Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

2 corrections, most recently by Hughesdarren - Show corrections

GEOGHI GORGE, WHERE "PIGEON," THE NOTORIOUS ABORIGINAL OUTLAW WAS SHOT.

THE ROYAL MAIL COACH AT CHESTNUT TREE CAMP.

ON THE FITZROY RIVER  

The lover of travel in a little known country would find his heart's desire in a journey into the heart of the West Kimberley country along the banks of the Fitzroy River. Through pastoral coun- try and across heavy plains, the traveller follows the course of the river, which, during portion of the year, is but a small

ANOTHER VIEW OF GEOGHI GORGE SHOWING CLIFFS 200 FEET HIGH.

stream, but in flood time runs a banker. Alone this river bank many a miner "humped his bluey" as he made all haste to the new goldfields at Hall's Creek in the eighties-a rush which resulted in many a man's bones being left to bleach in the tropical sun at a spot where he ended his journey through exhaustion. On either side of the river stations have grown, upon which cattle and sheep are reared. Hundreds of miles away from

the metropolis and any city, the men who live their lonely lives out there seldom see a traveller on pleasure bent, and less often one who carries a camera. During last spring Mr. H. J. Green made a trip along the river, and by the aid of his camera has given us an idea of what the country is like. On this page we repro- duce some views which Mr. Green took during the trip.

The first place of interest which the

Royal Mail coach reached after leaving the coast is "Hobby's Well." where Mr. J. Hayes has a very fine garden, which he irrigates from three wells. He grows all kinds of vegetables, and from ihis source Derby receives its supplies. Yeda Sta- tion is somewhat further along the river. It is owned by Mr. J. H. Game, a resi- dent of the old country, and is managed bv Mr. Galbraith. On the run there are 15.000 head of cattle. The hands com

prise three whites and ten blacks. Be- tween Yeda Station and Lower Liveringa Station plenty of game-consisting of turkey and kangaroo-is obtainable. The latter station is the headquarters of Mr. P. D. Hutton, the general manager for Messrs. Forrrest, Emanuel and Co., who own considerable property on the Fitzroy. Roughly, the station includes 100,000 acres. It carries 20,000 sheep, including two stud flocks, mainly bred from South

Australian sheep. Drafts of stud rams are annually imported from Messrs. Mur- ray, Hawker Bros., and other well-known breeders. Mount Anderson, the next station, is owned by Mr. G. C. Rose, and managed by Mr. Logue It consists of over 20,000 acres and carries a consider- able quantity of sheep. McLarty's Up ner Liveringa Station, owned by the Kimberley Pastoral Co., adjoins Mount Anderson, and is managed by Mr. Percy

Rose. It is one of the largest runs on the Fitzroy River. It comprises one million acres and carries 90,000 sheep and 4.000 head of cattle. About ten whites and thirty blacks are employed on the station. "Noon-ku-bor," the next run, carries 75,000 sheep, some horses, and a few head of cattle. In turn, Quanbunn Station and Jubilee Downs Station are crossed before the Brooking Creek Station homestead is reached.

A REACH OF THE RIVER NEAR GEOGHI GORGE.  

This is more generally known as Fitzroy Crossing. There is a small hotel there, and the station runs 4,000 head of cattle. Of this homestead a view is given. Gogo Station, six miles from the crossing. em- braces 1,750,000 acres. Fossil Downs Station is also illustrated. It is 33 miles from the Crossing, and carries 15,000 head of cattle. "Oscar Range" and 'Leo- pold Downs" are other large stations within reasonable distance of the Cros

sing. The traveller finds a warm wel- come all along the river. The scenery is, in parts, magnificent. At the Geoghi Gorge, where the Margaret and Fitzroy rivers meet, it is truly grand. The na- tives are a source of worry to the station people, and cattle spearing is a frequent occurrence. Two views are given of Geoghi Gorge. It was at this spot that the notorious outlaw "Pigeon" was shot some four years ago. after successfully

eluding his pursuers for three years. The spot is about 20 miles from the Fitzroy Crossing.

The country provides one of the chief sources of the meat supply of the State and has a splendid future before it.

An enterprising dairyman advertises that he "is prepared to offer milk and   fresh eggs from sound, healthy cows."

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down