Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

No corrections yet

BRITISH FILM

LOSSES

_

!. -

In the past six months outside capi-

tal, from th« city, commercial and - private sources, estimated at £3,600,000, has been enlisted for British film production. There is a grave danger of most of this money being lost, writes a correspondent of the London "Daily Express."

Two millions disappeared in th« liquidation of film companies that fol« lowed the disastrous 1928-9 boom.

Thc estimated average cost of pro- ducing a film at Elstree is already higher than Hollywood's. Few big films are now made in this country for under £70,000. Yet the possible yield in revenue from British thea- tres is actually below that sum. As yet only 7 per cent, of Britain's pro- duct is penetrating the American market.

HIGHLY PAID STARS

Films are being made here to-day that cost between £100,000 and £140,000, and have shown gross box office receipts of £40,000 and less. .

Studio inefficiency absorbs a great deal of the money. One Aim was sent back to bo re-shot three times. Fin- ally it cost £70,000. It cannot hope to earn £30,000.

Importation of American stars at high prices, with all expenses paid and income tax free, is another alarm- ing budget item.

This boom is a result of amazing profits made by a handful of impor- tant productions in 1934. "The Pri- vate Lif" of Henry VIII." cost £65,000 to make. Film-goers through- out the world have already paid «7750,000 to see it.

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down