Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

3 corrections, most recently by wittylama - Show corrections

DISTRIBUTION OF AWARDS AT THE EXHIBITION                          

DISTRIBUTION OF AWARDS AT THE EXHIBITION.

Of this ceremony, which took place on March 22, we give a full description elsewhere. THE EXPLOSION OF MR. L'ESTRANGE'S BALLOON NEAR SYDNEY. We gave in our last issue the particulars of the extra ordinary balloon accident which we here depict, but we may, for convenience, repeat that H. L'Estrange, an

aeronaut, who has had several wonderful escapes, went up in a balloon at Sydney on March 15. It descended at   Woolloomooloo, and L'Estrange succeeded in grappling a house, and sliding down the rope to terra firma. The balloon, however, became entangled with the house, and, while it was swaying to and fro, the gas escaping from it became ignited by a light in the house, and the balloon exploded. Several persons were scorched and bruised, and received shocks to the system. Mrs. Hawke, an elderly lady, was severely injured about the face, and is likely to lose her sight.   SPEARING FISH AT GRIFFITH'S POINT, WESTERN PORT. Griffith's Point is the northern point of the eastern entrance to Western Port bay, 60 miles S.E. from Mel bourne, and in the vicinity of the Kilcunda coal mine. Our Bketch shows the manner in which butterfish are captured at this place by means of spearing. This mode of fishing is exhibited by the residents for the amusement of visitors, and it is also adopted from bait and net proving ineffective to capture this kind of fish. The spear used is commonly a sharp, arrow-headed piece of iron, fastened to a strong stick like a harpoon, with a cord attached. MR. FRANCIS OEMONB, FOUNDER OF ORMOND COLLEGE. We present a portrait of Mr. Francis Ormond, the munificent founder of Ormond College, the Presbyterian.' college affiliated to the University. In our last issue we gave an account of the opening of the college, and illus trated its interior by a series of views. ' We need only repeat here that when the movement for establishing the college was in progress Mr. Francis Ormond, a rich colonist, who has for some time been resident at home, first appeared on the list as the donor of £300, which was gladly accepted by the committee, who, after much arduous labour, suc ceeded in raising £6,000. At this stage Mr. Ormond came forward in a most generous and munificent manner, and increased the sum to £10,000, provided a like amount was raised from other sources, as he felt convinced that £20,000 at least would be necessary to build a college worthy of the leading position which the denomination held in the colony. As the subscriptions continued to come in satis factorily, and commendable progress was being made, Mr. Ormond, while in France, laBt year contributed further siims of £2,571, the cost of erecting a tower, and £2,500 as the commencement of an endowment fund for professors. Ultimately Mr. Ormond offered to pay the whole cost of the building. The amount is estimated at £22,500. MR. J. W. M'CAY, WINNER OF UNIVERSITY EXHIBITION' AND ORMOND COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS. At a time when. so much notice, pictorial and otherwise, is taken in the papers of the successful competitors in athletic sports, ifc seems only fair that some prominence should be also given to those who in a much keener com petition display their prowess in the field of intellectual activity. In this view we present an engraving of young Mr. James Whiteside M'Cay, of the Scotch College. This young gentleman, at the recent University matriculation extimihations, was fortunate enough to win both the classical and mathematical exhibitions, and was also first in classics and mathematics in the open competition for scholarships at Ormond College. Mr. M'Cay is son of the Rev. A. R. Boyd M'Cay, Presbyterian minister of Castle maine, and has already hiid a distinguished edticational course. At the age of 11 he obtained a certificate of competence at the state school, and next year obtained a state-school exhibition, tenable for six years and worth £35 per annum. He then went to the Scotch College, and at the age of 13 he passed the matriculation examination in eight subjects, getting three credits. In 1879 he was dux of the school in mathematics, and the same year obtained a prize offered for the best scholar undor 10 years of age. In 1880, being then 15 years of ago, he was dux of the college and The Argus prizeman. At the present time, though only 16 years of age, he holds exhibitions and scholarships of the total annual valuo of £122 10s. Tho case is a noticeable one as illustrating tho advantages and facilities for educational progress available in Victoria, and also tho way in which they aro utilised by a deserving young Victorian. A COUNTRY MANSION : C ATTAIN GARDINER'S NEW HOUSE, LANOEFIELD-ROAD. We have given, from timo to time, engravings of some of the finer class of houses built in country districts, with a '? view; of showing how far we havo got in theBe colonies froin, ,.

THE EXPLOSION OP Mil. L'ESTKANGE'S BALLOON NEAR SYDNEY.

THE EXPLOSION OP Mil. L'ESTKANGE'S BALLOON NEAR SYDNEY.

SPEARING FISH AT GHIFFITH'S POINT, WESTERN POUT.

SPEARING FISH AT GHIFFITH'S POINT, WESTERN POUT.

MR, FRANCISr ORMOND, FOUNDER OP ORMOND COLLEGE.

MR, FRANCISr ORMOND, FOUNDER OP ORMOND COLLEGE.

MR. J. W. M'CAY, ?WINNER OF UNIVERSITY EXHIBITION AND ORMOND COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS.-]

MR. J. W. M'CAY, ?WINNER OF UNIVERSITY EXHIBITION AND ORMOND COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS.-]

A COUNTRY MANSION: CAPTAIN GARDINER'S NEW HOUSE, L AN CEF IE L D-ROAD.

A COUNTRY MANSION: CAPTAIN GARDINER'S NEW HOUSE, L AN CEF IE L D-ROAD.

the bark or log hut, which, there is too much reason to believe, i3 still regarded by many English people as the typical residence of an Australian squatter. In pursuance of the same desire we give a cut of the house lately built for Captain Gar diner upon his Mintaro estate, Lancefield, in close proximity to the site of the proposed new railway station. The style of architecture adopted is that of the semi- classic, the northern, southern, and western elevations being surrounded by a spacious colonnade built in the Doric order below and the Ionic above.- The main entrance is from the north, and the approach is fronted by an elegant porch leading to the loggia, and thence access is given to the hall, which is lift, in width and 51ft. in length, and gives access to drawing, dining, and morning rooms, library, and servants' offices. At the extreme end is placed the main staircase leading to the upper hall, and from thence to the various bedrooms, bathrooms, lavatories, &c. Both the lower and upper halls are most artistically ornamented, the ceiling of the former being supported by fluted Corinthian columns erected upon pedestals, and the whole surmounted by a massively enriched cornice which goes around the entire length and width of the hall. The floors of the upper and lower colonnades, lower hall, loggia, &c, are laid with richly embossed tiles manufactured by Messrs. Minton, Hollins, and Co., of Stoke-upon- Trent, to a special design. The general external -appearance is greatly enhanced by the addition of a lofty tower, which is in perfect harmony with .the remainder of the edifice, and adds considerably to the picturesque effect of the whole. The internal arrangements are most complete, the rooms being both spacious and lofty, and fitted with electric-bell communication, gas, water, and every other modern improvement necessary for the convenience of the occupants. The building has been erected from designs furnished by Mr. James Gall, archi tect, and under his superintendence, and he must certainly be complimented upon the successful results of his labours. The contractors who have carried out the respective branches of the work are Messrs. Linacre, Parry, Bodkin, Adamson, Simpson, Hamilton, and Hyde, and the execu tion of the various portions of the structure throughout reflects great credit upon them. Our illustration is taken from a view made upon the spot by Mr. W. Tibbits, of Windsor. THE MELBOURNE FIRE BRIGADE.

In giving some illustrative sketches respecting the per manent Fire Brigade maintained in Melbourne by the joint contributors the fire insurance societies, we subjoin the following particulars of the composition and proceedings of this brigade, which has always won credit by its discipline and promptitude, and the courage and efficiency its members have never failed to display : — The Fire Brigade consists of 14 members, 11 of whom are on the permanent staff, and three auxiliary men, with two stations — one in Little Collins street east ; the other station is situated in Bourke-street west, near King-street. The permanent men devote the whole of their time to the brigade duties, and all the men reside at the two stations, and are available for immediate duty. A constant watch is kept for the discovery of fire. Each man does four hours' duty in the tower, when he is . relieved by the next man for that duty. On discovering a fire the alarm is given at the station by the ringing of a large electric bell, and the look-out man intimates by telephone the exact locality of the fire. Should the fire be in Melbourne, all the available men proceed to it; if- in any of the suburban districts, a detachment only. The Bourke-street station is also in communication by telephone, and the men by that means can be summoned -to— attend any fire in their own locality or in any other portion of the city. The brigade are also in communication by wire with the Emerald hill fire station, and can send the alarm to the local fire brigade for any outbreak of fire in that locality. The brigade plant consists of two fire-carts and hose reels, two horses, extra hose reels, hydrants, branch pipes, ladder truck, fire engines, 5,000ft. of canvas and india rubher hose in a serviceable condition, and all the necessary appliances for working the brigade. One of the men is told off for duty every night for the purpose of working the fire escape belonging to the city council, and for which the council allow £80 per annum. The brigade is entirely supported by the Insurance Companies' Fire Brigade Association. The average number of fires, chimney fires, and false alarms in Melbourne and suburbs during the last six years was 200. Mr. Hoad, who is assisted by a foreman and assistant foreman in carrying out the brigade duties, haB held the position of superintendent in the brigade during the last 17 years. The subjects our artist has selected for illustration are — ' The superintendent,' ' The cart going to a fire,' ' The tower watchman,' ' Night duty.'

PAYING DAY AT THE ZOO. : FEEDING THE LIONS. The trustees of the Zoological and Acclimatisation Society's Gardens in the Royal- park have recently adopted, by per mission of the Government, the system of setting apart one day a week for paying visitors. The expectation has been that on these occasions a fashionable muster of visitors would take place, whose contributions would help the funds of the society. A band has been provided to add to the attraction of the very interesting and varied collection of. animals. Our illustration depicts a group of the visitors congregated in front of the lions' cage to watch the feeding of these animals. THE CAMPEEDOWN KABBIT-PKESERVING FACTORY. Some months ago the landed proprietors in the neigh bourhood of Camperdown determined to form a rabbit preBerving company, in the hope that the establishment of euch an industry would go a great way to assist them in getting the rabbits cleared oil' their properties. With this object in view, meetings were held in Camperdown for forming a public company. The matter, however, ended in the formation of a private company, with Mr. Farrington, of the Colac factory, as manager. The factory is now completed and ready for commencing operations. The only obstacle in the way of beginning is the difficulty Mr. Farrington experiences in getting a sufficient number of carters. The number of rabbits required is G,00t) a day, or, since the factory will be at work five days a week, 30,000 per week. The delivery of this large number will require a great number of spring-carts. However, this difficulty is |

not likely to prove insurmountable, and the supply of rabbits in the district will easily meet the demand. It is calculated that Mr. J. L. Currie's Lara estate alone will supply at least 1,000 per day. That immense warren known as the Stony Rises lies six miles from Camperdown, and on all the surrounding stations the rabbits are very numerous, so that the factory will be able to receive its supply within a radius of 15 miles. The establishment of this industry will be a great boon to the landowners of the district as a means of getting rid of these pests. No less a boon will it be to the working classes, for within the factory there will be about 90 men and boys employed, and, including car riers, trappers, and others connected with the establishment, employment will be given to from 300 to 400 persons. Our illustration shows the main building in the centre. ^ On the left are open sheds for drying the skins. On the right are the offices and stables, with a glimpse of Mount Leura in the background. LAKE WANAKA, NEW ZEALAND, BY MOONMGHT. Lake Wanaka, New Zealand, of which we give an illus tration, is Bituated in the province of Otago, in the South Island, and is a fine sheet of water overlooked by spurs of the Southern Alps. Our view is taken from Boy's Bay, and depicts the lake by moonlight. It is from a photograph by Messrs. Hart, Campbell, and Co., Dunedin. VIEW FROM FIiAGSTAFF-HILIi, WEST MELBOURNE, IN 1841. The engraving is a copy of a water-colour drawing, executed on Flagstaff-hill by Mrs. A. M. M'Crae on the 4th of September, 1841, at which date, looking westward from the point of view selected, not a single habitation was visible, no trace of cultivation, and nothing to break the stillness of the virgin solitude. In the foreground lies the sheet of water which had received the name of Batman's Swamp, and in the distance the line of the horizon is agreeably broken by the undulating forms of the Station Peak and the Anakies, while the intermediate portion of the landscape is occupied by grassy plains, lightly timbered, through which the Yarra winds its sluggish and devious course to its outfall in the bay. It would be superfluous to point out the complete contrast which the scene presents to its aspect at the present time, when the Flagstaff-hill is the centre of a populous neighbourhood, and when the view from its summit, looking in a westerly direction, embraces innumerable evidences of human activity and enterprise. That this marvellous transformation should have occurred within the lifetime of the estimable and accomplished lady by whom the original drawing was made is not the least remarkable circumstance connected with it. THE SAIYE ARTESIAN' WEIX.

We give an illustration of what is perhaps to be regarded as the most successful artesian well yet put down in this colony. In doing so, we quote the following particulars from an article which appeared in the Gipps Land Mercury, March 12 : — The possibility of securing a supply of water by sinking an artesian well in the town had been for some time speculated upon, and the borough council decided to call for tenders for such a work, which were accordingly received on the 15th April, 1880, and Mr. Niemann's tender for £225 was accepted for sinking to a depth of 300ft. Work was commenced immediately with 4in. tubes, which, by the way, were driven by a wooden monkey of considerable weight, and consequently were damaged. When about 100ft. had been bored, a 3in. pipe was put down inside the 4in. tube, for which also the concussion of the monkey proved too heavy, and which gave way at 176ft., when a 2in. pipe was put down inside the 3in. one. On the 17th June, at a depth of 190ft., an artesian supply was struck, and the water rose 3ft. above the surface, increasing in height to 13ft. when the pipes where put down further and certain obstructions removed. About this time the contractor, having been paid to the amount of £103 on account, suggested that the council should finish the work by day labour, which they did, and eventually got a stream of pure water at a depth of 231ft. , which rose in pipes 43ft. above the surface. The cost to the town was — for the well, £175 ; for adjusting surface and fence, £5 16s. .; for stand, horse trough, four 400 gallon tanks, and pipes for channels and trough, cocks, &c, £100 ; total. £280 16s. For this small cost, notwith standing the loss in pipes, they have a water supply purer and more convenient than could have been brought into the town by other schemes at a cost of £30,000 or so. Certainly it is to be regretted that the 4in. pipe was not carried down to the full depth, as that would have given nearer 200,000 gallons a day than 46,000. The ground bored through was all soft, with the exception of a piece or two of timber met with, and for a few days after water was struck the flow was very black, with an excessively disagreeable smell, and brought with it tons upon tons of dark sand. It shortly cleared, however, and it has been running ever since without the stoppage of a moment. NOItTH ADELAIDE CONGKEGATIONAI. CHURCH. We give an engraving of the fine building known as Jefferis Church, North Adelaide. It belongs to the Con gregationalist denomination, and the present pastor is the Rev. O. Copeland.

THE MELBOURNE FIRE BRIGADE.

THE MELBOURNE FIRE BRIGADE.

PAYING DAY 'AT THE ZOO.: FEEDING THE LIONS.

PAYING DAY 'AT THE ZOO.: FEEDING THE LIONS.

T IT K C A JtTE 11 D O W N R A II 15 I T - V 11 K S E 1 ! V T X G F A C T O I ! Y.

T IT K C A JtTE 11 D O W N R A II 15 I T - V 11 K S E 1 ! V T X G F A C T O I ! Y.

LAKE WAXAKA, Xl-^W ZEALAXD, BY MOONLIOTIT.

LAKE WAXAKA, Xl-^W ZEALAXD, BY MOONLIOTIT.

VIEW FltOM FLAGSTAFF.il ILL, AVKST MKLHOU'HNK, IN 1841.

VIEW FltOM FLAGSTAFF.il ILL, AVKST MKLHOU'HNK, IN 1841.

THE SALE ARTESIAN WELL.

THE SALE ARTESIAN WELL.

NORTH ADELAIDE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.

NORTH ADELAIDE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down