Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments

Show 1 comment
  • marymmw 6 Aug 2012 at 23:56
    I have changed the name of the creek from Bindebar to Pindabarn - the accepted local spelling. In early pastoral maps the same creek is known as the Whela Creek.

Add New Comment

4 corrections, most recently by mraadgev (NLA) - Show corrections

INVASION OF KANGAROOS

    HORDES AT MILEURA STATION

"The sky is brass, and the scrub lands glare, Death and ruin are everywhere." These words of Henry Lawson are in   a measure applicable to the Murchison at present. Yet there is one spot which is a veritable oasis amidst it all. That spot is at Mileura, one of the oldest stations on the Murchison, the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Walsh. Early in

the year thunderstorms, and later good rains fell in the vicinity of the home- stead, with the result that grass, green and luxuriant, waves in the wind along fertile flats and banks of the Bindebar Creek. Kangaroos have arrived in thou- sands from all parts of the drought- stricken areas and crowd thicker than flocks of sheep by day and night. Motorists, whilst passing along the narrow roadways, have to be on the alert to avoid crashing into the animals, especially during the hours of night, when the glare of the lamps appear to mesmerise the creatures. Kangaroo hunters are reaping a harvest of skins and, incidentally, providing food for crows, hawks and other birds. Hun- dreds of kangaroo are being shot daily, and still other hundreds come to fill   their places, and probably will continue to come unless the supply runs out, which is unlikely, for there are many thousands of their kind. The kangaroo, like the vulture, apparently can scent his food from afar, and being able to travel over long distances in brief time, there is little likelihood of supplies failing in that direction for a consider- able period. General rain or a heavy thunderstorm in another locality would divert the inrush.

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down