Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Adding your own images to Trove

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    27

    Adding your own images to Trove

    Did you know that you can add your own images to Trove to help build the record of Australian life? These could be scanned images of your Australian relatives, or photos of Australian people, places, events, fauna and flora. To add your photos all you need to do is join Flickr and upload your photos there, then add them to the 'Trove: Australia in Pictures' group. After about 10 days they will appear in Trove. If you want your real name to show in Trove make sure you put your name into your Flickr profile.

    Follow these steps
    1. go to www.flickr.com
    2. Sign in to Flickr, or sign up if you are not already a member
    3. To activate your Flickr account you will need to load at least 5 photos
    4. Visit the Trove: Australia in Pictures group, by searching for ‘Trove’ under the ‘groups’ tab in Flickr, or by following this link:
    5. Trove: Australia in Pictures
    6. Click on the ‘Join this group’ link and follow the prompts
    7. Read through the group descriptions for guidelines about contributing to Trove, including information on captions, tags and licences
    8. Upload your images to Flickr
    9. If you flag your photos ‘hide this photo from public searches’ your photos cannot be transferred into Trove
    10. Add your images to the Trove group by clicking on the ‘send to group’ icon located above each of your images in your personal pool.
    11. Remember to add accurate tags and descriptions to your photos because those are what the search is based on.



    My favourite photo uploaded recently is this one:
    http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37255844 Looking into the past from Nomad Tales
    A photo uploaded with unidentified persons in a Tasmanian Sunday school is here:
    http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37288101.

    Flexigel has been very active scanning old family photos:
    http://trove.nla.gov.au/picture/result?q=flexigel

    I also like the recently uploaded happy green treefrog:
    http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/37376696

    Rose
    Last edited by vjames [NLA]; 25-06-2012 at 11:46 AM.

  2. #2
    Trove user
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Concord
    Posts
    64
    If you are going to add your own images to Trove via flicker might I suggest that you learn how to edit the images metadata. Metadata is the data codeed into each image about how it was taken. For JPEGS there is EXIF and IPTC data that can be edited. I try and put my name and information about when and where the photos was taken (you can geocode photos). I think editing the metadata serves two purposes - If your image is nicked by someone and ends up making them a fortune having your name embedded in the metadata helps in asserting copyright. The second is it helps record when and where the photo was taken. Not only do we forget but sometimes caption writers and cataloguers make mistakes there is a photo of a dust storm at Broken Hill in c1907 - there are several on-line versions and tow in books I have. All have different dates and captions (indeed several libraries claim copyright) if there was metadata available then the image could be looked at for when it thought it was taken!

    There are some free programs worth checking out IrfanView and MS Pro Photo tools.

    IainS

  3. #3

    Unhappy What?

    What? it is not that hard to post a pic.

  4. #4
    Berg
    Guest
    If I'm not mistaken, if someone nicks your photos, he can choose not to save the EXIF and IPTC data if he uses IrfanView. There's an option to do so when saving the file. That said, I still embed metadata in my photos, include a watermark and a cleverly hidden clue or signature of some sort.

  5. #5
    Thanks so much!
    I'm searching it

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    4
    And if you want to find out where an image came from, TinEye is a reverse image search engine http://www.tineye.com/
    (this can also help in finding out if your images are being used by others!).

    After uploading the image or address, it can (hopefully) tell you the source and about other versions (which may be higher resolution too).
    As a registered user, you can contribute images to improve the search engine as it will save the pictures.

    If you are an artist, you can join Viscopy http://www.viscopy.org.au/about , they look at copyright licensing services for your works.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by SonjaBarfoed View Post
    And if you want to find out where an image came from, TinEye is a reverse image search engine http://www.tineye.com/
    (this can also help in finding out if your images are being used by others!).

    I didn't know that. That's very useful to me. Thanks.

  8. #8
    Excellent info, thanks! I am often uploading images to various sites, and have had a number of problems with the images being taken and used elsewhere, such as websites etc.

    One program that I regularly use is Xnview which is free online at http://www.xnview.com/ and has various editing and tagging options.
    Last edited by rmckay; 20-12-2010 at 11:13 PM.

  9. #9
    Flickr allows you to block your photos from download in your settings ... then people need to approach you for access.

    As a question why is you are a long term trove member and a long time picture australia contributor with the same address login don't your photos show in the stats?

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Berg View Post
    If I'm not mistaken, if someone nicks your photos, he can choose not to save the EXIF and IPTC data if he uses IrfanView. There's an option to do so when saving the file. That said, I still embed metadata in my photos, include a watermark and a cleverly hidden clue or signature of some sort.
    @Berg: That's exactly right. There are numerous tools available for embedded or altering the metadata in a picture, which is part of why doing so is only partially effective. A savvy picture thief can modify that for themselves. The watermark is a nice touch and harder to circumvent.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •