Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

No corrections yet

FIXING THE SA-WA BOUNDARY

By G F YOUNG

TVOW that the Defence Depart-

ment Is proceeding with our East-West road, the location of the boundary between South Australia and Western Australia is a subject of revived interest.

To Lieut. Douglas, a South Australian soldier, goes the credit of determining this line In 1867. He erected a flagstaff near

Eucla, and 3 years later John Forrest fixed a plate on tha western s.de of this pole.

The next survey was mode by surveyor Anketell in 1908 while engaged in deciding on the route of the Trans-Australian rail- way. Anketell erected a cairn-a humble affair, still to be seen 10 m les west from the town of Deakin. Within 8 chains of this pile of gibbers is a still smaller collect on heaped up into a cone. Same mystery attaches to this. It is older than Anke tell's, and has remained undisturbed for

sentimental reasons.

Railway officials and travellers often point to it and tell the audience in the

carriage "That is Forrest's determination of the boundary," and perhaps remark upon the small difference in the 2 calcu- lations made with instruments inferior to modern surveyors' appliances. But Forrest, on his second exploration trip, went 300 miles farther north, so it cer- tainly is not "Sir John Forrest's mark."

However, the official boundary mark is none of the above, but an obelisk, 6ft. Oin. high, 151n. square 'at the base, taper- ing to a little less than 12in. on top. It is securely planted in the Australian plain close to Eucla, and bears the date July 27, 1926.

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down