Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

4 corrections, most recently by Bjenks - Show corrections

THE WATERLOO OUTRAGE  

TRIAL OF THE PRISONERS.

At the Central Criminal Court yesterday, before his Honor     Mr Justice Windeyer, the trial of the prisoners concerned   in the Waterloo outrage was continued. William Hill,     George Duffy, William Newman, Michael Donnellan,         Thomas Oscroft, Joseph Martin, William Royce, Hugh         Miller, Robert George Read, George Keegan, and Michael     Mangan were charged for that they did, on the 9th of   September, at Waterloo, ravish and carnally know Mary Jane Hicks against her consent.

Mr. Teece, with him Mr. Pring instructed by Mr Wil-   liams, Crown Solicitor, appeared for the prosecution.  

Messrs. Elles and Scholes, instructed by Mr. Gannon, ap-   peared for Oscroft, Martin, Miller, Keegan, and Newman;      

Mr. Gibson, instructed by Mr. Gannon, appeared for Hill       and Mangan; Mr. O'Mara, instructed by Mr. H. Levien, for Read; Mr Moriarty, instructed by Mr. M. William- son (Williamson and Williamson), for Boyce; Mr Cana-   way for Duffy, and Mr. Edmunds for Donnellan, both

instructed by Mr Williamson.

Mr Gibson, on behalf of Mangan, called the following  

witnesses.

Henry Young said that on the date of the outrage he was working at Waterloo from 7 o'clock until 5; the prisoner     Mangan was employed carting sand from the place until   3 o'clock in the afternoon, when he was taken away to do   other work for a Mr Harden; Mangan was not out of   witness's sight for more than a quarter of an hour or 20  

minutes at a time.

Corroborative evidence was given by John Fowler, Andrew Russell, and Walter Harden.    

Henry Bryant Howe was called as a witness for Hill  

He deposed that Hill had been in the employment of the   Locomotive Tramway Department as a cleaner for three   years, during which time he bore an excellent character.    

Corroborative evidence was given by George Rose.  

A number of certificates as to character were also put in  

on behalf of Hill.

Mr. Canaway called the following witnesses on behalf of Duffy, and they each gave the prisoner a good character:- John Armstrong, Walter Kerr, William Trevellyan, John           Bennett, and Alice Duffy.  

Matthew Doran, a man who described himself as a dealer, gave evidence regarding an intimacy which he alleged existed at one time between himself and the com- plainant Mary Jane Hicks. The evidence was of a dis- gusting character, and the witness was severely cross-   examined by Mr Teece.

Evidence was also given by Charles Moon, Constable Begg, and Michael Willis after which Edwin Endicot,  

foreman of the works at Waterloo, at which Mangan had been employed, gave evidence to the effect that Mangan was working on the day of the outrage.

The Rev. T. J. Curtis, called by Mr. Gibson on behalf of Hill, deposed that he had known Hill for a number of years, and could say that he had always borne an excellent

character.

Evidence was given by Drs. O'Connor and Brownless and Thomas Stapleton (dispenser in Darlinghurst Gaol), respecting Donnellan's condition during the time he was on remand in the gaol.

Honora Donnellan, mother of the prisoner Donnellan, de- posed that at 3 o'clock on the afternoon of the outrage he

was at home.

Mary M'Mahon, the prisoner's aunt, corroborated this

statement.  

Evidence was also given by Helen Burns, Helen Don- nellan, A. Hutton, John Carrol, and John Adams to show that they had seen Donnellan between 3 and 4 o'clock on the day of the outrage.

Mr Ellis then called evidence on behalf of the prisoner

Oscroft.

John Price, greengrocer, residing at Redfern, deposed that in September Oscroft was in his employment, and on   the date of the outrage he was home having his dinner between 1 and 2 o'clock, he did not leave again until half-past 2 o'clock, at which time he went out with a cart to sell vegetables; witness saw him again at 4 o'clock

that afternoon.

Jane Guthrie gave corroborative evidence.

William Beer gave evidence to the effect that he saw Oscroft at about 11 o'clock on the date in question, and also again in the evening.

Jane Tracey deposed that she saw Oscroft between 1 and   2 o'clock, and also between 5 and 6 o'clock, on the date of   the outrage he was selling vegetables.

Mr Moriarty called evidence on behalf of the prisoner

Boyce.

John Dawson, living at Waterloo, deposed that he met   the prisoner Boyce in Elizabeth-street at 25 minutes to 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the outrage.

Alfred Angas deposed that he saw Boyce at the corner of Buckland and George streets Redfern, at ten minutes to 2 o'clock in the afternoon of the outrage, as he was returning to work. Similar evidence was given by William Mason. Other witnesses, including the prisoner's mother and father, gave evidence to the effect that he was at home between 2 and 3 o'clock on the date in question, and that he sold some fowls to a young man in the yard during the afternoon.

Mr Ellis then called evidence on behalf of Miller and Keegan.

Elizabeth Miller, stepmother to the prisoner Miller, deposed that he was at home having dinner between 1 and 2 o'clock on the day of the outrage.

William Foster, a youth, gave evidence to the effect that       he met the prisoner Keegan in Phillip and Elizabeth streets on the date in question at about 2 o'clock, and remained in his company till 5 o'clock that evening.  

Other witnesses were called to prove that they met   Miller and Keegan at different times during the afternoon in which the outrage was committed.  

Mr O'Mara called evidence on behalf of the prisoner

Read.

Charles Good, fellmonger, Thomas Alderson (of the firm   of Alderson and Sons), and James Peter Howe gave evidence to the effect that Read had been in their employ-   ment for some time, and that he had borne an excellent  

character.

At this stage the Court adjourned until 9 o'clock this morning.  

Digitisation generously supported by
Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation
Digitisation generously supported by

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down