Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

1 correction by doug.butler - Show corrections

"GOOD-BYE TO   THE MUSIC"  

The premiere of Sumner Locke Elliott's three-act romantic comedy, "Good-bye to the Music," was given a heartening reception at the Independent Theatre last night.

The comedy is a considerable ad- vance on Mr. Locke-Elliott's Three previous plays produced by Doris Fitton. The solution is neat, even if the last scene itself could be stronger.

The plot conforms to a somewhat conventional pattern, but if the characters are "stock," the skilful dia- logue gives them an appealing fresh-

ness.

The play concerns a pianist who has forsaken his music because of a sudden brainstorm on the public platform, and because he has been deserted by his wife. He suddenly regains his desire to play, when another woman-herself devoted to her own career-takes an interest in his music.

Frances Dillon gave an excellent, if over-exuberant, performance as the boarding-house keeper. Gwen Plumb, as Myrtle, the maid, almost stole the comedy honours.

John Alden had the role of the pianist, Charles Spillman, but he did not always convey the type of man described by his wife. Claudia Spill- man was capably played by Molly Brown. A little more confidence was needed by Irene Thirkell in handling the role of the career-woman in love. The cast also included the playwright himself, Phyllis Coghlan, Dorothy Whiteley, and Harvey Ross-Buchanan.

"Good-bye to the Music" will be pro- duced every Friday night, Saturday afternoon and evening until further notice.  

Digitisation generously supported by
Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation
Digitisation generously supported by

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down