Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

No corrections yet

JAP. CAPTURE OF KIANG-WAN

Y

Cantpnese Defenders Die to Last Man

WITHOUT FOOD AND WATER FOR DAYS

FIERCEST FIGHTING DURING THE CAMPAIGN

SHANGHAI, Sunday Afternoon (5 p.m.)

? . .?

The battle of Kiang-Wan has ended as the most sanguinary encounter dunng the Sino-Japanese hostilities.

Surrounded by a fierce horde, a small band of Chinese, numbering a few hun- dred, and lacking food and water, withstood incessant bombardment for over a week, and fought practically to the last man behind the ancient Chinese village wall, inflict- ing heavy casualties on the Japanese before annihilation.

The Japanese flag is now floating over the ruins of Kiang-Wan village, where the dead lie in hundreds after the fiercest hand-to-hand fighting during the present

campaign.

The stubborn resistance of the Cantonese defenders had stayed the Japanese ad- vance for three days, preventing strengthening of the line, while the'flanking move-

ments eventually hemmed the village.

Japanese official casualties during the capture of the village were 84 dead, 109 wounded, while the Chines defenders, numbering approximately 500, arc lying dead

amid indescribable shambles.

THEFALLOFKIANG-WAN

Yesterday afternoon, after a week's guerilla warfare ana terrille artillery pounding, three Japanese companies ot picked mea rushed the remnants of the Chinese1 defenders.

Th Chinese fought with extreme cour- age, withstanding the bayouel charges, ,und inflicting severe casualties with machine guns. They faced the Japan- ese in a hund-to-nand ba'Ule, realising that all retreat' was severed aud thal their lives must be torfelted. ( ( ,

Attacking on three sides, the Japan- ese followed the heavy artillery .boni; ba'rdment, charging the walled village, leaping on each ether's backs, and scal- ing the ruined fortifications.

J apúnese tanks led the advance, smashing their way through the ancient walls and pouring a deadly hail into the ruined houses where the Chinese .le

fenders were hidden.

Weakened by thirst and hunger, th« Chinese fought with the terooity ot tigers, hurling hand grenades and i>our ing machine gun and rifle tire into the advancing Japanese.

The bagged, desperate men laced the Japanese onslaught, wilting gradua'.iy under the terrille bombardment.

The picturesque Japanese charge was led by Coloael Huyashi, who followed the standard bearer. Leaping the Chinese entrenchments outside ".he wulla through which the Japanese taiiKs moved.ponderously, the infantry fought

.their way through the blackened.ruin5, ' meeting: the Chinese in ferocious com-, bat. Flinging themselves against ti.'

ruined walls, the Japanese clambered .across piles of dead, winning their way

to "the main compound, where the las:

stand was made by the Chinese.

A few minutes later the Japanese flag floated over the village, ending the battle of Kiang-Wan, the bloodiest en- counter in the present campaign.

A few prisoners who were taken, told a story of the miseries endured during tlio last few days. Water was prac- tically finished ai>d ammunition sup- plies were meagre. They reulised that It was a light to a finish wncn they

were surrounded.

The Japauese paid a tribute to the defonders. "As lighters, they "were equal to anything, but our artillery, a superior organisation, eventually told." suited General Uyeda.

The Japanese olliciully staled that the casualties since the commencement of the campaign are 210 dead, 1,500

wounded.

The Chinese casualties are unknown, I

but they are infinitely more.

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down