Lists (None yet)

Login to create lists

Tagged (None yet)

Add Tags

Comments (None yet)

Add New Comment

No corrections yet

JHE STRUTTER'S PAGE. .^

The Week's Programme Commendng Saturday

Amphitheatre —Vaudeville. Bondi— Wonderland Cily. Ckitkkion— -Under Ibe Southern Cross. II p.u Majestv's— Arrah na-Pogue. Hii'Poukoms— Phc-I.in's Big Bicgraph. I'alacb— The Yellow Peril, Queen's Hall— Bio-Tableaux. Koval.— The Midnight Wedding. Tivoli— Rickards' Vaudeville Company. Victoria Hall. — American Picture scope,

Amphitheatre - This is probably the strongest programme over shewn at the 'Am ]-!iy.' Dreamland, the setting for t he first part, is a pantomime scene, Si-l niT with peacock's feathers and giant holtynocks. The stars are Anthony and Kitty Rcggardis London performers who do some (if Cimiuovalli's tricks with fair success, and who score chiefly when the lady swallows a live elec tric bulb, which luminously betrays its tortuous course towards her dark interior, while Anthony, al so a swallower, makes his hit by holding in his mouth a bayonet which supports vertically a loaded rillo, which, when fired, apparently drives, by its recoil, the bayonet down his throat. Professor An tonio shows four dogs and two monkeys, which waltz, skip, bal ance and somersault. One of the

MISS MAIE STEPHENSON, OF THE ANDREW MACK CO.

dogs is the cleverest somersaul tcr we've met. Ueattie McDonald looks like Rae Cowan, but has not half her voice. W,ill Banvard docs a clever acrobatic dance, including a somersault from one foot. Dor is Tindall is get tin,, the horrid india-rubber word habit. She drags her termfnatTourtitl a word of two syllables :has twenty. Olga Mon tez has more style than most scr

ios, The Rowell Sister* , dance cleverly, and score by singing m unison. The Criterion - Edmand Duggan's historical and Chronological mosaic.the Southern Cross, is drawing excellent houses at the Criterion. One could almost wish that the House of Lords could give car to its severe attacks on that corrupt and effete constitution —the English aristocracy. It would vote for its own dissoJulioiumpnci iately afterwards. Since first night the drama has assumed better, shape and is now running more closely and without those long in tcr-act waits which so wearv, aud iences. We have. no. doubt. .but that Mr. Duggaiv will 'so improve the play as he goes along, that in time most of its grosser faults will vanish. Hut the words Wreck of the .Dunbar, and Lureka Stockade, are such draws that these are likely to remain, oven, though in the wrong order of time. The Hlppftdrome ?Down at the Ilaymarkct at pre sent the favorite song is Way down in jrry' Heart I've a Phclan for You, and so biz is buxom at

are showing so many new films— picturesque and sensational, comic and ?patriotic, instructive and en tertaining— itlm oiu1 is puzzled to say which is really best or to, in dued, name any. Among the most popular, however, arc: A Midnight Robbery; the Great Steeplechase; Lost in tihe 'now; The Gipsy's Re venge; Two .Vaughly Hoys, and A Drunk's Downfall. An excellent orchestra is in attendance. Her Mn|esty's- - The Way to Kenmare in its sec rind revival proved such an effective, money spinner that it is proposed to revive Arrah-na-Poquc, for tne second time this season, on the Kith for one week, and to conclude the season by a second revival of Tom Moore on the 26th. By these intermissions t.hc long-expected risiiiR of the P. hie Moon will be de-. layi'd, both by its Adelaide sue t-ess and by the local triumph of Andrew Mack, until 2nd November, Queen's [f nil - This week Mr. Clement Mason Is projecting on the Silver Screen, the following new subjects — the East* erner, or the laughable adventures of a tenderfoot in the West, the. Sailor's Lass. The Hue and 'Cry, The Foster Father, the Tramp's Dug, Two Scamps, Simpkin's Sat urday off, Motor v Horse, and Be ware. One very fine picture tells the story of the descent of Italian

the Hippodrome. Messrs Phelan brigands on a chateau which they, burn to the ground, and their pur suit by land and water, and their annihilation together with that of Ohcir retreat. Business is very good. 1 Ko-al - With the advantages of more stage room, a much better set for one scene at least, and a somcwhjU stronger cast, the Midnight Wed ding is, perhaps, slightly better played at the Royal than at its Cri terion production. Madge Mcln tosh plays the Princess with all due dignity and modesty, and .ill distinctly good in her emolion.il moments. She makes a handsome hussar. We were rather disappoin ted in Gaston Mervalc's Captain Rudolph. He playcd-him as a sour and lumpish villain — utterly with out dash. Charles Vane's height and: .military experience have out wardly strengthened the part of the Crown .Prince, wiliich he plays on Herbert Leigh's familiar lines. May Congdon is a distinct improvement in the part of Satanella. W. Hall, who succeds C. Wingificld as Lieu tenant Eugene, looks all right but he speaks with a provincial form ality and 'harshness which are not pjcasing. Tom Caimani's Bobo is sitill a cleverly worked up without being an overdone performance, and perhaps, his rtssociates, Max, Otto arc handled better by H. Hallcy and C. Boyis, tmau formerly. G. B. Russell is strong and in charac ter as the good priest. Winifred Gunn is still too niminy-piminy r.s Katie, the. pretty waitress at the Golden Dragon. The part rc;

quires to be played with breadth and a rollicking abandon. Har court Iteatty .e ins to have gone off since his first appearance as Paul Valmar. He is as hoarse as a raven, and has lost his sparkle. A coiir«» of sur! -bathing would brace his vocal chords, and tone him up generally. This play -.s written so coherently and directly, has its romance and comedy so well balanced, and presents so ?many exciting situations, that it will always command splendid houses and enthusiastic audiences. Tivoli— True to llis Trust, the Irish racing .sketch, written by Sutton Vale, and played by Edward Cran ston, Mrs. Bennett, and Garden Wilson apes the Bouicaultian man ner, and is too talky until the strug gle berwtenthe two men is entered on. Ti'iat is splendidly done, and quite saves the sketch from dulness. Cranston's dialect is more Cock ney than Irish, but he plays with great earnestness, as do the others. Onion Wilson also appears in his imitations. Perhaps the most suc cessful is that of Edward Gweun as Lively in Sunday. Pearl Hellm rich has made a successful first ap pearance at the Tiv. Price and Rcvost have gone to set Mel bourne 011 the giggle. Secley and West, the clever comedy music ians here about four years ago, will reappear on Saturday after noon, as will Mfadain Rhodesia, the smart and handsome lady juggler who showed here with the Fitz geralds about the same time. The molassos are going great guns. ' Wonderland City— William Anderson complains that tilioush he had 1500 applica tions for 50 posts as male atten dants at Wonderland City, an4 had T'ark-Street blocked with sup ers when lie wanted 100 for the Souliiern Cross was unable dur ing the winter to get_ a sufficiency of laborers tor . tfle improvements at Bnmli. In the city there are always more aftc- |jKht than heavy jobs, and a lot of would-be supers arc otherwise parti:(T!y employed during the day. Curiously enough, there are more men out of work just now than there were during the cold weather. 1/ic drought has made a big difference. It appears that E. W. O'Sullivan has also been guilty of a drama on tihe Eureka Stockade. New Zealand .may now be ?known as Fuller's earth, but it was once styled Dix's Land. ? The new Melbourne theatre is to be built in Russell Street, on the site of TattersaH's Club. Someone asks if the Yellow Per il, and the Great Pink Pearl have anything in common. Hilda Spong has got rid of most of her fat. Walter Howe plays with her in Kit, her vaudeville sketch. Secley and West, the comedy musicians, return, after four or live years' absence, on October ioth, to the Tivoli. . Maggie Moore writes Brother limniy to say that Harry Roberts is playing lead with Eleanor Rob erts in the The Girl who has 1-lverything. She still promises to . bring Harry back to his native land, along with a bunch of new plays. Oigood Moore, her niece, has married Percy Jordan, an Eng lish writer who lives in New York, and 'Ossy' has given up_ the stage, for which she has «i par ticular gift. William Asprey, just on the point

ot leaving tor lutrope to study under Arthur Nikisch, has ' cen appointed choirmaster and. ^on ductor at St. Mary's Cathedral, in room of the late John A, Delanoy, Harry Dawkins the organist at St. Mary's is also a Sydney native. It will be remembered that Asprey was chorusmaster to the Italian Opera Coy of 1001, and that he also undertook the musical produc tion of Ben Hur. He ha sat var ious times controlled church choirs in various parts of the city and suburbs. Robbery Under Arms, the Kin cmatograph picture taken by Messrs. Osborn and Jerdan, for Mr. 'Charles McMahon, will bear close comparison with the best of the imported work, and is a very interesting pictorial representation of Rolf Boldrewood's fine novel and play. --Mr. MacMahon _ spent over £900 on the comoosition of this picture. He had 25 players in the field for some months, and travelled them to various places in order to get die scenery 'fitted to his purpose — for instance to the rocky ridges at the back or Narra becn, to Hornsby, Moss Vale, Wollongong racecourse, Bat-hurst, the Turon, FJemingtou saleyards, and to other places. Starlight is splendidly impersonated by J.' Williams; .S. Fitzgerald made a good Warrigal; and Mrs. Kcight ley's ride was grandly done by Mrs. Mrs. W. J. Ogle of the Hip-^ podromc'.- The result is a very, beautiful and interesting picture, with as chief incidents— the bank robbery, the sticking up of- the coach at Terrible -Hollow, the chase after Old' Marsden, the Tu ron races, and so forth. - . 1 ? .

Digitisation generously supported by
1 of 2
New South Wales Government
Digitisation generously supported by
1 of 2
New South Wales Government
Digitisation generously supported by
2 of 2
State Library of NSW Digital Excellence Program
Digitisation generously supported by
2 of 2
Play Pause
1 2

Zoom

plus
thumb
minus
left
thumb
right
up
thumb
down