Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

2 corrections, most recently by anonymous - Show corrections

This oil won £300

By ARNOLD SHORE

The Dunlop fourth annual art contest takes

pride of place among the six shows on view in Melbourne.

The £1,000 offered is again divided into six oil and five water - color prizes, with a special concession award of £50

to a still-life study by Reshid Bey.  

The major prize of £300 was awarded to Laurie Pendlebury, Mel- bourne artist, for his sober, well - considered landscape study "Late Afternoon, Rhyll."

Pendlebury, above,         with Sir Dallas Brooks, Governor, beside the win- ning entry at Tye's Gal-

lery, has won awards in a number of these annual Dunlop competitions.

Arthur Boyd, young representative in the present generation of the well-known artist family of Boyd, collected the second prize of £200.

His "Timber Clearing Near Eaglehawk" is typi- cally Australian with, as much of his present work shows, a curious link be- tween present - day thought and that of some of our very early painters.

Max Ragless, of South Australia; Max Middle- ton, Victoria; Howard Ashton, N.S.W.; and Lawrence Daws, Victoria,

collected the other oil  

awards.

Len Annois won the top award for water- colors with a distin- guished study of the Pentland Hills near Bacchus Marsh.

Jacquelin Hick, S.A.; Catherine Jarvis, W.A.; John Loxton, Vic; and H. Gallop, N.S.W., won the other water-color prizes.

Some 900 paintings from every State of the Commonwealth were en- tered.

Al least 500 were of poor standard. Will Ash- ton, John Rowell, and myself know this only   too well, being the judges.

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down