prisoner. Sir Harry Poland
added that the report of the Bar Coun-
placed in a position of similar em-
MYSTERY CRIMES OF THE PAST. PURPOSELESS MURDERS. THIS DR. PRITCHARD CASES. (Article), The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 - 1942), Tuesday 21 May 1929 [Issue No.3150] page 4 2017-05-27 21:11 THE -DR. PRITCHARD CASES.
o' London's Weekly,' prompted by. sev
eral mysterious and motivoloss, murdors
in England, -has recalled' some outstand.
says, was that of Dr. Pritchard. That, ho
sion; they wore clearly ? not for /.money
.or for sexual motives.' ' Pritchard was, a
sinner with -an ingratiating manner and
a woeful ignoranco c of his profession,
who carriod ;on practice as a doctor: in
Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow' ?
Suddenly, Without rhyme or. reason, he
commenced slowly to: poison his .wife.
Iler-agod mother arrived .upon the scene
to' nurse her, - but herself first fell vic
tim ^ the doctor's Borgian wiles. Hav
ing slain vliis ? mother-in-law, Pritchard
-soon: finished off his wife, and calmly
made tho following entry in his diary:
?« — 'IS: Saturday. — Died- ... hero at 1
?a.m. Mary Jane, my beloved wife,
aged 38 voars — no torment surrounded
her bedside — but a calm and peacoful
God and Jesus, Holy Gli — One in Three
till mine- -be o'er, everlasting love. Save
Then followed ? one of, the most ghast
the ? morning 'of the funeral, Pritchard j
had the coffin unscrewed, that lie might]
look for the last, time on his dead wife's i
face; which being done, ho exhibited a:
deal,; of feeling, ? and in in the very pre
oi both' wife and daughter, tearfully
kissed tlie cold lips. History records
three infamous: talse kisses — namely,
that of Judas, .^.hat, with which King
'.Tames the First' and' Sixth sped the
lastly^: but not' least, .tlus, given in
such dreadful' circumstances, by . l?r.
Pritchard to his: dead victim.
'At his trial, this amazing man never
lost countenance. After .the death: sen
jauntily from the dock. Ill prison lie
remained calni, 1 protesting good humoi
edly liis innocence, to the chaplains . who i
/'visited liim. When one of them - told!
liim his guilt was only too manifest and j
exhorted him to confess and repent, the t
doctor contemptuously remarked, 'Uo
you know, Dr. McLcod, -I now under.-.,
Subsequently, however, lie .confessed— .
though with out the , slightest -?'sign of
repentance! On bidding farewell to the
chaplain to whom he . had made the con
meet you in Heaven;?' r'Sii,''. rotorted
tlio indignant minister, 'I. shall . meet
you. at the Judgment Seat.' !
Pritchard 's ^was the last public : exe
cution in Glasgow. He was greatly in
dignant when the, authorities . refused to
allow him to make a lengthy 'speech to
the- .assembled crowd.. For. .what .reason
lie slew -thoso two unhappy - women will
.for ever, remain a my^iery. . . .,
jstory comes from Albion Park. It apr
poars , that, a bottle of strychnine was
upset on the. floor- of a certain dairy, the
some of it, by somd unexplained means,
in order-: to iriake certain, ho tasted it a
the trouble quickly diagnosed. A polico
Minister, but it is said hp. prosecution is
likely. However,' it appears that only
been- a tragedy, and a deadly blow to
Australia's prestige in tlie: world's but:
tor 'markets. ? A later message from
Albion Park says ' the manager of the
factory states ' that, the tester did not
become ill after testing tlio cream. He
noticed that it had 'a peculiar .flavor, and
rejected the. whole; . can. As lie was
stirring, the cream - to - make -.the .test lie
found portion of a bottle- labelled strych
nine at the bottom of tho can, which
was then handed ovei; to the ; police.
THE DR. PRITCHARD CASES.
o' London's Weekly,' prompted by. sev-
eral mysterious and motiveless, murders
in England, -has recalled' some outstand-
says, was that of Dr. Pritchard. That, he
sion; they wore clearly not for money
or for sexual motives.' ' Pritchard was, a
sinner with an ingratiating manner and
a woeful ignorance of his profession,
who carried on practice as a doctor in
Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow.
Suddenly, Without rhyme or reason, he
Her aged mother arrived upon the scene
to'nurse her, but herself first fell vic-
tim to the doctor's Borgian wiles. Hav-
ing slain his mother-in-law, Pritchard
soon finished off his wife, and calmly
made the following entry in his diary:
-18 Saturday. — Died- ... hero at 1
a.m. Mary Jane, my beloved wife,
aged 38 years — no torment surrounded
her bedside — but a calm and peaceful
God and Jesus, Holy Gh— One in Three
till minebe o'er, everlasting love. Save
Then followed one of the most ghast-
the morning of the funeral, Pritchard
had the coffin unscrewed, that he might
look for the last, time on his dead wife's
face; which being done, he exhibited a:
deal of feeling, and in the very pre-
of both wife and daughter, tearfully
kissed the cold lips. History records
three infamous: false kisses — namely,
that of Judas, that with which King
James the First and Sixth sped the
lastly but not least, this given in
such dreadful circumstances, by Dr.
Pritchard to his dead victim.
At his trial, this amazing man never
lost countenance. After the death:sen-
jauntily from the dock. In prison he
remained calm, protesting good humor-
edly his innocence, to the chaplains . who
visited him. When one of them - told
him his guilt was only too manifest and
exhorted him to confess and repent, the
doctor contemptuously remarked, 'Do
you know, Dr. McLeod, I now under.-.,
Subsequently, however, he .confessed— .
though with out theslightest sign of
repentance O.n bidding farewell to the
chaplain to whom he had made the con-
meet you in Heaven," "Sir" rotorted
the indignant minister, 'I. shall . meet
you. at the Judgment Seat"
Pritchard 's was the last public exe-
cution in Glasgow. He was greatly in-
dignant when the authorities refused to
allow him to make a lengthy speech to
he slew -these two unhappy women will
for ever remain a mystery.
story comes from Albion Park. It ap
pears that, a bottle of strychnine was
upset on the. floor of a certain dairy, the
some of it, by some unexplained means,
in order to make certain, he tasted it a
the trouble quickly diagnosed. A police
Minister, but it is said no. prosecution is
likely. However, it appears that only
been a tragedy, and a deadly blow to
Australia's prestige in the world's but-
ter 'markets. A later message from
Albion Park says the manager of the
factory states that, the tester did not
become ill after testing the cream. He
noticed that it had a peculiar .flavor, and
rejected the. whole can. As he was
stirring, the cream to make.the test he
found portion of a bottle labelled strych-
nine at the bottom of the can, which
was then handed over to the police.
Deporting the Hun from N.S.W. (Article), The Richmond River Herald and Northern Districts Advertiser (NSW : 1886 - 1942), Tuesday 3 June 1919 [Issue No.2158] page 4 2017-05-27 20:51 Deporting the Hon from N.S.W.
? Some of tho Germans deported on the
Willoclira! last week are of a highly un
desirable class. They are criminals ?
out and out, and have never tried ;to
disguise the fact. It was for some of '
their, .class ,that Colonel SaJnds instit
uted at the Holdsworthy 'Camp what
lias .ever since been -known as 'the Sing
.Sing prison. They had a special guard
over .tliem, . .rind the wire-netting en
tanglements within which they wore
;enclosed wore of the most formidable -
i character. One inmate of that enclos
physical specimen. And because ;on
rsunny daiys ho wore nothing more .than
lie .soon browned in a fashion which
would have driven a sunbakor on the
boach green with envy. -His every
movement denoted strength, a'nd: on
one qccasion .when ho was going thro
ugh his .daily physical culture oxercises -
looker who was gating through the -
wire-netting at him, ''Do you know'
what -I do if I ha've you alongside in
hero?' 'I don't,' was the reply.
-'Well, I toll you,' said the German,,
as -his- eyes blazed, 'I break your back
across my knee. And ho not only
looked as: if lie .could do it, but that
than Jiaving a try. He was one of the
.one else in tlie camp to prey on, fright
ened worried internees, into handing -
over to: them money with which to buy
.extra rations^ in the canteen. In view
,of tho fact that these Sing Sing Ger
Willoclira 15 new- colls have been spec
ially constructed, and the. guards who
know them fully anticipate that it. will'
riot be very long before they will bo
occupied.' It is certain, at any rate,
that some of tlio deportees will not
number of them left Germany to es
cape naval or military conscript ser
vice. One, on his own admission, is=
was '-'in the way-' when the desporado
cscaped from a German warship in Nor
All the internees from Molongolo'
camp, which is about a mile from tho
Duntroou College, in tlie Federal capit
al area, are now aboard ship. It 'is a
well laid out little city, lighted ? by
ihe British Government by the Com
be brought from China. But tlie scheme
miscarried, or at any rate was not car
know- to what use the place will now be
put. There ..are still about 500 inter
that all will be on. tlio seas within a
Mi'Namara's, charged with dynamiting
the Los Angles 'Times' building, -. but
when it; eamo to the trial, so clear was
the advice of their attorney and con
early your orders for Sulkies and Bug
gies to J. W. Garrcd's.*
Deporting the Hun from N.S.W.
Some of the Germans deported on the
Willochra last week are of a highly un-
desirable class. They are criminals
out and out, and have never tried to
disguise the fact. It was for some of
their class hat Colonel Sands instit-
uted at the Holdsworthy Camp what
has.ever since been known as 'the Sing
Sing prison. They had a special guard
over them and the wire-netting en-
tanglements within which they were
enclosed were of the most formidable -
character. One inmate of that enclos-
physical specimen. And because on
sunny days he wore nothing more than
he soon browned in a fashion which
would have driven a sunbaker on the
beach green with envy. His every
movement denoted strength, and: on
one ocassion when he was going thro-
ugh his daily physical culture exercises -
looker who was gazing through the
wire-netting at him, ''Do you know
what I do if I have you alongside in
here?' 'I don't,' was the reply.
"Well, I tell you,' said the German,
as his eyes blazed, 'I break your back
across my knee. And he not only
looked as: if he could do it, but that
than having a try. He was one of the
one else in the camp to prey on, fright-
ened worried internees, into handing
over to them money with which to buy
extra rations in the canteen. In view
of the fact that these Sing Sing Ger-
Willochra 15 new cells have been spec-
ially constructed, and the guards who
not be very long before they will be
occupied. It is certain, at any rate,
that some of the deportees will not
number of them left Germany to es-
cape naval or military conscript ser-
vice. One, on his own admission, is
was in the way when the desporado
escaped from a German warship in Nor-
All the internees from Molongolo
camp, which is about a mile from the
Duntroon College, in the Federal capit-
al area, are now aboard ship. It is a
well laid out little city, lighted by
ihe British Government by the Com-
be brought from China. But the scheme
miscarried, or at any rate was not car-
know to what use the place will now be
put. There are still about 500 inter-
that all will be on. the seas within a
McNamara's, charged with dynamiting
the Los Angles 'Times' building, but
when it; came to the trial, so clear was
the advice of their attorney and con-
early your orders for Sulkies and Bug-
gies to J. W. Garred's
THE GATTON MURDERS. (Article), Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent (NSW : 1887 - 1932), Tuesday 7 February 1899 [Issue No.10] page 2 2017-05-27 20:21 The links in tho cliniit of evidenco which were
asserted to bo forging against liim are fast ;
molting away when oxposcd to the light of
inquiry. Tlio latest is the revolver episode.
Tho polico woroconfidont they had traced a
revolver to Burgess, inasmuch hh O'Brien, the
resident of Ptillen Vale, thirteen miles from
BrislNUio, for whom he worked a couplo of (lays
at tho beginning of December, was reported to
have seen one in his swag. Tho true fact of
tho case aro that O'Brien, who is nearly 90
years of ago, and with bis eyesight roniewhot
impaired, was passing on the outsido where
Burgess was rolling up his swag. Ho saw
something "shiny, mid this the police, on
learning of the incident, nt once concluded that
it must lie a revolver. Even O'Briun is uot
propnrcd to go to that length, and as Ids visual
Itowora iiro imperfect, thu urtinlo might have
icon any tiring from a pannikin to a ktiifo.
Anything tlmt is likely to toll ngahist
who use it to (mild up a caso iigainRt him.
Thoy certainly made tho most of tlio revolver
how tho police decided on such very slight
doubtful if it was, and he cortninly never told
the police so. O'Brien !>ocaniu acquainted with
Burgess on December 1. Ho Arrived nt thu
)0s per week to assist in a road contract.
Burgess is described as a willing weiker.
Employer and employee got an well until
the tiiilurdny following tlie urrivnl of Burgess.
Ill tho afternoon tticv with others were oil
upon Bathurst, N.S.W. O'Brien lmd been
there ninny yunr.s ago ; so lmd Burgess, but
O'Briun was anxious for news of tlio New .South
reasons best knouw to himself, grow taciturn,
and refused to Ihj interrogated. This exits-
Iierated hi elderly questioner and employer,
and bu ventured on a remark which was tanta
mount to saying that Burgcsa lmd bucn in
gaol. In' a moment tiie latter became wildly
excited, and catching the elder man by thu
shoulders hurled him from tho verandah into
the garden, fortunately without hurting liim.
Burgess did nor tarry after this. Ho rushed to
whoie his swag was, roltcd it up, and started
off without askinc for or waiting to receive his
burgess, in lho course of his ovidonco at the
magisterial inquiry, admitted Uint he hnd
worked for O'Btion, and tlmt he left owing to a
Local sympathy is strongly in fuvour of
Burgess, nud there is a widespread dissatisfac
tion at tho action of tho polico all through the
cose. Tho asserted unfair methods resortoil to
in order to, if possiblo, obtain incriminating
ovidonco against him nro strongly condemned.
Urt"pv hat lho Gatton milrdcrs wore
not tho work ol a strange Jiar-uuL,
That the crime was not brought home to tho
duo to gross official blundering ami incapacity.
Just now the lot of n policeman, in Queensland
at all o vents, is far from being a happy one.
bntsiiane, .Saturday Night.
It is now pretty generally accepted tlmt the
polico have failed miserably in their ollbrts to
trace the perpetrator of tho Gatton crime.
Not only have they, it is fully bcliovcd,
allowed the murderer or murdercrstooscapo, but
their imculiar conduct in regard to the case
go to indicate tlmt he was at Greeiiniount, and
not at Gattnn, on tho night of tho murder, and
thu opinion held for some time, is gaining
sympathy for tlio treatment ho bus received at
the nanus of tho authorities.
Littlo liujpo is now entertained tlmt tho
authors of the triple murder will ever bo dis
that they could bo found much nearer homo
than tho polico appear to think.
The only chance now is that a guilty con
It is still imposHiblu to got any official con-
firinatiuu or denial of tho report which has
been circulated to the offuct that Burgess's
statement as to his whereabouts on Xnms,
Boxing, and succeeding days has been corro
borate)!.. It is not to bo denied, however, that
the sympathy of the great majority of tho
looked upon as nn unjustly injured man.
of Grcoumount, to tho effect that Burgess called
nt hor houso ut 8.13 on the morning of Dec. 27,
and that he was tired and slccpv, is looked
is argued that, ns a prevoutivo to detection, if
not suspition, a man who was bent upon com
be as far away as possible from the nceuo of tho
tragedy on tho ovening preceding tlm murder.
In such an event tho riding of 20 miles or so to
and from tho fatal snot in ono night need not
bo a matter of impossibility.
It is said this idea lias suggested itself hi
polico circle, and in cuso that such u tiling
might have Iwen done in this instance and tho
liorxo possibly killed, n thorough search is being
any traces to confirm tlio theory.
Most pcoplu havo reverted to tho opinion
that tho murder was committed by local
persons, nml tlmt thu motivo was revenge.
section of tho K>licc are also convinced nf this,
aml lhuroh reason to believe that they have
again tukou up one of tho earliest clues, which
was abandoned in favour of the ono which has
been followed so iienristontly for such a long
time. The method adopted by tho jiolico for
tlio detection uf tho perpetrators are now being
soveioly criticised by tho general public. Thu
idea of relying nololy upon conspicuously nriued
men fur investigation, as has boon tlio ease, is
All who have travelled by thu Mcssngeries
praise of tho comfort, civility, mid excellent
cuisine mot with. See h9t of sailing in these
office, Quoon's-oorner, Pitt strcot, Sydney.
Signet Todacco. — "Siguot" Tobacco is tlio
whether it bo dark, or whether it bo light. It
is all tho samo, pure, wholosomo and plonsant.
Tvi'iioii) Fkveu.— Tlio "Western Post"
Mudgco nml Gulgong nro just now being miulo
with rather unpleasant frequency. In Mudgco
two members of tho Meyers family, at Went
End, havo just recovered from tho torriblo
disease. It is now stated that a third membor
is ill witli fovcr symptoms, but it is uot yet
kuowu fur cortniu whotlior ho is really sicken,
Farthing, employed ns housokcopcr by Mr. If.
Bcarle, sou., of Church-street, was removed to
Iter parents' placo suffering from tho dreaded
ftcourngo. This victim only returned to Iter
position ou Saturday night after having been
off for threo weeks' health-recruiting. Mr. C.
his attack as to bo ablo to leave tho hospital,
put twu tfvsh vatcu kavy fo town.
The links in the chain of evidence which were
asserted to be forging against him are fast ;
melting away when exposed to the light of
inquiry. The latest is the revolver episode.
Tho police were confident they had traced a
revolver to Burgess, inasmuch as O'Brien, the
resident of Pullen Vale, thirteen miles from
Brisbane, for whom he worked a couple of days
at the beginning of December, was reported to
have seen one in his swag. The true fact of
the case are that O'Brien, who is nearly 90
years of ago, and with his eyesight somehat
impaired, was passing on the outside where
Burgess was rolling up his swag. He saw
something "shiny", and this the police, on
learning of the incident, at once concluded that
it must be a revolver. Even O'Brien is not
prepared to go to that length, and as his visual
powers are imperfect, the article might have
been anything from a pannikin to a knife.
Anything that is likely to tell against
who use it to build up a case against him.
They certainly made the most of the revolver
how the police decided on such very slight
doubtful if it was, and he certainly never told
the police so. O'Brien became acquainted with
Burgess on December 1. He arrived at the
10s per week to assist in a road contract.
Burgess is described as a willing worker.
Employer and employee got on well until
the Saturday following the arrival of Burgess.
In the afternoon they with others were on
upon Bathurst, N.S.W. O'Brien had been
there many years ago ; so had Burgess, but
O'Brien was anxious for news of the New .South
reasons best known to himself, grew taciturn,
and refused to be interrogated. This exas-
perated his elderly questioner and employer,
and he ventured on a remark which was tanta-
mount to saying that Burgess had been in
gaol. In'a moment the latter became wildly
excited, and catching the elder man by the
shoulders hurled him from the verandah into
the garden, fortunately without hurting him.
Burgess did nor tarry after this. He rushed to
where his swag was, rolled it up, and started
off without asking for or waiting to receive his
wages.
Burgess, in the course of his evidence at the
magisterial inquiry, admitted that he had
worked for O'Brien, and that he left owing to a
Local sympathy is strongly in favour of
Burgess, and there is a widespread dissatisfac-
tion at the action of the police all through the
case. The asserted unfair methods resorted to
in order to, if possible, obtain incriminating
evidence against him are strongly condemned.
The theory that the Gatton murders were
not the work ol a stranger is the ????.
That the crime was not brought home to the
due to gross official blundering and incapacity.
Just now the lot of na policeman, in Queensland
at all events, is far from being a happy one.
Brisbane Saturday Night.
It is now pretty generally accepted that the
police have failed miserably in their efforts to
trace the perpetrator of the Gatton crime.
Not only have they, it is fully believed,
allowed the murderer or murderers to escape, but
their peculiar conduct in regard to the case
go to indicate that he was at Greenmount, and
not at Gatton, on the night of the murder, and
the opinion held for some time, is gaining
sympathy for the treatment he has received at
the hands of the authorities.
Little hope is now entertained that the
authors of the triple murder will ever be dis-
that they could be found much nearer home
than the police appear to think.
The only chance now is that a guilty con-
It is still impossible to get any official con-
firmation or denial of the report which has
been circulated to the effect that Burgess's
statement as to his whereabouts on Xmas,
Boxing, and succeeding days has been corro-
borated. It is not to be denied, however, that
the sympathy of the great majority of the
looked upon as an unjustly injured man.
of Greenmount, to the effect that Burgess called
at her house at 8.15 on the morning of Dec. 27,
and that he was tired and sleepy is looked
is argued that, as a preventive to detection, if
not suspition, a man who was bent upon com-
be as far away as possible from the scene of the
tragedy on the evening preceding the murder.
In such an event the riding of 20 miles or so to
and from tho fatal spot in one night need not
be a matter of impossibility.
It is said this idea has suggested itself in
police circles, and in case that such a thing
might have been done in this instance and the
horse possibly killed, a thorough search is being
any traces to confirm this theory.
Most people have reverted to the opinion
that the murder was committed by local
persons, and that the motive was revenge.
section of the police are also convinced of this,
and there is reason to believe that they have
again taken up one of tho earliest clues, which
was abandoned in favour of the one which has
been followed so persistently for such a long
time. The method adopted by the police for
the detection of tho perpetrators are now being
severly criticised by the general public. The
idea of relying solely upon conspicuously armed
men for investigation, as has been the case, is
All who have travelled by the Messageries
praise of the comfort, civility, and excellent
cuisine met with. See list of sailing in these
office, Queen's-corner, Pitt street, Sydney.
Signet Tobacco. — "Signet" Tobacco is the
whether it be dark, or whether it be light. It
is all the same, pure, wholosome and pleasant.
TYPHOID FEVER
Mudgee and Gulgong are just now being made
with rather unpleasant frequency. In Mudgee
two members of the Meyers family, at West
End, have just recovered from the terrible
disease. It is now stated that a third member
is ill with fever symptoms, but it is not yet
known for certain whether he is really sicken-
Farthing, employed as housekeeper by Mr. H.
Srarle, Sen., of Church-street, was removed to
her parents' place suffering from the dreaded
scourage. This victim only returned to her
position on Saturday night after having been
off for three weeks' health-recruiting. Mr. C.
his attack as to be able to leave the hospital,
but two fresh cases have occurred in that town.
Scene of two murders (Article), Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954), Saturday 21 July 1951 [Issue No.17,515] page 1 2017-05-27 19:37 POUCE SEARCH the ruin$ of the burnt-out howe at Wyan (NSW), of Donald
Wa7ní, ^aTdhU^fe oJa Jean Warner, "A-d^^¿»T£¿%
murdered with a shotgun and incinerated. William Abbott, 29, of Wyan, was yesterday
charged with haring murdered the couple on Sunday night.
POUCE SEARCH the ruins of the burnt-out home at Wyan (NSW), of Donald
Warner, 19, and his wife Orma Jean Warner, 17. Police believe the couple were
murdered with a shotgun and incinerated. William Abbot, 29 of Wyan, was yesterday
charged with having murdered the couple on Sunday night.
SERIOUS ACCIDENT. (Article), Goulburn Herald (NSW : 1881 - 1907), Saturday 21 July 1883 page 4 2017-05-27 18:57 Seonsu8 AoemcNT.-On Thursday afternoon a
load nonr Barbor's Crooeek when a small tree they
delireased on the brain. His mates picked him up
Creook topping.plnce on a stretcher, and telegraphed
to Gonlburn for a medical man; but the latter mise
to the hospital, where he was admitted still uncon
scious. The following morning Dr. Herding,
assisted by the other medical officera, Drs. Gentle
and Mo Killop, performed the operation of trephlin
Graham is fifty-two years of age, and has a ilfe and
SERIOUS ACCIDENT.-On Thursday afternoon a
land near Barbor's Creek when a small tree they
depressed on the brain. His mates picked him up
Creek stopping placed on a stretcher, and telegraphed
to Goulburn for a medical man; but the latter miss-
to the hospital, where he was admitted still uncon-
scious. The following morning Dr. Harding,
assisted by the other medical officers, Drs. Gentle
and Mc Killop, performed the operation of trephlin
Graham is fifty-two years of age, and has a wife and
R. Greenbank v. Jas. Davis. (Article), Bowral Free Press (NSW : 1901 - 1906), Wednesday 5 February 1902 [Issue No.1665] page 4 2017-05-27 18:49 M. Oxlty for plaintiff. This was an ac
" Mr. Gale raised the'point that security
verdicf wag'in favofc of his client.
' Mr. Qxley said the security' had not
been ask-ed for; they were quite prepared
he asked his Honor to amend the infor
| rriality.'
"His Honor postponed the c?ise to next
[We understand that this case vyas
tors.]" •' ' ""
M. Oxley for plaintiff. This was an ac-
Mr. Gale raised the point that security
verdicft was in favor of his client.
' Mr. Oxley said the security' had not
been asked for; they were quite prepared
he asked his Honor to amend the infor-
mality.
His Honor postponed the case to next
[We understand that this case was
tors.]"
Family Notices (Family Notices), The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 - 1909), Wednesday 9 August 1893 [Issue No.1773] page 1 2017-05-27 18:43 Wordts, Is. Each Insertion-
KNOWLE9.— August 0. at her parents' residence,
daughter of Robert- and' Alice KnowleB, aged 7
BLADE. — August 7, at Ranken-strect, Bathuret,
Frederick James, eldest son of iato Joseph
S'ade, of Randwiok. -
In Memoriani.
WEtOH.— In loving memory of my dear Mother,
dence, Joadja Creek. August O. 1802. Inserted
Words, Is. Each Insertion-
KNOWLES— August 6. at her parents' residence,
daughter of Robert-and' Alice Knowles, aged 7
SLADE. — August 7, at Ranken-strect, Bathurst,
Frederick James, eldest son of late Joseph
Slade, of Randwick. -
In Memoriam
WELCH.— In loving memory of my dear Mother,
dence, Joadja Creek. August 9. 1802. Inserted

Recent merge/splits

WhenSummaryCommentDetails

Read the merging and splitting guidelines.

Your lists

  1. Harper
    List
    Public

    2 items
    created by: public:DebbieK 2015-09-27
    User data
  2. Leveridge
    List
    Public

    Family Research

    3 items
    created by: public:DebbieK 2015-09-27
    User data
  3. McWaters
    List
    Public

    14 items
    created by: public:DebbieK 2013-08-25
    User data
  4. Scobie
    List
    Public

    Proof of immigration of great great grandmother - Mary Jane aged 10

    4 items
    created by: public:DebbieK 2013-08-25
    User data

Information on Trove's new list feature can be found here.