China Facing

Rebellion

And Invasion

NEW YORK, June 13 (A.A.P.). -Armed attempts to overthrow the Chinese Central Government's authority are being made in two of China's border provinces.

Following the Outer Mongolian in- vasion of Sinkiang Province on Tues- day, Buddhist monks are. now re- ported to have rebelled in Tibet. .

The Tibet rebellion, according lo reports reaching Chungking, began when the Chinese military authorities arrested a Buddhist leader and put him to death. Monks of the impor- tant monasteries, who virtually rule Tibet, which is nominally Chinese, then staged an armed rebellion against Chinese authority.

Fighting is reported to be in pro- gress near Lhasa.

SOVIET INFLUENCE

The American-owned Shanghai newspaper "Post and Mercury" says that recent arrivals from north-west China say that two brothers of the Sherif Khan family, who are among the leading clans in Chinese Kazak- stán, now head rival factions in Tibet.

Previously both were leaders in the rebellion movement against China

until the elder brother went to Russia, for training. The other brother then" sided with the Chinese, after which a number of clashes occurred.

President Chiang Kai-shek has ordered the Minister for National Defence, General Pai Chung-hsi, to fly to Sinkiang Province to consoli- date the Chinese defences against the Outer Mongolians.

The Government's Central News Agency stated to-day that Govern- ment forces recaptured Peitashan, 50 miles inside Sinkiang, but aircraft with Soviet markings continued to bomb the Chinese positions there.

The Nanking correspondent of the Associated Press of America says that Russian sources in Nanking state that the Soviet has trained and equipped a modern army in the Outer Mon- golian Republic, including a small bul

efficient air force.

The correspondent adds that son.e observers believe that the Mongolian invasion is a manifestation that China is in danger of losing Sinkiang under Soviet-stimulated demands for its autonomy.

SHANTUNG BATTLE

The China correspondent of the "New York Times," Tilman Durdin, says that the Government campaign against the Chinese Communists in eastern China has been halted by heavy losses, supply difficulties, fal- tering morale, and Communist guerilla

attacks in the rear.

In Central Shantung the Govern- ment and Communist forces have bat- tered themselves to a standstill,' says the correspondent.

Close