Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: fulltext versus exactPhrase

  1. #1
    Trove user wragge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    63

    Question fulltext versus exactPhrase

    I'm just wondering what the difference is between using fulltext:"your phrase" in the search box and exact phrase in advanced search.

    If I do a search on the phrase "new age" I get different results:

    8,308 results using exact phrase
    7,531 results using fulltext:"new age"

    Also, in both cases there still seems to be some fuzziness. For example there are matches in both for "new post age", "new cord age" etc. This only seems to happen when there's a line break - ie. "new post" on one line, "age" on the next. Is there any way of modifying this behaviour?

    cheers
    Tim Sherratt
    @wragge on Twitter
    Words at discontents.com.au
    Experiments at wraggelabs.com and labs.nma.gov.au

  2. #2
    Trove user wragge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    63
    ok, answering at least part of my own question...

    There still seems to be stemming on an exact phrase search -- ie "new ages" etc

    Still wondering about the other issue though...
    Tim Sherratt
    @wragge on Twitter
    Words at discontents.com.au
    Experiments at wraggelabs.com and labs.nma.gov.au

  3. #3
    Staff Moderator mraadgev [NLA]'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    518
    Wragge,

    (you posted your reply whilst I was typing)

    Phrase search in advanced search is not an exact phrase (hence we do not call it 'exact phrase'), and it will capture near matches - for example your search for "new age" would also return results for "new ages", "news age" and other combinations. Using fulltext:"new age" will not match these results.

    The matches you are getting with "new post age" and "new cord age" with the fulltext: search is because these articles are being indexed as if there was (correctly when we look at the images) a hyphen between the parts of the words, although there is no hyphen in the supplied text (I'm not sure why this is happening though). These terms are indexed as synonyms, with each part of the word as well as the combined word in the same location (so you would have 'post', 'age' and 'postage' indexed in the same location, which does mean a phrase search that includes any of these parts will pick up the word, which may appear in the article snippets).

    In terms of modifying the behaviour, the only reliable way to do this would be to exclude the terms that are not relevant to your results, so in the examples you've provided, add -"new post" and -"new cord" to your search, which will exclude these specific phrases.
    Mark
    Trove Support
    National Library of Australia

  4. #4
    Trove user wragge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by mraadgev [NLA] View Post
    hence we do not call it 'exact phrase'
    Well except in the actual search querystring of course...

    Thanks for the explanation, I thought it must be something like that.
    Tim Sherratt
    @wragge on Twitter
    Words at discontents.com.au
    Experiments at wraggelabs.com and labs.nma.gov.au

  5. #5
    Staff Moderator mraadgev [NLA]'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    518
    Quote Originally Posted by wragge View Post
    Well except in the actual search querystring of course...
    well....most people don't look at that :P
    Mark
    Trove Support
    National Library of Australia

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •