Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

No corrections yet

THEATRICAL GOSSIP

(By GOODIE REEVE.)

Josie Melville had a lovely surprise the other night. Nothing gladdens the heart of an ambitious girl so much as an anonymous present, and that was what Josie received in the form of a beautiful pearl. Being the occasion of Sally's 100th performance, some generous person was evidently anxious to pay eilent homage to the little star. \T af,r ( am Anctraiian artists Via Vft lOllTla

honor in their own country without previous experience oversea. Stan Kava nagh, the clever juggler at the Palace, is no exception. He had been many years' in England working 'the halls' before Harry Lauder chose him as a member of 'nis Australian company. Hughie Steyne has a most fascinating hobby. It is cutting and polishing tor toiseshell. Such handsome things he makes, and they are mostly for his lucky little wife, known once as Rene Hill. Pendants, rings, bangles, shoehorns and hairbrushes are among the treasured pos sessions of Mrs. Steyne. Marie la Varre is of French descent, and was born at Calais. Her early training was gained in the circus ring, where she was called upon to do any thing from acrobatic stunts to bareback riding. Her character songs and beau tiful gowns are just now a feature at Fullers'. Have you ever wondered how tall Pixie Herbert is ? I have asked her, and she replies, 'Five feet eleven.' She looks taller than this owing to the fact that she wears heels two inches high on her shoes. A sensitive person is Pixie when questioned regarding her height, despite the fact that she is the most stunning mannequin Williamsons have had for many a day. As you sit and watch the Tivoli snow you may wonder what made Oswald Ben^ud think of training pigeons for a livelihood. 'I love all birds,' he re plies, 'and they love me. I have had a strange power over them since I was a child, and never find any difficulty in taming and training them.' Gracie Lavers at the moment is mighty keen on golf. There is no spite or pettiness in Gracie. She is one of the most popular girls on the Austra lian- stage. Harry Lauder is pulling big crowds to the Palace. Mr. Alec Wilson, the newly-appointed manager at that theatre, says that all previous records of the house have oeen uroken. . Admirers, of Gladys Moncrieff will be interested to know' that it is her birth day next Friday. She is giving a select little party, to her friends in. Melbourne after the r^ow to celebrate the occa''n. George Gee has a dear little girl called Moya, aged four. . He is bristling w.th pride at the moment because she is learn ing to sew ; and the results, for a baby of her age, are rea'.'.y remarkable. Muriel Martin-Harvey, daughter of that famous actor, Sir Martin Harvey, is now residing at Hampton Court. She is not fond of social affairs, and is her very hr.ppiest when sewing or reading a bcok. She loves her part in If Winter Comes, but finds it very exhausting temperamen tally. 'Tom Payne, an excellent turn in Harry Lauder's company, is no stranrer to Aus tralian audiences. He was rere 14 years apo,. creating the part of Schnapps in Miss Hook of .Holland. ? ??Rumors are rife regarding futvre plans of WiHinmson's, Ltd. The latest is that Her Majesty's Theatre, Melbourne, is to

be closed down for four months, and made- into something unusually gorgeois to rival Ward's two theatres. If you want to know vv hat Happened to Mary, go to the Grand Opera House. where it will be produced short y. It is a comedy drama adapted from the novel. Bert Bailey will play the principal ro;e. There are few actresses in Aus:r. Ha who can pull the crowd like Emelie Polini. She is' really fascina.ing -n French Leave as the impulsive w.fewho risks everything to see her husband. A splendid education at a convent is *e sponsible for Miss Po'.ini's exce.lent French accent. How would you like to risk your lite twice daily ? This is what the Sisterj Staig do at Fullers' New Theatre, when, at break-neck speed, they race round th'j Globe of Death at 50 miles an hour, and loop the Icop on mo'or cycles. 'If at first you don't succeed,' etc., is a good motto, says George Baker. 'My first job was at a political mce ing in Birkenhead. I was paid five shil in;s to play Soldiers of the Queen. The :e suit was a riot. I nearly got ki'led :n the crush. Exciting, but hardly encour aging !' Ferry the Frog, the remarkable con tortionist at Fullers', must hnve given many anxious moments to his mocher a

a baby. He has been able to twist him self Into inconceivable shapes ever aince he nm a child, and it would take a big blow to hart his rubber-like limbs. Two theatrical entities are shrouded In mystery at the moment. One is Le: White and the other KiĀ«-!yn Hill.ard. The former is rehearsing mi anonymous chow in Adelaide, a?}d the latter is abouc to replace somebody in an L'nknow.i musical comedy shortly. William Valentine, who has played many important parts for Wi Tarns n's in latter years, is about to try his l\c.- abroad. He sails on the Medic next Saturday for England, from which country he will subsequently sail to fulfil a contract in America. Few people realise that the new con ductor at the Palace Theatre is Fred Quintrell, brother of Billy Quintrell, and a recent arrival from America. Charle3 O'Mara, one of the enter tainers at the Irish Village, has plenty of good jokes to tell. He is partial to the name of Guinness, he says, because it is mentioned In the Bible. ? 'Don't you remember.' he says, ' where they say 'He that is not for us is agin' us' '? Probably no performer has more songs In his or her repertoire than Sir Harry Lauder, and during his Sydney season he intends to change them every week. Yes terday he began to sing the following: I'm Going to Marry 'Arry, O'er the Hill to Ardentinney, There is Somebody Wait ing for Me, She's Ma Daisy, Sunshine o' a Bonnie Lassie's Smile, 'Hame o' Mine. Miss Maude Fane is leaving Australia for England to join her husband on his farm in Surrey. However, Sydney is to have Its opportunity of bidding her fare well, as the popular comedienne is to open in Mary, the new musical success, on April 28. She will be associated with W. S. Percy, Ethel Morrison, Madge El liott, and all the popular artists of the New English Musical Comedy Company. Miss Marie Polini, Emelie Polini's sis ter, is playing Nona In If Winter Comes in England. This part Is splendidly por trayed here by Miss Ailsa Graham. Musgrove's Theatres, Ltd., have en tered into an arrangement ? with Dix and Baker, of Newcastle, to prerent' celebrity vaudeville there. Garry Marsh, handsome hero of - If Winter Comes, is very elated just now. His favorite brother has just landed here from Philadelphia, and they have not seen each other for years. Sir Harry Lauder, who sang on nearly every front in France to the troops, and whose only son, Captain Lauder, was killed while fighting with a Scottish regi ment, has consented to sing to the Dig gers at the Anzac Day concert at the Town Hall on April 25. Miss Edna Robertson and her pupils will give a concert at Victory Hall, Johnston-street, Annandale, on Wednes day next. The programme will be con tributed to by Mr. Walttr Cobb, bari tcne, and Miss Jones, violinist. Musical monologues, sketches, and recitations will also be given by pupils of Miss Ley. Tickets are on sale at Nichol son's.

Digitisation generously supported by
1 of 2
New South Wales Government
Digitisation generously supported by
1 of 2
New South Wales Government
Digitisation generously supported by
2 of 2
State Library of NSW Digital Excellence Program
Digitisation generously supported by
2 of 2
Play Pause
1 2

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down