Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

1 correction by Brooksie - Show corrections

XTalk atom, Town

oMgru IlkmueMs, xwui Lo£?ip.

(p&OplsLQfL J/ulW&wa,

They're Hard Doers In This State!

'TN South Australia 10 women mean to contest ?*? Parliament, campaigning against betting shops and liquor permits, writes columnist Peter Persnur kus. in the 'Sydney Sun.'

'The country ol the Crow-Eaters is a land oi brave and bold men, who require statutory law to rein them against their vices,' he continued. 'Sydney suburbs, we know, have no need of Par liamentary enactments to keep husbands in order. No married man is ever a dollar short in what he brings home. When you find him out after hours, he talks of suicide rather than face the wife. 'Those fellows in Adelaide, who evoke a Wives' Party in Parliament— what hard doers they must be!' 'Double Play ' in Cricket THERE was a regular baseball 'double play' in the New Zealand cricket match, the ball being thrown to each end in turn, when Waite and Ward got mixed up in running. Ward was yards out of his ground when hijs stumps were put down; but the umpires decided that Waite had already been run out, and thus the ball was dead. One woman who was barracking for the visitors, and evidently knew more about the winter game, could hardly be persuaded that the batsmen were not both out. Tindill, the New Zealand 'keeper, was known in England, his comrades say, as 'the whispering wicket-keeper,' his appeals outdoing even Old field's in politeness. How Noted Tenor Discovered His Voice IF he had not fallen off a horse, Charles Benson, now a radio tenor, who has been heard over national stations this week, might never have discovered his voice. He learned of the unsus pected qualities of his voice during a long Period when he lay paralysed from spinal injuries suffered in the falL Mr Benson was a sultana grower at Mildura. and it was while he was engaged in this occupa tion that he met with the accident. Stricken with paralysis, Mr. Benson was taken to Sydney and examined by Macquarie street specialists and over seas professors, who at the time were attending a medical conference. His life was despaired of, and, expecting death, he took his family with him and went to a Tasmanian health resort. Whiling away the hours while he lay in bed. Mr. Benson used to practise singing, and after many months, his condition gradually improved until he was finally able to walk. Still training his voice, Mr. Benson began singing in public, and after giv ing recitals in Launceston and Hobart, he was ad vised to continue his studies overseas. Later he went to America and London, where he studied with Maggie Teyte and Blanche Mar chesi. He secured many engagements, in ton five year stay, and, now back in Australia, has proved an outstanding success as a radio artist. 'Hot as Blast Furnace' AFTER the battle of tactics in Parliament on the Five-year Parliaments Bill, during the debate on which' a number of withering rejoinders was re corded, tempers of members became a little strained this week. Even the Premier -Mr. Butler), usually un ruffled, showed signs of heat in defending the agree ment with the Broken Hill Proprietary Co., which, it is hoped, will lead to the establishment of a blast furnace. After some hot exchanges, Mr. Dale (A.L.P.. Adelaide) interjected:— 'Steady, now. you'll soon be as hot as a blast furnace.' And the Premier's smile returned. St. Peter's Mayors as M.Ps. 'VfANY members of Parliament have found muni ?*?'- cipal life a useful training ground for politics. This has been particularly noticeable in the St Peters Council, where three of the last four mayors have risen to Parliamentary rank. Mr. F. H. Stacey, M.H.R., who was recently re elected to the Adelaide seat in the Federal elections, was Mayor of St. Peters a few years ago, and he was succeeded in the mayoral chair by Mr. F. T. Perry, MJ3. The present' mayor (Mr. E. H. Han naford) served in Parliament some years ago, and he will be a candidate for Torrena at the State elections next year. This liking for Parliamentary honors is not con fined to the most recent St. Peters mayors. Ex Mayor Wilson became a senator after his term in the council, and Mr. A. T. Sutton, a former mayor of the town, was another successful aspirant for Parliament. Highest City Point A CCORDING to records kept by the R.A.A., th« highest point within the area administered by the Adelaide City Council is the land at Victoria Park Racecourse near where the grandstand is erected. Many people have a mistaken idea that the residential area of North Adelaide is the highest point, but it has been explained that the sharp rise in that direction gives an illusion of height, where as the more gentle slopes towards the eastern bor der of the city is slightly greater although less noticeable. Cockerline Line Line-Up 'POCKERLINE Line Liner' sounds euphonious, ^ doesn't it (writes a correspondent)! At Port Adelaide this week a friend said to me. 'A Cocker line Line Liner — the Germanic— is at No. 2 Quay.' I gaped. 'A what?' 1 queried. My friend repeated what he had said, got tangled up, and then with the aid of a Lloyd's Register of Shipping explained that Sir Walter Cockerline, of Hult operated a line of ships from Hull. Not con tent with that Sir Walter had given his name to the line. 'Oh, 1 get it,' 1 oaid to my friend. 'Kind of a line-up, eh?'

Dance Band Leader Went to Sea FROM dance band leader to mate of a ship is the step that has been taken by Mr. Tom Garnaut. He formerly conducted a dance band in Adelaide, and now is mate of a Bass Strait schooner. When 14 Mr. Garnaut followed his father's occu pation — the sea. But he also became a musician, and six years later stayed ashore at Adelaide and founded a dance band. However, the call of the sea was too strong, and he subsequently abandoned his 10-piece orchestra to tread the deck again, and is mate on the 160-ton schooner Milleeta. Now he is not sure which rhythm he likes better — the swish of the sea or the music of the band. Town Hall Identity 'T'HERE is one man. who never misses a rose show x in Adelaide. He is Mr. Alan Schulte, who sits in the inquiry desk in the foyer of the Ade laide Town Hall. He is well known to town hall visitors with his grey hair, blue eyes, and school boy complexion. Mr. Schulte cannot be induced to exhibit roses in a show, but he has some fine blooms in his garden, for rose growing is his pet hobby. He sometimes discusses the wavs of roses with Mr. E. L. War ner, also of the town hall, who exhibits and takes prizes nearly every year. It is 22 years since Mr. Schulte was first employed at the town hall, and four years since he has occu pied his position in the inquiry desk. He knows the name and position of everyone employed there, besides knowing them ^11 by sight, and has seen many lord mayors come and go. He knows exactly where everyone's room is, and you have only to mention a name for him to say with the rapidity of a machine-gun, 'Straight down the passage, turn to the right before the glass doors, along the passage, turn to the left, and the first door on your right.' And then he often has to watch the inquirer going straight through the glass doors and turning to the left instead. Few people can follow directions correctly, he says.

Evergreen SHELVED for '.hree years, the film On Our Selec tion, is to so the round again. According to Mr. Gordon D. Ellis, general manager in Sydney of Associated Distributors Ltd., new copies will be made and issued all over Australia immediately. The play and film that made Bert Bailey famous and earned him £200,000, is expected to make box office records. On a recent try-out at Launceston, it broke five-year-old records. For over 20 years Bert Bailey has played On Our Selection on the stage. Whenever he re turned from England and booked a Melbourne theatre for a long run with a new play, he in variably had to fill in the time with 'Selection.' There is a possibility that Bailey may make an other Steele Rudd story in Australia. The Unknown Warrior TN Westminster Abbey this week thousands of -*- people, after attending the Armistice Day cere mony at the Cenotaph, reverently filed past the tomb of the Unknown Warrior. Many of them have forgotten or are ignorant of the circumstances that took to LondoVi that war-battered body from the battlefields of France 17 years ago. Few people today realise that there were actually six bodies of soldiers dug up from nameless graves in order that the Unknown Warrior might be selected. Bodies were taken from graves on six different sectors of the fighting area — Ypres salient, the Marne, Arras, Cambrai, and two points farther south. No one knew whose bodies they were^ — humble privates ? or men of high rank; soldiers, sailors, or airmen. Each body was placed in a coffin, each coffin being of identical size and pattern. The coffins were then placed in a row in a hut and covered with Union Jacks, and the door was locked. On the following morning an officer who had not seen the arrival of the cortege or any of the coffins was asked to unlock the hut, enter, and place his hand on a coffin. The one he touched contained the body of the Unknown Warrior and the other five were re-buried. Draped with a Union Jack the coffin was placed on the deck of a British destroyer at Boulogne, carried across the Channel, and with guns thun dering a salute entered the harbor at Dover. On Armistice Day, 1920, after an impressive religious service in the Abbey, it was lowered into the tomb. The idea of a shrine to an unknown warrior ap pealed to other nations. France, Italy, and the United States followed the example of Britain. Subsequently the Unknown Warrior was to inspire writers in various countries and plays and novels were written round the theme. '

Good Beer And Romantic History A MONG pleasures which particularly intrigued -'- the New Zealand cricketers during their Eng lish tour was a hotel picturesquely called The Road to Jerusalem Inn, portions of which date back to the times of the Crusades. The New Zealanders, according to confessions made in Adelaide, appre ciated The Road to Jerusalem Inn for two reasons — its historical interest and the excellence of the beer brewed on the premises. Numbers of English inns, it appears, still make their own stockin trade. With the Road to Jerusalem Inn, the beer, about which several of the New Zealanders rhapsodied, is not served in the ordinary run — or flow — of cus tom. And as special visitors, the cricketers were privileged to savor samples. The inn is built against a cliff containing a cave, and it is in one of these caves that the beer is brewed. In earlier days the caves served a grim mer purpose. There remains evidence that they were used for the uncomfortable detention of priso ners for whom security was evidently rated above comfort. 'Anglo-Japanese Alliance' r*APT. H. Uoyama, master of the Japanese ^ steamer Yaye Maru which reached Port Ade laide from Yokohama this week, is the soul of cheeriness. He sees humor in everything, and dearly loves a practical joke. One of his favorite pranks is to effect what he most appropriately de scribes as an 'Anglo-Japanese alliance.' This is done whenever he has visitors whom he has not entertained before. First he produces a bottle of Japanese lemonade and asks his guests to sample the favorite drink of the ladies of Japan. This invariably gives the uninitiated the impression that the captain's cabin, like some mayoral parlors, is 'dry.' After the visitor has sipped the lemonade and expressed his approval, Capt, Uoyama produces a bottle of whisky of a well-known British brand, and into the lemonade he pours as much spirits as desired. The 'Anglo-Japanese alliance' thus achieved makes a most pleasant and refreshing leverage. Many Reports Here On Truck Mystery l^VTDENCE of the intense interest taken through ^ out Australia in the Victorian truck murder mystery is shown by the many reports received from citizens at the C.LB., Adelaide. Since the murder, reports have been received daily from per sons believing they have information that will assist the police in finding a solution. Even after the announcement that the truck and the body of its driver, Demsey, had been found, occasional re ports came to hand from, citizens who stated that they had seen the truck or a man answering Dem sey's description in Adelaide. No fewer than six anonymous communications have been received from one man on the subject. The messages show the writer's illiteracy, and de tectives have found it difficult to decipher them. In all big crimes it is usual for the police to be inundated with reports and anonymous letters from persons anxious to assist, but very rarely is any clue obtained. A good example of this is the mys tery of the pyjama-clad girl, whose body was found near Albury three years ago. In a very short period detectives investigating the crime had big files of letters from persons claiming 'inside infor mation.' In Adelaide about three years ago, following the disappearance of a woman, . the same thing occcurred. Persons claiming to have clairvoyant powers declared that they could provide the solu tion, but the mystery has never been solved. Another Case of Mistaken Identity A WOMAN, who was ordered in the Adelaide Local Court this week to pay 3/- a fortnight off her baker's bill of £3, mistook the solicitor appearing for the bakery as the baker himself. 'Tell your man not to leave bread for me when I put out a note' she told the solicitor, much to the amusement of the court. How a Little Hollywood Is Being Established HOW a 'Little Hollywood' is being established at Bondi Junction (New South Wales) was told   by Mr. H. C. Chapman, special representative of Cinesound Productions Ltd., who was in Adelaide this week for the South Australian premiere of Tall Timbers. Several years ago On Our Selection was made by the company in studios that were little more than huts with hessian walls. Now elaborate studios had been erected at Bondi Junction and all the latest equipment was used, he said. Previously filming of pictures was often inter rupted by bad weather conditions, but modern ideas had overcome this problem. Now the various sets were built and then taken to pieces and packed away. If exterior filming was spoiled by rain the company simply went to the studios, dragged out the specially made sets, and went on screen ing. Like Hollywood, it was mostly work and no play in the Cinesound studios. Filming took place from 8 am. to late in the evening, even on Satur days. If a day's work yielded three minutes of completed film they counted it a good day. Not All It Seemed 'q^HE Rev. A. D. McCutcheon, superintendent of -1- the Port Adelaide Central Methodist Mission, is never at a loss for a story to illustrate any point which he wishes to emphasise. He told the following anecdote at the opening this week of an extension to the Port Adelaide Free Kindergarten. The purpose was to warn people about becoming mechanical. According to Mr. McCutcheon, a clergyman who was staying at a farmhouse was delighted upon awakening to hear the lady of the house devoutly singing a hymn as she cooked the breakfast. Later he congratulated the woman upon her piety and mentioned that he had neard her singing the hymn. Imagine his surprise when she replied, 'I always sing that when I am boiling eggs — two verses for soft boiled and three for hard-boiled!' One of Australia's Smallest Racehorses t? ATHER a surprising statement was made by an American journalist. Bud Burmester, in Mel bourne after the VJl.C. carnival at Flemington. He said that no matter how good The Trump's record wa-= in Australia, handicappers in America tvould probably assess the Heroic gelding's weight in any handicap at about 7 2 after they had seen him. The Trump is one of the smallest horses to win the Melbourne Cup (he carried 8 5), being only 15.1 high. Mr. Burmester. an Australian by birth, has been in America for 25 years. Ajax, winner of the Linlithgow Stakes, impressed Mr. Burmester, who said that the three-year-old would probably hold his own with the best horses in America. Back to Normal Y\7ITH al! the excitement of the Melbourne Cup v* over, track watchers at Morphettville and Victoria Park are beginning to settle down again and take more notice of local happenings than Melbourne form, which had commanded theii attentions for six weeks or so. Track work has become more interesting and brighter with the advent of metropolitan meetings again, and all the best horses have resumed train ing. Whereas the Victorian carnival has practically finished, the racing in this State will attract plenty of interest, because of the big races to be decided at Cheltenham at Christmas time Now loca! tracks will be hives of activities each mornine. and jockeys, track watchers, and trainers will be working at their top from early hours in the mornina till late at night. Racins is full of surprises, and that is one of the attractions to all concerned in the sport of kings. Some track watchers have burnt the mid night oil in search of winners which would yield good returns for their investments.

'I just HAVE to whittle, sir'

'I just HAVE to whittle, sir'

Sir Ernest Fisk, chairman of directors of Amal gamated Wireless (Australasia) Ltd., who said that in 10 years in most countries every home would have a television set.

Sir Ernest Fisk, chairman of directors of Amal gamated Wireless (Australasia) Ltd., who said that in 10 years in most countries every home would have a television set.

Mr. H. G. Wells, noted author, who said this week that the real danger of war in Europe would he in 1940-41. He also said that the British monarchy was out of date.

Mr. H. G. Wells, noted author, who said this week that the real danger of war in Europe would he in 1940-41. He also said that the British monarchy was out of date.

Brig.-Gen. Price Weir, who has been elected chairman of the Father Adelaide Christmas Fund for the 1 5 th year in succession.

Brig.-Gen. Price Weir, who has been elected chairman of the Father Adelaide Christmas Fund for the 1 5 th year in succession.

Mr. K. C. Wilson, one of South Australia's neiV repre sentatives in the Senate. He was elected ai the recent Federal elections.

Mr. K. C. Wilson, one of South Australia's neiV repre sentatives in the Senate. He was elected ai the recent Federal elections.

Father Divine, Ncqro preacher, whose 'Super-Super Heaven'' in New York was burnt to the ground this week. The fire was j the climax of a series of misfortunes suffered by the preacher recently.

Father Divine, Ncqro preacher, whose 'Super-Super Heaven'' in New York was burnt to the ground this week. The fire was j the climax of a series of misfortunes suffered by the preacher recently.

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down