1. List: article by Frederick Dalton Special Goldfields Reporter for the SMH
    article by Frederick Dalton Special Goldfields Reporter for the SMH thumbnail image
    Public

    Columns written during a two year journey through the western, southern and northern goldfields of NSW published between 1858 and 1860 in the SMH. Frederick Dalton was a digger in California and Australia, went on to be a Gold Commissioner, Police Magistrate and one of the first Mining Wardens. He disappeared while on duty at the age of 65 in 1880.

    118 items
    created by: teddydog on 2013-12-16 23:08:09.0
    User data
    Tags:
    Add tag(s)
    Comments: No comments yet - Add one!
    Rating: unrated

List items:

Showing: 1 - 118 of 118

  1. THE WESTERN ROAD.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 22 November 1858 p 10 Article
    Abstract: THE first thing that attracts the attention of the traveller leaving Sydney for the far west is thelong string of drays laden with wood for the fires ... 4948 words
    • Text last corrected on 27 January 2014 by matth888
    • 1 comment on 25 October 2010
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-25 14:00:13.0

    Journey from Sydney to the head of the Turon river. Commentary on the road west from Sydney. From Five Dock to Penrith, across the Nepean river and on the old road through the Blue Mountains. Notes preparations for extension of the railway and its importance in brining produce to Sydney. Describes Parramatta as a townscape that from afar reminds him of English villages and earlier times for the writer 'when young hope was strong within him... and thus of holier things'. Decries the number of taverns that offer no accommodation but 'stinking taproom' that entice the population to drink. Compares the abuse of alcohol in NSW to the US. Describes the wealth of amenities for the traveller in the US and lack in NSW particularly of food and good accommodation. Describes St Mary's and Penrith. Then provides a commentary on the state of the road and potential engineering improvements seen in United states, California and Canada. Description both scenic and geological of the pass. Concludes with a similar description of the road to the Turon, scenery and industry (agriculture) along the way.

    Hide note
  2. THE UPPER TURON. [BY OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.]
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 14 December 1858 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE Willawa diggings, distant from Sydney 110 miles and from Cullen Bullen eight miles, have been opened about eight months, and during that period a ... 6068 words
    • Text last corrected on 24 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-25 09:16:04.0

    Geology ad geography of the upper Turon to Sofala. Detail on miners and mining, mining communities. Throughout this journey in Western NSW there are references to communities within a days ride or less with Hotels, stores, etc. These communities have totally vanished. References to contributions by miners from California and China. Also first references to the numbers of 'European' and Chinese miners with the Chinese population appearing to be about double the European.

    Hide note
  3. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOL[?] FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. II.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 21 December 1858 p 3 Article
    Abstract: LEAVING Sofals and the Turon behind, I commenced the ascent of the table land to the southward, a quarter of a mile along the Bathurst road, with a g ... 4300 words
    • Text last corrected on 6 November 2014 by anonymous
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-25 09:28:06.0

    Description of the geology and gold mining history close to Sofala.

    Hide note
  4. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER] No. III.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 23 December 1858 p 2 Article
    Abstract: RESUMING the road at Atkinson's Creek, on the right is a dead level, three-quarters of a mile wide, becoming contracted as it approaches the ranges. ... 2422 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-25 09:56:07.0

    Continuing south from Sofala through village (Wattle creek?). Commentary on the geography, gold geology and mining activities. Continuing to Bullocks Flat description of the townships and population, the nature of past and current mining activities. Also discusses that how longer term productive mining of gold resources could be implemented. Discusses incomes for miners; more than 3 pounds per week.

    Hide note
  5. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. IV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 24 December 1858 p 3 Article
    Abstract: TAXING a farewell of Palmer's Oakey, and following the river to the westward through the narrow defile in the mountains known as, the Gulf, from whic ... 4219 words
    • Text last corrected on 24 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-25 10:15:13.0

    Journey back to the Turon through a succession of creek bends and some settlements named the Oakey's. Description of the landscape and types of vegetation from mountainous regions to the undulating valleys - fertile treed grasslands. Miners are still working and making a good living, but there is evidence of significantly higher populations in previous years and a vignette of a miner and his family who have taken to farming.

    Hide note
  6. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FORM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. V.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 10 January 1859 p 5 Article
    Abstract: A FINE clear morning, with a refreshing breeze, tempted me once more to leave the bustling township and accompany old Turon in his devious windings t ... 2462 words
    • Text last corrected on 22 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-26 13:09:27.0

    Following the Turon west from Sofala. Geological descriptions and descriptions of mining activities on the river and it s tributaries close to town. Chinese, washing the tailings, Irish off in the ridges supposedly with a secret gold site. Recognises that battle with water, in this case specifically too much water in the river meaning that potential reefs cannot be dug. Begins the theme - need for a more scientific approach to mining. Describes an example ('a young miner of my acquaintance') of a miner without any geological knowledge missing out and the fortune going to others. Also includes a very artily descriptive piece on bush walk into a gorge in the middle of summer at midday. Includes a depiction of how the stream could become a torrent after a thunderstorm; Glenn of horrors. Mentions a gold town to the west of Sofala doesn't give a name. While the environs are heavily populated compared to today the dwellings and 'buildings' referred to are either tent houses or slab construction. Comments about even more encampments from an earlier time with burnt wooden posts all that remains. It would be interesting to see what if anything remains of these today.

    Hide note
  7. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] NO. VI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 11 January 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: A ROAD leads from Patterson's Point, over the neck of the peninsular, to the Little Wallabys and New Zealand Point; here multitudinous shafts and hol ... 2638 words
    • Text last corrected on 7 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-25 10:38:48.0

    Commentary on the community that has developed eg pretty canvas houses 'embosomed' and surrounded by shrubbery. Also commentary on the large Chinese community that appears to be doing well. Uses the term 'John Chinaman' and notes that they provide him with limited information on how well they are doing. Describes the Chinese willingness to spend on 'pale brandy and Champaign', ducks and chickens, when they are doing well. Notes that money could be made from breeding 'fowl' for the Chinese miners.

    Hide note
  8. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. VII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 18 January 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: ON the gold-fields [?] is your lot to full in with many varieties of the genus nomo—one dubs himself civil engineer, he is always getting up a compan ... 2004 words
    • Text last corrected on 25 January 2014 by teddydog
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-25 13:44:07.0

    Starts with a tongue in cheek discussion of the characters to be met on the goldfields. The so called civil engineer who is selling shares in a company that will lead to vast riches, etc. Develops in to a fictionalised account of a typical incident faced be the correspondent; discussion in an inn with the man who thinks he knows better and can d better on every subject and wants his opinions published. Followed by a parody at the expense of gold fields demagogues. With the serious intent of highlighting the community spirit of the average miner. Discusses the political landscape on NSW with an election in the offing and the need to establish a system for land a location: also a description of what the miners need in a representative; scientific, liberal. A very detailed and serious comparison of NSW and California, with detailed description of the natural advantages and the historical development advantage of California. Comment on Spanish (Jesuit mission settlements and an almost utopian depiction of there advantages), Mexican (termed 'greased'), Indian (reverential memory of the missions and anger, even violent, reactions to the US) and US ('Jonathan' including a depiction of their avaricious nature). Ends with a view that instead of seeing California as the xample NSW should follow England 'our mother' and seek to become self sufficient. Self sufficiency, developing policies that support a stable Christian population with agriculture and industry to provide good incomes (not boom or bust get rich quick) becomes a theme in these articles.

    Hide note
  9. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. VIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 21 January 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: WHERE did we separate—it was at the big Wallaby, that mighty rock on which old Time has chronicled his centuries. Let us now leave that "memento mori ... 2277 words
    • Text last corrected on 7 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-26 14:08:54.0

    Starts near big Wallaby (where is this?. Is the author staying at Sofala and travelling out each day?) Then with a note that the author has been asked by a diggers widow to have his tombstone inscribed with words from a poem by the American NP Willis; poem the soldiers widow (where is the tombstone? Sofala or near Big Wallaby). Continues with description of, scenery, geography, and geology of the lower Turon. Commentary on the number of miners eking a living - if subsistence - from a field past the initial rush. The author stays at 'Limburg's Inn' and takes half daily walks in the summer. heat. One to the top of the highest point south of the Turon 'Box Ridge' and describes the panorama, including the view to the Canoblas range with its 'towering central summits' Concludes back at the Inn. His paying comment to the Turon repeats a central theme that the geology of the goldfields is such that all who 'will labour' will at least find subsistence (a living).

    Hide note
  10. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. IX.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 26 January 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: AND now for the table lands on the north, bank of the Turon. Crossing the river below Circus Point you are on the Escort Track, at the foot of the we ... 2853 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-26 17:46:30.0

    Climb from the Turon to Tambaroora: Hill End still to be established. Maintaining the 'gothic horror' vein description of the locality at the height of summer. Description of the 'pretty' town - a European and a Chinese settlement (the latter closer to present Hill End). Mentions a recent European wedding and fact that the Chinese community gave the bride a gift of 50 pounds to furnish her tent. Theme, miners don't stray far from the worked land and notes that the whole area is relatively unexplored but shows good geological signs of more gold to come. On this theme, continues with discussion of ways of encouraging prospecting with those who find new fields receiving fees from any one who stakes a claim. [possible self interest FD is mentioned as one of the finders of the northern most Rocky field]. Ends with a discussion of his travels in the United States in particular discussion of the Utah Territory in 1852; Mormonism ('delusion'); anti Yankee sentiment in Utah and his own difficulties until he could prove himself and 'Englishman'; and comments on the authors affection for the writings of 'the Great Chalmers'; probably the Rev Chalmers a father of the church of Scotland and great british liberal thinker. Sparked by an oration by 'Mr Martin' (Martin the NSW MLA) - creating a reaction in favour of 'state aide' for the four main Christian denominations in the population of the western goldfields.

    Hide note
  11. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. X.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 27 January 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: WE are unhappy in the nomenclature of our creeks; in this respect the aborigines beat us hollow. There are the eternal Oakeys scattered throughout th ... 3998 words
    • Text last corrected on 26 November 2010 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-26 18:45:40.0

    Whimsical beginning on the naming of creeks. Also first mention of aborigines, but only as better names. Follows the Dirt Hole (now named the Tambarura Ck) through to its junction with the Macquarie. Discusses the history of gold mining in the area; at the time of writing in something of a decline. History of the colonial Gold Mining company operations -abandoned in 1856, only to be flooded with independent miners who made significant finds. Theme on gold working "it pays to work all the old claims over again".

    Hide note
  12. A VISIT TO THE AVESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] NO. XI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 28 January 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: MOST of the reefs on the Louisa basin appear to be V reefs or wedge-shaped, and in reefs of this character the gold has usually been found in the cap ... 2986 words
    • Text last corrected on 21 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-26 23:19:40.0

    Description of the geology and the goldfields population of the Louisa. This is depicted as a field in decline, but continues the theme that there is a living to be obtained. Notes an 'old salt' who it is claimed can afford to spend 500 pounds a year. Miners are concerned about there land tenure, they want to settle but they have no permanent claim to the land. Prices are high even though it has been a great harvest year. Explores in the Australian context a current US Canadian saying: '...first be ruined before he can succeed'. Describes the new immigrant who gets the best land and spends all his capital to improve it only to be bankrupted by the fits bad year. Juxtaposed by the old had who calls a bee to have his slab hut built in a weekend, ploughs as much land as he can with no attempt to keep straight lines etc: raising the largest crops with the lease possible expenditure of capital..

    Hide note
  13. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 11 February 1859 p 8 Article
    Abstract: IN making a tour of the western gold-fields the vast disproportion between the numbers of the European and Chinese mining population cannot fail to i ... 2548 words
    • Text last corrected on 26 December 2013 by teddydog
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-27 13:31:19.0

    Discussion on the influence of Chinese on the goldfields and the colonial economy. Suggestion that there is a 'superior intelligence' directing their movements. The Chinese add a maximum of 146,000 pounds to the economy and have taken in one year 400,000 profit. Notes that the Chinese are afforded the same civil rights as an Englishman because it is politic to do so: international relations. Notes that gold is a harvest that can only be reaped once and so the colony should be vigilant about regulating its production. If gold licences had only den issued to freeloaders it would have been better for the colony. Goes on to describe the way gold is transferred from the miners through local storekeeper; the Chinese take part in this but prefer to be paid in silver and get rid of notes as quickly as they can. Discusses the method of transferring and shipping gold and its impact on understanding the yield from particular rushes. Notes on the Chinese labour hire arrangements and that they are in a better position than Europeans. Chinese bosses from Hong Kong and so British subjects have discussed claiming the right to vote. Discusses mining activities on the ormer colonial gold mining company site and concludes with a note on the weather; rainfall from summer thunderstorms lifting the prevailing gloom. Appears to have been written 2 Feb - 9 days delay to publication. See next for date information.

    Hide note
  14. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 15 February 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: RICHARDSON'S POINT, 3RD FEBRUARY.—I hasten to forward an addenda to my communication of yesterday, to say that most favourable accounts have been rec ... 600 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-27 13:38:00.0

    Written 3 Feb - 12 days dray to publication.

    Favourable news from local prospectors - large nugget found 198 ounces - more miners arriving at the Turon and surrounds. Theme that quartz prospecting takes experience, patience and perseverance. late news from the Meroo and Guntawang dated 4 Feb may be a different author.

    Hide note
  15. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XIV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 21 February 1859 p 4 Article
    Abstract: WE have forsaken the Louisa, and now for the descent to the banks of the Meroo. Having already looked down upon it from the heights of the plateau, a ... 2469 words
    • Text last corrected on 8 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-27 15:06:41.0

    Travelling north down into the valley of the Meroo. Describes the scene at dusk, the light from a hundred fires (diggers cams) reflected on the leaves. comments that unless he is going to 'bush it' he will need to find quarters for the night. Then into a geological description of the district. Examining local quartz samples 'with the aide of a powerful microscope'. Describes a system of official assaying to give investors confidence. Encounters both tented and more permanent dwellings. Encounters a large Chinese encampment. Description of the storekeeper Quangho who is accumulating a rapid fortune including through running a gambling establishment - muses that the Chinese may have invented the 'dice box' and that the Chinese stick to the gambling table 'with all the pertinacity of a Spaniard or a Mexican'. More geography/geology, and details of the European settlement, four stores and a butchers, but no church or school. Little communication with the Louisa due to the seep divide - comments that the temperature hits 120 F in the shade. Concerns about the impact of rain on the diggers in the river.

    Hide note
  16. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 24 February 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE Meroo, although similar to the Turon in its geological features, differs in the character of its scenery, ranges recede now on the north bank, an ... 2454 words
    • Text last corrected on 8 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-27 15:32:20.0

    Compares the Meroo to the Turon, geography, scenery and geology. describes day break in the camp and travels to Avisford. No real town, the author has concerns about getting his dinner! A quarter mile further on he finds a roadside public house 'of the old school'. Historical anecdote about the Chinese miners attempting to avoid the customs at Sydney.

    Hide note
  17. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] NO. XVI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 26 February 1859 p 5 Article
    Abstract: WE were last at Poverty Point, in the Mer[?] district. Leaving the diggers, just let us now wend our way up stream. Beyond this the rocks are too pre ... 1808 words
    • Text last corrected on 8 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-27 16:29:26.0

    Moving on from another poverty point the author encounters a group of Chinese prospectors. He observes that they don't know what they are doing and shows them what to do. In gratitude they offer him a meal which he refuses on the basis to his reader that they may lack 'Mrs Glass's rudiments" (probably a character from Scott's 'the heart of Midlothian'. He visits a town with church and schools under development called Warratra on the Meroo (what town is this?) the town is on the upper reaches of the Meroo not long before it divides or is formed by a division from the north and south. He notes that mountainous country is lately unexplored. His intention is to follow the tributaries and then the river to the Words End.

    Hide note
  18. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XVII. ANOTHER SPLENDID NUGGET FROM THE LOUISA.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 8 March 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: ON the 24th ultimo a German digger obtained a fine specimen from a claim within a few yards of the spot where Turner found his nugget, containing 197 ... 1443 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-27 18:25:52.0

    Notes that large nuggets are being found in the region. The population has increased in the last few weeks. Notes that puddling is in its infancy in the area. Notes particular groups and locations in which prospectors are doing well. Discusses where the profit from gold goes - to the east Indies or British companies that receive the advantage (and use it to fund interests in India etc). Suggests the need for NSW to have its own currency to allow similar investment n railways etc. discusses the differences in geology with Fairfield (Rockhampton gold bubble) quotes 'rolling stone gathers no moss' in Latin noting that miners have not learned its truth - theme that there is plenty f gold still to be found for persevering miners. Ends with a suggestion that there are still new riches to be found close to hand; most of the land is unexplored and peopled by 'Rob Roys who infest the district'. Notes that there is blight in the district and that the children are suffering from scarlet fever. Also that locally there is little appetite for politics although some are trying to get themselves elected 'refers to little peddlington's' may suggest officious locals looking to get themselves an official soap box. Seems to be disparaging.

    Hide note
  19. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XVIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 16 March 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE immense extent of the gold-fields of New South Wales, and the consequent diffusion of the population, favours the transition from mining to agric ... 2299 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 21:52:23.0

    Predicts that due to the immense extent [geographic spread] of the goldfields lends itself to a gradual transition to agriculture [as the gold runs out]. Then goes back to discuss the geography and geology of the headwaters of the Meroo. Comments on the need to introduce drainage techniques and decries the lack of cooperative labour amongst NSW diggers. This theme is continued in later articles. In fact this article is written in a tone of frustration at the lack of simple engineering undertakings amongst the diggers. The author is travelling wit a Mr Murray - searching for a reef. Notes a higher level of cooperation amongst the Chinese miners.

    Hide note
  20. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XIX.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 17 March 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: EXTREME beauty of situation, and fertility of soil, scern insufficient to tempt the mining population on the Upper Meroo to engage in any species of ... 2651 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 22:03:19.0

    Continues the journey to the source of the Meroo. Descriptions of the geology and geography. Comparisons f formations to Stonehenge (had he seen Stonehenge?) but much grander. Concludes at a spring at the foot of a a giant gum

    Hide note
  21. AN EXHAUSTED GOLD-FIELD. [A SKETCH BY OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.]
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 17 March 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: FEW places present a more unsightly aspect to a stranger than a largo gold-field in its decadence. The ground is broken, and cut up in every imaginab ... 1063 words
    • Text last corrected on 23 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-01-28 22:24:50.0

    Description of an encounter with some inhabitants of an exhausted goldfield - a family who had been on the field for the six years of its existence eg since 1852-3. Chained dogs, clothes lines and a description of the life - including a description of a pathetic tale of one family - Europeans (not English) of a meddling class. Ends with truism about the establishment of inland towns - based on the necessities of the inhabitants.

    Hide note
  22. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. (FnoM ovR. SpCIAL, REroRTER.] No. XX.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 21 March 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: A'MR. RAYNOR has settled, himself and family on a few acres Of purchased land at Triangle Tlat; he has a small portion under cultivation, which produ ... 1284 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 00:10:04.0

    Describes a small farm to introduce that there is a lawless element to the mountain region. Cattle lifters who made a 'spreath upon his property'. These 'caterans' it is rumoured have a chain of posts in through the mountains into Victoria. How these people live is a mystery to all but themselves. A detachment of black police trackers would find full employment... He heads back from the spring to Mt Bocaple (Bocoble), gives a 360 description of the view. Discusses the geology to the north the end of the goldfields, occurrence of coal. Stays at the inn called Murray. Ends with a note written at a later date about recent gold finds. Ends with a rant about the unemployed in Sydney. Maybe reflecting some public debate of the day. Suggests that there may be some former 1816 English chartists may be in the antipodes. Suggests that employment could be found on the goldfields again pursues the theme of a mining labour force as opposed to individual prospectors.

    Hide note
  23. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 5 April 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: AGAIN we leave Richardson's Point, and, taking once more to the mountains, the valleys, and the streams, pursue our way along the plain that stretche ... 2011 words
    • Text last corrected on 4 June 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 00:36:35.0

    Muses on the name devils hole and suggests the name is due to the large number of public houses, now decaying on a declining field. He describes some discreditable activities on the goldfields people taking unfair advantage of others industry and forms of petty extortion. Describes a Chinese camp and the town of Doyle Bar.

    Hide note
  24. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] NO. XXII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 8 April 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: HALF a mile above Doyle's Bar, on the north bank of Long Creek, is Long Flat. This was one of the last places discovered in the locality; it is evide ... 1703 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-01 11:15:01.0

    Long flat - termed initially a 'shicer' since 'rushed' but suspects there is more gold to be found given the geology. Two Germans puddling are making 300 a year each. Lack of water driving diggers from their claims. Description of a non descript farm. Quotes a James Thomson poem. Passes a large abandoned sheep station close to the head of the Pyramul Ck - Bogie Mountain. Romantic description of the scenery in a valley bordering the main great dividing range. Two small farms cottages and eventually as night falls stopping at an inn on the Sydney road.

    Hide note
  25. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 15 April 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: WE parted on the threshold of a bush hostelry, as the shades of darkness were gathering upon the ranges, and now. Night wanes—the vapours round the m ... 1828 words
    • Text last corrected on 21 November 2013 by bridgedan
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 14:55:42.0

    quote from Byron's Lara. Scenic description 360 views around Aaron's pass and the Tabrabucca swamp that feeds many of the gold bearing streams south of the Meroo, specifically the Crudine. Description of the orographic process feeding permanent streams draining off the great divide. Recognises the hand of God in taming the mountains to make the land more suitable to man. Discusses the geology and geography and concludes that the land could be very productive and could sustain a large population. Suggests that self sustaining agricultural villages will soon (or should have already) appear between Mudgee and Bownfels. The road: the author has encountered teams building the road. Implied that he has seen things that he disagrees with and so a long discussion on road building and the pitfalls of the contractor system currently being established. Importance of rods to civilization. Legacy of the Romans and napoleon (more than his victories) is he sympathetic to Napoleon? Concerns that the culture of the 'rising class' is not such that will allow contracting roadwork to be successful - particularly access to alcohol and buy implication alcoholism. Also a cryptic passage that suggests that the class has no understanding of the system f patronage that makes the contracting game work elsewhere [my interpretation] describes the role class as stupid and uses the name 'Boniface' [is this referencing a connection between church and state] and that local clergy could be used by the communities to influence better outcomes?or that the interests of church and state are intertwined and so should be the mode for advancing civilization? ] this would support the discussion of state aide in a previous article. From this moves to the theme of unemployment and that Sydney has become a magnet because workers see the land as a wilderness that offers them no home. This population may be ticket of leavers leaving the sites of this indentured servitude. He sees that improvement is 'tabooed' and that these people only recognise it as a place of uninviting servitude.

    Hide note
  26. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXIV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 16 April 1859 p 5 Article
    Abstract: BIDDING good day to the road-makers and the wayfarers, let us resume our route. We now pass a small farm on the right, and a large edifice, intended ... 1331 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 15:18:26.0

    Farewell to road makers and wayfarers. Cherry tree hill, Lanes flat through Capertree. Discusses the geology and notes a rock type found a gain at Canoblas 100 miles to the west. Discusses ancient origins but moves on [where did he get his information Clarke?]. Suggests that Capertree should be prospected. suggest that the valley slopes would be good for wine grape cultivation equating to Spain and Portugal. [had he seen this first hand?] comments on early attempts at viticulture and notes the importance of soil. Discusses the submarine volcanic Silurian genesis of the mountings [gardens of stone?] a beautiful passage imagining the ancient coastal scene from the evidence of the rocks. Praises the Scottish geologist Hugh Miller - the stone mason of Cromarty - to trace the almighty hand in theses stupendous works! Journey ends at a wayside in at Ben Bullpen.

    Hide note
  27. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLD. FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 20 April 1859 p 5 Article
    Abstract: AT Ben Bullen I fell in with a party of diggers who had been employed sluicing some distance below Maitland Bar, on the Meroo, and were now on their ... 1878 words
    • Text last corrected on 21 November 2013 by bridgedan
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 16:35:08.0

    retracing steps to Bocoble discusses the Pyramuel gold field. Also encounters with diggers. Returning to Sydney obviously after having done well, but recalls that the same diggers on the goldfields had told him they were doing the opposite. ecount a story of a party of American diggers who took advantage of welfare in Sydney when they didn't need it accumulated 150 pounds each after only three months work (equivalent income of a middle class professional) and left NSW bagging the goldfields. The author notes the need for gov't policy to encourage appropriate agriculture to specific regions to give 'honey handed labour every advantage which he has a right to expect in a new country and capital that protection and security..' to prevent it being diverted from our shores. This policy is compared to the 'ordeal of blood, anarchy and confusion that every state founded by the American union has passed through.' Texas, Arkansas, Kansas ad Missouri....

    Hide note
  28. THE GOLD-DIGGER. (A SKETCH, BY OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.)
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 19 April 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THERE is no person for whom hope does so much as the gold-digger; she sustains him through hardships and dangers at the bare contemplation of which o ... 2485 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 16:44:13.0

    The gold digger sketch on the theme of hope. Describes typical activities for individual miners and groups. Describes types, the gold buyer, the old digger, the diggers wife, the Chinese diggers and their boss an opium smoker - his dreams. A tunnel caved in a man hurried... dead.. the diggers band together to find some cash for his wife and children...

    Hide note
  29. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. (FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXYL
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 22 April 1859 p 5 Article
    Abstract: ONCE again to the Pyramul. Three minor ranges diverge from the Bogie table mountain, in which many small streams have their source, and have enriched ... 1127 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 16:48:11.0

    Description of the long creek diggings - part of the paramuel chain but richer in gold. note that for a mile along the reek diggers European and Chinese mix and are working happily and busily alongside each other.

    Hide note
  30. LOUISA CREEK. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.]
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 27 April 1859 p 5 Article
    Abstract: APRIL 20.—A report is rife amongst the Meroo diggers that an important gold-field has been found somewhere about thirty miles to the eastward of Mudg ... 961 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-02 23:42:35.0

    Different kind of article - very brief. Notes a potentially lager field west of Mudgee. Describes a series of rushes in the local area. Then details an attempt by a Sydney man to bring crushing machines to the area - the man had little understanding of mining and less capital. His attempts to set up a company on the field meet similar difficulties. Decries the efforts of local publicans to stop the introduction of local judiciary against the wishes of the miners.

    Hide note
  31. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXVII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 28 April 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE sun shines bright and glorious; and, as the fleecy vapours sail across the clear blue sky their shadows flit over hill and valley, and the fitful ... 2551 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-06 22:28:56.0

    'Let us to the bush': pug mill. Jackson flat following long creek. description of a well worked - exhausted field. Drought. Nugget creek. Description of the geology and geography. comment that gold was found here prior to Mr Hargreaves by shepherds who didn't understand that they had gold - fortunes risen and fallen with the gold field... employs a Chinaman to collect specimens. Continued geological discussion. Discusses the purity of gold from the surrounding fields and notes that some scam by incorporating higher yielding ore with lower in the hopes of getting better prices from the buyers.

    Hide note
  32. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXVIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 29 April 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: AFTRR the digression in my Inst, into the various formations or granitic gold-fields, originating in the finding of a fragment of igneous rock, we sh ... 1813 words
    • Text last corrected on 10 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 07:47:41.0

    Down devils hole creek. Generals description of the goldfields geography, geology and mining activity. Frequently heavily peopled and deserted it is now lightly populated but with some permanent residents. Discusses problems with methods for extracting gold and suggests that improvements can be made that will mean gold can be extracted from even heavily worked fields. H P Wilson esq the agent of the Oriental Bank Warratra and Bank of NSW has also made large purchases over 60, 000 ounces in the previous year. Large numbers of Chinese are coming back to the fields - two wealth Chinese importers also. 'the have returned with an increased respect foor the Meroo and be it for good or ill mean to have a share of the gold. Levels warratra and the Stirling Inn 'we once more plunge into the Western wilderness'.

    Hide note
  33. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXIX.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 20 May 1859 p 5 Article
    Abstract: WHEN I wrote last we separated at Richardson's Point, and now we meet again on the ranges to the southward of that place. When passing over numerous ... 2427 words
    • Text last corrected on 7 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 08:50:48.0

    Richardson point looking down on the Meroo. Gold on the heights but prospectors stick to the valley close to water. Observes a 'multitude' of Chinese. On t the Louisa. Tents much more numerous than our last visit. Recent meeting 'outside the court house' presided over by the assistant commissioner. Miners have petitioned the governor general to establish a court house. The meeting attended many by publicans and store keepers 'and their respective hangers on... viewed this unlocked for movement of the diggers with unmitigated disgust'. The publicans - goes on to the theme berating some publicans premises as 'dens of vice and fountains of misery'. Asao the few crawling sycophants that hang about their premises ... these degraded beings. Also description of the type of building 'houses... slab and bark erections, previous to every blast... Notes a petition in a local store 'G Wheale's store left by 'a trooper in full fig' petitioning the governor not to establish a court. Notes that there is a high degree of confidence in the local commissioner captain brown. Continues down the Meroo and notes the mining activities, geology and geography. Several large Chinese towns with shops ending the article with a description of a Chinese village 'headquarters' including a 'capacious butchering establishment and several stores ... taverns .... opium'. disucces how the Chinese have not taken on English ways, notes that Chinese tradesmen understand their trade as well as similar Europeans, but are more likely to be able to read and write and to keep accounts - 'much better educated'. Decries the ignorance of the European population 'not 25%' of the westward population would be able to read or write.

    Hide note
  34. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXX.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 25 May 1859 p 8 Article
    Abstract: AFTER leaving the Chinese encampment at Golden Point, referred to towards the close of my last, you pursue the track round a point where the clay sla ... 1609 words
    • Text last corrected on 10 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 13:09:08.0

    Describes losing the path at night, and almost loses his horse. Camps out. Across the water from Chinese miners 'with their shouts and unearthly screeching'. To worlds end junction of gratti creek and the Meroo. A small store and Chinese working the drift.

    Hide note
  35. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXXII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 2 June 1859 p 5 Article
    Abstract: CONTINUING our journey down the wild and gloomy Meroo from the World's End, we cross the junction of Grati Creek, on the north bank. This stream has ... 2629 words
    • Text last corrected on 10 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 13:36:08.0

    Describes the Gratti and continues on the Meroo to the town of Meridee and beyond. Chinese have been the most successful miners on the Meroo and blames the availability of rum amongst the Europeans for their lack of similar success. Criticises the publicans and describes a letter between publicans, 'during a recent investigation at Mudgee' not sure what the investigation is about but ends with 'when the wolf and dog become too friendly, it is a bad lookout for the sheep.'

    Hide note
  36. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXXII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 3 June 1859 p 8 Article
    Abstract: THE unstable character of the mining population has been exemplified on the western gold-fields within the present year, which, although still young, ... 2445 words
    • Text last corrected on 11 January 2012 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 14:48:34.0

    Travels north to Mudgee. Spends the night in the 'royal something' but encounters the prospective local member and notes that his night would have been better spent against the lee side of a log in the forest. Describes Mudgee and its good prospects for self-sufficiency given the alluvial soil surrounding it. Describes the pipeclay diggings to the NE of the town. Then explores the Cudgegong - N limit of the Western goldfields. Describes the pastoral land - large estates of successful colonists - remind him of large farms in the south of Scotland. Describes the Pinbone ranges now becoming a site of interest to the prospector. Stops at the Guntawang Inn.

    Hide note
  37. THE OCCUPANCY AND DISPOSAL OF PUBLIC LANDS IN THE UNITED STATES.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 8 June 1859 p 4 Article
    Abstract: OUR Special Reporter, in a recent letter from the Wesstern Gold-fields, gives the following rough sketch of the American Land System, being the resul ... 1566 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 15:10:08.0

    Sketch of US frontier (waste) land allocation system. From personal experience as a resident in the US. In. The West...

    Hide note
  38. THE WORKING OF THE UNITED STATES LAND SYSTEM. (FROM OUR SPECIAL GOLD FIELDS' REPORTER.) LETTER No. 2.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 9 June 1859 p 6 Article
    Abstract: To my remarks in a previous communication, on the occupancy and mode of disposing of the public lands in America, I shall now add a few observations ... 1864 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-08 15:19:29.0

    Chicago pre 1860 description; about 1830 the tribes were removed, in the year 1848 it contained (was here there?). Then describes it in 1857 in detail or is this just when the latest population figures came out? US land disbursement practices; notes on US society. In the united states the farmer is the help and the trader is the aristocrat...

    Hide note
  39. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] NO. XXXIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 29 June 1859 p 5 Article
    Abstract: PURSUING our journey from the inn at Guntawang, by a mountain road, ten miles to the westward from that place, and double the distance following the ... 797 words
    • Text last corrected on 10 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-09 09:27:47.0

    Journeys west to the P river (may be the modern Piambong) Creek. Discusses the town of Wyadra (now gone) gazettes bu starved out by the surrounding landowners. Also discusses the effect of prolonged drought on pastoral leases. Some 'beautiful' stations are abandoned. Later articles suggest that he is traveling east and the Pinions may be the Waradra CK, Waradra itself may be an early manifestation of Gulgon???

    Hide note
  40. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXXIV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 14 July 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: LEAVING the banks of the Cudgegong, and taking the road which crosses the plain, you pass between two farms, the property of Mr. G. Rouse, and reach ... 3086 words
    • Text last corrected on 10 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-09 09:47:49.0

    May now be travelling north and west around guntawang and the (Gentawong gold fields). Describes the goldfields supported by Rouse on his properties. Well ordered tents, miners well clothed and food bought from Rouse at reasonable prices. rats castle rush (ascending the river from Guntiwang?). Compares the miners to the ragged prospectors of the Meroo. Description of the handsome residence of Mr F Bailey. Description of a new rush setting up along the river Frome Ck parallel to Rats Castle. Lawlessness - body of a German found hanging from a tree with his pockets cut in the mountains near Merindee - 'the black Bungaree who buried him reported that his head was broken and ... [he had been] stabbed... no coroner's inquest and ... [no] ... post mortem...' another man had received a fatal blow (Campbell's Ck) ... an American negro at Guntawang was knocked down and severely kicked... also buried without inquest etc... 'a Californian bravo ... save the reputation of his country... glide through forms that serve but to lend security to crime.

    Hide note
  41. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXXV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 15 July 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE plains of Merrinde[?], bounded to the southward by the forchills which terminate the steep descents from the table-land, extend to that point whe ... 1839 words
    • Text last corrected on 18 June 2011 by tonym
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-09 16:42:45.0

    Merindee to burrendong. Leaves Merindee to travel over the hills to Burrendong. Firstly travelling alone he spends a night lost in the bush. Describes the geography and the presence of large numbers of wild cattle and larger numbers of Kangaroos. Describes taking samples with 'knife and pint pot' - suggests that he doesn't take samples often and doesn't have equipment for it. Returns the way he came and finds a fellow traveller, they start off again and find their way.

    Hide note
  42. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXXVI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 16 July 1859 p 5 Article
    Abstract: MY LAST communication broke off somewhat abruptly, at the north-western boundary of the Burrendong mining district. I shall now, therefore, resume my ... 2825 words
    • Text last corrected on 14 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-09 16:49:59.0

    Description of the burrendong mining district. Notes on an American named Wallace who found a significant proportion of the gold bearing reef. Finds the diggings poor and very temporary in terms of structures and stores and public houses.

    Hide note
  43. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXXVII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 20 July 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: PURSUING my journey from the Burrendong across the plains, to the banks of the Macquarie, a short but pleasant ride brings me to the crossing-place o ... 2562 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-09 17:01:17.0

    Travels around the western edge of the gold districts visiting some of the creeks that join the Macquarie. Starts heading south from the heights he can see the hills around Mt Canoblas.

    Hide note
  44. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXXVIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 21 July 1859 p 8 Article
    Abstract: STONEY Creek was at one period a favourite resort of the diggers, partly on account of the unfailing supply of water, and partly on account of the ri ... 3417 words
    • Text last corrected on 14 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-09 17:06:51.0

    Muckerawa, iron bark, stone creek. Discusses the prospects of these goldfields and opportunities for their improvement.

    Hide note
  45. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXXIX.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 25 July 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THAT the Mullion Range does not now attract more attention must be attributed to the erratic propensities of the mining population, rather than to th ... 4173 words
    • Text last corrected on 15 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-09 20:45:11.0

    tavellig to Ophir - unclear if he has traversed all of the territory he describes. Mentions a man named white famed for extracting 47 labs of gold at Ophir. The author climbs to have met him combining of lack of golden opportunities on the southern fields, the author suggests this may relate to his work ethic...

    Hide note
  46. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XL.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 26 July 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: AT the first grey streak of dawn I issued from my comtortless quarters and crossed the Summerhill at the junction of Lewis' Ponds, where a mountain r ... 3138 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-12 21:06:02.0

    describes the flourishing agriculture of the region. Bark huts and shingled cottages, the plough at work in every direction - hawks, rooks, magpies and cockatoos watching the proceedings. But 'with all this there is assenting cold, and naked and comfortless... it has no hold upon the affections... it lacks paternal look of a good old English home... it is not improbable... it is not improbable that ... the intemperance that is the curse of the land has originate in the neglect of all domestic comfort ... love of country originates in love of home and he wo succeeds in inducing the people to improve the comfort of their dwellings will be a public benefactor.' Notes similarities between the soil here and on the banks off the Condamine and in the valleys of the Richmond and Clarence - had he been to the Darling Downs? Discusses land distribution around Orange and notes that the quality of the land is such that it could become the granary of NSW.

    Hide note
  47. A VISIT TO THE WESTERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XLI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 3 August 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: WE are again upon the road, and now turn our back upon the golden regions of the West, which terminate at Frederick's Valley; our way lays to the sou ... 2244 words
    • Text last corrected on 16 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-14 22:02:17.0

    Fredericks valley, canoblas, charcoal, Cowra. Description of geography and geology. Describes the kind of small farm that punctuates 'the monotony for the forest'. Bark hovel. Quotes from Oliver Goldsmith. Describes a night camping out in the forest in winter with no other shelter than his blanket. Describes the night sounds and discusses the nature of the wildlife that are astir at night. Spends much or the night awake because to the cold - watches the southern cross. Describes Carload - pretty compact little town - if it had a mineral spring it could be another Malvern Hills (Malvern was a fashionable spa town). Describes the town and then discusses issues with the selection of town poor sites - he describes them as picturesque desserts. To Cowra discusses the possibilities of irrigation and the town. Describes the pattern of settlement to Goulburn - farms and flour mills along the permanent creeks making the region relatively self sufficient.

    Hide note
  48. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 5 August 1859 p 5 Advertising
    2910 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-03 17:09:57.0

    Discusses the people of the west. Predominantly Irish the small farmers do it tough - lack of population, lack of labour, high costs of production - compares to the US. Describes the differences between life in Sydney and the bush and finishes with a small ode to the beauties of the Lachlan.

    Hide note
  49. BANK LIABILITIES AND ASSETS.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 13 August 1859 p 11 Detailed Lists, Results, Guides
    903 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-02-15 08:09:02.0

    Small article. For every 100 men only 2 will make more than the cost of their own labour. Even companies only break even. Discusses the labour force in Peru, Hungary and Russia - slave and oppressed labour. 'and I do not believe it can be shown that the search for gold has ever been successfully prosecuted in a country blessed with a free population by other than the labour of individuals on their own account or by co-operative companies". Begins a theme on the benefits of cooperation.

    Hide note
  50. WANDERINGS IN THE BUSH. (FROM OUR SPECIAL GOLD-FIELDS REPORTER.)
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 15 August 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: "OVER the river. Cross the rising ground to a dray track, and then four miles to the left and two to the right, when you will come upon the great sou ... 2217 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-11 14:55:41.0

    Cowra to Burrowa. Leaves cowra and promptly gets lost in land that is still uninhabited by Europeans. Spends the night in the forest, condenmes the moon as a lighting source to the traveller at night - notes evidence for a Chinese camp. Finding the road he finds the unsettled lands fertile and well watered grass lands that could easily carry crops, an area larger than some European kingdoms. Describes the geology and geography. Describes Borrowa, the settled district - gives an advertisement for one land owner who wants tenants - at good rates - and describes the town. Talks about the prospect of a road to Goulburn, but states that he cannot confirm the prospect as he has not seen it himself. Theme of young men with little to do hanging round the towns, getting into petty crime; ready to extort eg pinch your horse and sell it back to you or duff cattle a 'Mickie'. Seems to have discussed the issue with the chief constable at Burrowa.

    Hide note
  51. THE ROAD: BURROWA TO ADELONG. (FROM OUR SPECIAL GOLD-FIELDS REPORTER.)
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 19 August 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE district to the eastward of Burrowa, in common with most of the table land lying at the western base of the great dividing range extending from t ... 2777 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-30 07:32:59.0

    Burrowa to Galong and places in between. First travels east to Narrows on the Fish river, describes the similarities with the Turon and Meroo and the gold bearing possibilities. Travels west to the most magnificent sheep run - no name. To Binalong, describes the town and its prospects, mostly owned by a publican and a store keeper the author does not hold that this will bode well for the future of the town, even though it is rich in galena and should support a lead industry. Onto Cunningham plains - the rich plateau lands between Harden and Young. lack of water may prove an impediment but gives an example of a station the traps water by daming a dry water course. A property Cunningham, the proprietor has been allowed to select or buy up all of the surrounding land - quote from Robinson Crusoe. A bit of a rant about the population and settlement policy of the colony. Maintains that the land between the Murrumbidgee and the Lachlan bigger then many European kingdoms is sufficient to support a population of 3 million. But he suggests the policy is wrong as it attempts to 'plant a nation without a yeomanry'. He describes the towns of the interior as clusters of pothouses - continuing his themes of alcoholism and lack of homeliness. Then discusses the need to use the rivers for navigation and that this should be pursed to foster the settlement of the area - describes I some detail the use of flat-bottomed river craft into he US that agitate rivers and carry goods on waters much worse than the great rivers of NSW. Describes the general features of the headwaters of the rivers and describes the differences in sason and particulary of the dry season, where the fierce summer heat licks up every particle of moisture. Looks to the future of railways linking Sydney with the headwaters of the rivers - in particular with Wagga.

    Hide note
  52. GUNDAGAI AND ITS ENVIRONS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL GOLD-FIELDS REPORTER.]
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 26 August 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: SOME soulless biped in Victoria is reported to have deliberately written that "Australia is not worth fighting for." Has he ever witnessed the glorie ... 3916 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-01-01 10:44:27.0

    Soulless biped. Highlights the scenic glories of Australia 'the future happy homes of millions of our race as yet unborn.' Describes the countryside travelling south from Galong - summit of a range dividing the waters of the Lachlan and Murrumbidgee. Claims to see the snow caped wastes to the south. Describes the Hume Hwy to the east, a new bridge at Jugiong, almost impassable ditch over the ridges - worst road in the coloney. Observes the summit of a volcanic remnant[?] near the Muttama to the west.. describes an abandoned farm, memorial to a daring pioneer. Describes the gold bearing qualities of the creeks and the Money Money range. Arrives at Mrs Hanley's Inn (Muttama or Mingay Ck). Mt Parnassus, describes the view of 'surpassing loveliness" cottages, humble huts and forest. Begins the description of Gundagai - bad roads, idle young men outside the public houses, 'god made the country man made the town' [John Cowper's Olney Hymns]

    Hide note
  53. A VISIT TO THE SOUTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. I. THE ADELONG.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 5 September 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: HAVING crossed the Murrumbidgee at Gundagai, and the rich river flats, subject to frequent inundation, and passed Spencer's new steam-mill, we parted ... 2768 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-02 10:27:17.0

    Gundagai to Adelong. Describes the land following the highway (Hume) until it crosses the Adelong and then follows the valley of that creek to the town. Detonations - Gibraltar reef. Describes the geology, a history of lava flows. Tents and human activity on the heights and covering the hill. Williamstown (is this Grahamstown) . description of Adelong, Victoria reef, hotels, bridge crossing the Adelong, the tableland around the commissioners camp. 3000 souls many children, no school and no preachers. quartz crushing is being successfully carried out in NSW here for the first time. But 'many have laboured... few have reaped the reward'

    Hide note
  54. A VISIT TO THE SOUTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. II,
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 19 September 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: HAVING endeavoured in a former communication to give a general description of the Adelong, above ground, we will now ascend the low range to the left ... 4016 words
    • Text last corrected on 22 December 2013 by teddydog
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-09-16 11:56:35.0

    Adelong below ground. If a granite pebble could write its history, what man's life would suffice to enable him to read-to follow it in its varied migrations during the fapse of a thousand ages through the incandescent fires of the new bom earth, the ocean's depths, and the wreck of continents

    Hide note
  55. A VISIT TO THE SOUTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. III.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 28 September 1859 p 8 Article
    Abstract: IN our progress down the slopes following the course of the great quartz reef of Adelong, we had, in my last, reached the claim of Iredale and Compan ... 3416 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-09 00:40:56.0

    mines, miners and mine owners. The chemistry of gold reefs. 'nature is a simple chemist and varies her productions according to the materials upon which she operates.'

    Hide note
  56. A VISIT TO THE SOUTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. IV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 29 September 1859 p 8 Article
    Abstract: WE will now return to the crown of the great reef, and take a concise review of the operations carried on upon the northern slopes of the hill. The d ... 3148 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 February 2010 by OwenBurch
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-09 10:18:52.0

    mines, miners and owners continued. Interesting name early mine owner - Don Francisca Carreras. Discusses each of the claims on the various reefs. "from one heart that rejoices on a goldfield there are a hundred crushed and broken. The smiling there the light on graves, Has rank cold hearts beneath it." Ends with 'gloomy reflections; how far a new country is really advanced by such an expenditure of its chief resource, its labour... the wilderness is unbroken; ... no happy, smiling, homesteads have risen in the forest, and the country has derived no permanent advantage from the labours of these men...

    Hide note
  57. QUARTZ CRUSHING AT ADELONG—ITS CHEMICAL DIFFICULTIES. [FROM OUR SPECIAL GOLD-FIELDS REPORTER.]
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 4 October 1859 p 8 Article
    Abstract: HAVING, in my last two letters, described the piocess of raising the auriferous quartz from the great reef, we will now follow it to the crushing mil ... 2864 words
    • Text last corrected on 29 March 2012 by Douglas22
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-09 12:42:20.0

    Description of the industrial process. Visits and describes the crushing machines. Notes deficiencies and benefits also lack of chemical engineering skills on the goldfields. Suggests that the Victorian colonial government is more thoughtful in supporting the needs of industry. Suggests the colonial government should rep in assistance from Mr Faraday and co, references California and praises the engineering skill of the colony in producing gut machines.

    Hide note
  58. A VISIT TO THE SOUTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] NO. VI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 17 October 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: HAVING endeavoured to describe the great reel of the Adelons, we will now direct our attention to the lesser reefs in its vicinity, a detailed descri ... 2812 words
    • Text last corrected on 6 September 2014 by wpjacobs
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-09 23:59:30.0

    Exploring the other reefs and suggest that there is more gold to be discovered. Need for capital!

    Hide note
  59. A VISIT TO THE SOUTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. VII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 25 October 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: MY last was with reference to the lesser reefs of the Adelong. Since writing, I have met with a person on the hanks of the Murrumbidgee, who has been ... 1976 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-03-11 22:28:47.0

    Continuing the exploration of the field. Decries the lack of land for the township t provide itself with milk and butter. Suggests that there may be some corruption in the allocation of land to the township as the commissioner is also a substantial local landowner. Moves on to describe the children of which there are lots - how well are they fed, more importantly they have no education. Suggests that mining districts should be arranged in to municipalities to provide schools thorough there own taxation. 'while we are splitting hairs weighing atoms and ... they are fast approaching a state of primeval barbarism... onto a discussion of sly grog - the withering curse - and then back to geography/ geology.

    Hide note
  60. A VISIT TO THE SOUTHERN GOLD FIELDS [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. VIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 26 October 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: LEAVING the din and tumult of the camp, and the ceaseless clatter of the mills, we will once again essay the wilderness, and follow, the Adelong to i ... 3344 words
    • Text last corrected on 10 February 2010 by OwenBurch
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-18 13:04:40.0

    Travelling along the Adelong creek to its course. Describes the floral beauties on the slopes of the hills, 'a thousand other nameless plants and shrubs... they are strangers all ... the most interesting is the daisy and the buttercup: - they are old friends and call to mind other lands and with them a flood of recollections of the past.' Continues south toward the headwaters of the Adelong. Describes mining activity and hydraulic operations ...

    Hide note
  61. A VISIT TO THE SOUTHERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. IX.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 27 October 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: I CLOSED my lost with an account of the hydraulic operations either carried on or in contemplation at the head of Watson's Creek, and will now procee ... 3933 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-18 18:42:16.0

    continue journey to the headwaters of the Adelong describes mining activities. Crosses east to the Gilmore creek and travels south into the mountains for 20 miles. Discusses the need for better land distribution policies; current practices keeping the population in a state of serfdom. Mentions US in the time of Lord Baltimore.

    Hide note
  62. A VISIT TO THE SOUTHERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. X. THE VALLEY OF THE TUMUT.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 8 November 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE beautiful stream of the Lower Gilmore, now brawling over its bed of many-coloured pebbles, its spray sparkling like myriads: of liquid gems, as i ... 3382 words
    • Text last corrected on 27 December 2013 by teddydog
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-18 19:34:03.0

    Follows the Gilmore to Tumut. Detailed description of the beauties encountered along the way. Explores the town of Tumut. Talks about the good state of education and compares it to the low state in the European alps and its affects - ignorance and superstition. Also talks about the beneficial climate for European settlement in the high country. Heads on towards Yass.

    Hide note
  63. ON THE WAY TO THE NORTHERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. I.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 26 November 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: IT wants but an hour of midnight: the last bell has rung, the last farewel has been spoken, the hawser has been cast off from the wharf, and with two ... 2554 words
    • Text last corrected on 22 September 2010 by Mark-Rogers
    • 1 comment on 20 September 2010
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-18 21:08:06.0

    Travels at midnight in a steamship down the harbour. Quotes Byron Describes the harbour and Sydney at night. Onto Newcastle, description of the river estuary, town and then another ship. Men heading for the Clarence and the Timburra or Touloome. many of them had no idea f where that were going than if they were about to land in Japan. Describes the view to landward Mt Seaview to the south of the Clarence. Describes the auriferous potential of the northern reaches of the Clarence. Crossing the bar - he has been there before as he describes crossing the bar previously. Describes the luxuriant vegetation and difficulties of exploration. Notes aboriginal people waving at the boat. Talks about Mr Clarke Irving a large landowner . the steamer lets him off at Laurence a few miles from Grafton. Describes the road, characters and discuss the streams including the northern Rocky. Town of Tableau at the junction of the Clarence and Richmond rivers - as wide as the Thames at Richmond.

    Hide note
  64. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. II.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 13 December 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: AT the point where two main rivers, one coming from the southward, and the other from the northward, unite their streams, swollen with the tribute of ... 2774 words
    • Text last corrected on 30 July 2013 by kjharris
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2016-01-09 16:51:50.0

    Arrives at Tabulam and the Tooloom goldfield. Describes the scenery and prospects of the valley. Critiques land distribution policies. Discusses the history of farming in the region and the decline of homesteads. Fairfield goldfield. Notes that some claims are delivering thousands of Ls in gold. The author has been to the region previously and some of the miners he had previously met have left.

    Hide note
  65. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. III.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 26 December 1859 p 3 Article
    Abstract: ABOUT nineteen miles north, twenty east, from Fairfield, in a direct line, or thirty miles following the bridle track passing in the neighbourhood of ... 2927 words
    • Text last corrected on 9 February 2014 by goldpan
    • 1 comment on 9 February 2014
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-20 21:33:28.0

    Discussion of the discovery of the Tooloom goldfield, lack of water fierce nature of the aboriginal people. Description of the geology. Prospecting habits, reworking claims. Sheltering with a party of Chinese - sharing a tent in a thunderstorm. Discuss the differences between Chinese and English prospecting techniques. Competition between Grafton and Armidale for leadership in the region. Ends with news of a hailstorm that devastates Tenterfield.

    Hide note
  66. TOOLOOM.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 3 January 1860 p 5 Article
    Abstract: WRITING from the Timbarra on the 20th ultimo, our special reporter says:— Not one drop of rain has yet reached this place, the creek has consequently ... 335 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-20 21:35:23.0

    Brief article from the Tooloom goldfield.

    Hide note
  67. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. IV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 5 January 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: Two years since the character of the rugged country precipitously descending from the plateau of New England to the waters of the Clarence was little ... 4236 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-21 18:45:58.0

    Wanderings in rugged country above the northern rocky river. Mt Girard, McLeod, Timburra. Describes scrambling down hillsides clinging onto bushes for support.

    Hide note
  68. GOLD AND ITS COST. [FROM OUR SPECIAL GOLD-FIELDS REPORTER.]
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 6 January 1860 p 5 Article
    Abstract: AFTER an examination of the auriferous districts of the colony of New South Wales, extending over a period of fourteen months, it may not be out of p ... 1643 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-21 18:46:22.0

    Economics of gold

    Hide note
  69. GOLD AND ITS COST. SECOND ARTICLE. (From our Special Gold-fields' Reporter.)
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 9 January 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: WITHIN the last twelve months no practical improvement in the method of separating the alluvium from the gold which it is supposed to contain, has be ... 2112 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-21 18:46:40.0

    Economics of gold

    Hide note
  70. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. V.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 19 January 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE plateau on which the M'Leod and Sandy Creek have their source stands like an island in advance of the main table land, to which it is connected b ... 3457 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-22 22:03:04.0

    Around the Timbarra

    Hide note
  71. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. VI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 21 January 1860 p 7 Article
    Abstract: WE have already traced M'Leod's Creek for about seven miles from its junction with the Timbarra, and will now follow it in its tortuous course to the ... 3371 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-23 07:39:57.0

    McLeod's creek and the Timbarra - to a 'hughe basin encompassed with the frantic skeletons of mountains... storms that once battled round their peaks.' onto Sandy ck. diggers and the returns from their work in the area. 'at one point I thought I had strayed into the wilds of Connemara and dropped upon a 'potheen' still...' the secrecy of the diggers in the area. Diggers 'burrowing like wombats'. Mobs of Chinese re working diggings left by Europeans. Clarke's Inn - discussion of land purchasing rules, not favouring the original settlers. Small store and 'butchering establishment... two Celestial establishments... contrive to pick up their own share of the gold obtained from the neighbourhood.' Dramatic description of the local - scenery. Diggers have worked the stream and gone 'to new Caledonia to grow cotton and sugar, others ... to England, and more to the United States.'

    Hide note
  72. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD-FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. VII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 27 February 1860 p 8 Article
    Abstract: UP here in the far north, amidst the rocks and mountains, streams and valleys, the digger has thrown off his holiday suit, got rid of his headache, l ... 1065 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-23 22:56:24.0

    report dated 30 January back in Fairfield. A largely numerous newsy overview of dealings and goings on the northern diggings. Comments on QLD bid to draw diggers north. Also talks about the accidental deaths of two children on the diggings, the Chinese moving north, and an incident of a Grafton courier who is robbed after a night of drinking.

    Hide note
  73. FATAL BOAT ACCIDENT. TWO LIVES LOST.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 27 February 1860 p 5 Article
    Abstract: A MOST distressing accident, by which a family have been plunged into deep grief, occurred about half-past five o'clock on Saturday last. Mr. Parfitt ... 3592 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-23 23:04:19.0

    13 February. Very brief article with news of a gold strikes and social conditions (with the removal of troopers). Ends with some geological notes.

    Hide note
  74. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. VIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 2 March 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: A FEW hundred yards to the northward of the lone roadside inn at Fairfield, save and except the chance of meeting a wondering digger, you have looked ... 3145 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-23 23:39:22.0

    Heads north from Fairfield into the unpeopled wilderness towards Queensland. Dramatic description of a flash summer thunderstorm in the mountains - draws on his pipe (Irish - dudheen). Over the Gerard (Girard) range to Emu creek. Imagines the ancient ocean breaking against the then coastal range. As time goes by the coast changes, sea birds whiten the cliffs, But then the plateau rises, sun, wind and rain take over shaping the mountains and eventually they are clothed in trees and grass and flowers. His spirit has wandered and now returns to his body at the fringe of emu creek. Onto Cataract river and pretty gully.

    Hide note
  75. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. IX.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 3 March 1860 p 5 Article
    Abstract: As ever creeping time ushers the crowd along the dreary track that leads to the dark valleys how brief the journey appears to those who read his reco ... 2580 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-24 08:30:09.0

    Heading for Touloome. Rugged grandeur and sublimity of the surroundings, discusses how mans ability to read the history of the landscape leads us to see no horrors but to look beyond to a first 'first cause'. Thinks about Byron's Manfred brought into being by similar R prospects and similar thinking, but in Switzerland. Is brought out of his thoughts by meeting some diggers. The heat - he had been leading his horse for mile and yet still the sweat trickled from him - he rushed into the river with delight. Crosses the Clarence. Then gets into a conversation with two diggers on its banks about the need for a savings bank on the gold fields, the lot of the digger and his value to the colony, the value of a gentry class to England, underemployment, agricultural policy, imports form the US and the US agricultural system. And as he travels on he reaches the top of another plateau and now he is in another climate the cool breeze is delicious. On to the Touloom creek and the eight mile rush.

    Hide note
  76. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. X.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 5 March 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: FEW parts of New South Wales present such a rugged and broken aspect as the country intersected by the Lower Touloome, having its source in an irregu ... 2848 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-24 12:00:30.0

    The 8 mile rush - McLean a successful prospectors - Joes Gully a subsidiary camp. Describes the geomorphology of the region and the unexplored nature of the territory given its ruggedness. Describes the great plateau that forms to dDarling Downs to the north and intersected by the MacPherson range or series of isolated summits. Discusses that differences between volcanic action and rising from internal heat - perhaps tectonic action had yet to be theorised. There is potential on the Touloom but the author cautions

    Hide note
  77. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 8 March 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: FROM the Main Camp at Touloome, the road pursues a course cast of north, rolling over undulating slopes which succeed the more elevated ranges to the ... 2020 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-24 13:59:48.0

    Nth towards sugar loaf Mt and then onto toward Mt Lindsay - did he actually go that far? If he didn't he is very familiar with the region. Talks about Casino then a small village - smaller than some of the mining camps he has described. The Richmond river to its bar - discusses issues with navigation. Comments on the small population between the Richmond and the tweed. The lot of a timber cutter, the indolence of the locals and the fact that the country is being flooded with American grain and manufactures Which the population if they were more industrious could be providing for themselves. Continually refers to the lack of population. Back to Touloom man camp and then onto Tabulam - suspect this is all in a day so may not have gone as far as Mt Lindsay - definitely not Casino.

    Hide note
  78. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 14 March 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE fountains of the M'Leod, whose beetling crags, impervious scrubs, and treacherous swamps, were in sufficient to protect its golden treasures from ... 2406 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-24 17:15:48.0

    To Tenterfield. Probably starting at McLeod's creek. Town growing in support of the goldfields. Discusses the climate, healthy so healthy that doctors go broke! Farming and possibilities for crop production and institutions, no church and no school. Be moans that number of taverns and discusses te economics of alcohol in the colony. The village of 400 has a bowling alley! Journeys south describes the geological and agricultural character of the regions - compares it to Devonshire. Much successful cultivation of English fruit and vegetables. Stays at and comments on several farms 'Bolivia' and then onto the village of Dundee.

    Hide note
  79. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 21 March 1860 p 2 Article
    Abstract: FROM Dundee, following the banks of the rocky little stream of the Severn, in its progress to the westward, through an undulating country, monotonous ... 2970 words
    • Text last corrected on 8 March 2013 by anonymous
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-30 07:58:31.0

    Journey south

    Hide note
  80. THE SNOWY RIVER FROM A NORTHERN POINT OF VIEW. [FROM OUR SPECIAL GOLD-FIELDS REPORTER.]
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 21 March 1860 p 5 Article
    Abstract: URALLA, MARCH 10.—The miners on these northern gold-fields have been growing daily more uneasy, and now turn their eyes wistfully towards the Austral ... 951 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-24 18:16:55.0

    Refers to his own articles from Adelong - previous October. Also to characters from Dickens. concern that reports from the snowies are not accurate. concern for the miners I a snowy mountain winter and concern that many of those travelling south don't know where to go.

    Hide note
  81. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XIV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 23 March 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: MOUNT Mitchell, rising on the south-east margin of the platform that forms the base of the Ben Lomond range, is one off those remarkable domite eleva ... 3098 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-27 21:30:37.0

    Ramble from Dundee west and then south to Ben Lomond. West to Mt Mitchell. Commentary on the geology and morphology, pastoral pursuits and cattle. Compares rocky outcrops to Stonehenge (had he been?) compares the changeability of the climate around Mt Mitchell to a woman - all smiles and then all frowns!

    Hide note
  82. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XIV.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 9 April 1860 p 2 Article
    Abstract: AND now for the Southern limits of the Clarence basin, which, wild and rugged as it may appear to the casual traveller along the beaten paths, contai ... 2474 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-30 07:51:12.0

    From Oban to Armidale. Following the creeks and rivers describes the geology and geomorphology of the southern Clarence basin and the headwaters of the Macleay river. Describes the gold potential and some diggings, land title and distribution issues.

    Hide note
  83. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XVI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 23 April 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: AS we approach that portion of the eastern slopes of the main range in the vicinity of Armidale, the surface of the declining country, where the trap ... 4803 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-30 07:57:26.0

    armidale

    Hide note
  84. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLDFIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XVII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 30 April 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE Southern mail-road from Armidale at once plunges into the open forest upon leaving the township. To the south-west there has been no agricultural ... 2679 words
    • Text last corrected on 26 May 2013 by anonymous
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-31 20:49:55.0

    Description of the geology around Armidale and Uralla. Starts his decryption of the rocky river field.

    Hide note
  85. A CHARACTERISTIC SKETCH OF THE GOLD-DIGGER. [BY OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.]
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 13 May 1859 p 6 Article
    Abstract: THERE is no person for whom hope does so much as the gold-digger; she sustains him through hardships and dangers at the bare contemplation of which o ... 2541 words
    • Text last corrected on 23 February 2011 by Beatrice
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2013-12-31 18:22:22.0

    Reprint

    Hide note
  86. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD FIELDS. (FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XVIII.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 14 May 1860 p 5 Article
    Abstract: DIRECTING our course to the north-east, at the base of Mount Mutton ridge, we reach the dry channel of a creek. This stream, rising in a narrow but s ... 3027 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-31 20:53:03.0

    Continues his journey around the Rocky river goldfield.

    Hide note
  87. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XIX.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 16 May 1860 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE more a practical observer examines the country surrounding the scene of mining operations at the head of the Uralla, the stronger will be his con ... 1583 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-31 21:00:06.0

    disuccses the difficulties of exploration in the mountainous regions. Prospecting as a high risk and uncomfortable venture. Lack of support from the government and fellow contents in NSW - things are better in Victoria. Notes that the whole of Arts in Sydney contains American trash - literature, but no works on geology.

    Hide note
  88. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XX.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 17 May 1860 p 5 Article
    Abstract: CONCLUDING our hasty survey of the formation of the country drianed by the Uralla, we find ourselves again in the roadside village to which it has gi ... 3486 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-31 21:28:34.0

    Description of the tiny township of Uralla (5 or 6 cottages). Calls the field the Uralla, yet to be called the Rocky. Describes the field as close to exhausted. Again discusses failures in land distribution policies to settle small holders in the district. Discussion of a Cornish miner who drinks, shies off alcohol but ends up loosing all his money in a tavern. The woman tavern owner on the other hand is rich and has been mistaken for a lady ... discusses the population of the goldfield. Describes the youth young women and men. Continues describing the field and workings. Discusses issue with policies fostering a 'waste of labour' basically small holdings numerous shafts etc

    Hide note
  89. A VISIT TO THE NORTHERN GOLD FIELDS. [FROM OUR SPECIAL REPORTER.] No. XXI.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 25 May 1860 p 3 Article
    Abstract: ON the long slope at the south-western termination of Mount Jones is a rude slab edifice, under a calico roof, sometimes used as a Roman Catholic cha ... 2824 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2014-05-31 21:41:02.0

    Continues to describe the goldfield - notes the lack of Christian guidance and suggests that missionaries could be transferred fro Fiji. Discusses the role of a commissioner on the field ' and where so much depends upon moral force the less he is seen ... the better.' Move to form an association of miners on the goldfields. Notes that at least one third of the labour of the colony is concentrated on the Maneroo.

    Hide note
  90. To the Editor of the Herald.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 27 April 1860 p 8 Article
    Abstract: SIN,—Is your publication of 9th instant, I notice among other inaccuracies in a letter hended "A Visit to the Northern Gold-fields, from our Special ... 145 words
    • Tagged as: f dalton
    • Text last corrected on 20 August 2017 by LLBC
    Digitised article icon
  91. To the Editor of the Herald.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Monday 30 April 1860 p 8 Article
    Abstract: SIR.—My attention has been directed to a letter published in this day's ' issue of the Sydney Morning Herald sighed by the superintendent of Tilbuste ... 513 words
    Digitised article icon
  92. To the Editor of the Herald.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Friday 18 May 1860 p 4 Article
    Abstract: SIR,—In your publication of April 30th I observe a letter by your special reporter to the Northern gold-fields endesvouring to prove, by a letter fro ... 658 words
    Digitised article icon
  93. THE MERCURY. MONDAY MORNING, MAY 2, 1870.
    The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954) Monday 2 May 1870 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE reports of Mr. TULLY and Mr. GOULD, with the maps by the latter of portions of what he calls "Western Tasmania, though ignored by the Survey Offi ... 4023 words
    Digitised article icon
  94. MINES AND MINING. Mr. Warden Dalton's Report on the Billabong Gold-field.
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 20 November 1875 p 18 Article
    Abstract: COMMENCING with the Billabong Gold Field, which is now virtually an extension of the Lachlan Gold Fields, I beg to refer to my annual report for the ... 3172 words
    Digitised article icon
  95. MINES AND MINING. Mining Warden's Report. (From the Annual Report of the Department of Mines, N. S. W. for 1876.) LACHLAN DISTRICT. (Mr. Warden Dalton, P.M., Forbes.) (CONCLUDED.) FLYER'S CREEK.
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 11 August 1877 p 18 Article
    Abstract: GATHERING their waters from the swamps and valleys of the Forest, the tributaries of Flyer's Creek, deseending about 500 feet, unite and flow at the ... 1307 words
    Digitised article icon
  96. MINES AND MINING. The Billabong Goldfield.
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 2 May 1874 p 19 Article
    Abstract: THE following report from the Gold Commissioner Lachlan, to the Commissioner-in-charge, Bathurst appeared as an appendix to Mr. Whittingdale Johnson' ... 2855 words
    Digitised article icon
  97. Lachlan District—Northern Division. (CONTINUED.) MR. WARDEN DALTON, P.M., FOR THE LACHLAN. (From the Annual Report of the Department of Mines, New South Wales, for the year 1875.)
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 14 October 1876 p 19 Article
    Abstract: THE Ben Nevis, never very productive, is in the same state as at the close of last year. The deepest ground is now ascertained to be in the centre of ... 2327 words
    Digitised article icon
  98. The New Goldfield between the Began and the Lachlan.
    Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Saturday 8 July 1876 p 5 Article
    Abstract: REPORT by Mr. Warden Dalton on the metalliferous character of Burra Burra:— "Warden's Office, Forbes, 28th June, 1876. "Sir,—In accordance with instr ... 2095 words
    Digitised article icon
  99. TELEGRAPHIC NEWS. (From the Sydney Papers.) DISCOVERY OF A NEW GOLD FIELD.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Thursday 16 February 1871 p 2 Article
    Abstract: [Evening News.]—We are favoured with the following telegram, received this morning, from F. Dalton, Esq., P M., Forbes, by the hon. the Secretary for ... 172 words
    Digitised article icon
  100. LATER NEWS. 6 p.m.
    Wagga Wagga Advertiser and Riverine Reporter (NSW : 1868 - 1875) Saturday 18 February 1871 p 2 Article
    Abstract: The mail reached the Sound a day late. Mr. Childers has retired from the Cabinet through illness. 1652 words
    Digitised article icon
  101. MINES AND MINING. Mining Warden's Eeport, (From the Annual Report of the Department of Mines, N. S. W. for 1876.) LACHLAN DISTRICT. (Mr. Warden Dalton, P.M., Forbes.) (CONTINUED.) ...
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 4 August 1877 p 18 Article
    Abstract: I HAVE but little to add to the foregoing remarles the result of my visit to this division in April last. There has been the same scarcity of water d ... 2205 words
    Digitised article icon
  102. WEDDIN MOUNTAINS GOLD-FIELD.
    The Bega Gazette and Eden District or Southern Coast Advertiser (NSW : 1865 - 1899) Saturday 8 December 1866 p 2 Article
    Abstract: Mr. Neale (without notice) asked the Secretary for Lands if he had received any report from the Waddin Mountains Gold-fields, and, if so, what was th ... 429 words
    Digitised article icon
  103. Mr. Warden Dalton's Report on the Billabeng Gold-field.
    Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Tuesday 23 November 1875 p 3 Article
    Abstract: COMMENCING with the Billabong Gold Field which is now virtually an extension of the Lachlan Gold Fields, I beg to refer to my annual report for the y ... 2875 words
    Digitised article icon
  104. MINES AND MIKING. Mr. Warden Dalton's Report on the Billabong Gold Field. (CONCLUDED.)
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 27 November 1875 p 18 Article
    Abstract: I NOW come to M'Guiggan's Lead, as regards the north side of the creek, is the most important discovery during 1874. Amongst the same hills from whic ... 3225 words
    Digitised article icon
  105. METALLIFEROUS CHARACTER OF BURRA BURRA.
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Wednesday 5 July 1876 p 3 Article
    Abstract: THE following report by Mr. Warden Dalton will be read with attention by persons interested in the Burra Burra district:— "Warden's Office, Forbes 28 ... 2550 words
    Digitised article icon
  106. The New Goldfield between the Bogan and the Lachlan.
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 8 July 1876 p 10 Article
    Abstract: REPOFT by Mr. Warden Dalton on the metalliferous character of Burra Burra:"Warden's Office, Forbes, 28th June, 1876. " Sir,-In accordance with instru ... 2101 words
    Digitised article icon
  107. MINES AND MINING. Lachlan District-Northern Division. | (From the Annual Report of the Department ot Mines, New South Wales, for the year 1875.)
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 7 October 1876 p 18 Article
    Abstract: I HAVE now the honour to report upon the present state of the mining district under my charge, and regret that I have been unable to do so at an earl ... 2667 words
    Digitised article icon
  108. NEWS OF THE DAY. Suicide at Orange.
    Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931) Monday 9 October 1876 p 2 Article
    Abstract: A correspondent writing from Orange on the 8th instant says:-Mrs. Byrne, of Kite-street, Orange, poisoned herself at half-past 11 Sunday morning by t ... 625 words
    Digitised article icon
  109. MINES AND MINING. Mining Warden's Report. (From the Annual Report of the Department of Mines, N. S. W., for 1876.) LACHLAN DISTRICT. (Mr. Warden Dalton, P.M., Forbes.)
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 14 July 1877 p 18 Article
    Abstract: THE absence of rain in the northern portion of the Lachlan Mining District during the past year, has restricted gold mining to such parts of the old ... 2547 words
    • Tagged as: f dalton
    • Text last corrected on 15 January 2016 by anonymous
    Digitised article icon
  110. MINES AND MINING. Mining Warden's Report. (From the Annual Report of the Department of Mines, N. S. W. for 1876.) LACHLAN DISTRICT. (Mr. Warden Dalton, P.M., Forbes.) (CONTINUED.) ...
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 21 July 1877 p 18 Article
    Abstract: AMONGST the discoveries of 1876 may be recorded the fact that the rock upon which the auriferous drift of the Bushman's Lead reposed at a depth of 90 ... 1706 words
    Digitised article icon
  111. MINES ATO MINING. Mining Warden's Report. (From the Annual Report of the Department of Mines, N. S. W. LACHLAN DISTRICT. (Mr. Warden Dalton, P.M., Forbes.) (CONTINUED.) EMU CREEK A...
    Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907) Saturday 28 July 1877 p 18 Article
    Abstract: DURING my visit to the Emu Creek Goldfield, in April last, knowing that the working shaft, situated upon the quartz workings held by the Grenfell Con ... 2999 words
    Digitised article icon
  112. PARKES. [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.]
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Thursday 2 August 1877 p 2 Article
    Abstract: THE first appearance of spring is just manifesting itself in tho blossoming of the almond trees. The country in the immediate vicinity of Parkes and ... 755 words
    Digitised article icon
  113. DISCOVERY OF A NEW AND EXTENSIVE GOLD FIELD.
    Illustrated Sydney News (NSW : 1853 - 1872) Saturday 15 December 1866 p 3 Article Illustrated
    Abstract: ONE of the most important events of the month has been the discovery of an extensive gold-field on Wood's Run, near the Weddin Mountains, a locality ... 432 words
    Digitised article icon
  114. THE GOVERNMENT TELEGRAMS.
    The Tumut and Adelong Times (NSW : 1864 - 1867; 1899 - 1950) Thursday 6 December 1866 p 4 Article
    Abstract: In the Assembly, on Wednesday, 28th ult., Mr Neale (without notice) asked the Secretary for Lands if he had received any report from the Weddin Mount ... 556 words
    Digitised article icon
  115. CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT. (Abridged from the Empire.) THURSDAY, AUGUST 4.
    The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 - 1893) Tuesday 9 August 1859 p 2 Article
    Abstract: John Ratcliffe, convicted on a previous day of an attempt to commit a burglary, was sentenced to be imprisoned for twelve calender months in Darlingh ... 6215 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-31 15:23:23.0

    reprint

    Hide note
  116. Advertising
    The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Tuesday 26 July 1859 p 5 Advertising
    2922 words
    Digitised article icon
    Note

    2015-01-31 15:26:12.0

    reprint

    Hide note
  117. QUARTZ-CRUSHING AT ADELONG.
    Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899) Saturday 5 November 1859 p 1 Article
    Abstract: Having, in my last two letters, described the process of raising the auriferous quartz from the great reef, we will now follow it to the crushing mil ... 2581 words
    • Tagged as: f dalton
    • Text last corrected on 10 December 2015 by anonymous
    Digitised article icon
  118. QUARTZ-CRUSHING AT ADELONG— ITS CHEMICAL DIFFICULTIES.
    The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Thursday 27 October 1859 p 6 Article
    Abstract: Having, in my last two letters, described the process of raising the auriferous quartz from the great reef, we will now follow it to the crushing mil ... 3757 words
    Digitised article icon