Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

2 corrections, most recently by AlexSims - Show corrections

Churches and Church affairs

BROUGHAM PLACE CONGREGA- TIONAL CHURCH.   "A RESORT FOR ENQUIRING MINDS."      

'^Beautiful for situation' ? might .with aptness be said of the commodious' struc ture ?'which has been built upon,, that ele vated- portion_of;Brougham plac.c, North Addaide, 2TCTlp9k|5g-:the ;.pai&; irfrpm ?which a fine-view- of- the -city and its en virons caniie^oTitarneiir'-Evidenees afford ample proof that the foundations of the Congregational ? Church ,were' laid 'on a' sloping sectjoh'.of.-tha lank of an ancient river.' Thecare exercised by the original designer is ? shown in the layout of the foundation, -which ~ is oiiite flat. To secure this result it -was necessary to dig in for a 'considerable distance and depth towards the northern boundary, and the foundations are over A ft. in -width, and correspondingly deep. Owing to a slight movement in the ground, it was considered desirable, about 30 years ago, to buttress- the- northern footpath across the length o£ the church, and since then the footpath line has moved a fe\r inches. Interstices haying since developed between the structure and the buttresses, the movement of the struc ture appears to have been slightly greater than that of the footpath. The build ing has moved bodily, and no cracks in the walls of foundations are visible. The Rev. Thomas Quint.on Stow, of Adelaide, had a long-cherished desire to found a fellowship at North Adelaide. He selected a site for the future church, and collected funds to pay for the land. At the suggestion of two members of lis church resident ?? there— Messrs. Thomas Frost and Manoah Ifori-is— he invited a number of, friends to form a workin-r committee, at the first meeting of which the site chosen by Mr. Stow jras approved, and the purchase decided on. It happened. at that time that the Rev.J. L. Poore. of Melliourne, was pro ceeding to London to engage ministers for Victoria. He was asked to engage one for South Australia. Mr. Poore con ferred with the Rev. .T. Jefferisv . LLlB.. pastor of Saltaire Congregational Church, who had been advised by leading. London doctors to seek. a warmer- climate. An invitation was given him, which he accepted. Mr. .Tefferie, with, his newly married wife, arrived in Adelaide on April 24. 1859, and was welcomed by the committee. Meanwhile a hall in Tynte street had been taken for tem porary worship, and on May 15 the first services were held, the Revs. T. Q. Stow and F. \V. Cox taking part. Three months later it was decided at a public meeting to secure the erection o£ the intended Congregational Church. A committee of 32 was appointed to carry out the objsct contemplated. On October 20 the church was formed by 52 persona entering into fellowship— 13 from the mother church in Adelaide, and 39 on profession of faith. The church thus founded was one of that brotherhood of churches known as Independents, or Congregationalists. Xeithor Ministers nor members subscribe to any humanly constructed creed.. They accept ' the Scriptures' of the Old and New Testament as containing * revelation of the mind and will of-God-abou't Himself and' His rela tions to men, 'and' such laws as He has divinely,, ordained for human conduct. They acknowledge Jesus. Christ as. the Son of the Everlasting Father and the sole Redeemer of- inn.' ' They depend on the Eternal Spirit as their guide and teacher.

They reject all Tinman authority in- church government, worship, and belief. The first church meeting was held on December 2, when ' the Rev. .T. Jefferis was invited to the pastorate, which he accepted, and the chnrch. work developed. On January 15. 1860. teachers and officers were appointed to the Sunday school, the school beginning with 10 classes and nearly 100. scholars. _ A young men's society for -mutual instruction was also formed. It is recorded that young people came forward in a remarkable way to aid the pastor in every department of Christian activity, and worshippers, crowded the hall on Sundays..'''-' ??? A Harmony of Dissimilars. x ? At the last church meeting of the year the pastor stated that the building com mittee had accepted a design for the church from Messrs. Hamilton & Wright. In the following April tenders were* received. for the building, but. as they were far above the architect's estimate,' it was resolved to proceed with the basement, under the direction of Mr. Frost as superintendent of works, fhc land was pegged out, and the excavations begun. The foundation stone ?was laid by Mr.. Stow on May 15, 1SC0, exactly 12 months after the first service at | the hall. The Bum of £500 was placed on the stone. Financial help for the building fund continued to come in freely. A course of lectures by Chief Justice Hanson; Sir Charles Todd, nnd others brought in a large sum. A bazaar*- realized £705, an amount -augmented to nearly £1,400 by other promises. ' Mr. R. lB. Smith gave £500, in addition to £100 a year for the current expenses of worship. On February 22, 1861, the new church, still in an un finished state, was opened for; worship. Mr. Stow preaching the sermon. From that time, it is stated, the church became a resort for enquiring minds professing different creeds or having no settled belief. Without abandoning their own views of church policy, Episcopalians, Methodists, Presbyterians, Baptists, Roman Catholics.) and -Jews joined m the ??worship, many of ? them, entering the fellowship. A pro- 1 gressive theology was taught. The exposi-) tion of the- Scriptures proceeded on the, assumption tliat more li?ht and truth were to break, forth from God's holy word, and thafc the study of the universe and the 'world of men would deepen human know ledge of the Most High. Science and philosophy -were looked upon as handmaids to religion, and 'as contributing' in their 'several spheres to. a. true, theology. On March 4,- 1S62, the ?ynun'; men's society ?was definitely began. ' The ..society— said to have, been the 'first of. '.its. kind in the colony, if 'not- in Australia— became .one of the -most flourishing and -endnring institu tions.of the church. At the closing service, of .the second year nearly 700 -were present, and- its .influence was widespread. Its rules were eagerly sought in the. neighbour ing colonies, and adopted by more than one society in England. It aimed at moral and intellectuaLculture founded on religion. .When itwasformed'there-was no univer sity-in Ade'laidtvand the society, strove .to supply what was lacking. Classes were fqrmed-for the- study- of geology, natural . history, physiology, and -shorthand. Lec tures' 'were delivered on a' great variety of topics, : 'and regular ?' debates took place on subjects '? of ' international and colonial importance. In a mimic parliament ??legislative' measures were] discussed. 'Auuierices'of 400' and 500 eager listeners were'.readily secured. forJeetiires, I often ofc;t$w hours' ;.duration, 'and given | ?without -any- of- the 'frills' now. deemed , necessary, to relievo ' the strain of listen ih;f rto a1 purely intellectual effort.. Work of -that -order carried on. sedulously was| not' witTirmt'lresnlt/.-' A not'jnconsider- 1 ?'abl't number, of the citizens who iaye won I high positions in the- Christian ministry, in the press, in municipal 'and Parliamcn

'??.*? ?''''. ???' ' | tary Government, and as lawyers, doc tors, .bankers, and; merchants, received strong impulse and wise training in the North Adelaide Young's'' Men's Society. In', timejr -of -its greatest prosperity the Sunday school' numbered 400,' with. 40 teachers:- ..;' Its interest in missions was peat. During five years alone it3. juven- ile, missionary society contributed no less than £1,000 to the funds of the -London Missionary Society. Perhaps the greatest work achieved by the school was the founding of the Young Christians' Union in 1873. The original conception was due to the superintendent (Mr. Frost). It aimed at the open rcognition by the school and church of such scholars as were desirous of loving and serving Christ. A large number of young and ardent souls were thereby brought ? into full ' church membership. Copies of the rules of the union were sent to America and published there. ' . '-. ? Phases of Extensive 'Work The mission . at Lower North' Adelaide was one of the church's earliest efforts at evangelization in . the neighbourhood. 'Irish Town' was the name then given to a fairly populous district extending from

Kermode street to the eastern park lands. In November, I860, an empty store was engaged for a .Sunday school. The mis sion is now the' chief auxiliary of the church. A mission church at Gilberton was also built about 10 years ago. For some years the pulpit of the Houghton Church' was supplied chiefly by laymen from North Adelaide, and occasionally by the rastor. Mr, Jefferis, having accepted a call to the Pitt Street Congregational Church, in Sydney, resigned the pastorate in March, 18//, after a nappy ministry of IS years. .The Rev. Osric Copeland suc :eeded to the pastorate in July. For seven years he laboured unstintingly. He was a thoughtful and poetic preacher, a faith ful pastor, and a loving friend of the poor. He was largely instrumental in the formation of the fellowship at .Medin die, which took place in 1882. In 1885 the Rev. Samuel H.obditch, of London, was appointed pastor. ' After serving faith fully for three years he resigned, on ac count of' ill health. A, fortnight later he passed away. The vacant pastorate was filled in 1SS0 by the Rev. Frederic Hast ings. He zealously laboured in the work for four ' years, resigning in November, ]S0'. He was also an able -lecturer and public speaker: In May, J895, Dr. Jef feris, then pastorof Belgrave Church, Tor quay, resumed his old pastorate, and for seven years the work went steadily on. The church was renovated at a cost of £500, and a debt of £3,000 was. success fully grappled with. 'After six years Dr. Jefferis offered to remain for a further year, on condition that a co-pastor, who might become his successor, was ap pointed. The church agreed, and elected the Rev. W. II. Lewis, of Ballarat. On March 6, 1901, Dr. Jefferis retired, having been pastor altogether 25 years. Mr. Lewis was chosen to. fill his -place. His ministry was marked with great devoted - ness, his preaching being characterized by an intense fervour. He resigned the uas

torate on February 1, 1U05. J?or over two years the- church remaine'S without a pas tor. In August, 1907, the Rev. A. E. Gifford, of Victoria, began .his duties as pastor. ? lie brought a keen, analytical mind to bear upon the. subjects with which he dealt, and his sermons were de livered with an earnestness of conviction and a purity of diction. He did^much to stimulate the study -of. 'poetry and lite rature, and manifested an undiminished. interest in ' the ; different ' young ? people's organizations osociated with the church. His services were given frequently as a speaker at ? public gather ings . in_ _ the city. He was also a military chaplain, and took a prominent part in Maspnic functions. He resigned the pastorate at the close of

1921, having accepted a call to a church in Victoria. The present minister, Rev. L. C: Parkin, M.A., has just ' completed 12 months in the pastorate. He has done much to emphasize the function of the church in relation to moral and. social questions, and' his scholarly discourses are suggestive of a deep personal concern for the welfare of his fellow-men. A Noble Corinthian Stnfcture. The building is regarded as. one of the.! finest edifices typifying the Cuiiuihiau design in the State, and is built* in noble proportions.-' The interior dimensions are approximately 96 ft. length, and 48 ft. breadth, and seating accommodation' is provided for about 800 ' people. The pews and fittings are of cedarri-all nicely appointed. Alterations to the pulpit have been made from time to time, and on the last occasion the keyboard of the large . pipe organ was brought down to the' choir platform. The organ is blown by pneumatic action. Two 'small balcon ies Tiave been provided, but these, are not used at present. A large belfry' has been erected above the main entrance, but no bells' have yet been installed. Above the belfry is a solid tower, over reached by a. lantern tower, from ?which a brilliant light beams whenever a- ser vice is held in the church. The solid flight of marble: steps, marking . the approach to the front entrance : to the buildings is greatly admired' by visit ors. -About the year 1877 a large- icnooj

building was constructed, and adjoins. the rear portion of the mam building. Ample provision was made for Sunday school classrooms under the church,: and. about 1888 the spacious area -was divided by partitions for that purpose. Later on a number of the partitions were removed to provide the necessary space for kin dergarten requirements. A Veteran in the Cause. Mr. P. J./Williams, of North Adelaide, is still actively identified with the life of the church.. Speaking to a pressman this week, he recalled various incidents associated with the early- days. He re membered being present, as a child, _ at the ceremony of laying the foundation stone, under which a copy of The Regis ter, coins of the realm, and other articles were placed.- He has given 50 years of cheerful service to the church work, and was the first scholar in the Sunday school. On referring to a membership ,roll of January, 1875, he discovered1 that the numerical strength at that time was 434, and as far as he has been able to ascer tain, there are at present three of those members now associated with the cause, ?namely — Mrs. A. S. Devenish, of Pros pect, Mr. T. B. Raglass, of Bridgewater, and himself, and each of them was pre-' sent at the communion service . held in the church last Sunday morning. . . A Group, of Activities. The missionary cause continues to re ceive liberal support from the church members. The devotional services ha\-e proved a source of inspira tion. The women's guild is a valued .adjunct to the church and the reading club has_ always been' a strong factor. In ad dition to a well-equipped Sunday school, the young people's needs are. catered for by different societies, a gymnasium,'' and other clubs.' The young .men's brottierj hood continues its useful' service. -'Mr. Parkin recently inaugurated a weekly community service, a feature of which is the screening of /moving pictures. It is hoped by- this means to secure the interest of outside people and .increase the sphere of the church's influence. Memorial Tablets and Windows. Marble tablets to the memory of the Rev. T. Quinton Stow, the founder of the church, and .the Rev. S._ Hebditch, adorn the walls of the building. The memory of the Rev. Dr. Jefferis has been honoured by an ornate painted window. A large and beautifully executed stained window, installed by Sir George Doolette, as a tribute to the memory of his wife, occupies a promiment position in the wes tern end of the building. Over 100 young men from' the church and its institutions enlisted during the Great War. The honour roll and the roll of sacrifice are engraved on a stained window in the northern wall. 'The Twilight of the Gods.' The evening- service on. Sunday, August 28, was conducted by the pastor. The congregation sang, 'We come' unto »our fathers God,' as the opening hymn, and the invocatory petitions were, offered, the Lord's Prayer being chanted. The hymn, ''When 1 survey the wondrous' cross,' was ' impressively rendered. The' lesson was selected from the First Epistle to the Corinthians, and the general prayer was delivered. The chant — a regular fea ture of the service— rwas 'O ? sing unto the Lord a new song.' Stainer's an them, 'Ye shall dwell in the land,' was

the choir item.- Iflr. Parkin an nounced a somewhat novel title as the subject of his address— 'The twilight1 of the gods.' .He said it was alwayihard to realize that the Christian Church had had stages in which the very vital things that concerned its faith seemed to the people of the day to be shaken. What was really shaken were temporary forms in which those truths had clothed them Eelves. The eternal things remained for ever. That had been the record of the church throughout its history. They were timestof growth. They faced one of those crises to-day. They had recently been held by a lecturer in Adelaide that that was the twilight -of the .gods. He bad said that many people did not go to church, that a large body of scientists did not believe in a modern God, and that many great thinkers did' not believe in a personal God. It did not prove anything, Mr.. Parkin proceeded, that the mass o f people had drifted from the church. TimeVand again that had been the case. It had- been so in England, before the Reformation, but then the people came bock to the church because they found it had something to give which they could not get anywhere else. There had been tremendous changes in their outlook during the past 50 years, and the church was not ready, for them. They were passing through a great ' stage of social reorganization, and unfortunately some Christian' men had been reactionar ies in the movement. ' The. world to-day possessed attractions that no past age possessed. To-day the possibilities of pleasure had been increased tremendously. There was no fear, of a, burning hell for people, who did not go to church.* But all that did not prove that religion had failed. Christianity had depended upon the spiritual experience of ? ordinary people, who had tried its message and found it to be true. The preacher quoted leading scientists like Lord Kelvin; Sir Oliver Lodge, and ? others, against, the argument .used by the lecturer. He said the attitude of .modern thought was op posed to the crude theology of the old times, but their Christian faith was a

treat experiment, which could justify itself intellectually. They found God when they sought Him with a childlike heart, ind when they realized that in the' sac- rifice of Jesus Christ there was a soirit of goodness that inspired them. What held the church back was not science; it was just that 'those who believdd in Christ did not trust Him enough, and were not prepared to follow Him where He might guide- them. The eyes, of the church -would be opened to see new truths, but always at the centre there would be the invisible love of Christ, curing men I and women of sickness and sorrow, I The twentieth article of the weekly series will deal with Tynte. Street Bap tist Church, North Adelaide.

REV. T. QUINTON STOW. The Founder of the Church.

REV. T. QUINTON STOW. The Founder of the Church.

REV. DR. J. JEFFERIS. Minister for two periods, aggrcgatng 25 . years. . .

REV. DR. J. JEFFERIS. Minister for two periods, aggrcgatng 25 . years. . .

REV. A. E. GIFFORO. Minister frcm 1907 to 1922.

REV. A. E. GIFFORO. Minister frcm 1907 to 1922.

REV. L. C. PARKIN, M.A.. The present minister (since 1922).

REV. L. C. PARKIN, M.A.. The present minister (since 1922).

THE VEN. ARCHDEACON WHJTINGTON, the first organizing chaplain of the B.H.M.S.

THE VEN. ARCHDEACON WHJTINGTON, the first organizing chaplain of the B.H.M.S.

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down