Page 1 of 10 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 100

Thread: Amusing Electronically (mis) Translated Text

  1. #1

    Amusing Electronically (mis) Translated Text

    While a lot of the electronically mistranslated text is just plain random strings of characters, sometimes it's real words that add a whole new dimension to the rest of the sentence. I thought it'd be fun to have a thread where people could give examples that struck them as particularly amusing. To start it off, one I found and corrected today described a marriage, in a church, between Thomas Richardson James and "Satan" (Family Notices, The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Friday 28 July 1876, page 10)

    "Satan" was actually "Sarah". But marrying "Satan" sounds like a far more newsworthy event!

    Does anyone have other examples they've come across?

  2. #2
    Trove addict
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Newcastle, New South Wales
    Posts
    73
    Sadly the following wasn't in any hilarious context. The old form of 's' - 'f' (forgotten what it's called) - in some early editions in the Sydney Gazette reminded me of one very funny episode of the Vicar of Dibley when 'such' was printed with the long 'f' and the 'h' had scanned as a 'k'. It made me laugh. It's gone now - naturally.
    Jane

    PS. Satan was far more newsworthy.

  3. #3
    Here are a few published in this Crikey article:

    “Urgent Moves to Prevent Sh-t in UN”
    “Appeasement and Poo”
    “Our Boys and Girls, Their Powers and P-nis”

    http://www.crikey.com.au/2010/08/12/...-a-bygone-era/

  4. #4
    Trove addict
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Newcastle, New South Wales
    Posts
    73
    I recently had to correct in a Family Notice from the 1800s about a gentleman who had been a Detective in the Polite Force.
    Jane

  5. #5
    Trove addict
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Newcastle, New South Wales
    Posts
    73
    An early court case where the Crown Prosecutor accepted the pleas from the defendants had scanned as 'accepted the pies'.. bribery perhaps?

    Jane

  6. #6
    A little clichéd perhaps, but nonetheless a genuine example. This article:
    http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/13951674
    contains a list of politicians attending the opening ceremony of a railway.
    One of them, identified as simply as "Bavister", was originally decoded
    by the machine as "Bluster."

    Maybe the computer is smarter than we give it credit?

    Further indications: in http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/47446917
    the OCR cleverly substituted a genuine "11" with "XI". Maybe the program speaks
    Latin?
    Last edited by AuFCL; 07-12-2010 at 08:56 AM. Reason: Additional evidence of potential computing sentience.

  7. #7
    Trove Development Team jmeakins [NLA]'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Canberra, ACT
    Posts
    15
    FILM STAB DRESSES FOB AUSTRALIA* WOMEN.


    I was envisioning some kind of murder report involving the fashion police.

    Instead I got: Film star dresses for Australian women

  8. #8
    Not hilarious, but I had a chuckle while fixing a distant relatives' will probate:
    and all persons hating any claims against Die Estate

  9. #9
    In a death notice "passed away" had the "a" in passed replaced with an "i".
    Imagining that they must have a penchant for alcohol I laughed quite hard at that one.

  10. #10
    LOL, talk about a life wasted.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •