Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Lots of lines of almost nothing

  1. #1
    Prolific poster
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    257

    Lots of lines of almost nothing

    Me again.
    Item: http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/2193395
    Sydney Gazette, 12 September 1829, page 3, article on Emigration to the Swan River Colony.
    At the transfer from column 2 to column 3 of the article, some twenty lines of virtual nothingness appear, consisting of two or three apparently random letters per line from goodness knows where. My instinct is to delete them all, leaving a giant space. OK?
    But where in the world do they come from?

  2. #2
    Staff Moderator mraadgev [NLA]'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    366
    Hi Catessa

    The reason for these lines of 'nothingness' is that when the article has been processed, the 'zones' for each column have slightly overlapped into the next column, which has then been read by the OCR as a separate line (due to the clear delineation between the columns, the OCR software does sometimes pick up columns without being told...).

    This is one of the few cases where simply deleting the content of the lines is acceptable, however you do need to cautious when doing this, as the lines are duplicates, and you may receive an error if you save both this line and the full version of the line at the same time, so I would suggest that you save these separately to any other corrections you make on the article. You also need to be aware that sometimes these won't be deleted, so if this happens just try to ignore them...

    Mark
    Mark
    Trove Support
    National Library of Australia

  3. #3
    Prolific poster
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    257
    I'll check down and see whether the letters appear to have been ripped out from text lower down.
    I trust I can also use the "Undelete", unless perhaps if I have saved an alteration.

  4. #4
    Staff Moderator mraadgev [NLA]'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    366
    They may or may not appear the same as the text further down - the easiest way to see if there has been an overlap between the columns is to download the article as a JPG, and if there is an overlap you will see this (as long as the JPG only provides a single column at a time...)

    Mark
    Mark
    Trove Support
    National Library of Australia

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •