Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

No corrections yet

^^ ?^V^^ ^ISB^ ?'? ^^ ^^ ^^ X ^^^

Since the present hostilities began, many people have been seeking relief from war worries by attend ing amusements — the talkies principally. In the early months of the great war, South

Australia's citizens, in common with the rest of the Empire, had all the more reason to seek relaxation and forgetfulness in entertainment. Terrible fighting had taken place, soldiers were leaving Adelaide for over seas, and, in general, war was on in grim earnest. What was the range of entertainment here in 1914? The moving picture was in its infancy, but, for all that, films provided the bulk of the entertainment. The stage, of course^ was stronger than it is now, and the concert with a varied programme seemed to have a much wider appeal.

AND apart from the ordin ^k ary entertainments, great y~% shows were organised for M f^ patriotic charities, which naturally needed every penny they could get. Today even those people who are not film or theatregoers are kept well aware of what is on by skilful modern advertising. Now let's glance through the press advertisements from August 4 to November 25, 1914. When war broke out W. C. Fields was appearing on the state at the Tivoli. He was billed as 'the world's greatest silent humorist.' (He is still a great humorist but not so silent.) At the Theatre Royal William An derson was presenting 'The Face at the Window.' Said the advertise ments, 'this is by the well-known playwright E. Brook Warren, and is absolutely the greatest detective play yet seen in Adelaide. The play that thrills.' ? ? ? ttT') UFFALO Bill' was being 1™^ staged at the Hippodrome, j J— ' This place of amusement ? was in Grote street, on the site of the present Empire Theatre, and consisted cf a wooden frontage with a big tent behind. j Very appropriately at the Star Theatre (now the Majestic) 'the magnificent patriotic film, 'Under the Union Jack — Why' Britain Rules the Waves,'' was being shown. At West's (soon to reopen again, but with what a difference in con- i struction!) there was a stupendous [ attraction. 'Little Mary Pickford'!

was appearing in 'Tess of Hie Storm Country.' The Wondergraph (now the Civic) looked after the needs of its patrons as well as giving entertainment. ''Light refreshments' were served free to circle patrons. On August 5 appeared an adver tisement that few could resist. Here it is in all its glory-:- — 'CHEER UP! Why worry when you can see 'Caught in a Cabaret'? The most hilarious joke of the year. Nothing so quaintly human and humorous has been shown in Adelaide. Spend 3d. or 6d. today and thus rid yourself of all worry and strife. There's fun fast and furious awaiting you continually from 11 a.m. to 10.30 p.m. Can you resist having a laugh?' Now, of course, the Rex has sup planted the Pav. At the town hall the 'Pink Dan dies' were giving a season. A little later West's were present

ing a film about which there had been no half-measures. This was ' 'Nero and Agrippina.' the story oi the rise and fall of the monster Nero. The film that cost two for tunes to produce!'' It must have been quite a classic era. for a following attraction at West's was a beautiful film version of 'The Vicar of Wakefield,' the famous work by Oliver Goldsmith. ? * * THE man who wrote the ad vertisement for the new at traction at the Tivoli ex celled himself. This is what he wrote: — ? 'Direct from Paris. DE DIO. the world famous Parisian dancer and Queen of Prismatic Dancers, who will present a marvellous. beautiful, chaste, and gorgeously brilliant specta cular production, outrivalling anything hitherto seen this side of the world, entitled 'Terpsi- chore's Dream.' ' On August 24 the Pav. was well up to date with a film of the 'Gunboat' Smith-Carpentier flght, which had taken place in London on July 16. Carpentier had won. 'The Cry of a Child' at West's starred Asta Nielsen. Before Mary Pickford came into her fu)I glory. Asta was probably the most famous actress on the screen. She had scored a success in the title role of the film version of 'Hamlet' and — here's a funny thing — quite a number of her films were produced by Ernst Lubitsch. who today has just left directing to so back to producing The immortal Gilbert and Sulli van operas were having one of their frequent seasons at the Theatre Royal under the direction of J. C. Williamson. ''The Gondoliers.' 'The Mikado.' 'Iolanthe' and all the favorites were being presented. Then on September 1 Peter Dawson gave a farewell concert before leaving for England. And now here he is back in Austra lia, still singing, after a most il lustrious career. The Wondergraph was showing the film version of 'The Silence of Dean Maiiland' (ar. Australian company made a talkie version of this melodrama a year or two ago).

Said the 1914 advertisement — through the lips of the dLsmal Dean — 'Nineteen years ago. when in deacon's orders, 1 led a young girl j astray. I was the tempter . . ' | Pathe Freres. one of the pioneer groups in the motion picture in dustry, had 'a fine photo drama. 'A j King in Name Alone,' ' showing at West's. ? -k ? 1-s HOSE were the days of the custard pie comedies. and the Pav presented at the same time '?Gambling Rube.' a Kevsione comedy. (Recently a ; film 'Hollywood CavaJcade' has been completed by Fox. and in it ?, the old Keystone comedies are given i prominence.) ] On the afternoon of Septem ber 4. exactly a month after the outbreak of war, a 'monster war fund programme by the whole of the artists appearing in Adelaide under the manage ment of J. C. Williamson Ltd.. Hugh D. Mclnlosh, and Ben J. Fuller' was presented at the Theatre Royal One name has been missing from ' this article But here it is Charlie Chaplin appeared at the Pav in 'The Knockout.' (Now he's work ing on a different kind of 'knock- out' — a film dealing with dictators).

The next show at the Pav. was another Keystone comedy, one that promised well if the audience were not too superior in their sense of humor. 'Caught In Tights' was the title. From September 24 to November 21 the films included Asta Nielsen in 'Vengeance is Mine' (Wests), Oliver Goldsmith's 'She Stoops to Conquer'' (West's). Shakespeare's 'Anthony and Cleopatra' (West's), and Ford Sterling (who died re cently) in 'Love and Vengeance' (Pav). At the Theatre Royal Bert Bailey - still going strong and famous as 'Dad' ? and company was present ing 'What Happened to Mary'; and at the Hippodrome the Bohemian Dramatic Company cut loose with 'Ned Kelly and his Gang.' 'Dick Turpin.' and 'Captain Starlight, or Robbery Under Arms' 'CapU Star light is the .subject of a film now showing at an Adelaide theatre). * * ? BUT the highlight of enter tainment in those first few months came m November when Melba herseli sang at a sreat patriotic concert at the Ex hibition Building Reserved seats were Cl 1'. and unreserved 10-6. Films showing on Novembei 25 included 'The Worker's Way,' which cost a whole £11.000 and was produced by the Swedish Biograpb. Co Sut there was 'The Spitfire.' loo. We can end our article with a quotation from the ad vertisement for this film 'This is a thrilling tale ol the theft of a yacht, a case of jewels, and a heart. The lead ing character is portrayed by Carlyle Blackwell. a famous American actor, who is also re garded a.* the most handsome photo player in the United Stages.'

BERT BAILEY

BERT BAILEY

SIR BENJAMIN FULLER (left); Hugh D. Mclntosh, as he was years ago (centre); Peter Dawson eight.

SIR BENJAMIN FULLER (left); Hugh D. Mclntosh, as he was years ago (centre); Peter Dawson eight.

_ ABOVE. — Does anyone need to be told it's Charlie Chaplin? Below. Dame Nellie Melba.

_ ABOVE. — Does anyone need to be told it's Charlie Chaplin? Below. Dame Nellie Melba.

IV. C. FIELDS, as he appeared in a recent film.

IV. C. FIELDS, as he appeared in a recent film.

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down