Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

1 correction by C.Weber - Show corrections

SELF-CONFIDENCE IS VITAL

"Bluey" Wilkinson's Record

SELF-CONFIDENCE is a vital factor for success, especially in a sport   like dirt track speedway racing. Almost from his debut "Bluey" Wilkinson had it. Proof— first took to the game in   1928 at his home town, Bathurst (N.S.W.). He had ridden only there, and once at a smaller country centre, when next year he decided to throw his helmet in the English ring. Un- heralded, and certainly unsung, he came, saw, rode, and conquered. And

West Ham, the first team to engage him for a season, has had him for every English season since. The status of this speedway is best indicated by the fact that for a final and rubber deciding Test match, it has had a crowd of 82,000. "Bluey," a compact little chap — even his leathers cannot obscure a splendid physique— has ridden in every official   Test match since 1929, with the excep- tion of two in 1930; and in '33 he scored the highest individual total. He   has won what was styled as a world's   championship, staged in Paris; and this Australian season he has proved himself the finest rider on the world-famous Empire Speedway at Sydney.   No Sign of it Yet THAT new pavilion at the Sydney Cricket Ground has- not been com menced. yet. Every brick in the old pavilion still stands. Even the Trustees' cottage reposes as snugly and smugly as usual, with the flower beds, refreshed by the latest showers, blooming un aware of the hicorioclast in the back ground. Now An Angler 'VTOW 66 years old and back to his native Australia for the second time within- a year, is S. F. Edge, a world leader -in motor racing of the old days, and probably the most, famous Australian speedster of all time. He started driving in France in 1895, and his most famous achieve ments wero the winning from France of the classic Gordon Bennett Cup in 1902; the world's 24-hour record (1581& miles) five years later ; and double twelve 'record in 1918. On an average he drives 30,000 miles a year, and his aggregate mileage is over a million. This time he is here to fish for trout in Tasmania. He has fished . every where, and believes Australia offers the best sport — hence tlie visit. Back To Good Health A FTEIt a month's absence front the water front, due to ill-health, George Robinson, of Balmain, cele brated his recovery on February 9 by winning the 18ft handicap of the . Syd ney Flying Squadron with his veteran craft, Britannia. The craft sailed like a witch in the puffy sou'-east breeze, and later when the wind died away to feather strength. It was certainly a remarkable exhibition of sailing as Robinson's charge scored the easiest win of the season, defeating Furious by 4min 5sec. The success was popular, as it was Britannia's first for the season. It de monstrated that the craft is in lino for the blue ribbon of Fort Jackson and at Easter she will go to Tort Macquarle to defend the championship won there in 1934. Robinson, in his youth, won fame as a Rugby League scrum-half for Bal main, and, ? in addition, won State honors. He has also officiated ? as ,rs£» eree. . 'Will Even Surpass, Crawford !' 'rtOTTFRIED VON CRAMM will ? * succeed F. J. Perry as ? amateur tennis champion of the world this year.' Thus forecasts Tilden in one of those sweeping statements for which he is famous in tho tennis world. . 'Von Crarnm will sweep5 everything before , him this season,' adds Tilden. 'He- will, even surpass Crawford, .the best amateur on the courts 'to-jday.' So-Tllden goes bill To the' American, Von VCramm and' Crawford, are 'the only first-class amateurs ? left.' The rest, we are solemnly assured, have been- ruined 'by the terrific-, tension under which tliey play to-day. — Lon- don 'Daily Telegraph.' He's Like Old Wine ?pATSY HENDREN, who made a ccn^ ? tury against British' Guiana for the M.C.C. team, is one of the perennial youths of cricket. Born on- February 6. 1889, Patsy is 46 years of age, or eleven or twelve years older than that retired veteran, Mr.' Billy Ponsford, of Melbourne. Patsy is more hilarious with the bat now than he was in the thirties. '- There -is a bit of the old wine element about him.' Years, hence he may be able to say what Tom Reece, the English wit of billiards, said: 'I have, arrived at the age 'of fifty-three, and I can truthfully say that I am as young as ever Ii was. I am playing better billiards than ever. My eyes are :. as . true as ever, and physically and mentally, . I . believe - that I am at' the top of my form.' . Baseballer, Too TIT ANY Australian cricketers of starid . ing . play baseball , in the winter months ; but the position Is reversed . in South Africa. . ' Gerry' Brand, great Springbok, full back, is a keen and accomplished base baller in' the summer months. . At present there are negotiations afoot be tween South Africa and Japan for an Interchange of baseball tours, and if tills is accomplished, Brand will -' be In' the running for representation at this sport, too. Australia, will probably see Brand in 1937 as full-back. for. the Springboks, and, from all accounts, they will see. a great footballer. He has played on the wing and In the centre, as well as full back, for South Africa, and is a great goal-kick, either place or drop kick/ In the six games for his province in the Currle Cup tournament of 1934 he scored 70 points — all from goals with the ex ception of one try. This Is a record for the series, and- all the more meri torious, as Western- Province (Brand's team) only shared the honor, with Border.

The Fans Admired Him T30BBY BLAY, the Victorian 'iron- bark' has definitely retired. He recently left Sydney for Brisbane to fight his comeback contest, tho first in many, many months. But defeated, he showed Brisbane only the shadow ' of Blay In his prime. However, part of the attraction in Brisbane was the prospects of a job. He's got It; and

he is not likely to test Fate again. He takes ? into his retirement the. good wishes of the fans who admire ? his rare courage' in the ring. '? ' ?-, 1 'Robson of Shore' 'DUMOR spread fast through one ol Sydney's morning daily newspapers last week, that a new headmaster of Sydney Church of England Grammar School had come from overseas. Im mediately friends of Mr. L. C. Robson, began to ask questions of one another, and to ring up the school. It was a. false alarm as. of course, old boys knew it was. Shore's chief Is no mere figurative head over there. A real headmaster, he graduated from New-, ington, where they turn out good ones in 'sport arid citizenship. At. Oxford lie developed his sense of oarsmanship into one of science, and through ? the medium of Shore has spread the gospel near and far.' Tlie new arrival, by the way, is a ? sportsniaster on exchange duty with Mr. Fisher,' Shore's football coach. . The Olympic Dream fTHE desire of. some Olympic idealists tliat the Olympic Games be held in Australia in 1940 is founded on a Midas' dream, that the money is to be had for the mere thinking about it. Amateur athletics do -' riot' draw enough people to make; the turnstiles move as though lubricated. Then- how In the . name of good sport and reasonableness can the. A.A. bo so manipulated as to attract so many thousands to pay four or five bob a time; and keep 011 paying it day after day, as is essential for an Olym piad's financial health! The reply, of course, is 'Let the Government pay.' No Government, would be justified In meeting tlie cost of such a venture un less the venture-promoters were iri ia position to do something big them selves. And that is what Olympic Coun cils (la Australia) cannot do.

Health in the Blue Mountains ? . WILLARI) BROWN, the smiling * ' young American, who gallantly went Into battle with Tod Morgan at 3'ydney Stadium last Monday week, with an angry boil on his right-bleep, left Sydney for the Blue Mountains last week to recuperate from tlie strain

of the. contest- This resort has always been popular with boxers . since the very early, days of Sydney '' Stadium. -The fine- air of the . high altitudes is 'guaranteed to remove staleness . and return ari- athlete- to robust health. Wlllard Brown brings In'to the ring a good personalty, speed and cleverness and a' very snappy punch with the right. . At his top he is a fascinating, youngster in the ring. Topsy-Turvy Cricket H^HINGS are -a bit mixed in the in -^'-ternal cricket of Australia. If they were not; instead of New South Wales

sending a team to Western Australia' shortly, that - honor and duty would have been undertaken by South .Alls-, tralla, with New South Wales left. free to despatch, her team over to Auckland! .Wellington, and Canterbury, to: play | cricket with the - New Zealanders. ' It 1 takes longer to get : : to Perth from Sydney than to Auckland. .Anyhow. 1 the crackaters, ; as the Yorkies used to i say, ? from ' Sydney side are looking, for- 1 ward keenly to their trip west. - wi ne | WestieB.will find them good fellows, one and all. ' ... ? J

Digitisation generously supported by
1 of 2
New South Wales Government
Digitisation generously supported by
1 of 2
New South Wales Government
Digitisation generously supported by
2 of 2
State Library of NSW Digital Excellence Program
Digitisation generously supported by
2 of 2
Play Pause
1 2

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down